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Fluency. by cursive !M6R0eWkIpk - Mon, 19 Jan 2015 15:54:37 EST ID:XaB5Kl1U No.11961 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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How do you define "fluency?"
Do you make distinctions between "conversational" and "fluent?"

>Here's what Google spits back when searching "fluent definition"
flu·ent
ˈflo͞oənt/
adjective
adjective: fluent

(of a person) able to express oneself easily and articulately.
"a fluent speaker and writer on technical subjects"
synonyms: articulate, eloquent, expressive, communicative, coherent, cogent, illuminating, vivid, well written/spoken
"a fluent campaign speech"
antonyms: inarticulate
(of a person) able to speak or write a particular foreign language easily and accurately.
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Oliver Forrynodging - Tue, 27 Jan 2015 13:33:08 EST ID:6mW8O8BP No.11982 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>11961
it's really simple. what you're asking for is to define proficiency, which you can do here
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ILR_scale

however, one can be proficient and not fluent. fluency generally applies to speaking, which is the most difficult of the three parts of language for people to grasp. i believe fluency is exactly as google defines it - speaking or writing, i.e. formulating your own independent thoughts easily, accurately, and naturally. this is much more difficult to do than being a proficient reader or listener
>>
Fanny Sommlesare - Wed, 28 Jan 2015 00:11:13 EST ID:7eexnvjt No.11985 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11982
>i believe fluency is exactly as google defines it - speaking or writing, i.e. formulating your own independent thoughts easily, accurately, and naturally. this is much more difficult to do than being a proficient reader or listener
I think writing is much easier than speaking. Speaking involves very little thought process, it just happens naturally. Writing does require thinking, which makes it easier for the student because they have time to think about which verb form to use, the proper word order, etc.

Let's consider the etymology of the word "fluent." In Latin, "fluens, fluentis" means "flowing." To me, this implies speaking spontaneously without stop, or with minimal stopping since we pause every now and then, while simultaneously being pleasing to the ear. Even listening is a flowing process, because if one is truly fluent they should be able to keep up in a conversation without being dragged behind trying to figure out what the person is saying. But, on the other hand, reading and writing aren't as spontaneous as these processes. Perhaps one can be a fluent reader and writer if they are said to be able to read and write without looking up words in a dictionary, though.

So in short, I think speaking and listening are the primary considerations for being fluent. Reading and writing are secondary.

ALSO, the concept of linguistic competency might be of interest to people here. T

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linguistic_competence
>>
Augustus Blendlewater - Wed, 28 Jan 2015 03:45:16 EST ID:6mW8O8BP No.11986 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>11985
i've gotta disagree. i get what you're saying and maybe it varies from person to person but statistically it is accepted that listening and reading are easier to master than speaking and writing. yes fluency refers to flow, i guess i could see how one could apply it to listening or reading but i can't see how in the real world anyone would claim to be a "fluent reader of xyz language". perhaps writing isn't as spontaneous as speaking, but it still deals with production of ones own thoughts in a target language. reading and listening are merely processing information that already exists. and while one could theoretically be "fluent" in a language by the strict definition and still lack proficiency, true fluency has a lot to do with proficiency as well, like having a broad and accurate vocabulary rather than relying on circumlocution or knowing certain levels of speech that would be appropriate in different situations.

here's some more detailed breakdowns of the ILR scale, for anyone interested
http://www.govtilr.org/skills/
>>
Sidney Hoblingbone - Sat, 14 Feb 2015 17:19:01 EST ID:RYQ9LXTa No.12001 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11986
>www.govtilr.org/skills/
That's one ugly site... I'm betting you have to be full-on ameribear to like it.

