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Until by Fucking Decklehodge - Wed, 23 Nov 2016 17:43:00 EST ID:MZHbqQXT No.12718 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1479940980031.jpg -(32796B / 32.03KB, 512x512) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 32796
Hi, smart people.
I have argument with my friend, about whether or not you can use "Until this day" in sentence. She's arguing that you have to put certain time information after "until".
THX for answer, reference would be perfect

BTW some reference would be perfect
>>
Hugh Funkindock - Thu, 24 Nov 2016 16:35:59 EST ID:a8IBsJss No.12720 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Does the expression make sense? Is it unlikely to cause confusion? I would say yes and yes and burn your friend at the stake.

>BTW some reference would be perfect
That's not how language works jolly african-american


Finnish by Cornelius Ginkinsudge - Sat, 20 Aug 2016 22:47:59 EST ID:4HnKYQAn No.12641 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1471747679333.png -(263074B / 256.91KB, 500x334) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 263074
I cannot, for the life of me, find an answer for a simple question on any of the sites on which I study.
I generally know when to use the nominative, accusative and partitive, except for the verb "to be." I at one point thought it would just be the nominative, ex. "Se on taulukko. It is a table" from skimming walls of finnish text, but I later read that the accusative may sometimes look like the nominative. I have no idea which case ending I should use with "olla" as the verb, and it seems so fundamental to everyday speech that I want to get it straight in my mind.
>inb4 learn a useful language
Finnish is wierd and fascinating, albeit useless.
2 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Reuben Cirringshaw - Sun, 21 Aug 2016 23:05:44 EST ID:iUxAqiYX No.12647 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12642
At one point on that, it talked about the "ambiguity" of the accusative which is what I'm trying to understand.
AP on homo vai AP on homon?
I know that traditionally, "It is I" is preferable to "It is me" but I don't know if this is the same in finnish.
As for books, I am lacking. I've searched around, but there are never any reviews for them because few people are interested in finnish. If you know of any that exxplain grammar well, it would be appreciated.
>>
Shit Honeywater - Sun, 16 Oct 2016 03:30:52 EST ID:vyWRFM4Q No.12680 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1476603052143.jpg -(47239B / 46.13KB, 550x550) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>Se on pöytä
>It is a table

Both "se" and "pöydä" are in the nominative case here.
I only know some simple Finnish and Karelian but I figure olla always has nominative case. Same as with many other languages
(Fun fact. Accusative is not used here because accusative is used for objects. This is not an object because objects can be promoted to subjects through passivisation.
>My uncle loves a plumber > A plumber is loved by my uncle
This transformation goes OK because "a plumber" is the object, thus accusative
>My uncle is a plumber > A plumber is been by my uncle
This transformation is no good because "a plumber" here is not really an object, thus not accusative)
Of course you can also use various locative cases depending on what you want to say.
>Se on pöydällä
>It is on (the) table

And as you asked for literature:
I can recommend "Finnish: An Essential Grammar" by Karllson. If you find a torrent called GRAMMAR PILE 3.0 it's in there, and I'm seeding it.
>>
Graham Drizzlenag - Mon, 17 Oct 2016 20:34:30 EST ID:kC4WcnXW No.12681 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12680
>that torrent

holy shit I fucking came
>>
Eliza Sunningridge - Mon, 17 Oct 2016 20:36:31 EST ID:NVLrxJ4E No.12682 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12680
I just downloaded the book. It's very comprehensive. Thanks bruh.
>>
Clara Drubberlat - Tue, 22 Nov 2016 15:39:35 EST ID:PZICZQ5a No.12717 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12682
Also I think Iso suomen kieloppi is good. It's descriptive grammar for those who can read Finnish


what does it mean? by George Nasslegold - Mon, 31 Oct 2016 04:13:39 EST ID:nKlONaKn No.12698 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1477901619447.png -(63957B / 62.46KB, 263x201) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 63957
pic related
language enthusiasts?
bwh_bw-errytime
>>
Hamilton Sillertitch - Tue, 08 Nov 2016 17:39:55 EST ID:tBCLFBlr No.12705 Ignore Report Quick Reply
大仏。。。本当に奈良だった。
Daibutsu.... It was really Nara.
(daibutsu are giant statues of Buddha and Nara is famous for them)


