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What's even the point. by Phyllis Dottingmadge - Sun, 27 Jul 2014 19:55:53 EST ID:3PaB0X0O No.11569 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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No one wants to talk to you in their native language, they want to practice English with you. Or they'll get mad as if you were implying they don't know English. It's a required subject in every developed nation, everyone speaks English. Foreign media is available translated. I really enjoyed Spanish and French in school/college but now I'm disappointed I never get to use them and can't see the point of trying to pick up another. Why do you guys do it?
8 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Fucking Serringdock - Sun, 07 Sep 2014 13:12:53 EST ID:gG+m/mt6 No.11674 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11569

Umm.. why don't you.. you know.. travel.. nobody speaks fucking English
>>
Oliver Brookville - Mon, 08 Sep 2014 05:16:08 EST ID:1aKqN+jS No.11679 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11646

Dutch guy here.

I try to speak German to my German friend, but we always fall back on English. Why? It's just so much easier. I speak it, he speaks it, the conversation just goes much, much more fluently and thus, is a lot more fun.

Try getting into a group of people. They will be much more reluctant to talk in English and will fall back to their own language except when adressing you.
>>
Beatrice Hollerhuck - Tue, 09 Sep 2014 15:35:34 EST ID:AWCZ+ZVx No.11686 Ignore Report Quick Reply
counterpoint:
http://www.memrise.com/blog/10-monolingual-countries-where-you-need-to-know-th/
http://www.memrise.com/blog/10-monolingual-countries-where-you-need-to-know-2/
>>
Nicholas Famblebanks - Sat, 13 Sep 2014 08:54:13 EST ID:yemH8wU3 No.11701 Ignore Report Quick Reply
In China I've become friends with a lot of 40+ year old men and women. People who own the convenience stores near me, my apt complex security guards, the ladies who monitor the keys in the teacher's lounges at my school, etc. These people never learned English and by this point in their lives they're pretty much settled in and are never going to. So what if they're almost old enough to be my parents, they're constantly bored at work with plenty of free time to chat and don't know any English beyond "hello."
>>
Doris Crackleshaw - Mon, 15 Sep 2014 19:50:09 EST ID:xlt8pxCz No.11710 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11569

>I really enjoyed Spanish and French in school/college but now I'm disappointed I never get to use them and can't see the point of trying to pick up another.

What? You must be shrooming.

I spent a week in Paris and didn't hear a word of English until I got back to the airport. Not my taxi driver, not my hotelier, not the woman at the drugstore, not my waiters, not the guys who sold the tickets at the Louvre. None of them spoke any English to me. They were either unable or unwilling. And as much as I'd like to flatter myself by thinking that it was because my French was so good, it most certainly wasn't. I held very basic conversations and took care of necessities, but it was obvious that my French was shit. And I'm fat, so they probably figured I was American. Or British. Either way, an English speaker. But I heard no English from them.


Need help boosting my German by Nathaniel Wullybodge - Tue, 02 Sep 2014 00:51:44 EST ID:si6pwvxP No.11661 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I am a German student 3 courses away from my degree in German, but I still really struggle in reading. I passed B1 in April... I'm in a very difficult German reading course right now where we are tackling a Novella a week. Half the students are grad students and most of the other undergrad German students are out classing me.

I really love German but I am starting to get down on myself and my motivation is suffering. I'm also a geology student and doing calculus II this semester, so I'm pretty heavily loaded up on schoolwork.

What's a good way to amass vocab and confidence at this point in my studies?
>>
Lydia Pallyfield - Tue, 02 Sep 2014 02:33:57 EST ID:/B/BFMOS No.11662 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Vocab? Anki. Confidence? Actually speaking and thinking in the language. Start talking to native speakers if you haven't already.
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Whitey Pittingwater - Fri, 12 Sep 2014 20:43:44 EST ID:BArGmrn0 No.11699 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Unterhalte dich mit Muttersprachlern.
>>
Nicholas Famblebanks - Sat, 13 Sep 2014 08:07:36 EST ID:yemH8wU3 No.11700 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Remember: language learning is not a race. It's easy to think of it as being one, especially when you're taking courses and being outdone by your peers (I've been there before, I know.)

