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Late medieval thread by Nathaniel Bledgenidge - Mon, 24 Apr 2017 17:01:04 EST ID:aLFu7iIl No.57163 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Does anyone have any good lectures, essays etc on the decline of knights as a class and the decline of feudalism in general?
Also, general late-medieval, renaissance thread.
8 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Charlemagne - Sat, 12 Aug 2017 11:16:18 EST ID:7moSACzs No.57251 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>57214
>mail was great against arrows, so people invented crossbows
What? Crossbows have been in use since the 6th century BC in Asia and in some form or other since the 5th century BC in Europe.

The primary advantage over bows was that it required less training to use, so much like early guns, you could show a bunch of nobodies how to load it, stick them in a big formation and point at the enemy. You are correct that they could punch through plate armor, however.
>>
Charlemagne - Sat, 12 Aug 2017 15:06:21 EST ID:7moSACzs No.57252 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57165
>>57166
It's correct that arrows did little to the French army, besides perhaps drop a few horses. However, the English archers still had a part to play in this.
What rekt the French cavalry was the fact that the longbowmen had previously set up a series of spikes in the ground, and when they saw the French committed to their charge, ran behind them.

Later in the battle, when the larger French army was utterly locked in place by the narrow field and thick mud, groups of the archers began singling out men-of-arms on the outskirts/those stuck in the mud and gangshanking them with daggers. This was part of what made the propaganda value of the battle so great at the time: it was one thing to be captured or killed by a noble of equal rank to you, but it was dishonorabru as fuck to be stabbed in the mud by a bunch of filthy peasants.

Check out John Keegan's The Face of Battle for a good book on Agincourt specifically.
>>
Priscilla Handergold - Tue, 15 Aug 2017 17:32:29 EST ID:9CoQeyOj No.57253 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57210
The opposite actually, castles made taking and holding territory practically impossible so warfare evolved into almost ritualized pitched battles of armies meeting eachother face to face on the field. It wasn't until siege tactics and weapons advanced to the point medieval castles were obsolete that European warfare became about maneuver and siege, and you see cavalry getting lighter and more about control and disruption of communication and supply lines around this time.
Castles were also a symptom of the increasing feudalisation of society, and that brought along more and more of the professional warrior class of knights who could afford horses and armour with it. Eastern Europe never had this to the same degree the west did (especially France) and so they kept light cavalry raiding tactics, which were eventually reintroduced to the West as Hussars.

Funny enough a similar thing happened again hundreds of years later when advanced star forts loaded to the gills with cannons started controlling the countryside and you started to see pitched battles with thousands of musketeers unloading into eachothers lines from near point blank range.
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Ebenezer Tillingham - Tue, 15 Aug 2017 19:19:47 EST ID:bayldp7v No.57254 Ignore Report Quick Reply
You got to read up on the plague as an important factor for the decline of feudalism.
>>
Albert Chanderwater - Sat, 19 Aug 2017 03:02:54 EST ID:rbK+gS1r No.57257 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57251
I should have said I talked about European war crossbows specifically. As you said, the chinese had crossbows in antiquity, and the Picts had hunting crossbows in the early medieval period.


Was Jesus an Iron Age cult leader? by Doris Fuckingson - Thu, 13 Jul 2017 16:42:44 EST ID:6FQAmMFX No.57218 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Hi all (Before I start quick disclosure: I am an atheist but I am here to have an honest discussion and am not here to troll and offend anyone.)

When i read the account of Christ and I read it as a myth that was meant to be examined as testimony I imagine that instead of reading a book Luke, John, or Matthew are at the bar just telling me a story about some guy they knew. This is what a testimony is after all: a story someone tells you. If a book is written in the format of a testimony thus you must not necessarily believe the narrator at all times. Sometimes you can assume that he is lying or exaggerating things just like a stranger telling you a story at a bar would. (Sorry for the long intro but it will help the rest of this make sense... hopefully) So following this logic and using its lens to examine the bible I make 3 assumptions as I read the accounts of Christs life.

1 - Jesus is not divine and has no special powers. (ex. I've never seen a dude walk on water why would I believe a testimony that says someone saw someone do it somewhere.)

2 - No one else has special powers everyone is a human limited by the knowledge and culture of Iron Age Middle East.

3 - Jesus is corruptible just like every other person.

