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Movember time by Dance Mania - Sat, 25 Nov 2017 11:04:06 EST ID:5nGcC7gO No.57309 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1511625846394.jpg -(39234B / 38.31KB, 564x549) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 39234
Dancing in this November. That´s good history of that epic short film. Watch and enjoy that music well!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGq-2gY81os


Tell me everything about America + (Soviet) Russia + Middle East by Jack Hillyhall - Tue, 22 Mar 2016 19:00:45 EST ID:asXAvW71 No.56601 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I'm trying to discuss ISIS with my friends and family, but eventually we always seem to hit some sort of dark spot of ignorance. Questions like:
  • Why is ISIS about religion, unlike Al-Qaeda?
  • Why did America create Al-Qaeda and ISIS? Why is influence in the ME so important?
  • Why did Iraq invade Kuwait, and why was it important enough to cause the Gulf War?
  • Why was the US buddies with Saddam? Why did the relationship go south?
  • Why does the US fear Iran so much?
  • Why did the USSR invade Afghanistan?
  • What possible gain could there be in turning the ME communist?
  • Why does Israel exist?
  • What's Clinton's role?

This is just a fraction of all the questions I have. Please don't feel limited to just answering these questions. I'm really trying to understand the current situation and how we got here. I'm also looking for a good, mostly OBJECTIVE documentary on the subject (possibly impossible to find?)
Really, I'm just looking for an outline of the past 60 years of history, simple enough for anyone interested enough to ask the question to understand. I realize I could just google it, but most of the times the reasoning they provide is as dry and unhelpful as "it was a in response to this event".

I know this is asking for much, but face it, ya'll fuckers love history enough that you'll enjoy telling me everything you know. you enjoy telling ignoramuses like me what's up.
Tl;DR: read the title and do it.
24 posts and 4 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Nigel Clandleshaw - Tue, 03 Jan 2017 18:17:33 EST ID:bNT6UmHB No.57033 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I see people just guessing in this thread.
If you want to understand M.E history then you have go back to the imperialism days. After the imperialists left, the area was carved up with no regard to the original national, ethnic, religious factors. The countires became, and still are, primitive authoritarian system of governance. That's about early-mid 20th century shit. A lot of your questions are small time which is kinda bad if you want the bigger picture.
>Why is ISIS about religion, unlike Al-Qaeda?
Do you mean what were the factors to it's ideological birth?
A severe lack of education, poverty, a prominent religions role in the M.E, reactionary radicalization because of foreign interests.

>Why did America create Al-Qaeda and ISIS? Why is influence in the ME so important?
America indirectly created Al-Qaeda, it wasn't the number 1 intention. The U.S armed the mujahideen against the U.S.S.R. Then the mujahideen turned against the U.S. because of general involvement in the M.E (support of Israel, economic and military influence). ISIS was created by the same source of people, the militant religious radicals from the 80's and 90's , all the while radicalizing new and younger people.

>Why is influence in the ME so important?
Why is the influence in Asia or Europe so important? Because it's territory. There's still east vs. west mentality.

>Why did Iraq invade Kuwait, and why was it important enough to cause the Gulf War?
Iraq was authoritarian, it was only natural to start wars for economic and power gains. He also waged war on kurds and Iran. This is what authoritarian systems do.
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Samuel Chaddlestone - Wed, 04 Jan 2017 03:34:05 EST ID:UqesEraZ No.57034 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57033
Good post, Nigel. Excellent work.
>>
Henry Chedgeman - Sat, 21 Oct 2017 15:41:22 EST ID:qzwjzNUD No.57283 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>57032
dude it's just a coincidence
>>
Ebenezer Wugglebig - Wed, 01 Nov 2017 16:33:28 EST ID:/EK+cIBP No.57294 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57032
This is why middle-eastern genocide is only 99% bad. All of our heroin comes from US controlled Afghan, and don't even get me started on their kush. Fucking uptight Taliban would cut a nigs head off for growing that shit.
>>
Nathaniel Havingfodge - Thu, 09 Nov 2017 17:06:39 EST ID:PmmRJlWL No.57297 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>57294
>>57283
>when Australia grows opium to feed Big Pharma's mass prescriptipon campaign in America, it's fine
>when Afghans do it to fill the demand after Big Pharma got them all hooked it's wrong