The easiest way to regain confidence is to go back and read something you haven't read in your target language in over a year. As long as you're practicing, even just a little, you'll be able to note a higher level of fluency over your past self. Don't worry about being better than your classmates, just focus on being better than you.
>>
Charlotte Siffinglot - Fri, 10 Oct 2014 05:52:53 EST ID:KHT6bnsu No.11774 Ignore Report Quick Reply
memrise is good too

everything you can, as many different resources as you can, that way you see the same words in different situations instead of revising over and over

when reading novellas don't write the translations of words over them but instead on a post it and stick it to the page

then try to read the page and refer to the post it when you need it, giving yourself time to try to remember the word first


Voynich Script by Simon Wivingline - Sun, 31 Aug 2014 13:11:50 EST ID:8+cBdc9r No.11649 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voynich_manuscript
What's it mean?
>>
Walter Gibberpet - Mon, 01 Sep 2014 04:27:44 EST ID:NqJL1ymG No.11653 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Probably a c. 1450 act of personal art that just got traded into noble hands, forgotten about, and passed on. The techniques used to make it and the tech drawn in it put it at a date range of 1450-1480 at the most likely and the location of somewhere in central to east central Europe, where it came from.

It's information patterns as a mix of pseudolinguistic gibberish (like glossolia, speaking in tongues) and of something patterning like a mildly analytic language, suiting the "chinese" explanation but parsimoniously being explained by the Germanic and even a reduced Latin (somewhat like a correctedRomanian or Spanish or French) underlying the cipher. The noise though is probably so great that it's what's throwing off decypherment. Additionally, some of the nonlinguistic patterns detected might explain the lack of corrections - the mistakes were simply addended with corrections; like say "The lino lion ate the mause mouse", outside of glossolalia patterns of simple noise.



Regarding it's purpose, probably just someone's private world committed to paper. A would-be mystic monk in a time where mysticism was flourishing but off paper, possibly compounded by drugs and disease (migraines explain many of the stranger sites). Another explanation that I find parsimonious, a sufferer of an autism-like disorder - likely to be made a priest in the era, likely to have an inner world like that persist into adulthood, likely to put in the excruciating detail to commit it to paper, and have the overactive pattern-seeking behavior to put it through a cypher.


Of course it's just my opinion. This site is a little bit more conservative in that it dismisses most "explanations" without committing to one of it's own but it brings up quite a lot of the known details for people in good detail:

http://www.ciphermysteries.com/


Language-learning method I created by Martin Niggerspear - Sun, 24 Aug 2014 00:39:20 EST ID:rbS8hkzn No.11625 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Rate the method I have come up with to learn Icelandic. I'd like to hear your guyses feedback concerning it. I'm still at the first stage and sticking to it.

First stage: Acquiring reading fluency

The first stage consists of reading general texts (like news) in order to get to know the basic vocabulary used by these kind of texts. News texts generally follow a template and always use the same words. The method to acquire the reading fluency requires that the learner checks every word in a text in order to get accostumed with patterns, like conjugation and declension patterns. It is slow and tiresome in the beginning, but as day passes, the learner will be able to recognize more and more words, find out the infinitive form of a conjugated verb and the nominative form of a declined adjective, adverb, noun, article or pronoun. In this stage the learner is to be assisted by pages that are capable of indentifying conjugated verbs' and declined words' root form in order to help in the pattern-finding part. A website capable of finding the root form of declined words or conjugated verbs is http://bin.arnastofnun.is/forsida/. Wiktionary (http://en.wiktionary.org) is also able to conjugate and decline words, but it isn't as reliable.

Second stage: Acquiring writing fluency

By the time the learner reaches this stage, he's to have the standard vocabulary used by news websites. He's to know the most used verbs, nouns and adjectives as well as their conjugation and declension patterns. In this stage the learner will use the vocabulary he acquired to write blog-like entries in the website Lang-8 (http://www.lang-8.com). This is the stage that will focus the heaviest on grammar. The learner must submit his texts to Lang-8, compare their texts with the corrections submitted by native icelanders and study the mistakes in order to get rid of the majority of them. Sites like WordReferenceForums (http://forum.wordreference.com/forumdisplay.php?f=75) can be used to answer specific answer regarding grammar and Wikipedia's article on Icelandic grammar covers the technical intricacies. The learner when writing an entry must translate the words he wants to use in his entries using a translato…
Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.