Mandarin music? by hodeedo - Wed, 18 Jul 2012 18:30:15 EST ID:QpPIe/nL No.7196 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I require music in Chinese. MANDARIN please for the love of God. I find most Canto music is better, but Canto is not what I'm learning :/ Preferably not pop music, its all I ever seem to be able to find.

Is there anything more new-wavey, like Neon Indian, or alternative? Lo-fi beach pop like The Raveonettes or Best Coast, rap, whatever, just.. nothing that's going to remind me of N*SYNC plz.

Is this kind of like asking for good movies from China? Not happening?
21 posts and 2 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Rebecca Murdfuck - Sat, 13 Feb 2016 09:32:57 EST ID:rs4OV+RG No.12545 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12539
Glad to hear it! She's a really nice jewel of modern Chinese music, I think she'll be very successful.
>>
Sophie Turveyson - Sun, 14 Feb 2016 21:09:09 EST ID:IJt0Suyt No.12546 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>8795

That's now one of my favourite Mandarin songs. Anyone have anything else similar to Lotus Flower by 龙宽九段? (I know, 3 year old post).
>>
Cedric Buzzdale - Tue, 23 Aug 2016 20:31:05 EST ID:vAYFLULp No.12648 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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How has no one posted MC HotDog yet?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGmROzNJ-dk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQ8mn5fS5_M
>>
Polly Fuddleshaw - Mon, 17 Oct 2016 21:35:08 EST ID:W3n1K4f3 No.12683 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>8795
Thanks, wow
>>
Sidney Hunkinfurk - Wed, 02 Nov 2016 15:56:54 EST ID:FjAbvXN/ No.12701 Ignore Report Quick Reply
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=piNgOdC1BBU

Lyrics are from some Daoist text. Try to ignore the anime crap the uploader added.

As an aside, Christopher Tin is pretty great for polyglots in general.


Learning Italian at home by Phineas Blackleman - Sun, 23 Oct 2016 18:33:27 EST ID:IAKVe98s No.12687 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Any advice for learning Italian at home?
I won't have a lot of time to spend on it maybe an hour a night.
I would like to be able to have intermediate conversational level.
Any useful websites or textbooks?
>>
Betsy Crunnerville - Fri, 11 Nov 2016 19:22:39 EST ID:NZmMur/5 No.12712 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12687
Future learn has some free courses on it at the moment.


Mandarin self-learning by Albert Turveystock - Tue, 02 Aug 2016 07:08:37 EST ID:VsaRwmTc No.12618 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I need some kind of tone-learning program for Mandarin that I could turn on and practice daily. No money here, so it has to be free or piratable. ;_;

In exchange I recommend Mitchel Thomas method for basic Chinese. Way better learning curve, than most other stuff.
4 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Angus Gumbledotch - Wed, 17 Aug 2016 14:39:17 EST ID:VsaRwmTc No.12636 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Okay, so no programs for tones... How about writing? I learned English that way - by reading. There's a firefox plugin that allows to view meaning and sound of every Chinese character, so this shouldn't be that much different after learning the very basics of the language? If so, are there good logogram programs?

I'm big on interactive stuff, since it's easier to engage in small doses on a daily basis and keep a steady pace, than with something like a handbook, which dishes out chapter-sized bites.

Also, where do I get a big list of tone drills? I only see small crappy sample sizes.