>statistically it is accepted that listening and reading are easier to master than speaking and writing
I gotta agree with this. It's always harder to produce something than it is to merely experience something.
>>
Simon Bannerchedge - Sun, 22 Feb 2015 10:42:41 EST ID:hL/5FZ6b No.12014 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>12001
yes, it is indeed ugly but the content is there describing fluency


Spanish by David Fezzlelare - Fri, 13 Feb 2015 19:24:22 EST ID:5HHbKzFo No.11998 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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So I've been studying Spanish on my own for 9 months
and I have learned a lot. I have been doing it without a school but with
a private tutor and literature. But I have gotten to a point where all of the stuff that
I have been studying isn't helping anymore. Do you guys have any ideas on how
I can expand my foreign language and direct it to the path of becoming fluent? Please and thank you
>>
Albert Fucklefire - Sun, 15 Feb 2015 19:34:53 EST ID:ieSPCZB9 No.12004 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Immersion is good. I stayed in Mexico for like 3 months and picked up enough to not starve to death. Different study materials/media are good too. Movies, music, TV all that sheeeeit
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Matilda Bibbleledge - Sat, 21 Feb 2015 01:59:07 EST ID:k/DXUEtw No.12012 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11998
You need to find an opportunity to use it in real conversation outside of class. Travel to a Spanish-speaking country, make friends with some Mexicans, something like that.

Also, fuck yes Wizard of Wor


Learning Arabic in a year by alkemest - Sun, 27 Jul 2014 06:35:43 EST ID:86jrGCuF No.11565 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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What's up guys, quick question, how do I learn Arabic at least passably in about a years time?
I'm graduating Uni in a year or so with a degree in journalism and polisci, and Palestine has been on my heart and mind for years. This current slaughter is really pushing me towards volunteering to teach English there when I graduate. The thing is that I'll probably want/need some understanding of Arabic before I head over. I can take classes, but I may also need to buckle down and get my required classes done this next year.

What are some tools that are available to learn Arabic? Primarily I'd want to be able to speak it with passable basic writing skills.
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Cornelius Fuckingworth - Wed, 26 Nov 2014 20:23:33 EST ID:wHm1akGe No.11875 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11770
this is the language board. i cant believe you still take regilion seriously in the year 02014. we're about to colonise space and shit, and you still by da grace of god believe in this bullcrap.
>>
Wesley Fendlefug - Thu, 27 Nov 2014 10:48:54 EST ID:uS2H+RWa No.11877 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11875 atheist here and though I don't believe I acknowledge that religion is a personal thing. People bring in their own values to the religion; the violent person brings violence to his faith and he who's full of love brings love to his faith. Maybe for us religion is something we do not want to subscribe to. Still, imposing this idea or any other on anyone, no matter the evidence, belief or reason behind our words is not the way to peaceful coexistence.

Ps I understand if you want to take this discussion further but remember this is a language board. Islam might be a central force behind Arabic but let's discuss the language here. This is a language board after all.
>>
Wesley Fendlefug - Thu, 27 Nov 2014 10:49:14 EST ID:uS2H+RWa No.11878 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11875 atheist here and though I don't believe I acknowledge that religion is a personal thing. People bring in their own values to the religion; the violent person brings violence to his faith and he who's full of love brings love to his faith. Maybe for us religion is something we do not want to subscribe to. Still, imposing this idea or any other on anyone, no matter the evidence, belief or reason behind our words is not the way to peaceful coexistence.

Ps I understand if you want to take this discussion further but remember this is a language board. Islam might be a central force behind Arabic but let's discuss the language here rather than the faith. This is a language board after all.
>>
Molly Buzzman - Fri, 02 Jan 2015 16:42:31 EST ID:EHPAq2I/ No.11943 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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I just started arabic too but still learning writing and reading, I mostly use memrise.com and these videos because they are in my native.
http://iszlam.com/iszlam-videok/arab-iras-olvasas

For grammar and vbocabulary I'm not really sure either, because I couldn't find any single book in my native about any type of arabic so far. I will either get some random pdfs in english or try the FSI courses as >>11567 suggested.

