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A /chem/ thread not about drugs by Poolboy Steve - Wed, 20 Sep 2017 11:31:48 EST ID:yU3xLtgU No.78855 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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This is a thread about pool chemistry since it's pertinent and relevant to my daily duties.

What I wanna know is if Sodium Bicarbonate has a pH of about 8 how then is it helping me keep my pH between 7.4-7.8?

Seriously, this is the hardest thing to explain to non chemistry enthusiast coworkers of mine. That and the relationship between Cyanuric Acid and Free Chlorine
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press !XIxc6BpKnU - Wed, 20 Sep 2017 15:12:21 EST ID:qHAhLtQq No.78856 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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sodium bicarbonate doesnt have a pH. pH is a scale for the concentration of protons or rather H30+ ions in aquoes solutions. a solution of the bicarbonate can have a pH value, but i cant recall the pKa's

the bicarbonate should form a buffer system with other chemicals in the pool water? dont know nuttin about dem poo's or the agents used
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Betsy Heffingwane - Wed, 20 Sep 2017 19:58:35 EST ID:EwOTpBZD No.78860 Ignore Report Quick Reply
piss is acidic
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Basil Clumblehall - Thu, 21 Sep 2017 16:00:09 EST ID:d8sALoQJ No.78863 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>78856
Well giving the pH value of anything assumes it's in a solution and since pOH and pH exist in equilibrium one can be calculated from the other which is why we just use pH. And I get that it forms a buffer I'm wanting to know chemistry specifics because I've been googling for months with no clear answer. Nobody cares how it works they just use it. I understand it has something to do with the controlled release of H+ and OH- in some sorta cycle.
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press !XIxc6BpKnU - Fri, 22 Sep 2017 05:34:58 EST ID:OHYz+LTM No.78864 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>78863
specifics on the carbonate/bicarbonate buffer system or on the "chlorine buffering" of cyanuric acid? whats your level in chemistry?
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Priscilla Summleworth - Fri, 22 Sep 2017 18:43:30 EST ID:hBAZGxou No.78865 Ignore Report Quick Reply
b/c it's dilute silly

didn't you ever have a chemistry set as a kid? dilution is like one of the only things you can even do with them these days

if you add 100 gallons of pH 8 to 1000 gallons of pure water you're gonna get a pH of like 7.2
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Bombastus Werrywag - Fri, 22 Sep 2017 22:59:16 EST ID:TigEi9EW No.78866 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>78865
dilute... or dilaudid?
>>
Phineas Blatherman - Sun, 24 Sep 2017 16:43:22 EST ID:EmAQ3RSJ No.78868 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>78864
My level in chemistry is like 1000 level course in college plus more reading on my own. I understand how cyanuric bonds to the FC to keep it in the pool. I'm fuzzy on the carbonate buffering. pH is wacky in a few places and I'm trying to pin down a cause and also they may have me train employees and I like to know everything and assume others would as well instead of having to dig for the information like me.


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