PS It's easier to go from traditional to simplified, than vice versa, right? I don't plan on learning to write, so trad would seem more optimal (I also have a history buff streak and learning older scripts eventually is a possibility).
>>
Polly Fuddleshaw - Mon, 17 Oct 2016 22:17:19 EST ID:W3n1K4f3 No.12684 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12618
ChineseSkill is a pretty nice app because it has a huge vocabulary, teaches tones, strokes, sentence structure, accurate audio, it is free, and lets you skip sections if you're already learning by taking quizzes.

If you have a teacher and want to get better at pronunciation start with the pinyin alphabet. Then basic introductions, numbers, colors, directions.

A pretty childish drinking game they like to play is to pick a subject then go around a circle and name an object in that category (eg name a fruit), if you repeat an object or you're wrong you drink.

If you're into pop culture they have a ton of talk shows and tv celebrities, musicians, reality TV is somewhat sane.
>>
Phineas Blackleman - Sat, 22 Oct 2016 20:32:46 EST ID:IAKVe98s No.12685 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Hey OP you should check out memrise.com, it's completely free, and you can get the app free too. Just sign up for mandaring and it will drill words based on the level you are at. It works pretty well, it will sense what words you are having trouble with and then will drill them more. They have HSK 1 to 6, I highly recommend it.

加油啊!
>>
Phineas Blackleman - Sat, 22 Oct 2016 21:08:41 EST ID:IAKVe98s No.12686 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12634
Any chance you were there for that huge explosion?

I saw it in the distance from my flat and for real I thought that war had broke out.

Scary shit anon
>>
Anita Flowershitter - Mon, 16 Jan 2017 08:02:08 EST ID:ux7B0QWz No.12735 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12618
just bundle together an anki deck and download a mass of audio files for a bunch of words and you're set, god lazy people.


TEACHING ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE HORROR STORIES ETC by John Nicklefield - Tue, 26 Aug 2014 08:13:29 EST ID:mPRdrUeT No.11631 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I've just finished my Cambridge ELT qualification, got a job offer (signed, sealed, delivered, I'm yours) and I'm now about to move away to a Eurasian metropolis where I will be undertaking my first English teaching job.

tell me about how snotty the kids are going to be
any horror stories (to tell camp-fire style)?
been figuratively fucked in the arse by a language school?
16 posts and 1 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Hugh Puckledale - Sun, 21 Aug 2016 13:17:09 EST ID:HU6JyZmP No.12645 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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How difficult is it to teach English in the EU? What do I need to make it happen?
>>
Henry Fanwater - Thu, 15 Sep 2016 22:37:30 EST ID:Bdrk/Gkl No.12669 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12607
It's the spelling exceptions that make it a chore to read and write, but for speaking it's quite simple.
>>
Clara Worthinggold - Fri, 16 Sep 2016 00:29:59 EST ID:mVf2/T6i No.12670 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12645
Can't speak for other regions, but our English teachers in Scandinavia are usually (read: Never heard of this not being the case) locals with a BA in teaching (specializing in English) or an MA in English (for high school-equivalents).
You might have better luck in the PIIGS (sans Ireland), but even then it's likely they've got locals who know more about English grammar than you ever want to, even if they have a weird accent.

tl;dr: Speak the local language fluently and have an MA in English as a foreign language, and you'll get to compete with the thousands of other candidates who can do the job and know the local culture better than you are likely to ever know it.

Not that it's impossible, it's just not Asia-tier levels of easy to get a job just by being white and anglo, and you're more likely to have to do some private classes with annoying business-types who speak shit English if you go do it.

Tbh, I'd recommend just getting a job in a major Russian town instead (got a couple Chechen friends who say it's easy if you speak good English) and flying to the EU for whatever you can't easily/legally do in Russia,
>>
Doris Fuggleville - Wed, 28 Sep 2016 20:23:52 EST ID:EyvlnHM8 No.12672 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12644

I think you need a bachelor's degree from a university. My sister used her degree and has been teaching English to kids in Japan for four years.
>>
Betsy Crunnerville - Fri, 11 Nov 2016 19:27:16 EST ID:NZmMur/5 No.12713 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12644
You need a CELTA course. In Europe it pays between €5 and €25 an hour, depending on the country. You have to start in the countries that pay fuck all and build experience. No one will hire you with an Online Cactus course or any of those websites that offer weekend courses.