First I want some decent reading skills because that's how I started japanese earlier as well. Or should I go for spoken arabic first? For chinese, I heard that tip rom several people to start with spoken stuff first and learn writing in parallel.
>>
Jack Fedgeman - Sat, 21 Feb 2015 01:44:44 EST ID:s4ozBC2z No.12010 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11769
>go to Melbourne or Hobart
The meme is real


Spanish to Portuguese by Ian Mummerbotch - Fri, 31 Oct 2014 13:54:54 EST ID:48iE+eos No.11823 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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quick question for you guys. I'm aware that romatic language grammar structures are quite similar, but are they basically identical, just with different words, verbsm and conjucations, or are there major grammatical differences between them, specifically Spanish and Portuguese.


I have spoken Spanish for nearly 3 years and have obtained a fairly high level of fluency and comprehension in the language, mostly because I have lived in a Spanish speaking country for the time. I like languages and would like to learn another, and figured Portuguese would be a language not all that different (I hear Italian is closer but I have more interest in Portuguese because of Brazil).

Issue is, I do not have a lot of time right now, and may be just an hour before bed. How similar are the two languages from a grammatic stand point?

Thanks.
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Edwin Blazzlelock - Tue, 11 Nov 2014 19:19:08 EST ID:XHh1Q3YK No.11848 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11847
ok..thanks.
>>
Reuben Cluddlechatch - Thu, 27 Nov 2014 00:01:40 EST ID:vcyAu2t7 No.11876 Ignore Report Quick Reply
My parents study braziilan portuguese and spanish is their mother language. They say one of the most difficult things about portuguese is to avoid mixing both languages, as spanish might be very similar but it has some important differences, is common to make those mistakes until you master the language. Pronunciation is a little bit tricky too, some sounds are difficult to make and distinguish from others at least for spanish-speaking people.
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Molly Mezzledock - Sun, 14 Dec 2014 15:15:37 EST ID:KJu4J5EH No.11902 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11876
I am learning that right now. The pronunciation rules can be tricky with limited access to the language actually being spoken.

A lot more resources for Spanish than Portuguese it appears.
>>
Oliver Clinderway - Fri, 26 Dec 2014 16:10:24 EST ID:aB6uAQ+j No.11930 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11823

I've been learning Spanish about 5 years and I'm fluent. I've been learning Portuguese about a week and it's quite cool, I can already understand advanced texts. Oh but I can barely figure out what's going on in a basic news report on the radio. Even if it's a story I read about earlier that day.

Pronunciation is difficult and there are enough differences in grammar to surprise you occasionally.. but if you speak fluent Spanish and you think Portuguese is hard it's because you've never learned another language, at least not as an adult.

I would say it's a massive mistake to start learning Portuguese until you have an advanced level of Spanish unless you have to. I lived in Catalonia and I saw my friends who tried to learn Catalan when their Spanish was only intermediate struggle. They constantly made silly mistakes in Spanish, like writing "havía" instead of "había" or using Catalan words that sound Spanish, confusing which grammar rule was Catalan and which was Spanish.. If you wanna learn a language before you are fluent in Spanish then learn something from another family. German for example, it's much harder, but it won't fuck your Spanish to pieces.
>>
Lydia Dadgeshit - Tue, 10 Feb 2015 22:30:51 EST ID:9hlFs5NV No.11996 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Você tomará no cu intensamente com a pronúncia do português brasileiro. Sério, boa sorte.


Novels in Spanish for reading comprehension. by Molly Mezzledock - Sun, 14 Dec 2014 15:13:35 EST ID:KJu4J5EH No.11901 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Hey guys,

I speak spanish quite well. I lived in a spanish speaking country for a number of years, but am now back in Canada now where they are not very many Spanish speaking people.

I am looking for a couple of intermediate novels to read, not something with a lot of the tenses you only find in high level literary works, just something to read before bed to keep my reading comprehension up.

I recently read "The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway in Spanish, something along those lines.

