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emailing academics? by William Bapperfoot - Sat, 26 Mar 2016 17:16:48 EST ID:XFbI7gxA No.56613 Ignore Report Quick Reply
File: 1459027008847.jpg -(65343B / 63.81KB, 640x432) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 65343
Would it be inappropriate to email a question to an associate professor at a major university about sources for a course of his that's cited on wikipedia?
I'm trying to find information about Uruk's population in the third millennium BCE, but most of the figures online don't cite any real scholarly data and a reference to part of a course this professor taught is the most I can find on wikipedia.
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Basil Fandale - Sat, 26 Mar 2016 21:12:17 EST ID:bPcAIger No.56616 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Emailing ANYONE with a public address is fine so long as you use proper etiquette and keep things to the point. Academics in particular tend to think they have some obligation with regard to their public works. This is what you're looking for though:

https://web.archive.org/web/20110930050413/http://proteus.brown.edu/mesopotamianarchaeology/699

These are lecture notes, not a course, and there's no population estimate that I can see. When it comes to Wikipedia, any citation that isn't both complete and inline is garbage. If you're an editor, please fix that article.

>I'm trying to find information about Uruk's population in the third millennium BCE
Any estimate you're likely to run across is going to be based on an assumption about how population and settlement size correlate. In the case of Uruk, 150 people per hectare would be a likely guess but there's a huge margin of error. If you're looking for The Truth, you can fucking forget it.
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Hannah Grimstone - Sat, 26 Mar 2016 21:26:01 EST ID:O2FYGm52 No.56617 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I love messaging authors of papers about things. Some of them go way too far out of their way to justify their research, and I have to tell them "no, please don't scan and translate Anton Denikin's memoirs of the Russian Civil War just for me!"
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Basil Closhsire - Mon, 28 Mar 2016 15:34:27 EST ID:XFbI7gxA No.56620 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56616
> This is what you're looking for though:
I had actually found exactly that, which is what prompted me to consider emailing the professor.

>Any estimate you're likely to run across is going to be based on an assumption about how population and settlement size correlate. In the case of Uruk, 150 people per hectare would be a likely guess but there's a huge margin of error.

Yeah, but I'm interested in how a figure like 150/hectare is determined in this specific case - archaeological evidence and the like.
Definitely true that "the truth" is unapproachable in historiography, but the process by which our best guesses are gleaned seems worth reading about.
Thanks for your help!
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Henry Claywell - Wed, 30 Mar 2016 15:26:33 EST ID:ct5r8tQL No.56623 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56620
If you knew something was incorrectly attributed and nothing to do with the guy, why would you want to email him? Yes, that would be inappropriate.
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Priscilla Brangergold - Wed, 13 Apr 2016 00:32:57 EST ID:wbo9Cc1W No.56642 Ignore Report Quick Reply
If their contact information is public it's fine. When I was in college we were encouraged to contact researchers if we were writing about their work and it was a mostly positive experience.
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Reuben Pittspear - Wed, 05 Oct 2016 02:56:46 EST ID:NG1TsJYT No.56920 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56616
>Academics in particular tend to think they have some obligation with regard to their public works

Not only that, but they also just really love to talk about their focus to anyone that will listen.
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Shit Burryforth - Sun, 27 Nov 2016 07:14:01 EST ID:gYCJk4B2 No.56994 Ignore Report Quick Reply
If they reply it helps justify their existence.

By all means, do.

I've known a lot of academics and they really are just intelligent and very bored people. This is exactly the kind of stuff they love to engage with.

If they don't want to they will ignore or sidetrack your request. You can literally say, "If you're too busy I understand but I would really appreciate (this level of detail) of explanation." Be precise and most would rather email you than watch some shitty television show that's beneath them, or play with their fucking kids.

"No, honey, I've got an important email to write."

They're pretty normal people.
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Hamilton Bollerdock - Sun, 08 Jan 2017 14:02:17 EST ID:cVNnBfM0 No.57035 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56613
Email their graduate students. They do all the work anyways.
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Hamilton Clayville - Sun, 23 Apr 2017 18:28:02 EST ID:ERYmyDk/ No.57162 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1492986482876.jpg -(675657B / 659.82KB, 1440x2560) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>56613
If you are close to the campus you can probably stop by his office during office hours.
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Ebenezer Dishson - Wed, 03 May 2017 16:09:45 EST ID:8gNEOVqK No.57174 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57162
thats weird to do if you're not even a student at that university though
emailing the guy isn't weird op, but i see why you'd ask. if his email is on the school website and he has published work, (what history professor hasn't published at least some journal articles, though?) you are totally fine to email him about his work.


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