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Christ's Cut by Faggy Sasslestack - Sun, 06 Mar 2016 13:01:52 EST ID:wFiqczKy No.56569 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Did Jesus have a Jewfro or an Afro?
10 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Matilda Crundledodge - Sun, 29 Jan 2017 23:35:21 EST ID:swlAdxHJ No.57056 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Finally, a chance to show off my pic of Baby Black Jesus
>>
Fuck Pinderspear - Tue, 07 Mar 2017 12:11:01 EST ID:fWsCsdbU No.57117 Ignore Report Quick Reply
All that matters is that his education came from the east
>>
Oliver Sinningpone - Thu, 09 Mar 2017 16:25:21 EST ID:YEmgtMe4 No.57119 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>57117
>All that matters is that his education came from the east
Word?
>>
Fanny Fuckingworth - Tue, 14 Mar 2017 21:05:05 EST ID:wVlCXJBU No.57120 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57117

u do know Lamb was a satirical work of fiction right?
>>
Oliver Puggleburk - Sun, 19 Mar 2017 13:33:19 EST ID:mSizdWFT No.57129 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57120
Soooo fucking good though. Need to reread nb


Looting lol by Jarvis Clozzlelock - Tue, 28 Feb 2017 02:43:55 EST ID:+Y0H01EZ No.57109 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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So, I live in an area with a lot of historic sites for the United States--loads of maneuvering and raiding and fighting during the Civil War, some action in the Revolutionary War & 1812, plus the fact that Europeans have been in the area for 400 years. Unfortunately, a lot of important shit gets paved over all the time. Battlefields being turned into subdivisions and shopping malls. I got a nifty metal detector for Christmas so I think I'm gonna snoop around a wooded area at the junction of two local roads behind a gas station later this week. According to some local records during the Civil War a group of Confederates and Union troops skirmished at that road junction. There's another road nearby that something like 50 generals marched troops on during the War I'd like to search. Keeping in mind none of this land is parkland if you get caught relic hunting on protected battlefields they fine you, lock you in jail, & confiscate your metal detector & the vehicle you drove in on , have any of yall ever gone out and tried to gather relics?

I know it's trespassing but these are basically bum-infested thickets waiting to get turned into another strip mall and it feels wasteful having that history get lost, you know?
>>
Walter Geffingstock - Wed, 01 Mar 2017 15:46:48 EST ID:YEmgtMe4 No.57112 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>it feels wasteful having that history get lost, you know?
Digging up artifacts without going through the proper archaeological methodology destroys any historical value that the items had. Without very carefully recording things like exact coordinates, soil stratum, soil type, etc. you've stripped the artifact of its temporal and special context, which are needed to establish historical context. This is why dig sites are so specific with their grids and boxes. So while leaving it in the ground might let some historian dig it up later or maybe not, digging it up yourself will definitely waste the historical value of whatever you find, at least in an academic sense.

I mean, post-Revolutionary American artifacts aren't exactly shedding light on some dark and mysterious part of human history and I'm certainly not going to cry over the loss of what will likely be Yet Another Bullet in the American historical record, so do whatever. But just know that every time you find something, some archeologist out there is silently shedding one single tear.
>>
Oliver Wadgekut - Thu, 02 Mar 2017 01:28:02 EST ID:C0s92n5H No.57113 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57109

I've been looking into metal detectors for this reason.

The thought of treasure speaks to a place in my spirit that rejoices at the thought of discovering something new, or rediscovering something long lost.

Historical accuracy aside, relics are about the only thing I would ever be proud to decorate a room with. Aside from monetary value, I could see myself placing quite a sentimental value on artifacts I recovered from the field.

And a modest find would make a hell of a bar story. I mean, are you really going to regret searching for some long lost treasure or better yet, recovering something that others can only imagine seeing for themselves?