>even though both fund terrorism


History repeating itself. by Michael Angelo - Tue, 25 Aug 2015 20:46:20 EST ID:mwxNDmgT No.56026 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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What can we see from past events in history, that can help us piece together the major events of tomorrow?
18 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Cedric Penkinfug - Mon, 22 May 2017 21:20:00 EST ID:uOfeITwV No.57188 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>56093

>buddhist theocracy [...] in response to Australia
>>
Samuel Hummledidging - Sun, 28 May 2017 02:44:08 EST ID:rJQXt3rx No.57192 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>people are whimsical and commit terrible mistakes

over and over and over and over and over until the meteor struck.
>>
Sophie Gammlesore - Sat, 28 Oct 2017 01:41:33 EST ID:1oNFPI90 No.57286 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Mummys, bitches.
>>
Ebenezer Wugglebig - Wed, 01 Nov 2017 16:31:44 EST ID:/EK+cIBP No.57293 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56026
I got one OP. Those new declassified military docs from the CIA that suggest planting bombs in urban centers and staging shootings to frame Cuba as hostile terrorists might give us some insight into modern terrorism and its ultimate motivations and sources.

If you haven't seen the docs, they're covered here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eRdHKn8lULk
>>
John Wuffingnet - Thu, 09 Nov 2017 08:42:06 EST ID:rbK+gS1r No.57296 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57293
I doubt that the CIA was directly involved in the creation of modern islamic terrorism, but it's important to remember that Osama bin Laden was trained by the CIA to fight communists using guerilla tactics, so Osama probably just took those plans and lessons and simply applied them to killing American citizens after the Soviet Union fell.


Prechristian germany by Ian Wangerdadging - Sat, 07 Oct 2017 13:17:05 EST ID:BrfXiFVX No.57269 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I'd like to learn more about the Germanic regions before christianism. Any suggestions? Cool facts?
1 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Ebenezer Fepperwater - Wed, 11 Oct 2017 17:19:10 EST ID:XW/jiJlY No.57276 Ignore Report Quick Reply
You can read Tacitus but it's quite obvious he just collected a bunch of rumors.
>>
Jenny Choshmod - Sat, 14 Oct 2017 08:15:51 EST ID:BrfXiFVX No.57277 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57275
>Cool fact: German tribes were big on Heracles
Did the greek have a lot of influence on the more north-eastern parts of europe?

>Not so cool fact: Most sweeping generalizations about ancient Germanic peoples are horseshit. Especially the 'muh heritage' garbage but also especially anything that isn't very narrow scholarship.

Well i was trying to avoid the whole heritage lovers, I hope there aren't too many here
>>
Albert Brenkinridge - Sat, 14 Oct 2017 20:54:02 EST ID:G431o8lC No.57278 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>Did the greek have a lot of influence on the more north-eastern parts of europe?

No. A few Greco-Roman dieties show up in inscriptions around the Rhine. Heracles perhaps more than any other figure shows up all over the place. Consider this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hercules%27_Club_(amulet)

As influence goes it's trivial. Germans migrating into Roman territory are another story. They were Romanized to varying degrees with some of the nobility learning Greek.
>>
Basil Tootham - Tue, 17 Oct 2017 10:44:01 EST ID:lE3doHR2 No.57280 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57277
It's more that the Roman's, in their histories, identified foreign deities with their own Roman figured. Mercury, or Hermes, the psychopomp was equated with Odin, iirc. Hercules would probably have been equated with Thor or a Baldr type figure.