Any recommendations would be appreciated. Thanks!
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Matilda Dasslemodge - Thu, 01 Jan 2015 17:46:52 EST ID:lzcV9T6g No.11939 Ignore Report Quick Reply
El Viejo que Leida Novellas de Amor is really really good. Also there's a decent book, originally in spanish, about the Haitian revolution, but I can't think of the name right now. Somthing about Kingdoms.
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Nigger Furringlatch - Fri, 02 Jan 2015 02:21:28 EST ID:sPwTzU+z No.11941 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Herman Hesse's Demian is an easy read.
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Samuel Brupperridge - Tue, 06 Jan 2015 19:13:00 EST ID:5rSHWso6 No.11950 Ignore Report Quick Reply
el Aleph or any collection of shortworks from Jorge Luis Borges, he's my favorite author

I recommend reading plays if you can get into them, because they're extremely accessible. Ariel Dorfman is a decent playwright. Modern Spanish rendering of Conde Lucanor stories would be good since they're short fables with relatively simple prose.

I'm currently reading The Motorcycle Diaries and I'll admit it's a challenging read, but if you're committed to it it'll do you well. It's just the Argentine slang that's a bitch.
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cursive !M6R0eWkIpk - Mon, 19 Jan 2015 20:57:55 EST ID:XaB5Kl1U No.11968 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>11941
translated from german to spanish or german to... english to spanish?
german and spanish don't seem to jive too well for native speakers of each.
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Lydia Gubbleworth - Wed, 28 Jan 2015 10:14:16 EST ID:P/Qs0eHF No.11987 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11901
I'd suggest reading something from a spanish speaking author, not a translation. Not that it'll be easier, but I always find it somewhat more satisfactory reading an original than a translation

Here are some easy authors you can begin with:
Horacio Quiroga: he wrote short, horrible tales, like the Edgar Allan Poe of South America. I strongly suggest you read La gallina degollada from Cuentos de amor, de locura, y de muerte.

Julio Cortazar. Well reknowned author, he wrote some pretty strange books (Rayuela for example), I think he even won a Nobel prize. I suggest you also read some of his short stories, they're somewhat kafkian: really short, concise, and surreal; check out "Instrucciones para subir una escalera".

If you're for something a bit longer you can check out Ernesto Sabato's El tunel, it's about 100 pages long, but it's not that complicated (I think). It's like a mash up between Bukowski and Dostoievski, though not as good as either of them.

Garcia Marquez is also pretty cool and easy to read, but I don't find him quite as interesting as these other authors. Ohh, and Borges is the best, but he's not an easy read at all, I don't suggest him as a first read.


franco-phoney by Augustus Bevingspear - Sat, 06 Dec 2014 15:21:04 EST ID:MxuHFgw1 No.11890 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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j'ai honte, je ne peux plus parler français. non seulement est-elle maintenant ma troisième langue, mais c'est vraiment honteux quand j'essaie de parler avec quelqu'un et ne peux pas dire même certains mots très simples (par exemple, je pouvais pas trouver le mot "vite" il y a deux jours quand je faisais un effort de discuter en français avec un québécois)

donc, aidez-moi les mecs, allons-y créer un thread où on peut parler de n'importe quoi en français. tu peux corriger les fautes, ou pas, c'est à choix

dis-moi
où tu-vis?
et, je sais pas.. quels films francophones est-ce que tu recommandes?
>>
Charles Hettingtore - Tue, 27 Jan 2015 23:24:00 EST ID:nkd0TrwG No.11984 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Je vais t'aider à corriger les fautes.

>non seulement est-elle maintenant ma troisième langue
"est-ce là" plutôt que "est-elle". Mais c'est assez formel, tu pourrais simplifier:
>Non seulement c'est ma troisième langue

>et ne peux pas dire même certains mots
et [je] ne peux même pas dire certains mots
C'est plus facile à comprendre si tu répètes le "je".

>je pouvais pas
je ne pouvais pas
Si tu veux être un peu plus formel.

>je faisais un effort de discuter
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Rechercher by Polly Sammerlag - Sat, 03 Jan 2015 14:38:43 EST ID:4jjffGeJ No.11944 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Hi all, I am writing a short story and was wondering if it would be totally strange to use the French word rechercher as my protagonists last name. I know it basically means to look for in English, I don't know much other than that besides that I like it. I plan on the protagonist having American parents with maybe some French somewhere in their lineage but it's not a part of the plot just a mental note for me. So, people who speak French or actual French people (if there are any on this board) would it be highly uncommon for a person to have the French verb rechercher as a last name?
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Eliza Mammerfock - Sat, 03 Jan 2015 15:49:51 EST ID:hPhCch4K No.11947 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>11944

I'm not a French speaker, but......