Now with all this in play as I go through the bible I hear a story about a Iron age Rabbi that ran an organization with lots of hall marks of a cult like abandoning families to follow a holy teacher, giving up wealth, and dedicating one entire life soul, body, and mind to the holy teacher. Further this holy teacher showed them a bunch of cheap parlor tricks. The holy teacher was so narcissistic and egocentric that anytime anything other then him comes up he tells you how unimportant it is compared to him and tells you to give up everything just to worship him and serve him.

Further he is reckless and his delusions of grandeur like thinking he is himself a god as well as his corrupt nature like soaking himself in a years wages worth of perfume in one sitting in front of a bunch of people who gave everything up to obey and follow him. The picture is clear. I do not see a wise and loving guy. I see Charles Manson or Marshall Applewhite.

Again, I am not here trying to offend anyone, I am just trying to honestly explain my thought process. Now that I explained my thoughts, what I really want to ask is what are yours? How do you read the bible? How do you see Jesus? What do you think were his motivations and aspirations? And most importantly why do you believe these things.
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Cedric Soddlebodge - Tue, 08 Aug 2017 04:52:18 EST ID:lJYPBOas No.57243 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57223
Admittedly i don't know much about this but i thought there were roman records of the crucificttion of Jesus and some other shit.
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Molly Clannerfidge - Thu, 10 Aug 2017 20:16:22 EST ID:JPVhQX35 No.57248 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57223
There def is evidence of the historical Jesus.

>Virtually all New Testament scholars and Near East historians, applying the standard criteria of historical investigation, find that the historicity of Jesus is effectively certain [4][5][6][7][nb 1][nb 2][nb 3][nb 4] although they differ about the beliefs and teachings of Jesus as well as the accuracy of the details of his life that have been described in the gospels.[nb 5][13][nb 6][15]:168–173 While scholars have criticized Jesus scholarship for religious bias and lack of methodological soundness,[nb 7] with very few exceptions such critics generally do support the historicity of Jesus and reject the Christ myth theory that Jesus never existed.[17][nb 8][19][20][21]
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Molly Clannerfidge - Thu, 10 Aug 2017 20:20:42 EST ID:JPVhQX35 No.57249 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I think this is a decent summary of the most likely chain of events though much is still debated.

>Jesus was a Galilean Jew[12] who was baptized by John the Baptist and subsequently began his own ministry, preaching his message orally[24] and often being referred to as "rabbi".[25] He was arrested and tried by the Jewish religious authorities,[26] and turned over to the Roman government, and was subsequently crucified on the order of Pontius Pilate, the Roman prefect.[27] Jesus debated fellow Jews on how to best follow God, performed healings, taught in parables and gathered followers.[27][28] After his death, his followers believed he rose from the dead, and the community they formed eventually became the Christian Church.[29]
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Alice Buttingtutch - Thu, 10 Aug 2017 23:59:32 EST ID:Redgi3D4 No.57250 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57249
It's pretty interesting how a man as simple as your statement suggests, has over time turned into the head of the monolith that is Christianity.
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Albert Chanderwater - Sat, 19 Aug 2017 03:00:58 EST ID:rbK+gS1r No.57256 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57250
Remember, a fuckload of proto christians died for that community. Bashed to death and shanked to death by fellow proto christians. Proto christians took their apostle cult warfare extremely serioys.


Worst battles in human history by Lydia Bamblelat - Fri, 12 Feb 2016 07:46:23 EST ID:CwlDQeu1 No.56482 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I'm in a pretty soul crushing mood today and I've been thinking about the battle of Passchendaele. All factors considered is there a worse battlefield in human history? Will the world ever see such horrors, like those witnessed by the men in the general vicinity of Ypres during the war? 24 hour shelling, machinegun lines, snipers, chemical attacks and corpses everywhere? By comparison the highly mobile combat led in WW2 seems like a dream to me. Am I missing something?
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Reuben Habblestone - Tue, 24 Jan 2017 06:43:34 EST ID:vClVXRJl No.57047 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57046
Considering it was uninhabited until the Vikings that is interesting. Though I guess it's kind of irrelevant because the Greek and Romans would have never settled there, it really was just a pile of frozen rocks. Ireland was too rainy, far, wet, cold, boring and populated with savages as it was. Nevermind Iceland.
>>
George Ferryfid - Tue, 07 Feb 2017 22:40:25 EST ID:M+lZDv5i No.57066 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56496
The Pacific theatre of WW II is kinda the opposite but related, it takes true bravery to charge to death. With the Japnanese doing banzai attacks from well-fortified positions instead of holding out as long as possible. Their best fighter pilots trying to kamikaze a battleship instead of staying alive to fight again.
>>
Charles Gezzlehotch - Thu, 20 Jul 2017 04:12:58 EST ID:R5CmWaGx No.57233 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57066
this. take a look at Hacksaw ridge. good movie depicts the japanese' mentality during the war
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Cedric Soddlebodge - Tue, 08 Aug 2017 04:48:14 EST ID:lJYPBOas No.57242 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57004
I'm doing an indian history paper atm for exactly that reason. Like, its not like there was no history. There were hundreds of fucking massive empires.