It's the call to adventure. A dream of fortune. And in the end, what's a few lost trinkets going to matter to anyone?
>>
Polly Fullernick - Mon, 06 Mar 2017 16:19:37 EST ID:ueQZvpy5 No.57114 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57112
This. Never forget your actions are not in a vacuum, and other people will follow your lead if you let them. One bullet is nothing. A thousand idiots with metal detectors trampling over historical sites is not nothing. Europe has huge problems with treasure hunters ruining old Roman ruins or neolithic dolmens trying to hunt for gold.
>>
Cyril Widgenut - Thu, 09 Mar 2017 09:11:39 EST ID:nLTvpZ14 No.57118 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57114
>searching for gold in neolithic dolmens

Just when you think people can't get more retarded... they do.
>>
Shitting Murdwater - Wed, 15 Mar 2017 20:19:30 EST ID:M+lZDv5i No.57121 Ignore Report Quick Reply
In cases where the area will be destroyed it sounds more okay to do, considering the above, with this clip about similar practice archaeologists called salvaging: http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/short-film-showcase/damnation-desert-goddess-remembers-arizonas-glen-canyon


How reliable is historiography? by S\Gh0st\ - Wed, 18 Jan 2017 15:17:53 EST ID:ywx7469d No.57044 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Sometimes I get a little paranoid about this. Do all historians have evidences about they're afirmatives?
2 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Martha Bluddlespear - Tue, 21 Feb 2017 15:20:33 EST ID:wVlCXJBU No.57069 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>they're

how does your brain operate at such a dim level that you can even make this mistake? even since i was 5 years old i have never used "they're" on accident. switching their and there is slightly more understandable but still embarrassingly retarded. but how the fuck do you "accidentally" throw in a god damn apostrophe and not even catch it? unless english is your second language, i think you are a dummy
>>
Phoebe Fonkinhood - Tue, 21 Feb 2017 15:50:45 EST ID:TuA6Cd+C No.57070 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57069
Is your shift button broken? No? Then how about starting a new sentence with a capital letter? How dare you lecture someone while using such sloppy punctuation yourself.
>>
Basil Bingerforth - Wed, 22 Feb 2017 18:42:38 EST ID:4Js4gPGR No.57071 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57070

You ended your question with a period.
>>
Rebecca Crockleford - Wed, 22 Feb 2017 19:23:07 EST ID:FvOh3MvL No.57072 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57071
It was a rhetorical statement?
>>
William Grimman - Fri, 24 Feb 2017 02:50:00 EST ID:4Js4gPGR No.57106 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57105

I was just fucking with him

I don't even know what histiography is.


Periods which need more exposure? by Thomas Gunningshit - Mon, 07 Nov 2016 10:53:53 EST ID:mHFutvZ2 No.56963 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Medieval Byzantium certainly doesn't get enough credit
>stole silk from China
>greek fire
>essentially bought the huns off as permanent mercenaries

What periods do you think need more exposure? What times do you think its important for the average person to know more about?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VaZK-WqZMB8
7 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Fanny Pushdit - Thu, 08 Dec 2016 21:44:48 EST ID:YEmgtMe4 No.57009 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>56963
Ethiopia, and the Horn of Africa in general. They have one some of the oldest recorded histories in the world, had a pivotal influence in all three Judeo-Christian religions, and created some absolutely stunning architectural wonders. And yet nobody in the West ever talks about them or cares to look into them.

Also, archeology in Nigeria needs a serious shot in the arm. Seriously, the place is like a condensed petri dish of human culture and artwork like few other places on earth. Between Nok, the bronzeworks, the walls of Benin and Sungbo's Eredo, Ile-Ife, nsibidi and the Ekpe secret society, the possible "Lost Tribe" connection to Israel, the over 500 languages spoken, all leading to their rapid rise to become the economic behemoth of Africa, the country is a potential goldmine of archeology just waiting to be discovered. And that's just the stuff we know about with what little has been done so far; it's mind-boggling to imagine just how much more archeological treasure and knowledge could be unearthed from that relatively small corner of the world.

My hope is that if both countries develop and grow as rapidly as they are now then they can start to become safer and more amenable to archeologists and tourists. But certainly, based on what we already know about them now, it's a shame they don't get more exposure.
>>
Edwin Bonkindetch - Sun, 11 Dec 2016 01:45:47 EST ID:oY5SR2vX No.57016 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56970

i think in its most early primitive stage, items were moved tribe to tribe until they reached the end of the line. once this ricocheted back to its source, the concept of trade probably became more solidified and maybe gave rise to nomadic traders
>>
Phyllis Brunkinham - Sun, 25 Dec 2016 17:30:22 EST ID:ZG4s1pP5 No.57031 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57009
I've been to the horn of africa and it's an utter shithole. Nothing of value
>>
zxz - Wed, 11 Jan 2017 21:07:05 EST ID:hJDXnZvF No.57039 Ignore Report Quick Reply
ancient colombia and mexico

all the old world shit is greeeat and all,

but people in central and southern mexico and colombia were doing mushrooms and dmt for thousands of years. no one gives a fuck though thats the part thats so mind numbing to me.