Not a polygot by Polly Murdwill - Mon, 04 Aug 2014 11:57:36 EST ID:PUY3prz5 No.11590 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I'm 26 years old and I only speak English. There is no doubt in my mind that I am progressing in Spanish very quickly.

Would it be implausible for me to seek a degree in Linguistics?
>>
William Chackleforth - Mon, 04 Aug 2014 13:06:48 EST ID:/B/BFMOS No.11591 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Of course not. And you don't have to be a competent speaker of multiple languages to have a degree in linguistics, although it would be very weird if you got that far and didn't pick up a few.
>>
Edward Honeyfield - Wed, 06 Aug 2014 05:49:45 EST ID:w4o0Iqm5 No.11597 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11590
There are plenty of linguists who only speak one languge. If you want to learn languages get a degree in languages instead .
>>
Oliver Hebbershaw - Fri, 08 Aug 2014 16:10:56 EST ID:qizTVHik No.11603 Ignore Report Quick Reply
How's that Spanish coming along? It was coming super quickly for me at first until I got owned and realized there's so much I didn't know. Still progressing though.
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Jack Sunningstone - Wed, 20 Aug 2014 22:40:49 EST ID:zQYXj+n2 No.11616 Ignore Report Quick Reply
That is an impressive reference, dude.


japanese question by Doris Snodgold - Sat, 12 Apr 2014 19:55:14 EST ID:aNRx9wD5 No.11234 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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how does one write/say "snake river" in japanese?

hebi = snake

kawa = river

hebi kawa = snake river?
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Martha Brullerpack - Sun, 13 Apr 2014 03:24:59 EST ID:NqJL1ymG No.11235 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Don't know for sure, just trying to help, but I would think either

hebi no kawa == river of snakes with the genitive postfix, if an unnatural construction (like a hitherto unknown or undescribed thing, especially when brought up for analogy). Might be a bit more "snake's river" than intended if it's anything like the head final languages I'm used to.

else I think Japanese has that areal lenition-induced consonant gradation thing going on:

hebigawa

Again don't know.
>>
moxie !QvI1p9.OFY - Tue, 15 Apr 2014 04:15:23 EST ID:avmU74pl No.11237 Ignore Report Quick Reply
sorry i'm high as fuck i've been staring at this for like an hour now wtf.

>>11235
蛇の川 (へびのかわ hebi no kawa) is "river of the snake" or "snake's river" but i think i prefer the former translation becuase... の (no) is a genitive particle... for example, if you had 川の蛇, it's now "snake of the river" or "river's snake."

but you don't really need a genitive particle here because i think snake is supposed to be a descriptive word, so unless it's a literal snake owning the river.......

>>11234
蛇川 (へびがわ hebigawa) sounds more like what you're looking for. one word.
>>
moxie !QvI1p9.OFY - Tue, 15 Apr 2014 04:15:44 EST ID:avmU74pl No.11238 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11237
and of course there's a fucking typo lolol
>>
NinKenDo !GEcKEyOqGA - Tue, 22 Apr 2014 13:13:56 EST ID:VKUrAz63 No.11280 Ignore Report Quick Reply
蛇川 (へびがわ) is probably good. But I think that might mean "snake leather" given that 蛇革 was the suggested kanji from Google IME. Fucktons of homophones in Japanese anyway though, so it wouldn't much matter if the context made it clear, also in written form you'd have the kanji to make it totally clear, so if it's in written form it's definitely fine.
>>
Eugene Billingwill - Mon, 18 Aug 2014 22:36:29 EST ID:yb9jDlV5 No.11615 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11238
participle


surrendermonkeyese by Jenny Sullerworth - Tue, 15 Apr 2014 13:29:54 EST ID:JWfHUhIZ No.11244 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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quick question about french

the "past historic" tense of a verb is considered for literary use only. but from what I understand, the tense is the same as the english "I ate, I slept, I walked"

why is that considered literary use only? it seems very basic to have a past tense like that.
>>
Charles Dartstone - Tue, 15 Apr 2014 16:53:27 EST ID:/sKGtROt No.11246 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11244
The passé simple does not translate as easily as you think it does. In english, the "I ate" past and the "I have eaten" past are still largely interchangeable and both occur frequently in speech (I forgot the name of those tenses). In french, the "je mangeai" past (passé simple) has simply disappeared from everyday use. You only ever hear the passé composé.

