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Logitech G933 Artemis Spectrum 7.1 Headset Giveaway!

G933 Giveaway     Discussion Thread
Subscapularis by Wesley Chabbledack - Thu, 06 Sep 2018 19:11:29 EST ID:5NtbGv9Z No.94988 Ignore Report Quick Reply
File: 1536275489263.jpg -(37253B / 36.38KB, 283x216) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 37253
Hey guys massage therapist here. Ever find yourself playing a sport and you've noticed a phenomena called pulling? I.e. My shot pulled to the right or my throw pulled to the left. Well turns out what your experiencing isn't a problem of eye hand coordination but is more than likely a tight rotator cuff. With a loose and properly functioning rotator cuff passes, punches, shots and even aiming a gun shouldn't take much thought and should be a fluid experience.

One muscle people tend to have a lot of problems with and don't realize is involved in making a basketball shot. Id bet 10$ you've seen someone wing their elbow or even play mind games about how to make their shot everytime. Well I've come to save the day. The primary reason people play mind games when making a basketball shot is because their brain hasn't made the neural connections to relaxing a primary muscle in a basketball shot. The muscle in talking about is the subscapularis muscle posted in the picture. It's underneath the shoulder blade so people tend to have no clue this muscle even exists. Focus on relaxing this muscle next time you take a basketball shot and watch the sparks fly as you witness your body having correct body mechanics and watch all those mind games fade away.
Comments appreciated always trying to learn something new.
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David Droffingwin - Sun, 09 Sep 2018 16:17:30 EST ID:Al7ONzdb No.94994 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I tore my rotator cuff and has surgery on it and let it heal. That was 7 years ago. Still to this day it acts up sometimes. But, I've also lost mobility in it.

OP or anyone else with the right knowledge; how can I strengthen my rotator cuff and what mobility work can I do for it?
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Phineas Bliggleforth - Sun, 16 Sep 2018 20:15:57 EST ID:+1P+PRu0 No.95012 Ignore Report Quick Reply
please explain how a medial shoulder rotator is the "primary muscle" in a basketball shot when it's a fixator at most.
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Nigel Beshwill - Thu, 20 Sep 2018 23:15:51 EST ID:Rrg8pidq No.95016 Ignore Report Quick Reply
i have a small tear in my labrum but am experiencing a pinching, burning pain in the front towards the end of my collar bone. MRI shows no sign of rotator injury. can massage therapy help this? i get a pulling feeling sometimes between my shoulder blade and spine, not sure if its related, the tear in my labrum is on the back.
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Henry Snodbury - Sat, 13 Oct 2018 03:13:09 EST ID:zPodxCZB No.95059 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1539414789502.jpg -(127533B / 124.54KB, 850x601) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
For medical problems, see a doctor.


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