art is cute and all but what can you actually experience and take hold of or apply from these other places. theres very little that you can turn in to your own experience.
>>
Hamilton Brugglebury - Fri, 13 Jan 2017 22:48:56 EST ID:pjKBi0qU No.57040 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57039
>no one gives a fuck though thats the part thats so mind numbing to me.
Because that culture was so thoroughly raped, there's so few people around who truly know and very, very scarce records. This was deliberate. Destroy all knowledge of these peoples because it was inferior to the glorious might of Spanish Catholicism.

I had this super hippy dippy sociology professor in college. He told us this story about how he was doing research in South America (he did his dissertation on Liberation Theology) and he rode up to a group of very rural people on a horse with his companions. And they had never seen a white man before, and so appears this man with long hair and pale skin and they think it's Jesus Christ himself. Pretty whacky stuff. But yeah, the reach of the Spanish Empire was long my friend.

But beyond the Drugs dude. Like in Peru, the Incans were literally the Roman Empire with a massive sprawling connected empire of roads and cities (i think it was more complicated politically). So they got fucked cause they got there late. This was like, an ongoing process in the 1500s. It's not like Ancient Egypt where these ruins have been


I Sincerely Believe... by Ernest Binninghotch - Sat, 10 Dec 2016 19:05:48 EST ID:gG9f1duV No.57013 Locked Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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It seems that throughout history, there have been more mass rapes, sexual slavery and forced breeding done to white people by Muslims than the other way around.

Others say that this is not true, but they only say this because they do not have the emotional strength to admit it. But you might know. So if you can, please prove me wrong.
Locked
Thread has been locked
Thread was locked by: Quetzalcoatl
Reason: yeah, no.
6 posts and 1 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Molly Fankincocke - Sun, 11 Dec 2016 17:26:03 EST ID:4RNy1lDa No.57021 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57020
Are jews white?
>>
Edward Sunnerfield - Tue, 13 Dec 2016 22:45:20 EST ID:fVshiL/m No.57024 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57019

They didn't have a lot of people across the world though. They usually looked for local allies who did all the dirty work for them and just a few soldiers and policemen to keep up the law.
>>
Isabella Bammerfetch - Thu, 15 Dec 2016 06:12:13 EST ID:nLTvpZ14 No.57025 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57020
>No such thing happened the other way around; in fact, there is no evidence that Crusaders raped women en masse.

Hahahahahaah, are you retarded?
>>
Alice Chorrylark - Fri, 16 Dec 2016 06:23:13 EST ID:UpNsw6rc No.57027 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>57013
your question should be on yahoo
ignored nb
>>
Ian Blubbleman - Sun, 18 Dec 2016 07:35:16 EST ID:pACIDeoi No.57028 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Even IF what you're saying were true (which I don't think it is), let's make out a big of atrocities Christians have done

Colonized the just about the entire fucking world
Killed hundreds of millions (over a billion maybe?) through enslavement, ethnic genocide, famine, war
De-industrialized and intentionally underdeveloped nations all over the globe
Supplanted countless local cultures, forced capitalism upon everyone, tried to force Christianity on everyone
Is more or less the reason why the world today is in such a dire, perilous shitty state

I could go on. Equally, I could make a big long list of the positive contributions to humanity that the West has done, and I could make a similar list about both aspects for Muslims. The point is that you can't make sweeping generalizations with no context or facts and expect it to hold up as an argument or people to actually take you seriously. I don't even know why I'm trying, there's pretty much nothing anyone will say that will make you change your mind. You might act like you're willing to "discuss" but in actual fact you're just an uneducated tool.