I could turn your question around. Quick question about english - the second person singular pronoun 'thou' is only every used in specialized literature. But from what I understand, it's the same as in the french 'tu' in contrast to 'vous'. Why has thou disappeared? It seems very basic to make a distinction between the singular and plural second person pronouns.

The passé composé appears frequently in written media because most forms of french literature are very conservative in their language. Take a intellectually mid-range magazine like National Geographic. In english the language used in NG would be pretty close to regular spoken english. In french the difference would be a lot more noticeable - writing in media tends to be a lot more convoluted, sophisticated and flowery in grammar and lexicon than everyday speech. It's quite an interesting phenomenon really. The end result is that written french has many elements that don't occur in spoken french, the passé simple being one of them.

When I speak french with frenchmen I sometimes like to throw in a passé simple form to see their reactions. They usually comment on it.
>>
Jenny Sarringspear - Tue, 15 Apr 2014 17:35:36 EST ID:NqJL1ymG No.11247 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Mind you, languages other than English tend to have a lot more dialectical variation; enough that there's (or was until about 50 years ago) actually a gradient of "know this language, you can understand this language" between French, Portuguese, and Italian. This means that there's a great deal of interest in locking the rules down in stone so things aren't too different to figure out for everyone. French becoming the region's lingua franca (cough) doesn't help the whole "keep it constant so everyone can understand it" thing. Whence the spelling.

Another thing about translation is sometimes it isn't possible. The past historic doesn't actually translate into English; it just formed analogously to our simple past and makes for a better feeling translation than free translation, which is more difficult for teachers to measure because not all of the elements are being drawn the same. And since they're both past tense anyways (little information other than feeling is destroyed or pulled out of nowhere), that's the way it goes.

As a note of trivia, the same thing kinda happened in German; the more irregular past tense (where you have the remember that o becomes a in come/came (komme/kam)) is harder to memorize and less systematic with sound changes in weird dialects. The result is you only pretty much use it when you're telling an impersonal story, but a lot of media will just use the regular past (the hab ge+verb+en) anyways. It's actually probably an areal feature, like German and Dutch picking up the Parisian R.
>>
Shit Worthingdale - Sun, 10 Aug 2014 12:53:51 EST ID:uKLKdjDs No.11604 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11246
This post is very good.

As a native speaker, I'd say you have to consider first the fact that when you are using this tense you are talking/writing about something which is supposed to be 'cut' from the present time. And by that I mean not something you can count, as if there was a time limit, when you use this tense what you are talking about is almost from another dimension, you can't relate to It in any imaginable way.

You can see from the perspective "It is mostly use in those kind of text therefore...". But you should try to get closer to the meaning of this tense. I actually it's not one of the most difficult thing in french language


Learning Finnish by Molly Fuckingham - Wed, 15 Jan 2014 22:28:04 EST ID:uWRxXpm/ No.10987 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I want to learn Finnish. I've never learned a second language. I speak English. Does anyone know of a good free resource for becoming fluent in Finnish. I'm thinking a website, a book or a set of books. Piracy is ok. I also welcome advice.
66 posts and 21 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Jenny Forrydirk - Sun, 27 Jul 2014 13:05:52 EST ID:3F0ALnSa No.11566 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Nothing makes me more madder than a fucker who wants to move here. Fucking 'migrant scums. "I'ts my dream to move to Finland blablabla" and all other kind of shit like that. I really want it that it's hard as fuck to gain citizenship, those fucking Finnboos make me mad.
>>
CrazyFolksTribe !loJSOMZg0g - Sun, 27 Jul 2014 17:52:24 EST ID:/NadvR2u No.11568 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11566
You're the reason why countries suck.
>>
Basil Smallgold - Tue, 29 Jul 2014 21:46:16 EST ID:Q5R8DPz7 No.11574 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>11566
Fuck you, I for one welcome any migrants who come through 420chan.
>>
Esther Dirringspear - Fri, 01 Aug 2014 10:23:02 EST ID:i0gwflFu No.11578 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>11568
>>11574
>>
Hugh Blytheham - Tue, 05 Aug 2014 02:11:59 EST ID:zI1SXTVd No.11595 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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DICKS EVERYWHERE