>>12645
Getting a job is not hard if you have a CELTA qualification and if you get the visa and do all the paper work yourself. Schools will hire British and Irish people before you, and only hire Americans when they are desperate, because they hate doing the paperwork. Soon though British and Americans will be equally undesirable, so there will be more demand for you, the population of Ireland is only 4 million after all, they can't exactly teach all of of Europe English.

(I am an ELT teacher who has worked in 3 EU countries)


German by William Mablingford - Tue, 13 Sep 2016 05:11:03 EST ID:6cVh3/6V No.12664 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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is it possible to find Germans here that can do some sort of exchange language learning prior to my arrival to Germany in 3 weeks?
>>
C-Higgy !lfsExjBfzE - Tue, 13 Sep 2016 16:18:36 EST ID:sq+gza3T No.12665 Report Quick Reply
It's absolutely possible through the power of the internet. Here's 12 suggestions for finding a German language exchange - http://www.fluentu.com/german/blog/german-language-exchange-partner/

Also this - https://www.mylanguageexchange.com/Learn/German.asp
>>
Jenny Pondlenere - Tue, 13 Sep 2016 17:16:24 EST ID:k3lQQ8Jn No.12666 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>12665

Danke Schön


can anyone here translate heiroglyphs? by Fuck Buzzwell - Sun, 14 Aug 2016 11:56:21 EST ID:+vg/lECh No.12627 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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i've been trying myself and it is complete fail
got these two items at the store for 11 dollars /brag
2 posts and 1 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Sophie Gasslebury - Mon, 29 Aug 2016 14:55:16 EST ID:RQ9rHzrc No.12654 Ignore Report Quick Reply
so i googled some translation sites and i can't make heads or tails of this yet...
anyone know of atleast a place maybe where the community might be helpful
looking at the same time just thought it would be nice to get some help
>>
Albert Trotman - Mon, 29 Aug 2016 20:25:58 EST ID:wm2vfAfR No.12655 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>12628
This is a copy of a painting on a wall of the tomb of Horemheb. The inscription says either dicks out for Horemheb or it's a description of what's going on in the afterlife. The lovely lady is Hathor, she faces Horemheb, and that mysterious looking masked wrestler is Horus who would go on to have an amazing second run as Jesus of Nazareth. See more here: http://www.osirisnet.net/tombes/pharaons/horemheb/e_horemheb_pharaon_01.htm

>>12627
It's definitely a phonetic script. May or may not be nonsense. I'm not going to look up anything about it because it's just fucking tat.
>>
Esther Hommerpore - Fri, 02 Sep 2016 18:56:14 EST ID:yesq+7fO No.12656 Ignore Report Quick Reply
It say's "OP is a fag".
>>
Graham Sepperville - Sat, 10 Sep 2016 14:41:15 EST ID:RQ9rHzrc No.12660 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>12656
>>
Phyllis Hodgewot - Mon, 12 Sep 2016 11:48:46 EST ID:RQ9rHzrc No.12661 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>12660
tits for translation


how do you keep it all straight by Cedric Hattingmedge - Wed, 17 Aug 2016 21:11:20 EST ID:+vg/lECh No.12637 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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so i have to wonder how you people that know multiple languages
3+
keep it all straight.. do they ever bleed together?
>>
Albert Pucklehork - Fri, 19 Aug 2016 06:05:21 EST ID:VsaRwmTc No.12638 Ignore Report Quick Reply
No, different neural pathways, I guess. Other words only come into play, when you forget one from the language you were using. Then a drawer in your head opens and you pull out something from the other languages you know.
>>
Basil Punnerback - Sun, 28 Aug 2016 15:56:17 EST ID:mVf2/T6i No.12652 Ignore Report Quick Reply
It's fairly normal for people here know English as a foreign language (to varying degrees of success) and either French or German at a reasonable conversational level.
Sometimes, if you're at a reasonable level of fluency, you might prefer some languages for certain things (English, for instance, is terrible at explaining medical things to the layman because everything has a crazy name like 'Cirrhosis' that tells you nothing about the condition, while other languages might have names meaning 'Shrinking Liver' or something that gives you a decent hint). I know some language majors on their 4th or 5th language who make a game of using as many foreign languages in a sentence as possible while still having it make sort-of sense to someone who knows all of them.