Franz Conrad von Hötzendorf by The Boat - Mon, 28 Nov 2016 15:03:29 EST ID:SqGhCnYX No.56996 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I just watched over this weekend all of "the Great War"s week by week one hundred years ago in the First World War youtube videos, and I must recommend them because of the high documentary level quality and the details of how each week of the War unfolded.

https://m.youtube.com/user/TheGreatWar

One of the most interesting people from the war that even I didn't know much about was the Austrian Cheif of the general staff
Franz Conrad von Hötzendorf

Specifically his consistan overestimation of the Austrian-Hungarian ability to wage war. I suppose he wasn't that different in that respect from the likes of Italian General Luigi Cadorna. But Hotenzndorf really couldn't see that economical the Hapsburg Empire was incapable of supplying and supporting a modern army.

Does anyone have more info or books about him to recommend? Especially if they have to do with operational planning and the logistics of the Austro-Hungarian war effort?
>>
Edwin Foggleford - Tue, 29 Nov 2016 02:00:57 EST ID:GBTnxtdM No.56997 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Oh yeah, total buffoon. It's interesting when you begin to see Indy get genuinely frustrated by him at one point. Does he not launch like, a fourth assault into the carpathians in winter or some shit? It's terrifying how clueless nobles were able to get themselves into such influential positions back in the day. That applies to all WW1 armies but the A-H specifically.
>>
The Boat - Tue, 29 Nov 2016 03:30:16 EST ID:SqGhCnYX No.56998 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>56997
Three attacks into the carpathians in winter with cardboard boots and summer uniforms, to rescue the garrison of 100,000 at the fortress of premesyl they lost in those attacks 800,000 men... this was modern war <gravity laden pause>.

Yeah isn't this show great? He seems to get frustrated with herzedorf and Cadorna the most.


Musketmen by Graham Mavingridge - Sun, 02 Oct 2016 19:47:46 EST ID:KCDGi4tU No.56914 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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So in the 17th and 16th century muskets used a matchlock or wheellock mechanism to fire and therefore took a long time to reload, leaving the musketeers vulnerable, so they needed Pikemen to protect them. My question is- why didn't they just attach the pike underneath the musket and turn them into Piketeers?

I mean if you attached it underneath the musket with hoops, you could move the pike along so the musket was at the centre of gravity when you fired it. And obviously if it got to close quarters you could just us the pike like a pike.
4 posts and 1 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Hamilton Goodshaw - Mon, 03 Oct 2016 21:53:48 EST ID:TL6DdA5o No.56919 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Because evolutionary pikemen were rapidly becoming obsolete. They were able to hold off cavalry that attacked with sabres but once the horsemen switched to shooting at infantry formations with their pistols the pikes just took useless casualties and it was considered a better option to have more muscets than pikes.
>>
Graham Blathercocke - Fri, 07 Oct 2016 18:25:53 EST ID:FqRGTRMQ No.56925 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56918
This.

Bayonets aren't good at all. They're dumb unwieldy slow unbalanced short spears. They also weigh down your gun, and make it harder to aim. They make reloading harder.

That's something they don't teach in videogames.

The only reason why bayonets became commonplace is because spears and pikes stopped being used. Suddenly an unwieldy bad slow unbalanced short spear became a lot better. Because it no longer had any competition.

Another point is that in the 16th and 17th century, all musketeers had their own sidearms, typically a sword and a dagger. So if they found themselves in a melee, they'd drop their gun, and use their sword.

But as the 18th century progressed, soldiers armed with guns became less professional, and more like retards with a gun. Replaceable retards with a gun. And no one is going to spend money on making swords worth more than a retard with a gun. So it became economically viable to just stick a knife on a gun, and give it to some retard and tell him to shoot other retards.
>>
Jack Blonkinhock - Sat, 08 Oct 2016 21:51:26 EST ID:bw6ZNCus No.56931 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>56925
Well the first bayonets were plug bayonets that sat in the barrel of the musket. It still amazes me they didn't work out that was a bad idea right from the very start.
>>
Cornelius Shakebury - Wed, 12 Oct 2016 08:33:24 EST ID:FqRGTRMQ No.56940 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56931
It does make sense from their perspective.

One of the main reasons why bayonets make for such shitty weapons, is that they're misaligned.