This syncretic identification was by no means unique to the Romans, at any rate.
>>
Edwin Tootbury - Sat, 24 Mar 2018 05:31:44 EST ID:PmmRJlWL No.57410 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57277
Well for starters, "Germania" was a concept invented by the Romans. It was used to categorize. Most of these peoples never considered themselves a unified "German" ethnicity much less a nation. That would come later, much later. In ancient Germania, the carrying capacity was much lower than modern times because the forest sod was too thick to cut by the ard plow which was common in such times. Most communities were semi-permanent, and migration constantly according to the seasons. They stuck to morrane valleys, circular areas surrounded by a high wall of rock and debris that were formed by the massive ice shelves of the last glacial period. These areas were treeless and their loose soil easily be cut by the ard, but they lacked in nutrient-rich topsoil. Thus, they were not good for consistent pasturage, and they could only support temporary communities. The thick old growth of the European Plain, now long gone, preempted efficient communications between tribal leaders.

Altogether, and it's not hard to see how radically life could differ from one village to the next based on all sorts of factors but primarily resource availability. Due to the constant migratory pattern, tribes blended into each other and became other tribes. It's the reason we see so many shifting names in the Roman record. Many tribes rose, competed with one another, and collapsed during the span of Rome. And it's hard to make generalizations over such a diverse people over centuries of time. Much of the ancient Germans was built to be temporary, and much of what constituted their cultures is now lost. Many tribes only adopted written languages for purposes beyond symbolism after the fall of Rome. This makes piecing together the intricacies of their culture beyond a limited set of runes not really designed to convey significant information difficult, to say the least. Most of what we know was written by Roman sources, or written after the Fall of Rome. Never do we see a first hand account of living amongst a Germanic tribe in any of this, only third-party accounts relayed to people like Tacitus, who has spawned a great deal of oft-repeated myths as a result of this.

Significant foreign excu…
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PreColumbia y'all! by Hedda Fillerstock - Wed, 12 Jul 2017 17:47:30 EST ID:imeVvWkF No.57216 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I find pre-columbian native history fascinating, the most interesting thing to me is the parallels between old world and new world history. Seeing as how they're completely separated by a massive ocean and had (most likely) no contact, it's really a great study in how humans deal.

Today I'm going to talk about the origins of the Inca and the similarities between it and Rome.
>>
Hedda Fillerstock - Wed, 12 Jul 2017 18:01:44 EST ID:imeVvWkF No.57217 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>57216
To begin, I have to address the many differences between the Incas and Rome.

The Incas civilization can be tied back to the Chavín culture.

The Chavín culture began with two settlements of people united with religious unity. They had created a great ceremonial site where a large portion of both small settlements came together.

This new ceremonial site became the site of the great new town between the two. This settlement became popular as they started to domesticate llamas, create more agriculture, and were by far more secure. People started to really like this shit and so a proto-urban center was created.

Soon, folk stopped hunting and gathering and started to specialize in certain crafts, in a classic tale they became a civilization through and through. Soon the elite class rose up, the folk who were "connected to the Gods". Obviously, as a religious culture this caught on.
>>
Fuck Pittspear - Thu, 03 Aug 2017 07:51:48 EST ID:BrfXiFVX No.57238 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57216
please tell me more, i know practically nothing about aztec cuture
>>
Sophie Weshbanks - Sun, 06 Aug 2017 05:21:06 EST ID:pACIDeoi No.57239 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Continue. I am well versed in the history of my continent, Europe, but know very little about pre-Colombus America, apart from how brutally we devastated the natives there. I do find the art of Mesoamerica civilizations fascinating though.
>>
Fanny Gendlelitch - Sun, 06 Aug 2017 16:04:26 EST ID:Redgi3D4 No.57240 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I am monitoring this thread. Perhaps someone can take over from OP since he seems to be gone
>>
Simon Baffingnure - Sun, 15 Oct 2017 03:52:12 EST ID:CBu3jKCh No.57279 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57217
Is it because they had a system similar to the marathon runners of Rome for sending messages between kingdoms? If I remember correctly messages were conveyed using rope tied into combinations of knots.