I feel like we need a state who's education department just makes games based on periods of history that get neglected.
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Ebenezer Tillingham - Tue, 15 Aug 2017 19:22:06 EST ID:bayldp7v No.57255 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57233

I saw one scene where a guy picked up a human torso and used it as a shield while charging at the Japanese and firing 200 rounds from his BAR. I can't help but think that this movie is a piece of shit.


What if...? by Beatrice Dickledale - Tue, 18 Jul 2017 01:26:19 EST ID:Redgi3D4 No.57230 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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So what if all modern wars suddenly had to be fought with swords and other pre gunpowder weaponry?

What would the military tactics be like? Would small groups of armed men run around as they do in modern war with guns or would we have to revert back to lining up in a field?

At first i thought it's obvious that we would adopt modern strategies and tactics but if an enemy decided to go for the line up in a field approach and just started marching toward whatever their target was (a city for example) small pockets of men would seem kind of pointless.

If someone can be bothered to waste time giving me some speculations, i'd be very interested to read. Also would be pretty interested in any examples of ancient armies doing operations that closely resemble modern strategies.
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Cedric Soddlebodge - Tue, 08 Aug 2017 04:39:57 EST ID:lJYPBOas No.57241 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57230
I mean, assuming we couldn't ever relearn to use gunpowder again i could imagine new gun-like crossbow things would emerge. The Chinese had been using repeating crossbows since before Jesus so i can only imagine what kind of batshit contraptions we could think up with modern physics and engineering knowledge.

Actually now that i think about it, we don't have gunpowder right? what about petrol? cos, i'm no engineer but surely we could make gun-like machines using petrol as the propulsion agent. Or like, a variety of other materials.
I mean, even if we didn't have gun-like things for any reason but still had petrol, we sure as hell couldn't have lines anymore. I can only imagine the carnage of tanks rolling over lines of pikes.
I mean, i'm imagining battles like Fury Road, where there are thousands of screaming mad men riding whatever vehicle they could into one another. Fuck, imagine a destruction derby between Europe and Russia.
Actually, its probably get gummed up pretty quick. cars stuck in mud and gridlocked on roads.

I don't really know much about modern armour but i feel like crossbows might end up being pretty useless against shit like this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQM6zLiSn1E
However, bullets are pretty blunt and often hollowpointed so they probably don't have the point necessary to pierce it. who knows.

I mean shit now that i think about it, think of all of davinci's machines, we could totally make those now. Think of the siege weapons we can make with modern steel and a better grounding in science. I wanna see a revolving ballista that fire bolts like a gattling gun. I don't really know what it'd be used for but it'd be fun to watch.

I have an essay to write now.
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Barnaby Cuckletedge - Tue, 08 Aug 2017 07:22:59 EST ID:rbK+gS1r No.57244 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57237
Not really. Crossbows are only really effective against mail armour. And medieval people quickly realised that metal plate armour is incredibly effective against crossbows.
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Barnaby Cuckletedge - Tue, 08 Aug 2017 07:23:37 EST ID:rbK+gS1r No.57245 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57244
Durrr, of course, they work fine on shit like gambesons and naked skin/normal clothes too.
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Cyril Gindleshit - Wed, 09 Aug 2017 11:50:28 EST ID:Redgi3D4 No.57246 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57241
>I have an essay to write now.
Do it, please cover tactic and strategy differences
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Cyril Hucklespear - Thu, 10 Aug 2017 10:36:41 EST ID:Redgi3D4 No.57247 Ignore Report Quick Reply
On the topic of crossbows, i'm not sure what my rules allow for but if kevlar was allowed to stay then i'm guessing we'd have to go back to plate anyway. Last time i checked most blades would be able to get through kevlar and I assume crossbow bolts would be able to penetrate too.