The thrusting blade doesn't line up with the general line of the weapon, making it imbalanced and a liability in melee combat. That unbalance will result in slower attacks and bad accuracy, and someone with an actual spear, or a sword can capitalize on that immediately, since they have much better balanced weapons.
>>
Augustus Sudgepet - Tue, 15 Nov 2016 01:38:58 EST ID:BBViIOJc No.56976 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56916

yeah your strength or adaptability are irrelevant when it comes to timing, whenever a threat is advancing, a defense/counter must be executed simultaneously. with mixed arms you may have less of each weapon available but there is a greater time range of group readiness and less openings of vulnerability


Related to Veterans/Heroes? by Pentagon - Fri, 17 Jun 2016 16:23:37 EST ID:j8QhAWnX No.56735 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I'm new to / his /.
I was wandering if anyone here is related to any military veterans, or someone who died a hero, and what their story is.

My grandfather was a Staff Sergeant in F Company, 22 Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division in WWII.

He went in on Utah Beach on D-Day. Fought in 4 campaigns; Normandy, Rhineland, Hurtgen Forest, Battle of the Bulge, and Central Germany. He received 3 purple hearts, and Bronze Star for bravery in his unit taking the city Luxembourg. The 22nd IR received two Presidential Distinguished Unit Citations. He was the leader of the VFW in my hometown until his passing in 2007.

Like any good American, I hold high regard and respect for all of those who have served, and would like to hear some other stories.

Ric Flair unrelated but pretty American tbh.
33 posts and 12 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Reuben Benninghall - Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:05:58 EST ID:f/IVyCNt No.56968 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>56735

Every male in my family from that Generation served. I'll talk about my paternal grandfather.

He was an odd man, and I disagreed with a lot of the conclusions he drew, but he had some insights and he survived.

He hated the stupid, blunt ass standard foxhole shovels assigned to the US Army Infantry on the western front, so he stole a functional one off of a tank when the crew wasn't around. They had a tank, he at least deserved a decent hole in the ground. He cut leg holes in his sleeping bag so that if they got ambushed in the middle of the night he wouldn't get stuck trying to shimmy his way out of the canvas, he could just hike it up and get ready to go. He once spent the night on a recon mission sleeping in a pile of warm manure in order to hide from a Nazi patrol. He was part of the division that liberated the city of Bitche, on the far east of what is now again France. He drafted in 1944, so he and everyone else from his cycle were pretty convinced they were gonna be the ones sent to fight the Japanese after Germany kicked it, until the Bombs got dropped and the war ended.

I don't think he ever really came home. Honestly, as tough as he was I think his life was ruled by fear, but on the home front unlike in the war you don't have anything to attack, you just live with the vague knowledge of a threat. I guess it was the first generation of living like we all do today and think is normal, but they weren't ready for the fucking international psy-ops the world was gonna play on with them after they weren't needed anymore. He made it all the way to 90.

He didn't like president Kennedy, but he was horrified that he was assassinated all the same, because he knew that wasn't how it was supposed to work. He lived the rest of his life convinced there was a second shooter.

He thought the movie WaterWorld was awesome
He was fucking superhuman at playing chess, I never did once beat him in 28 years and I'm not terrible myself. Even my dad could barely keep up.
He told me once that there was at least one lesson you could learn from everybody, which was ironic since he didn't trust anyone. But I suppose he meant that even if you didn't like or trust people you could learn things from them.
Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.
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Nathaniel Sigglefuck - Fri, 11 Nov 2016 06:39:17 EST ID:FqRGTRMQ No.56971 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56968
>He thought the movie WaterWorld was awesome

Whaaaaaaaaat?
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Molly Dunninghore - Mon, 14 Nov 2016 02:01:21 EST ID:k5UrPwXz No.56972 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56971
I know, the only thing he was right about...
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Molly Dunninghore - Mon, 14 Nov 2016 02:02:09 EST ID:k5UrPwXz No.56973 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56971

I know; the only thing he was right about.
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Albert Clayford - Mon, 14 Nov 2016 07:49:49 EST ID:FqRGTRMQ No.56974 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56972
>>56973
I like it too, it wasn't great - but good enough to be enjoyable, and it has sights that are just... wow. Unique.

But an old man digging a weird scifi film like that... that's pretty cool.


The men who fuck goats by The Boat - Wed, 26 Oct 2016 11:11:43 EST ID:EUhXVZGQ No.56945 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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So like psychic powers are bullshit, but are reverse psychology powers real?