>>57238
The word Aztec is a misnomer made popular by a British archeologist in the late part of the 19th century. The people that refers to are citizens of an empire called the Triple Alliance, the conquering head tribe, that of the Montezuma lineage, the Mexica, pronounced Mecheeka. It's actually where the origins of the word Mexico and Chicano lie. They began as a cult worshiping the god of life and death while living under the previous ruling empire, they skinned the princess and a priest wore her skin in a ceremony and they were killed and chased to the swamps and badlands in the area that is now Mexico city. The head priest had a dream that they should settle a spot where they see a golden eagle perched atop a cactus eating a snake. They adapted to the region and started large scale farming operations in the swamp. They had grid systems in the shallow waterways that resembled rice paddies, they made small islands out of sticks, mud and derbies where they grew the traditional mesoamaerican crops of corn, squash and beans which thrived being farmed like this, they also did aquaculture in this system. Excess food allowed for a population boom and through conquest and alliance with two tribes I can't remember off the top of my head because they aren't as iconic. The empire was split into states and one of them was called Aztlan. This is where the British archeologist was studying and he was a blank slate before heading there in an age before the internet. It wasn't an intentional misnomer but it stuck, just like everything else involving Indians in America. Technically I guess the people he was studying were "Aztec" as far as the English language goes but that is like if aliens concurred earth, moved the people around then tried to study humans 200 years later and called all humans Floridians because they happen to land in Tampa. Of course that is even assuming the aliens speak English, but that's a long shot I think. Anyway, I hope that was som…
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Jewish history. by most certainly not a communist - Thu, 06 Jul 2017 14:21:02 EST ID:NpNqj0ZF No.57213 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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(THIS IS NOT A JEWISH BASHING THREAD, IT IS SIMPLY REVIEWING A HISTORY TO EXPLAIN THIS GROUP OF PEOPLE)

The holocaust was of course a tragedy, but what we don't look into is how the perceptions of anti-semitism came to be. Sometimes investigating victims can lead to fewer instances of victimhood. I'm worried about Jews in America.

It's not entirely unfounded that the Jewish population has had many wealthy and powerful individuals throughout the world, this is not because of some "elders of Zion" but due to the circumstances they found themselves in.

For instance, Christians could not charge interest on loans they gave due to the laws of the Catholic Church at the time. The Jewish bankers became by far more profitable and powerful as they could charge interest.

Although this did lead to inequality among a small minority, it did help build communities by handing out loans in the principal of investment.

However, powerful minorities creating inequality sows the seeds of discontent among the majority christian populace. The persecution of Jesus Christ in Israel is used as further evidence of Jews being evil (as Jesus was literally the most important thing to many), as well as the Jewish lore of "blood libel" to create the Golem of Prague. This became a popular rumor that Jews were kidnapping Christians and crucifying them as well as sacrificing them.

Due to the high rate of childhood, unexplained mortality it was an easy jump to accuse the Jews of kidnapping their children, this scapegoat was easy as there was already quite a bit of hatred direct toward the isolated Jewish community.

It didn't help that later that a Jewish Family, the Rothschild family DID create a conspiracy to gain power and influence in Europe and DID infiltrate many royalties. Of course, people don't want to be treated as lesser and resent the Rothschilds for controlling finances.
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Molly Beshdod - Fri, 21 Jul 2017 16:34:18 EST ID:4Z1EkLgS No.57234 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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This isn't jewish history, this is just an semi-coherrent refelection on the origins of anti-semtic myths. I wana talk about pre diasporia Levent and the Abassad kingdoms of beta isreal. IDRK how to describe your post, but their dosnet seem to be any historical sources conntected to anything you are saying. This all reads like your bong water scatter brain diarrhea. Give me somthing written by someone with a PhD or go home.
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Clara Dronningstone - Mon, 24 Jul 2017 23:20:06 EST ID:flID+PsE No.57235 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57234
I'm glad that I can go into a Jewish thread and have my reply expectations met.