It all depends on your audience and the significance of his name. I'm assuming that this is short story is going to be in English, so unless its extremely pertinent to you personally, the fact as to whether or not his name is commonplace might not matter. I highly doubt that a verb infinitive would ever serve as a name in French-speaking cultures, but like I said, I don't speak French.

As for the significance, is his name important to the story or the character your creating? A good example would be from the movie 'They Live' in which the main character, a homeless transient, is named "John Nada'. 'Nada' means 'nothing' in Spanish, and considering the characters situation, it makes sense. Even though 'Nada' is not a common surname in Spanish-speaking cultures (in fact, I'm pretty sure it's non-existent) and that the character isn't even Spanish, the name still serves a purpose.
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David Worthingford - Sun, 04 Jan 2015 12:09:30 EST ID:lHdJYkhU No.11948 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11944

I'm not sure.

In the book "Este Domingo" by the Chilean author Jose Donoso, some characters have the last name "vives", which in Spanish means "you live".

So it's not a totally unprecedented concept, at least.
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Phineas Dopperhon - Thu, 22 Jan 2015 06:35:57 EST ID:E3W6Xz/v No.11971 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11944
Yes, it would. It makes no sense.
I guess I have nothing to reply to the previous examples mentioned, but if anything some common names are sometimes used as last names, but never verbs. It can work for an english audience, there's often a lot of weird names in japanese stuff that aren't natural at all, but work to evoke "germanness" or whatever for the audience. But don't expect it to be fine for everybody just because you like it.
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Charles Hettingtore - Tue, 27 Jan 2015 23:03:59 EST ID:nkd0TrwG No.11983 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11944
Hello, frenchie here.
Absolutely NO ONE in France has "Rechercher" as their last name (yeah, just checked).
We simply don't use verbs in the infinitive, nouns or adjectives are much more common. For instance, "Recherche" is an actual surname (meaning "research" or "search", as a noun), although it's a very uncommon one (498 persons out of 65 millions). But it does sound natural, at least.
"Pierre Recherche" would strike me as unusual but would still sound french; "Jean Rechercher" would just make me think the author didn't know what they were doing at all.
If you want to retain the meaning, go with "Reserche" or "Chercheur" (searcher). A verb will sound out of place, only to French speakers though I guess.


Any success stories? by Fanny Pivingwell - Thu, 16 Oct 2014 19:35:58 EST ID:8Xo2pqDl No.11789 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Seems like you guys just ask each other "what language should I learn" or "What is a good movie in X language?"

Any real success stories here? Becoming fluent? To the point where you can read/write/speak/watch/listen as if it were your native tongue- anyone use it to travel or perhaps meet friends/lovers? Impress and inspire me guys.
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Shit Clannerbanks - Sat, 17 Jan 2015 11:47:02 EST ID:5rSHWso6 No.11956 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11789
He estudiado español hasta 10 años y estoy sacando mi certificado de traducir. Desafortunatamente, no puedo charlar al nivel lo que quería y es muy dificil a expresarme sobre algunos temas, pero puedo joder con mis compañeros de trabajo y mis colegas.

According to professors who administer the ACTFL proficiency tests (those used by the U.S. state dept.), I would rank around a 3-4 in Spanish which is basic professional competence. My real love is Persian however I've studied it far less time and rank around a 2 which is described as social competence and limited professional ability. I'm pretty satisfied with my progress considering it's been about 4 years of intermittent instruction.