>like did the Air Force do this in the 50's? Or was that movie complete horse shite?

Like what if man?

My theory is that we did look into that kind of shit in the Cold War because we looked into everything.
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Sidney Clayshit - Thu, 27 Oct 2016 17:27:39 EST ID:XLSgC62Y No.56948 Ignore Report Quick Reply
This is not strictly what you're talking about bout still pretty interesting/ totally insane:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Earth_Battalion
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Martha Chonderlock - Thu, 27 Oct 2016 19:35:54 EST ID:FqRGTRMQ No.56949 Ignore Report Quick Reply
If I recall correctly, Soviet aligned double-agents successfully convinced the US government to invest millions possibly billions of dollars into bogus research into mind control, ESP, psychic shit, UFO's, remote viewing and all kinds of tinfoil shite. The double-agents would say something like "The Soviets learned how to mind control people with LSD! The Soviets have developed telepathy!" and given the era of science rapidly advancing into really weird territory, the US government and intelligence agencies just believed it.
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Cyril Bablingfedging - Fri, 28 Oct 2016 13:41:55 EST ID:JW5iN93X No.56950 Ignore Report Quick Reply
there are certain genetic dispositions which allow for the factor to be true in qualities observed which at the normal circumstance of what is currently known does not rectify its posibility , which is cool , but remains as it is , its wildly imaginative up until you actually put together ways of application
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Edwin Worthingwell - Sat, 29 Oct 2016 08:13:47 EST ID:lW/tbAqQ No.56951 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56949

The mind control stuff was taken over from the Germans after WWII. They'd drug people with mescaline, put them into a really uncomfortable room and the interogator would say things like "This is really bad, they know you know and if you don't tell us we're all in deep trouble" while pretending to freak out himself. The Americans just switched to LSD and tried to fry their test subjects' brains even harder.
>>
Frederick Clendlepin - Sun, 30 Oct 2016 21:29:18 EST ID:drL7sWsr No.56952 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56950
nj?


/int/craft - imageboard community minecraft server by Esther Barddock - Sat, 08 Oct 2016 09:10:13 EST ID:1o6WsWXm No.56929 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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  • IP Address: intcraft.online
  • Server Version: 1.8.8 (any client from 1.8, 1.9 or 1.10 can join the server.)
  • Chien's World Map cropped to Eurasia
  • Towny, Brewery, meme recipes, word filter and more..
RP and General Rules
Contrary to previous iterations we will now state the actual rules for the server in a clear way, pre-launch. In theory, as always, there is only one rule: Don’t be a shitter. If you follow this set of rules, you are thereby not a shitter and you are in theory allowed to do what you want on Intcraft, and it will be up to the server population and community to put an end to their own disputes.
Towny War Flag will only be enabled from Friday-Sunday, from Monday-Thursday it will be disabled. PvP will always be enabled.
First 24 hours after launch will have War Flag disabled
Roleplay
  1. Building a town/nation must be historically accurate for that location given the current time (300bc-300ad)
  2. Buildings do not have to be 100% accurate, variations are allowed. But no memes.
  3. Towns do not have to be exactly in the same geographical location as they were, but it should be in the same general area.
  4. If you only want to pvp, find a pvp server
  5. If you only want to buildfag, join a nation or get gud.
  6. Nations can spread through conquest or diplomacy, but no Atlantic Federation tier memes.
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Archie Chebbleville - Sun, 09 Oct 2016 20:43:40 EST ID:4RNy1lDa No.56936 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I'm in, you should post this in VG too
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Jenny Buckleded - Wed, 19 Oct 2016 23:09:03 EST ID:4zlanzOr No.56942 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Could you explain what this game is?


Venus figurines by Jarvis Blellymat - Mon, 15 Aug 2016 14:21:00 EST ID:FqRGTRMQ No.56810 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1471285260548.jpg -(167014B / 163.10KB, 800x1270) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 167014
Is there anyone here knowledgable about those things?

Someone recently mentioned an interesting thought to me, that Venus figurines are in fact NOT all of very "rotund" women as popularized by the Venus of Willendorf, and that the idea that prehistoric people liked their women "t h i c c" is just a modern presupposition based on incomplete evidence.