Late medieval thread by Nathaniel Bledgenidge - Mon, 24 Apr 2017 17:01:04 EST ID:aLFu7iIl No.57163 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Does anyone have any good lectures, essays etc on the decline of knights as a class and the decline of feudalism in general?
Also, general late-medieval, renaissance thread.
11 posts and 1 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Ebenezer Tillingham - Tue, 15 Aug 2017 19:19:47 EST ID:bayldp7v No.57254 Ignore Report Quick Reply
You got to read up on the plague as an important factor for the decline of feudalism.
>>
Albert Chanderwater - Sat, 19 Aug 2017 03:02:54 EST ID:rbK+gS1r No.57257 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57251
I should have said I talked about European war crossbows specifically. As you said, the chinese had crossbows in antiquity, and the Picts had hunting crossbows in the early medieval period.
>>
Charlemagne - Mon, 21 Aug 2017 13:58:25 EST ID:6zd51tsO No.57258 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57254
The impact the plague had on medieval society is pretty crazy when you start looking into it. Entire noble estates are abandoned/wiped out and then claimed by whoever happens across it, art becomes morbid and twisted, population scarcity causes peasant strikes and revolts because labor is suddenly in major demand, and you get crazy stories like how a pope at the time spent years wrapped in layers of blankets between two fires because they thought heat dissuaded disease.

>>57257
>The crossbow is portrayed as a hunting weapon on fourPictish stonesfromearly medieval Scotland(6th to 9th centuries):St. Vigeans no. 1,Glenferness,Shandwick, andMeigle.[49]The use of crossbows in European warfare is again evident from theBattle of Hastingsuntil about the year 1500. They almost completely superseded hand bows in many European armies in the 12th century for a number of reasons.

From Hastings to the 12th century we're predominantly seeing chain and padding for armor. It was in regular use before the rise of plate armor in the late Middle Ages.
>>
Charlemagne - Mon, 21 Aug 2017 14:22:12 EST ID:6zd51tsO No.57259 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57258
Disregard the crossbow bit, I'm an idiot and forgot what your original point was.
>>
Nigel Fanham - Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:51:06 EST ID:bo3asBrW No.57265 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57258

It showed me the one positive example about humanity. Towns became more independent and dirty farmers proved to be able to understand and create great works of culture, philosophy and politics within a few generations and without church support. Literally people who spend most of their time knee deep in mud evolved into great painters, architects and writers. We think humanity is constantly devolving but there are regrowing ressources that clearly don't rely on a genetic advance.


Worst battles in human history by Lydia Bamblelat - Fri, 12 Feb 2016 07:46:23 EST ID:CwlDQeu1 No.56482 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I'm in a pretty soul crushing mood today and I've been thinking about the battle of Passchendaele. All factors considered is there a worse battlefield in human history? Will the world ever see such horrors, like those witnessed by the men in the general vicinity of Ypres during the war? 24 hour shelling, machinegun lines, snipers, chemical attacks and corpses everywhere? By comparison the highly mobile combat led in WW2 seems like a dream to me. Am I missing something?
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Fucking Hingershit - Thu, 24 Aug 2017 09:18:05 EST ID:/+tLisk/ No.57260 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57233

I happened to watch it with a bunch of marines. They called it the most unrealistic movie ever.
>>
Sidney Clugglekot - Fri, 25 Aug 2017 05:30:16 EST ID:82WzNMAT No.57261 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57260
They obviously haven't seen Big Mommas House 2.
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Ernest Hizzleham - Sat, 26 Aug 2017 14:51:00 EST ID:Rv8hXdtD No.57262 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>57255
I really enjoyed the movie, mainly because I kept laughing my ass off at ridiculous scenes like that.