PreColumbia y'all! by Hedda Fillerstock - Wed, 12 Jul 2017 17:47:30 EST ID:imeVvWkF No.57216 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I find pre-columbian native history fascinating, the most interesting thing to me is the parallels between old world and new world history. Seeing as how they're completely separated by a massive ocean and had (most likely) no contact, it's really a great study in how humans deal.

Today I'm going to talk about the origins of the Inca and the similarities between it and Rome.
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Hedda Fillerstock - Wed, 12 Jul 2017 18:01:44 EST ID:imeVvWkF No.57217 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>57216
To begin, I have to address the many differences between the Incas and Rome.

The Incas civilization can be tied back to the Chavín culture.

The Chavín culture began with two settlements of people united with religious unity. They had created a great ceremonial site where a large portion of both small settlements came together.

This new ceremonial site became the site of the great new town between the two. This settlement became popular as they started to domesticate llamas, create more agriculture, and were by far more secure. People started to really like this shit and so a proto-urban center was created.

Soon, folk stopped hunting and gathering and started to specialize in certain crafts, in a classic tale they became a civilization through and through. Soon the elite class rose up, the folk who were "connected to the Gods". Obviously, as a religious culture this caught on.
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Fuck Pittspear - Thu, 03 Aug 2017 07:51:48 EST ID:BrfXiFVX No.57238 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57216
please tell me more, i know practically nothing about aztec cuture
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Sophie Weshbanks - Sun, 06 Aug 2017 05:21:06 EST ID:pACIDeoi No.57239 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Continue. I am well versed in the history of my continent, Europe, but know very little about pre-Colombus America, apart from how brutally we devastated the natives there. I do find the art of Mesoamerica civilizations fascinating though.
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Fanny Gendlelitch - Sun, 06 Aug 2017 16:04:26 EST ID:Redgi3D4 No.57240 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I am monitoring this thread. Perhaps someone can take over from OP since he seems to be gone


Jewish history. by most certainly not a communist - Thu, 06 Jul 2017 14:21:02 EST ID:NpNqj0ZF No.57213 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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(THIS IS NOT A JEWISH BASHING THREAD, IT IS SIMPLY REVIEWING A HISTORY TO EXPLAIN THIS GROUP OF PEOPLE)

The holocaust was of course a tragedy, but what we don't look into is how the perceptions of anti-semitism came to be. Sometimes investigating victims can lead to fewer instances of victimhood. I'm worried about Jews in America.

It's not entirely unfounded that the Jewish population has had many wealthy and powerful individuals throughout the world, this is not because of some "elders of Zion" but due to the circumstances they found themselves in.

For instance, Christians could not charge interest on loans they gave due to the laws of the Catholic Church at the time. The Jewish bankers became by far more profitable and powerful as they could charge interest.

Although this did lead to inequality among a small minority, it did help build communities by handing out loans in the principal of investment.

However, powerful minorities creating inequality sows the seeds of discontent among the majority christian populace. The persecution of Jesus Christ in Israel is used as further evidence of Jews being evil (as Jesus was literally the most important thing to many), as well as the Jewish lore of "blood libel" to create the Golem of Prague. This became a popular rumor that Jews were kidnapping Christians and crucifying them as well as sacrificing them.

Due to the high rate of childhood, unexplained mortality it was an easy jump to accuse the Jews of kidnapping their children, this scapegoat was easy as there was already quite a bit of hatred direct toward the isolated Jewish community.

It didn't help that later that a Jewish Family, the Rothschild family DID create a conspiracy to gain power and influence in Europe and DID infiltrate many royalties. Of course, people don't want to be treated as lesser and resent the Rothschilds for controlling finances.
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Molly Beshdod - Fri, 21 Jul 2017 16:34:18 EST ID:4Z1EkLgS No.57234 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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This isn't jewish history, this is just an semi-coherrent refelection on the origins of anti-semtic myths. I wana talk about pre diasporia Levent and the Abassad kingdoms of beta isreal. IDRK how to describe your post, but their dosnet seem to be any historical sources conntected to anything you are saying. This all reads like your bong water scatter brain diarrhea. Give me somthing written by someone with a PhD or go home.
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Clara Dronningstone - Mon, 24 Jul 2017 23:20:06 EST ID:flID+PsE No.57235 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57234
I'm glad that I can go into a Jewish thread and have my reply expectations met.