Where to look for career-specific vocabulary by Simon Crorryhet - Mon, 04 Aug 2014 20:52:51 EST ID:LJXwQPLv No.11594 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I need a basic overview of French (Southern Quebec/Northern New England) construction vocab, words like hammer, plywood, scaffold, "to drive a nail", "on the clock" etc. Does anyone know where to look for things like this, it's basic but it's highly situational. All the library books focus on colors and foods and shit and also are European-oriented.


Books by Hedda Dummerlock - Thu, 24 Jul 2014 12:11:39 EST ID:i0gwflFu No.11558 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Recommend me a good language (text)book that is nevertheless not easily available on the net or in libraries (i.e. relatively recent and on an obscure topic). I need to make a 17e purchase from amazon.de and something extra would help with the shipping costs.


Suicide note.. by Oliver Bomblehall - Thu, 10 Jul 2014 14:38:04 EST ID:HmrDo+U8 No.11533 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Can someone who speaks french tell me exactly what this means, please? Someone I loved left this behind

>Certaines personnes qui comptaient à mon coeur me manque terriblement ... je vous aime et je vous embrasse fort au revoir

I don't speak French and google translate seems to mess it up a bit. Could someone please tell me exactly what he's was trying to express?

It's very important to me that I understand, please.
4 posts and 1 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
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CrazyFolksTribe !loJSOMZg0g - Sun, 13 Jul 2014 00:20:21 EST ID:wT/piNfP No.11540 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>11539
>>
Henry Wirryforth - Thu, 17 Jul 2014 09:07:01 EST ID:A+W5xLuM No.11544 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11539

It's not your fault. That person made the decision. If they decided their entire life wasn't worth living how is that the fault of anyone one tiny individual in their life?

Anyway, he said "certain PEOPLE" plural, not singular.

Most people lose a lot of loved ones in their lSives, and it sounds like this person did as well. Life is really hard. Too hard for some people. Nobody's fault.
>>
Basil Neblingkedge - Sun, 20 Jul 2014 16:51:43 EST ID:mPRdrUeT No.11550 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11539
note that the you (vous) is plural, if thats any help. the note is addressing more than one person throughout
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Basil Neblingkedge - Sun, 20 Jul 2014 16:52:10 EST ID:mPRdrUeT No.11551 Ignore Report Quick Reply
well shit, someone already said that


nb
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Nell Nedgeworth - Sun, 20 Jul 2014 21:40:13 EST ID:gPIGtUk4 No.11553 Ignore Report Quick Reply
it wasn't your fault, or doesn't matter if it was.
read a book: Giovanni's Room by James Baldwin
it's about unrequited love with a frenchman, makes you think, you'd like it.


Language Learning on the Internet by Barnaby Woblingnutch - Sun, 20 Jul 2014 06:30:58 EST ID:dI81Dve+ No.11548 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Tell me, what is your favorite website for learning languages? Mine is duolingo.com. But if I had money, it would be busuu.com.
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Nell Nedgeworth - Sun, 20 Jul 2014 21:35:05 EST ID:gPIGtUk4 No.11552 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Facebook.
I have friends all over the world who I chat with, sometimes using google translate, but increasingly I start to get the hang of the language and am able to communicate without a crutch.
>>
Nigel Muzzleson - Mon, 21 Jul 2014 05:43:23 EST ID:/B/BFMOS No.11554 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Here's one you might not think of: Wikipedia. Articles on things you're interested in written by (probably) native speakers in any language you're likely to want to read.

On a side note, there's a galling lack of Busuu on Busuu. There was apparently a campaign to "save Busuu", except saving meant sharing a video with your friends and possibly learning enough Busuu to fill one side of an index card. I do hope the handful of Busuu speakers are getting something in exchange for this co-opting.


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