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Sticking my Foot in the Dutch Kiddie Pool by Nell Muttingworth - Thu, 22 Dec 2016 21:22:22 EST ID:RH+DJ+MI No.12729 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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So I have duolingo to practice my French. Im not horrible and Im not great. Im getting better as I have regular conversation in the language. My goal is to live in Quebec for awhile since its bilingual.

But I have an interest in learning Swedish,Dutch and German since I may also desire to go those places. I know all three have similarities and differences. Though I am unsure of how great those differences are. I've messed around with German before and it seems like something I could pick up. I just tried Dutch and its like a different universe I've heard it on some TV shows and movies and its sort of weird even compared to Swedish.

Do you guys have any advise suggestions or questions?
>>
Frederick Gucklestone - Fri, 06 Jan 2017 00:02:11 EST ID:yrO7zLOv No.12732 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12729
Just so you know, despite the presence of a large number of anglophones in Montreal and some other areas, Quebec is not in fact bilingual. Quebec is technically monolingual with the official language being French (Quebecois).
New Brunswick is the only officially bilingual province in Canada.


ZUINOSIN by Alice Gendledadging - Tue, 06 Dec 2016 14:39:46 EST ID:JLWMsRTy No.12725 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Can anyone who knows Japanese please take their time to tell me what these songs are about? What is he singing about? This shit is top-tier insanity.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZajXaVinOf0&t=3s


wolla wat is deze by Lydia Peshdock - Wed, 30 Nov 2016 11:26:49 EST ID:hbxr/Ldy No.12723 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Anyone show me some love? What on earth does this say? :(
>>
Basil Tillinggold - Thu, 01 Dec 2016 17:52:04 EST ID:MEa4WanU No.12724 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Dunno. The script looks to be Balinese though.


I wanna learn a new language. by Koshka - Wed, 23 Oct 2013 17:55:20 EST ID:8Pq3Puce No.10102 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1382565320247.png -(116866B / 114.13KB, 983x470) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 116866
I really don't care if I ever use it. I want to learn a new, less common language.
Here are my stipulations:
It has to have an alphabet. It can't be like Chinese or Japanese where you learn 100s of symbols, stroke counts, and pronunciations.
I was looking at Tamil or Balinese, but I don't have a reliable source to learn either of them. Any suggestions?
22 posts and 5 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Augustus Sagglelock - Sun, 06 Nov 2016 22:22:04 EST ID:jgUoywD5 No.12703 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1478488924300.gif -(42075B / 41.09KB, 600x587) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>10102
Teaching yourself the Hebrew characterset and abugida character order (A B G D, etc) can get you far if you're at all interested in Semitic linguistics.

The nice thing about abjad alphabets/languages (Hebrew, Phoenecian, Syriac, Mandaic, et al) is that they tend to follow the exact same pattern with regard to letter order (see above), with Arabic being the main exception (it has about twelve additional letters in the standard alphabet, if memory serves). Obviously you have to learn the individual characters and pronunciations, but having a common ground will definitely make it easier to branch out. And if you decide to teach yourself Yiddish for whatever reason, there are only about five additional glyphs to learn.

Hope that helps some. Shalam.
>>
Augustus Sagglelock - Sun, 06 Nov 2016 22:28:19 EST ID:jgUoywD5 No.12704 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12703
Oops. Meant abjad the first time, not abugida. See
>>12700 if you want an abugida. derp.
>>
Matilda Sindershit - Mon, 14 Nov 2016 09:58:27 EST ID:YrYpk7Xo No.12715 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Учи русский. aлфaвит нe лaтинский, сaм язык — aбсoлютнo пoeхaвший
>>
Fanny Billingfoot - Fri, 18 Nov 2016 13:14:23 EST ID:jgUoywD5 No.12716 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12715
cyka блядь
>>
James Clobbershit - Thu, 24 Nov 2016 03:34:51 EST ID:Y2hK87M9 No.12719 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12695
Polish doesn't use the Cyrillic alphabet


Until by Fucking Decklehodge - Wed, 23 Nov 2016 17:43:00 EST ID:MZHbqQXT No.12718 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1479940980031.jpg -(32796B / 32.03KB, 512x512) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 32796
Hi, smart people.
I have argument with my friend, about whether or not you can use "Until this day" in sentence. She's arguing that you have to put certain time information after "until".
THX for answer, reference would be perfect

BTW some reference would be perfect
>>
Hugh Funkindock - Thu, 24 Nov 2016 16:35:59 EST ID:a8IBsJss No.12720 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Does the expression make sense? Is it unlikely to cause confusion? I would say yes and yes and burn your friend at the stake.