Churchill by Phineas Gangerwell - Wed, 21 Sep 2016 09:17:19 EST ID:jg4fL/jL No.56882 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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So Churchill has been on a lot of people in the UK's lips on account of him now being on a lot of people in the UK's notes.

There's been a lot of backlash from the people who link him with the Bengal famine, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bengal_famine_of_1943 and blame him for their deaths. There's also stuff like this popping up http://hitlerorchurchill.info/ (try it, it's interesting). Plus there was his collosal fuck up during WW1 with the Dardanelles.

ALL THAT SAI I can't bring myself to hate him. People of history don't exist in a vaccume, and are products of (and in Churchills case, shapers of) the time they live in. I'm not denying that the Bengal famine was an atrocious loss of life and as a Scottish person I've never been a fan of Britain or the British Empire, but part of me just allows it. This alcoholic infinitely quotable badass that embodied the attitudes of the nation he ruled at the time. Even if the nation was allowing massive amounts of Bengalis to starve to death...

I don't really know what I'm trying to say here, I'd like to think it isn't so simple as "He's a product of his time so that makes it ok" but I can't really explain it otherwise. I'm no apologist to the atrocities commited on his behalf but I just find myself unable to get that pissed off with him. I've heard there's people refusing to accept the £5 notes with him on it.

So what do you guys make of him?
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Cedric Cellersud - Thu, 04 May 2017 10:14:53 EST ID:8iQhyERG No.57177 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56882
Oh, I'm a conservative.

Maternal... instinct...


nope
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Lydia Dartbanks - Tue, 04 Jul 2017 11:39:50 EST ID:YYFtDXxk No.57211 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Sounds like typical self-hating and deeply naive bourgeois intellectuals. For some reason the British "left" (liberal centrist) establishment hates Imperial Britain and everything about it.
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Lydia Dartbanks - Tue, 04 Jul 2017 11:43:57 EST ID:YYFtDXxk No.57212 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57005

I love this revisonism lately to use pictures of Roosevelt and Churchill with some Canadian rather than the usual photos with Stalin as the third party
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Doris Mucklekurk - Sun, 16 Jul 2017 06:28:17 EST ID:9CoQeyOj No.57228 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57212
>it's revisionism to use different photographs than that one famous one of the yalta conference
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Walter Blisslewut - Sun, 16 Jul 2017 14:47:13 EST ID:sVSDp2E0 No.57229 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57228
Hey man, history is what you see in history textbooks.


Historical Inconsistencies in Christianity by Jenny Tootgold - Sun, 07 May 2017 12:22:37 EST ID:zZvV2w/f No.57182 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I think I just became aware of a large one that most people probably look over or ignore.

According to the Pauline Epistles in the NT, Paul of Tarsus was tasked by the Jewish High Priesthood to go to Damascus to root out the Christian believers there and take them back to Judaea for judgment and execution. This account is already problematic enough considering Paul's supposed Pharisee background and his collaboration with the Sadduccees, and the fact that "Christians" had not even coalesced into a separate religion at the time Paul said his conversion occurred.

But the glaring problem is that: how is it that the Jewish High Priests had jurisdiction over Damascus? At the time, Judaea was a province of the Roman Empire, and of such low status that it was administered as a client of the Roman province of Syria (an Imperial-type Province).

Furthermore, the Jewish Priesthood had many of its prerogatives removed stripped: by 28 CE, the Romans had removed or limited the ability of the Jewish courts to impose capital punishment or to judge themselves by their own ancient laws. Considering the reputation of the Priesthood/Sanhedrin of being 'collaborators', it's likely they themselves

So how the fuck could Paul have been tasked by the Priesthood to go to Syrian Damascus to arrest Roman subjects there? It's the equivalent of a Louisiana policeman driving all the way to Austin in Texas and arresting people there and claiming jurisdiction. It makes no sense, and reeks of a fabricated story.
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Molly Chettingpune - Sat, 27 May 2017 23:58:17 EST ID:Yt0MTGo3 No.57191 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57182

Was it the Pauline epistles that said that? I thought it was just Acts
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Nicholas Turveyridge - Wed, 31 May 2017 11:37:41 EST ID:5kPy1v57 No.57193 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Like 90% of the OT. What? God stopped the sun from setting just for you and the rest of the world didn't notice at all? King David built a powerfull kingdom that nobody else ever talks about? Also Mose's biography seems to have been stolen from Sargon of Akkad.
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Sidney Blackstock - Wed, 28 Jun 2017 19:12:54 EST ID:+cP8QzkY No.57205 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Rome, despite being viewed as installing completely new and radical governments and changing the duties of the people themselves, making slaves et cetera, often used the government currently in power as a force underneath their army.