Can anyone corroborate this?
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Edwin Hushman - Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:01:56 EST ID:nvRt55wR No.56850 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56843
The introduction of Chapter 6, the shaman and the priest, contrasts the individual spiritual quest of the hunter-gatherers to the social religious organizations of the planters.

>The contrast between the two world views may be seen more sharply by comparing the priest and the shaman. The priest is the socially initiated, ceremonially inducted member of a recognized religious organization, where he holds a certain rank and functions as the tenant of an office that was held by others before him, while the shaman is one who, as a consequence of a personal psychological crisis, has gained a certain power of his own. The spiritual visitants who came to him in vision had never been seen before by any other; they were his particular familiars and protectors. The masked gods of the Pueblos, on the other hand, the corn-gods and the cloud-gods, served by societies of strictly organized and very orderly priests, are the well-known patrons of the entire village and have been prayed to and represented in the ceremonial dances since time out of mind.

Here it is in entirety https://archive.org/stream/TheMasksOfGodVol.01PrimitiveMythology/The%20Masks%20of%20God%20%20-%20Vol.%2001%20-%20Primitive%20Mythology%20-%20Campbell
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Fucking Gimmlegold - Wed, 28 Sep 2016 07:25:28 EST ID:aW3zOmSa No.56909 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56811
That's Mcdermott's suggestion in "Towards Decolonizing Gender: Self-Representation in Upper Paleolithic Female Figurines"
> Thus the size, shape, and articulation of body parts in early figurines appear to be determined by their relationship to the eyes and the relative effects of foreshortening, distance, and occlusion rather than by symbolic distortion

A pretty definitive study, worth looking at.
http://www.kbcc.cuny.edu/academicdepartments/art/Documents/durantaspaleolithicvenus.pdf

I like what this paper [ https://www.hindawi.com/journals/janthro/2011/569120/ ] puts forward:
>At the time these figurines were made, Europe was in the grip of a severe ice age. Obesity and survival into middle age after multiple pregnancies may have been rare in the European Upper Paleolithic. We suggest that depictions of corpulent, middle-aged females were not “Venuses” in any conventional sense. They may, instead, have symbolized the hope for survival and longevity, within well-nourished and reproductively successful communities.

although it concluded this based on the very spurious fact that the figurines rate "low in attractiveness in visual assessment polls" or some shit lol.
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Caroline Claffingworth - Thu, 06 Oct 2016 16:30:03 EST ID:dl+0XG2p No.56921 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56810
personally I think all the stuff about these being goddesses is bullshit. My occam's razor answer is that these were made by men to impress women and get them to mate with them.

before language, making these would have been a way to demonstrate dexterity, intelligence, and ability to plan ahead and take care of things. it immediately shows you are a desirable mate, men who were intelligent but not strong probably made these to have a chance to pass on their genes

think about it
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Graham Blathercocke - Fri, 07 Oct 2016 18:20:48 EST ID:FqRGTRMQ No.56924 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56921
You might have a point there. Just not a point you mentioned.

A guy who can spend time carving some statue, clearly has enough resources to do basically nothing for a day except carve some silly statue.
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Caroline Blackridge - Sat, 08 Oct 2016 14:09:58 EST ID:Yt0MTGo3 No.56930 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56921

Part of the problem also is that Westerners have a tendency to see any religious figure as necessarily being a "god". It's quite possible that the individuals who made such statues had religious purposes for them, but to say that the figure is meant to represent a "god" may be a case of projecting. We have a bad habit of assuming primitive or non-Western societies have the same understandings of what constitutes a "god" as us or even have a clear cut word for "god". If some other still existing animist religions (such as Shintoism) are any indication, the line between what would constitute a "god" and just a "spirit" can be blurry. And in places like Papua New Guinea, some of the tribes that convert to Christianity, still manage to keep many of their animistic traditions. Same goes with African animism or Yoruba, where there are plenty of African Christians and Muslims who simply re-interpret the Yoruba cosmology through a new religious lens. Likewise, Voodoo's mixture with Catholicism in the Americas where various saints are seen as embodiments of voodoo spirits reveals a similar dynamic element to animistic traditions. If the conceptions of "gods" were hard set and strictly defined in animistic traditions as they are say in the Greco-Roman pagan tradition, this kind of adaptability wouldn't be possible. In Japan, for instance, there has been at times a bit of difficulty in translating the term "kami" into English, which can be rendered as either "god" or just "spirit", depending on which is the preferred translation, the term "kami" as used in Japanese folklore and Shinto religious manuals can take a whole new meaning. If translated directly as "god", Shinto religion comes across as thoroughly polytheistic as any ancient Greek or Roman faith, but when translated as merely spirit, the cosmology of Shintoism seems much more capable of conforming to the theology of monotheistic traditions as well as polytheistic ones.