>BTW some reference would be perfect
That's not how language works jolly african-american


Finnish by Cornelius Ginkinsudge - Sat, 20 Aug 2016 22:47:59 EST ID:4HnKYQAn No.12641 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1471747679333.png -(263074B / 256.91KB, 500x334) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 263074
I cannot, for the life of me, find an answer for a simple question on any of the sites on which I study.
I generally know when to use the nominative, accusative and partitive, except for the verb "to be." I at one point thought it would just be the nominative, ex. "Se on taulukko. It is a table" from skimming walls of finnish text, but I later read that the accusative may sometimes look like the nominative. I have no idea which case ending I should use with "olla" as the verb, and it seems so fundamental to everyday speech that I want to get it straight in my mind.
>inb4 learn a useful language
Finnish is wierd and fascinating, albeit useless.
2 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Reuben Cirringshaw - Sun, 21 Aug 2016 23:05:44 EST ID:iUxAqiYX No.12647 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12642
At one point on that, it talked about the "ambiguity" of the accusative which is what I'm trying to understand.
AP on homo vai AP on homon?
I know that traditionally, "It is I" is preferable to "It is me" but I don't know if this is the same in finnish.
As for books, I am lacking. I've searched around, but there are never any reviews for them because few people are interested in finnish. If you know of any that exxplain grammar well, it would be appreciated.
>>
Shit Honeywater - Sun, 16 Oct 2016 03:30:52 EST ID:vyWRFM4Q No.12680 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>Se on pöytä
>It is a table

Both "se" and "pöydä" are in the nominative case here.
I only know some simple Finnish and Karelian but I figure olla always has nominative case. Same as with many other languages
(Fun fact. Accusative is not used here because accusative is used for objects. This is not an object because objects can be promoted to subjects through passivisation.
>My uncle loves a plumber > A plumber is loved by my uncle
This transformation goes OK because "a plumber" is the object, thus accusative
>My uncle is a plumber > A plumber is been by my uncle
This transformation is no good because "a plumber" here is not really an object, thus not accusative)
Of course you can also use various locative cases depending on what you want to say.
>Se on pöydällä
>It is on (the) table

And as you asked for literature:
I can recommend "Finnish: An Essential Grammar" by Karllson. If you find a torrent called GRAMMAR PILE 3.0 it's in there, and I'm seeding it.
>>
Graham Drizzlenag - Mon, 17 Oct 2016 20:34:30 EST ID:kC4WcnXW No.12681 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12680
>that torrent

holy shit I fucking came
>>
Eliza Sunningridge - Mon, 17 Oct 2016 20:36:31 EST ID:NVLrxJ4E No.12682 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12680
I just downloaded the book. It's very comprehensive. Thanks bruh.
>>
Clara Drubberlat - Tue, 22 Nov 2016 15:39:35 EST ID:PZICZQ5a No.12717 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12682
Also I think Iso suomen kieloppi is good. It's descriptive grammar for those who can read Finnish


what does it mean? by George Nasslegold - Mon, 31 Oct 2016 04:13:39 EST ID:nKlONaKn No.12698 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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pic related
language enthusiasts?
bwh_bw-errytime
>>
Hamilton Sillertitch - Tue, 08 Nov 2016 17:39:55 EST ID:tBCLFBlr No.12705 Ignore Report Quick Reply
大仏。。。本当に奈良だった。
Daibutsu.... It was really Nara.
(daibutsu are giant statues of Buddha and Nara is famous for them)


Learning Italian at home by Phineas Blackleman - Sun, 23 Oct 2016 18:33:27 EST ID:IAKVe98s No.12687 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Any advice for learning Italian at home?
I won't have a lot of time to spend on it maybe an hour a night.
I would like to be able to have intermediate conversational level.
Any useful websites or textbooks?
>>
Betsy Crunnerville - Fri, 11 Nov 2016 19:22:39 EST ID:NZmMur/5 No.12712 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12687
Future learn has some free courses on it at the moment.