I know enough German for fucking around, listening to music, and reading simple articles or stories, but I don't consider myself seriously proficient. I would love to resume studying it at some point, but I'm kind of tapped out in Uni

>>11923
second this poster.
>>11909 I run into kids like you in language programs all the time that delude themselves about being "fluent". It's good to be proud of whatever you've achieved but your post seems like a shit-ton of exaggeration and boasting.
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Simon Blabbleman - Thu, 22 Jan 2015 14:41:18 EST ID:7eexnvjt No.11972 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11909
I'm only a beginner at German, but I can tell right away that this is full of errors. I see simple mistakes analogous to things in English like "I loves" and "did spoke" and etc. I'm not sure about your syntax/word order, but your agreement needs work. You may have an inspiring story (and I say that not out of sarcasm) but you probably shouldn't boast.
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Simon Blabbleman - Thu, 22 Jan 2015 15:01:25 EST ID:7eexnvjt No.11973 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11799
That is very funny, because I have a Teach Yourself German book from the 60s. The introduction contains this very great sentence: "if the student thinks he is going to speak, or read, or write German in a couple of months by means of a lesson or two done now and then, he had better give up the idea completely, for he is wasting his time." Then, in comparison to the more modern Teach Yourself German book from around the 90s-00s, there contains a brief chapter at the beginning which describes the language learning process, and it is titled "Only got a minute? Only got five?" This is of course because the modern language learning books are marketed towards modern language learners, who are people who have no time for diligent study. The modern book is drastically oversimplified, where instead of teaching grammar and how to form your own sentences, it teaches you to parrot simple phrases with very little instruction on grammar.

As for studying 5 hours a day, I definitely would not recommend it, especially if you are only studying 5 hours on a single language. An hour at the minimum, two hours at the maximum. The problem with learning for such a long period of time is that you get excited and you start going through various chapters of your language learning book at such a rapid speed that you hardly retain any of it. I have experienced this myself, when I once spent an all-nighter doing six chapters of an Old English grammar and exercise book. It all *seemed* to make perfect sense, but I was doing so much and learning so many new concepts, that at the end of the sixth chapter, I found that I had forgotten many things from the first few chapters. I think it is better to spend a short time a day (but definitely not five minutes) studying one or two things. Don't overload yourself.
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James Crellypere - Mon, 26 Jan 2015 06:06:00 EST ID:6mW8O8BP No.11979 Ignore Report Quick Reply
i learned a language in the army. any of you who are serious about language learning, native exposure, and proficiency, there's a pretty good resource at ( GLOSS dot dliflc dot edu ) maybe visit it on an incognito page and check it out ^^ it's got reading and listening exercises in 40 languages. i still use it 3 years after to keep up my proficiency a bit, but aside from talking to grocery store clerks and ordering in restaurants and reading the occasional news articles i suck now that i dont use it every day :(
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Priscilla Sonnerhall - Tue, 27 Jan 2015 09:42:30 EST ID:WbDEOjjy No.11981 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11979
A really nice resource, thanks!


Learning Turkish by Fuck Grimgold - Sun, 25 Jan 2015 00:07:34 EST ID:Ch+tAKXh No.11976 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Hello! I've been attempting to learn Turkish for about a month now. I know the basics, like hello, yes, no, goodbye, ect... I was wondering how long on average does it take to learn Turkish let alone a second language fluently. Plus, I was wondering how difficult it is to learn Turkish compared to other languages.


looking for someone german by Hannah Bunstock - Sun, 16 Nov 2014 23:40:38 EST ID:z7MSlm2F No.11862 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Hi /lang/ I've been learning to speak german for a year now and I'm at a point where I'm in need of a fluently speaking german influence to correct my errors and teach me proper spelling and such. I speak english and french fluently for who ever's interested in an exchange.
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Martin Hannerlock - Wed, 19 Nov 2014 07:37:59 EST ID:GQMne/JL No.11866 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11862
lang8 is a website where you can do this
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Cyril Demblebetch - Mon, 15 Dec 2014 22:33:08 EST ID:gg1+s9fO No.11908 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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I speak German pretty fluently, but it's a second language and I'm sure you're looking for someone who speaks it as their primary language.
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Hitler - Thu, 08 Jan 2015 05:01:06 EST ID:j4mbWJz1 No.11952 Ignore Report Quick Reply
ICH SPRECHE DEUTSCH FLIEßEND. WERDE ALLERDINGS NIEMANDEM HELFEN DER NICHT ARISCHEN BLUTES IST.
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Phyllis Senkinhidge - Sat, 24 Jan 2015 18:31:58 EST ID:AQoHklXU No.11975 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I'm german myself and can speak english fluenly.