Not sure that was the filmmakers' intention, though.
>>
George Piddlestone - Sun, 27 Aug 2017 01:31:18 EST ID:PMeC+LId No.57263 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56496

In that one example, carthage held out for seven fucking years, which would have been enough to defeat almost any other invading enemy, except the romans. The romans first asked for 10,000 talents, and when this was paid, asked them to give 300 noble hostages, and when this was done asked them to give up their weapons and they did so to keep peace, at which point the romans asked them to abandon the city to live in the hills, and then the carthaginians realized they had been tricked, now having to defend the city without weapons. I'd say they did pretty well considering. The romans burned them out house by house, much like the crushing of the warsaw uprising, it saves men to simply destroy rather than take.
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Matilda Cickleforth - Sat, 02 Sep 2017 19:43:37 EST ID:i2pzJk0z No.57264 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>57263

the 3rd punic war was the stuff of legends unseen ever again in the ancient world

the carthaginians actually dug a canal under the nose of the romans to create a new harbor and avoid the blockade, men swam in the ocean carrying torches to set roman ships on fire, carthaginian women used their own hair to create bow strings etc

after carthage fell, the character of the romans never recovered they fought barbarians and civil wars and slowly faded away


What if...? by Beatrice Dickledale - Tue, 18 Jul 2017 01:26:19 EST ID:Redgi3D4 No.57230 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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So what if all modern wars suddenly had to be fought with swords and other pre gunpowder weaponry?

What would the military tactics be like? Would small groups of armed men run around as they do in modern war with guns or would we have to revert back to lining up in a field?

At first i thought it's obvious that we would adopt modern strategies and tactics but if an enemy decided to go for the line up in a field approach and just started marching toward whatever their target was (a city for example) small pockets of men would seem kind of pointless.

If someone can be bothered to waste time giving me some speculations, i'd be very interested to read. Also would be pretty interested in any examples of ancient armies doing operations that closely resemble modern strategies.
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Cedric Soddlebodge - Tue, 08 Aug 2017 04:39:57 EST ID:lJYPBOas No.57241 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57230
I mean, assuming we couldn't ever relearn to use gunpowder again i could imagine new gun-like crossbow things would emerge. The Chinese had been using repeating crossbows since before Jesus so i can only imagine what kind of batshit contraptions we could think up with modern physics and engineering knowledge.

Actually now that i think about it, we don't have gunpowder right? what about petrol? cos, i'm no engineer but surely we could make gun-like machines using petrol as the propulsion agent. Or like, a variety of other materials.
I mean, even if we didn't have gun-like things for any reason but still had petrol, we sure as hell couldn't have lines anymore. I can only imagine the carnage of tanks rolling over lines of pikes.
I mean, i'm imagining battles like Fury Road, where there are thousands of screaming mad men riding whatever vehicle they could into one another. Fuck, imagine a destruction derby between Europe and Russia.
Actually, its probably get gummed up pretty quick. cars stuck in mud and gridlocked on roads.

I don't really know much about modern armour but i feel like crossbows might end up being pretty useless against shit like this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQM6zLiSn1E
However, bullets are pretty blunt and often hollowpointed so they probably don't have the point necessary to pierce it. who knows.

I mean shit now that i think about it, think of all of davinci's machines, we could totally make those now. Think of the siege weapons we can make with modern steel and a better grounding in science. I wanna see a revolving ballista that fire bolts like a gattling gun. I don't really know what it'd be used for but it'd be fun to watch.

I have an essay to write now.
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Barnaby Cuckletedge - Tue, 08 Aug 2017 07:22:59 EST ID:rbK+gS1r No.57244 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57237
Not really. Crossbows are only really effective against mail armour. And medieval people quickly realised that metal plate armour is incredibly effective against crossbows.
>>
Barnaby Cuckletedge - Tue, 08 Aug 2017 07:23:37 EST ID:rbK+gS1r No.57245 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57244
Durrr, of course, they work fine on shit like gambesons and naked skin/normal clothes too.
>>
Cyril Gindleshit - Wed, 09 Aug 2017 11:50:28 EST ID:Redgi3D4 No.57246 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57241
>I have an essay to write now.
Do it, please cover tactic and strategy differences
>>
Cyril Hucklespear - Thu, 10 Aug 2017 10:36:41 EST ID:Redgi3D4 No.57247 Ignore Report Quick Reply
On the topic of crossbows, i'm not sure what my rules allow for but if kevlar was allowed to stay then i'm guessing we'd have to go back to plate anyway. Last time i checked most blades would be able to get through kevlar and I assume crossbow bolts would be able to penetrate too.