Best explanation I can come with is
>>12638
Think running vs swimming. They're all forms of locomotion, but you'd never just collapse in the middle of the street and start doing the magikarp because you got the two mixed up.
>>
Sophie Gasslebury - Mon, 29 Aug 2016 14:40:34 EST ID:RQ9rHzrc No.12653 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12652
that is impressive.. 4 or 5 languages.. i'd started to learn dutch but moved to russian unfortnutaly i got side tracked and haven't used rosetta stone for a while
>>
Fuck Ninnerbanks - Fri, 02 Sep 2016 20:48:12 EST ID:XwCU7Rol No.12657 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12653
4 or 5 is impressive, but not crazy. Look up some of those youtube polyglots like Luca Lampariello or Richard Simcott, that's where shit gets really crazy


Deitsch by CrazyFolksTribe !owU3wSU682 - Mon, 21 Dec 2015 21:36:44 EST ID:3VyXICsi No.12515 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Does anyone here speak Pennsylvania German or have an interest in the language?

Pennsilfaanisch Deitsch is:
  • only a native language to certain groups of Americans and Canadians whose ancestors came from a specific region of Germany.
  • similar to some High / West German dialects, but also borrows lots of words from North American English.
  • almost completely a spoken language; Deitsch music and literature exist but even spelling can change from one author/artist to the next.

I find this language interesting even though it's only useful in highly specific situations and regions. I used to live in an area with a sizable Amish population and always thought the language sounded relaxing. Almost all the Amish past a certain age know English too, and even when talking with each other they sometimes use Deitsch and English interchangeably.

I'm using internet resources to learn some basic Deitsch. Maybe I'll be able to have a conversation with some Amish folks in their native language someday. Or at least I'll be able to tell what they're saying when they talk to each other.
3 posts and 1 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
John Pupperson - Sat, 20 Feb 2016 22:50:44 EST ID:BaQMI3Pf No.12551 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>12515

yeah i live in central pa too. i never had much interest, but i've heard it a bunch. A lot of older country folk you hear with thick accents . my shitty racist father thinks he does a good impression. for real, though, some times you hear an old timer say something really dutchie and you just wanna be like "fuck dude you are trying too hard"

i think a lot of older pennsylvanias with pennsylvania dutch heritage idealize their ancestors way of life and are clinging to what are probably the last vestiges of the language

Hex signs are pretty dank, too.
>>
CrazyFolksTribe !owU3wSU682 - Sun, 21 Feb 2016 23:51:59 EST ID:3VyXICsi No.12552 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12551
>some times you hear an old timer say something really dutchie and you just wanna be like "fuck dude you are trying too hard"
That's wonderful. It reminds me of when Southern rednecks really overdo the drawl to sound more patriotic to their homeland. I never lived near the main Pennsylvania Dutch area of PA so I never got the chance to hear a non-Amish person speak it.

I wouldn't be surprised if, after the middle of this century, most of the "progressive" Amish and similar groups have all but switched to English for both public and family matters. I have a powerful attraction to dying languages of the U.S. and wouldn't mind keeping it alive for no practical reason.

One last thought: Deitsch sounds much more subdued and "rounded" than standard German, and the inflection/accent seems to have more in common with American English than with standard German. I also love how calmly and quietly it's spoken compared to English.