TEACHING ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE HORROR STORIES ETC by John Nicklefield - Tue, 26 Aug 2014 08:13:29 EST ID:mPRdrUeT No.11631 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I've just finished my Cambridge ELT qualification, got a job offer (signed, sealed, delivered, I'm yours) and I'm now about to move away to a Eurasian metropolis where I will be undertaking my first English teaching job.

tell me about how snotty the kids are going to be
any horror stories (to tell camp-fire style)?
been figuratively fucked in the arse by a language school?
16 posts and 1 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Hugh Puckledale - Sun, 21 Aug 2016 13:17:09 EST ID:HU6JyZmP No.12645 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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How difficult is it to teach English in the EU? What do I need to make it happen?
>>
Henry Fanwater - Thu, 15 Sep 2016 22:37:30 EST ID:Bdrk/Gkl No.12669 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12607
It's the spelling exceptions that make it a chore to read and write, but for speaking it's quite simple.
>>
Clara Worthinggold - Fri, 16 Sep 2016 00:29:59 EST ID:mVf2/T6i No.12670 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12645
Can't speak for other regions, but our English teachers in Scandinavia are usually (read: Never heard of this not being the case) locals with a BA in teaching (specializing in English) or an MA in English (for high school-equivalents).
You might have better luck in the PIIGS (sans Ireland), but even then it's likely they've got locals who know more about English grammar than you ever want to, even if they have a weird accent.

tl;dr: Speak the local language fluently and have an MA in English as a foreign language, and you'll get to compete with the thousands of other candidates who can do the job and know the local culture better than you are likely to ever know it.

Not that it's impossible, it's just not Asia-tier levels of easy to get a job just by being white and anglo, and you're more likely to have to do some private classes with annoying business-types who speak shit English if you go do it.

Tbh, I'd recommend just getting a job in a major Russian town instead (got a couple Chechen friends who say it's easy if you speak good English) and flying to the EU for whatever you can't easily/legally do in Russia,
>>
Doris Fuggleville - Wed, 28 Sep 2016 20:23:52 EST ID:EyvlnHM8 No.12672 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12644

I think you need a bachelor's degree from a university. My sister used her degree and has been teaching English to kids in Japan for four years.
>>
Betsy Crunnerville - Fri, 11 Nov 2016 19:27:16 EST ID:NZmMur/5 No.12713 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12644
You need a CELTA course. In Europe it pays between €5 and €25 an hour, depending on the country. You have to start in the countries that pay fuck all and build experience. No one will hire you with an Online Cactus course or any of those websites that offer weekend courses.

>>12645
Getting a job is not hard if you have a CELTA qualification and if you get the visa and do all the paper work yourself. Schools will hire British and Irish people before you, and only hire Americans when they are desperate, because they hate doing the paperwork. Soon though British and Americans will be equally undesirable, so there will be more demand for you, the population of Ireland is only 4 million after all, they can't exactly teach all of of Europe English.