Churchill by Phineas Gangerwell - Wed, 21 Sep 2016 09:17:19 EST ID:jg4fL/jL No.56882 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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So Churchill has been on a lot of people in the UK's lips on account of him now being on a lot of people in the UK's notes.

There's been a lot of backlash from the people who link him with the Bengal famine, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bengal_famine_of_1943 and blame him for their deaths. There's also stuff like this popping up http://hitlerorchurchill.info/ (try it, it's interesting). Plus there was his collosal fuck up during WW1 with the Dardanelles.

ALL THAT SAI I can't bring myself to hate him. People of history don't exist in a vaccume, and are products of (and in Churchills case, shapers of) the time they live in. I'm not denying that the Bengal famine was an atrocious loss of life and as a Scottish person I've never been a fan of Britain or the British Empire, but part of me just allows it. This alcoholic infinitely quotable badass that embodied the attitudes of the nation he ruled at the time. Even if the nation was allowing massive amounts of Bengalis to starve to death...

I don't really know what I'm trying to say here, I'd like to think it isn't so simple as "He's a product of his time so that makes it ok" but I can't really explain it otherwise. I'm no apologist to the atrocities commited on his behalf but I just find myself unable to get that pissed off with him. I've heard there's people refusing to accept the £5 notes with him on it.

So what do you guys make of him?
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Cedric Cellersud - Thu, 04 May 2017 10:14:53 EST ID:8iQhyERG No.57177 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56882
Oh, I'm a conservative.

Maternal... instinct...


nope
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Lydia Dartbanks - Tue, 04 Jul 2017 11:39:50 EST ID:YYFtDXxk No.57211 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Sounds like typical self-hating and deeply naive bourgeois intellectuals. For some reason the British "left" (liberal centrist) establishment hates Imperial Britain and everything about it.
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Lydia Dartbanks - Tue, 04 Jul 2017 11:43:57 EST ID:YYFtDXxk No.57212 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57005

I love this revisonism lately to use pictures of Roosevelt and Churchill with some Canadian rather than the usual photos with Stalin as the third party
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Doris Mucklekurk - Sun, 16 Jul 2017 06:28:17 EST ID:9CoQeyOj No.57228 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57212
>it's revisionism to use different photographs than that one famous one of the yalta conference
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Walter Blisslewut - Sun, 16 Jul 2017 14:47:13 EST ID:sVSDp2E0 No.57229 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57228
Hey man, history is what you see in history textbooks.


Historical Inconsistencies in Christianity by Jenny Tootgold - Sun, 07 May 2017 12:22:37 EST ID:zZvV2w/f No.57182 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I think I just became aware of a large one that most people probably look over or ignore.

According to the Pauline Epistles in the NT, Paul of Tarsus was tasked by the Jewish High Priesthood to go to Damascus to root out the Christian believers there and take them back to Judaea for judgment and execution. This account is already problematic enough considering Paul's supposed Pharisee background and his collaboration with the Sadduccees, and the fact that "Christians" had not even coalesced into a separate religion at the time Paul said his conversion occurred.

But the glaring problem is that: how is it that the Jewish High Priests had jurisdiction over Damascus? At the time, Judaea was a province of the Roman Empire, and of such low status that it was administered as a client of the Roman province of Syria (an Imperial-type Province).

Furthermore, the Jewish Priesthood had many of its prerogatives removed stripped: by 28 CE, the Romans had removed or limited the ability of the Jewish courts to impose capital punishment or to judge themselves by their own ancient laws. Considering the reputation of the Priesthood/Sanhedrin of being 'collaborators', it's likely they themselves

So how the fuck could Paul have been tasked by the Priesthood to go to Syrian Damascus to arrest Roman subjects there? It's the equivalent of a Louisiana policeman driving all the way to Austin in Texas and arresting people there and claiming jurisdiction. It makes no sense, and reeks of a fabricated story.
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Molly Chettingpune - Sat, 27 May 2017 23:58:17 EST ID:Yt0MTGo3 No.57191 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57182