Deitsch word of the day: gschriwwe
>>
Doris Hobberfod - Sun, 08 May 2016 16:38:20 EST ID:v3xAEYJ1 No.12582 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12552
>gschriwwe
Does it mean "written"?
>>
CrazyFolksTribe !owU3wSU682 - Tue, 10 May 2016 01:46:34 EST ID:ASCbueoR No.12584 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12582
I believe so. I've barely done any learning on this language since creating the thread though.

Random observation: Last week I was with a couple Amish guys and noticed that they preferred the English words for prices and numbers, even when the rest of the conversation was in Deitsch.
>>
Cyril Sushville - Fri, 26 Aug 2016 16:43:03 EST ID:pcMWDhvA No.12651 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12552
Funfact: if you're fluent in german you probably have no problem with Deitsch either. it's sounds pretty similiar to swabian german, (they speak it in like less than 200km from where i live)
deitsch sounds less retarded tho.

it's also better understanable than some of the weirder german accents, like everything outta the mountains down south, or the extreme platt from the north coast.
people up north speak a pretty good common german beseides their accent tho, people south are mostly ignorant enough to not even realise it's not even remotely german whatever they're talking lol


Learning Japanese, tips on remembering Kanji besides radicals by イッカク - Thu, 28 Jan 2016 15:42:43 EST ID:6f3V80M0 No.12536 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Ayy everyone. I'm in the process of learning Japanese. Just recently finished up with learning how to read Hiragana on textfugu and I'm starting on Kanji soon, and also Katakana shortly thereafter. Textfugu does a great job of helping me memerize radicals and stuff, but are there any more ways I can improve my long term memory of Kanji, Hiragana, and Katakana? I found a PDF file of over 1000 Kanji in it so that's definitely going to help out a ton. If nothing else, I'm sure textfugu will help out sufficiently. It's a pretty great website. I highly recommend it for people learning on their own.

>also I'm not a spokesperson for the website, just saying it's really really helpful

Anyone care to share their experiences with learning Japanese? Tips and/or advice are always welcome!
5 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Angus Turveyway - Wed, 02 Mar 2016 23:50:41 EST ID:2RPCMfTI No.12555 Ignore Report Quick Reply
you should learn hiragana and katakana at the same time. really its just like upper and lowercase letters, same pronunciations, just different looking, or slightly different looking characters.
>>
Cornelius Bussleville - Tue, 10 May 2016 20:33:51 EST ID:8JAjK7aC No.12585 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>12536
>I found a PDF file of over 1000 Kanji in it so that's definitely going to help out a ton
if you're not willing to learn at least 2000 Kanji, it makes no sense to even start.
>>
Angus Pockson - Fri, 17 Jun 2016 10:26:19 EST ID:JaVU4zbp No.12599 Ignore Report Quick Reply
learn chinese first, the mother language

then laugh at the strange island-folk usage of the characters
>>
Molly Chongerpock - Fri, 05 Aug 2016 16:45:59 EST ID:2RPCMfTI No.12621 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Jisho is a really good all around japaneseto English dictionary. They even translate romaji. I would learn hiragana and katakana at the same time, since its like upper and lowercase. That way you hve pronunciations down. You can spell and japanese word with those scripts. Also some smartphone/tablet apps i found are tae kims japanese learning and kanji script. I dont speak a lick of japanese but i strarted trying to learn last year. Got lazy and gave up. Be better then me man i gave you the powa
>>
Martin Gunnerridge - Wed, 24 Aug 2016 02:55:00 EST ID:RIIf5LgT No.12649 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Hey so since I'm going to Japan soon does anyone know the best way to speak simple conversational Japanese? There has to be some good guide I can memorize basic phrases in within like a month. I'm not gonna be able to read jack shit but I just want to know how to ask for a bathroom and some ham.

It'd be nice if it didn't try to make me speak fucking weeaboonese either I have a feeling 'konichiwa' is viewed at as idiotic by now


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