What reason would they have to care about ordering the church around if they paid taxes?

Also I read on /b/ some guy doubting Jesus existed and while the few fragments of his life that remain are proof enough for some people, I wanted to point out that the New Testament mentions that the Jewish churched paid the Romans to be silent about him. There are still some sources beyond the Bible, but what better source to learn about Jesus anyways?

The fact that the Bible is incredibly accurate is proof enough I think
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Lydia Dartbanks - Tue, 04 Jul 2017 11:26:09 EST ID:YYFtDXxk No.57209 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Jews were given more autonomy than most since the Romans respected their "authenticity" if you will--they were old, and well documented as very old, and Rome--being deeply conservative--revered old things.
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Phoebe Wavingnine - Mon, 10 Jul 2017 07:34:52 EST ID:n86/MK/a No.57215 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Religious people are very good at ignoring inconsistencies in their beliefs. That's all there is to it mate.


saharan slave trade by Nell Cizzlehood - Fri, 28 Apr 2017 22:44:19 EST ID:tC/dl63y No.57170 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Any of you follows know any good books about the trans Saharan slave trade? Watched a few good YouTube videos on it and was wishing to learn more.
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Wesley Gublingway - Mon, 05 Jun 2017 20:01:16 EST ID:Yt0MTGo3 No.57196 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57195

He's right. One of the main oppositions to slavery in the south was the white working class, many of whom actually lived a worse quality of life in terms of income and housing than the slaves. The term "white trash" comes from the fact that even many of the slaves actually felt sorry for some of the poor jobless white folk that lived around them.

President Johnson also was an ally of white worker unions opposed to slavery, but these unions weren't opposed to slavery on moral principle as much as the feeling that slaves took away their job opportunities. It was because of President Johnson's close ties to these unions that Lincoln made him his vice-president since he was kind of a "moderate" voice on the issue.
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Ebenezer Blytheman - Tue, 06 Jun 2017 19:10:11 EST ID:xQkSNyxY No.57197 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57196
>One of the main oppositions to slavery in the south was the white working class
Lmao no. The white working class in the South enthusiastically threw themselves to their deaths to protect slavery, in their thousands. Then they spent the next century and a half enthusiastically voting for the old plantation owners to keep the blacks down. What kind of person would actually believe...

>many slaves actually felt sorry for some of the poor jobless white folk that lived around them.
...oh. One of those "slavery wasn't so bad the Southern whites were the real victims" kind. I get it.

Whatever you need to do to feel better about yourself, I guess.
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Nathaniel Clayspear - Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:36:52 EST ID:ncjsiAmY No.57198 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57194
Sounds like the rich has been using racism to divide the working class for centuries...
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Beatrice Happerbury - Tue, 20 Jun 2017 11:44:06 EST ID:YiUudFwN No.57199 Ignore Report Quick Reply
We shouldn't be too surprised. Redneck Southern states do intentionally underfunded their own school systems, after all. It only makes sense that they would be so ignorant of their own history along with everything else.
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Jarvis Pinnersere - Sat, 24 Jun 2017 01:09:14 EST ID:N6lY6tKM No.57203 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>thread on islamic slavery
>devolves into "muh US slavery was worse"
classic


The peasants, citizens and background characters of history. by Charlotte Greenstone - Wed, 28 Jun 2017 21:19:05 EST ID:99/qp7+6 No.57206 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Most of history is the mundane everyday goings of the populous,
I believe that the masses are really what history is about, not great men.
I'd like to take a chance to talk about the people, the collective, the
"zeitgeist" if you will of the population.

ITT: We talk about the people as if they were a great person.

For instance:
The majority of peoples in the United States (2017) is a slightly overweight, suppressed and tired person. He works for a company that sees him as little more than a resource and he's pretty tired of it. But he's loyal and works hard, to a flaw even and takes any abuse he's given at work for a fairly low wage.