Was it the Pauline epistles that said that? I thought it was just Acts
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Nicholas Turveyridge - Wed, 31 May 2017 11:37:41 EST ID:5kPy1v57 No.57193 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Like 90% of the OT. What? God stopped the sun from setting just for you and the rest of the world didn't notice at all? King David built a powerfull kingdom that nobody else ever talks about? Also Mose's biography seems to have been stolen from Sargon of Akkad.
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Sidney Blackstock - Wed, 28 Jun 2017 19:12:54 EST ID:+cP8QzkY No.57205 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Rome, despite being viewed as installing completely new and radical governments and changing the duties of the people themselves, making slaves et cetera, often used the government currently in power as a force underneath their army.

What reason would they have to care about ordering the church around if they paid taxes?

Also I read on /b/ some guy doubting Jesus existed and while the few fragments of his life that remain are proof enough for some people, I wanted to point out that the New Testament mentions that the Jewish churched paid the Romans to be silent about him. There are still some sources beyond the Bible, but what better source to learn about Jesus anyways?

The fact that the Bible is incredibly accurate is proof enough I think
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Lydia Dartbanks - Tue, 04 Jul 2017 11:26:09 EST ID:YYFtDXxk No.57209 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Jews were given more autonomy than most since the Romans respected their "authenticity" if you will--they were old, and well documented as very old, and Rome--being deeply conservative--revered old things.
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Phoebe Wavingnine - Mon, 10 Jul 2017 07:34:52 EST ID:n86/MK/a No.57215 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Religious people are very good at ignoring inconsistencies in their beliefs. That's all there is to it mate.


saharan slave trade by Nell Cizzlehood - Fri, 28 Apr 2017 22:44:19 EST ID:tC/dl63y No.57170 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Any of you follows know any good books about the trans Saharan slave trade? Watched a few good YouTube videos on it and was wishing to learn more.
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Wesley Gublingway - Mon, 05 Jun 2017 20:01:16 EST ID:Yt0MTGo3 No.57196 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57195

He's right. One of the main oppositions to slavery in the south was the white working class, many of whom actually lived a worse quality of life in terms of income and housing than the slaves. The term "white trash" comes from the fact that even many of the slaves actually felt sorry for some of the poor jobless white folk that lived around them.

President Johnson also was an ally of white worker unions opposed to slavery, but these unions weren't opposed to slavery on moral principle as much as the feeling that slaves took away their job opportunities. It was because of President Johnson's close ties to these unions that Lincoln made him his vice-president since he was kind of a "moderate" voice on the issue.
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Ebenezer Blytheman - Tue, 06 Jun 2017 19:10:11 EST ID:xQkSNyxY No.57197 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57196
>One of the main oppositions to slavery in the south was the white working class
Lmao no. The white working class in the South enthusiastically threw themselves to their deaths to protect slavery, in their thousands. Then they spent the next century and a half enthusiastically voting for the old plantation owners to keep the blacks down. What kind of person would actually believe...

>many slaves actually felt sorry for some of the poor jobless white folk that lived around them.
...oh. One of those "slavery wasn't so bad the Southern whites were the real victims" kind. I get it.

Whatever you need to do to feel better about yourself, I guess.
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Nathaniel Clayspear - Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:36:52 EST ID:ncjsiAmY No.57198 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57194
Sounds like the rich has been using racism to divide the working class for centuries...
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Beatrice Happerbury - Tue, 20 Jun 2017 11:44:06 EST ID:YiUudFwN No.57199 Ignore Report Quick Reply
We shouldn't be too surprised. Redneck Southern states do intentionally underfunded their own school systems, after all. It only makes sense that they would be so ignorant of their own history along with everything else.
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Jarvis Pinnersere - Sat, 24 Jun 2017 01:09:14 EST ID:N6lY6tKM No.57203 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>thread on islamic slavery
>devolves into "muh US slavery was worse"
classic


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