So if you need any help give me your email or skype or something.
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Fucking Weppershaw - Tue, 17 Feb 2015 05:18:47 EST ID:txBu1ds7 No.12005 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11952
There is no capital ß. It becomes SS.
nb


Why Latin is useful by Jack Sonnertedge - Sun, 21 Dec 2014 16:15:44 EST ID:ZtJh40Yw No.11921 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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  1. Helps with understanding of Romance languages across the board.

2. Allows you to read historical documents from centuries ago. Not all of them have been translated into English or any contemporary language--there is a wealth of information which exists only in Latin.

3. Useful for understanding legal, philosophical, and scientific terminology.

4. It's fun.
6 posts and 2 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Phoebe Dummerlat - Mon, 05 Jan 2015 15:57:05 EST ID:lHdJYkhU No.11949 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11942

Tons of literature from the Middle Ages, and lots of historical documents from that time.

I can't name them off the top of my head but they're out there. I spent maybe 30 hours writing an essay for my literature class last semester and a bunch of the citations I needed, I had to get from sources which were entirely in Latin, and I had to translate the meanings as best I could.
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Fucking Sammerstock - Wed, 07 Jan 2015 00:22:14 EST ID:JUrf6k0U No.11951 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11946

Not really, we can glean a lot of information from how the speakers of Latin's progeny have changed sounds in order to reconstruct what it is most likely to have been, along with accounts from classical times about their own linguistic perception of the languages pronunciation. Going beyond just phonemes we can understand the lengths of vowels in words and inflections due to metrical poetry. >>11927 goes into detail parsing out the rational and evidence for various pronunciations and is actually a decent read.
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Whitey Mibberham - Sun, 18 Jan 2015 10:27:57 EST ID:7eexnvjt No.11958 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I've studied Latin for three years. I love the language, but I think it's ridiculous how many people wish to use it for communicative purposes. I've had a few conversations in Latin, but I viewed it as a gimmick. The real reason to study it, first of all, is to stimulate an intellectual curiosity. Secondary reasons would include the wealth of literature in the language, including some of the most dramatic and entertaining poetry in the world, though many of it is just dick jokes. Religious people might enjoy reading the Bible in Latin, as well.
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Jack Brookson - Mon, 19 Jan 2015 16:11:23 EST ID:FSpFf/PB No.11963 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11958

>I think it's ridiculous how many people wish to use it for communicative purposes

That sounds like a lot of fun, and I'm sure people who view it that way also find it fun. Different strokes and all that.
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Graham Hangershit - Tue, 20 Jan 2015 12:20:58 EST ID:7eexnvjt No.11969 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11963
It does sound like fun, but it's too impractical. It's every Latin student's wish to be fluent in the language and to maintain Ciceronian dialogues within it, but it's difficult in that the language is not modern. This leads to gaps in vocabulary, where we cannot discuss things such as computers and television shows unless we agree on the words to be used beforehand.

Besides, one thing that must be mentioned: the Latin that is studied in schools is hardly reflective of the Latin spoken by the average Roman. The "Classical" variety that we all know was a highly polished form that only the educated Romans spoke. Your average Roman would have spoken Vulgar Latin, which is of a drastically different character, being much simpler. A good friend once made the analogy that studying Latin by reading Caesar, Catullus, and Ovid is like studying English by reading Shakespeare.


Influence of English on the language of Italian media by Hamilton Nevinglot - Mon, 19 Jan 2015 15:25:14 EST ID:jYf4zYSf No.11959 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I'm writing a pretty long paper on the topic thereof. Any good sources I could start from? Both English and Italian work for me.


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