It's possible that if you talked to the people who made these "Venus" statues, they may have equally responded in the affirmative eq…
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is history the future? by Shaman !MbOrDArdlI - Tue, 26 Apr 2016 19:23:18 EST ID:R/09CF0k No.56667 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I've been listen to Dan Carlin's Hardcore History series about WWI and its been making me think a bit about human nature. He talks about the learning curve that the military leadership climbed, killing millions senselessly in the process. They were all so certain of thing that anyone today would say are obviously wrong.

So how different are we? Take the US election as an example. The news says X will win because Y, and Z will happen blah blah blah.
But why are they so sure? Through the study of history, how much more do we know now about... idk causality, then the generals in WWI? If you look at the entirety of human history, its obvious things happen for a reason, and humans try to take advantage of that, but does it ever actually work? It all just seems like anarchy to me. Big things happening that occur because a gabizzilon tiny incidents that seem so obvious in hindsight while simultaneously being inconceivable before hand.

Can people as a species study enough history to overcome this? To do what people since forever have dreamed of doing and be able to use history to accurately predict the future? I think... maybe... but in the mean time, what the point of being certain of anything? If history tells us anything, it's that anything can happen at anytime for reasons that are very complex.

Take everyone on /pol/ with their thoughts about this and that. What do they know, what do any of us know. We are all just generals from WWI saying "If you just give me another 100,000 men, I can take their trenches in a mad rush"


IDK if this is the right board, but thought you might appreciate the traffic
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Fucking Pickford - Thu, 08 Sep 2016 01:13:06 EST ID:I29mmA+A No.56851 Ignore Report Quick Reply
A bit OT from where this thread ended up but blaming the leadership completely for WW1 seems a bit silly. Millions were always going to die because they didn't know how to organise troops for modern warfare.

We have highly trained and expensively equipped soldiers in modern warfare that can work with complex tactics at a squad level while in coordination with entire armies.

In WW1 part of the problem was that soldiers and lower-level leadership were still only drilled for the most basic situations partly because it was conceived as the best way to train them quickly and partly because they didn't realise what properly trained soldiers could do. An additional problem is that most soldiers weren't conditioned through their training to kill back then either.

So now we invest heavily in our soldiers. They're trained for a long time, conditioned to kill their enemies, expensively armed and equipped etc. and we have way less. Even America with its massive military capacity wouldn't invest nearly as many troops per square-mile as WW1-era militaries would.
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Shit Clanderlock - Sun, 18 Sep 2016 06:54:00 EST ID:FqRGTRMQ No.56872 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56851
It's funny how we've returned to the medieval idea of a soldier. A highly trained professional soldier that has to learn a fuckload of shit.
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Emma Bodgeham - Wed, 21 Sep 2016 12:09:15 EST ID:3Ays09so No.56884 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56872
Funny you mention it, when I was in basic my company commander did a little speech on how we were supposed to live up to knightly virtues innasandbox during a lecture on the laws of war.
That, and I remember reading somewhere years ago that some people were upset we were ditching conscript armies because it meant we might return to medieval-style warrior families, with nobody else really having a clue how to fight. Looking at the fact that military families are a thing, they might be right.
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Shitting Necklechidge - Fri, 23 Sep 2016 23:00:01 EST ID:FBZRkRuk No.56894 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56848
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/8016685.stm
Huh. The article says they charged, but then kinda meanders off. Did nobody actually get impaled? Also found this surprising:
>They had to charge across open ground and in the trenches they fought for five hours in one of the most intense battles since the Falklands.
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Cyril Sundlewater - Sat, 24 Sep 2016 09:35:53 EST ID:FqRGTRMQ No.56896 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56894
If I had to guess, all the insurgents routed as soon as those Scots with mounted bayonets started charging.


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