He doesn't trust the government and is skeptical of most people claiming to be a savior. He's very religious and donates a good amount of his cash to christian charities. He tends to only read things that affirm his beliefs and is not open to new ideas. He is divorced or in a loveless relationship, he doesn't much care for his children who for the most part are not as far as he'd hoped they'd be in life.

U.S man (I say man because the U.S is inexplicably masculine) is getting over a long racial-based guilt. He drinks a few beers a day. He drinks a few cups of coffee a day. He's on medication and sometimes doesn't even know what for. He's skeptical of his neighbors, especially if they have darker skin.

U.S man, currently is evaluating his options and is jumping to extreme stances. I hope he can hold it together.
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Betsy Sinkinwidge - Fri, 30 Jun 2017 18:08:43 EST ID:OIj+UVJT No.57207 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Hell yeah. I think about that shit all of the time.. The real super heroes are the mother fuckers that ate shit and lived through horrid conditions to propel humanity into a state where it was able to thrive. And I mean.. The level of shit eating just built progressively on top of itself.

i.e. everyone has ate shit, but some have ate more shit than others. The barely evolved homo sapien that lived into there 30's and endured the most painful ailments is one level.. The European settler that lived in the more recent centuries was one.. I mean altogether, those struggles add up to get us to this point, here..

It's pretty wild because we don't know shit about them. And really, they're us. We are reflective of them. But their conscious experiences were so much more fucked up than ours - not to say they didn't experience pleasure, too. Or even a satisfying life. But there's so much painful momentum that had to be built up by those poor assholes to get us here.


Historical artifacts questions. by Nicholas Dunkinfuck - Wed, 21 Jun 2017 13:27:22 EST ID:CfVamwXk No.57200 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Hey fellow stoned history geeks. I have a very interesting piece of militaria in my collection. My research into this is sadly minimal, I learned that Special Forces trained in Germany, and were housed in the same barracks the Waffen-SS trained in. The Death Head was sort of a moral patch in a way. But I would like any more info on this Beret if you guys have any knowledge in this.

And too keep the thread going, if anyone has any historical item from history they are curious about post them here and tell us what you know. Maybe someone can answer a few questions.
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Nicholas Dunkinfuck - Wed, 21 Jun 2017 13:29:25 EST ID:CfVamwXk No.57201 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Here is the soldiers name. Googling found very little as well.
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Archie Dingershaw - Fri, 23 Jun 2017 23:23:43 EST ID:nzDJ3VGr No.57202 Ignore Report Quick Reply
The flash (badge) goes with the 5th Special Forces Group. I seriously doubt it was ever worn in Germany though and not just because that group was never deployed there. That person probably had a patch with just the pattern and they would put their rank in the center.

As for repurposed Nazi construction, that happened all over. There are still Americans living and working in Nazi buildings.


History repeating itself. by Michael Angelo - Tue, 25 Aug 2015 20:46:20 EST ID:mwxNDmgT No.56026 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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What can we see from past events in history, that can help us piece together the major events of tomorrow?
15 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Frederick Hunderset - Mon, 07 Sep 2015 20:59:40 EST ID:46Ivwr3B No.56105 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Does anyone have that vicky screenshot of the Crimean Crisis?
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Emma Hungernug - Tue, 08 Sep 2015 04:48:06 EST ID:8hSk1rC9 No.56108 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56103
It was broken as shit until the first major expansion (like a quarter of the world's population would usually be British).
They actually made it balanced with the more recent ones, and Africa forms up really nicely.

The economics are still a bit fucky, but some mods help that.
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Frederick Hunderset - Tue, 08 Sep 2015 15:34:50 EST ID:46Ivwr3B No.56111 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56108

>economy

Just run minor surpluses and only produce things that you can manufacture with raw materials from yourself and empire. An irregular + cavalry pair is the cheapest and most efficient army for occupying territory. Because supply limits actually matter in vicky 2, you only really need one battle group, with a 5 attack general, win every time.

Bonus points for stockpiling coal from 1600 onward in the Ultimate mod, leading you to have a 99% strangehold on coal reserves in the 19th century.
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Cedric Penkinfug - Mon, 22 May 2017 21:20:00 EST ID:uOfeITwV No.57188 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>56093

>buddhist theocracy [...] in response to Australia
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Samuel Hummledidging - Sun, 28 May 2017 02:44:08 EST ID:rJQXt3rx No.57192 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>people are whimsical and commit terrible mistakes

over and over and over and over and over until the meteor struck.


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