(I am an ELT teacher who has worked in 3 EU countries)


German by William Mablingford - Tue, 13 Sep 2016 05:11:03 EST ID:6cVh3/6V No.12664 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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is it possible to find Germans here that can do some sort of exchange language learning prior to my arrival to Germany in 3 weeks?
>>
C-Higgy !lfsExjBfzE - Tue, 13 Sep 2016 16:18:36 EST ID:sq+gza3T No.12665 Report Quick Reply
It's absolutely possible through the power of the internet. Here's 12 suggestions for finding a German language exchange - http://www.fluentu.com/german/blog/german-language-exchange-partner/

Also this - https://www.mylanguageexchange.com/Learn/German.asp
>>
Jenny Pondlenere - Tue, 13 Sep 2016 17:16:24 EST ID:k3lQQ8Jn No.12666 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>12665

Danke Schön


can anyone here translate heiroglyphs? by Fuck Buzzwell - Sun, 14 Aug 2016 11:56:21 EST ID:+vg/lECh No.12627 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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i've been trying myself and it is complete fail
got these two items at the store for 11 dollars /brag
2 posts and 1 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Sophie Gasslebury - Mon, 29 Aug 2016 14:55:16 EST ID:RQ9rHzrc No.12654 Ignore Report Quick Reply
so i googled some translation sites and i can't make heads or tails of this yet...
anyone know of atleast a place maybe where the community might be helpful
looking at the same time just thought it would be nice to get some help
>>
Albert Trotman - Mon, 29 Aug 2016 20:25:58 EST ID:wm2vfAfR No.12655 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>12628
This is a copy of a painting on a wall of the tomb of Horemheb. The inscription says either dicks out for Horemheb or it's a description of what's going on in the afterlife. The lovely lady is Hathor, she faces Horemheb, and that mysterious looking masked wrestler is Horus who would go on to have an amazing second run as Jesus of Nazareth. See more here: http://www.osirisnet.net/tombes/pharaons/horemheb/e_horemheb_pharaon_01.htm

>>12627
It's definitely a phonetic script. May or may not be nonsense. I'm not going to look up anything about it because it's just fucking tat.
>>
Esther Hommerpore - Fri, 02 Sep 2016 18:56:14 EST ID:yesq+7fO No.12656 Ignore Report Quick Reply
It say's "OP is a fag".
>>
Graham Sepperville - Sat, 10 Sep 2016 14:41:15 EST ID:RQ9rHzrc No.12660 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>12656
>>
Phyllis Hodgewot - Mon, 12 Sep 2016 11:48:46 EST ID:RQ9rHzrc No.12661 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>12660
tits for translation


how do you keep it all straight by Cedric Hattingmedge - Wed, 17 Aug 2016 21:11:20 EST ID:+vg/lECh No.12637 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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so i have to wonder how you people that know multiple languages
3+
keep it all straight.. do they ever bleed together?
>>
Albert Pucklehork - Fri, 19 Aug 2016 06:05:21 EST ID:VsaRwmTc No.12638 Ignore Report Quick Reply
No, different neural pathways, I guess. Other words only come into play, when you forget one from the language you were using. Then a drawer in your head opens and you pull out something from the other languages you know.
>>
Basil Punnerback - Sun, 28 Aug 2016 15:56:17 EST ID:mVf2/T6i No.12652 Ignore Report Quick Reply
It's fairly normal for people here know English as a foreign language (to varying degrees of success) and either French or German at a reasonable conversational level.
Sometimes, if you're at a reasonable level of fluency, you might prefer some languages for certain things (English, for instance, is terrible at explaining medical things to the layman because everything has a crazy name like 'Cirrhosis' that tells you nothing about the condition, while other languages might have names meaning 'Shrinking Liver' or something that gives you a decent hint). I know some language majors on their 4th or 5th language who make a game of using as many foreign languages in a sentence as possible while still having it make sort-of sense to someone who knows all of them.

Best explanation I can come with is
>>12638
Think running vs swimming. They're all forms of locomotion, but you'd never just collapse in the middle of the street and start doing the magikarp because you got the two mixed up.
>>
Sophie Gasslebury - Mon, 29 Aug 2016 14:40:34 EST ID:RQ9rHzrc No.12653 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12652
that is impressive.. 4 or 5 languages.. i'd started to learn dutch but moved to russian unfortnutaly i got side tracked and haven't used rosetta stone for a while
>>
Fuck Ninnerbanks - Fri, 02 Sep 2016 20:48:12 EST ID:XwCU7Rol No.12657 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>12653
4 or 5 is impressive, but not crazy. Look up some of those youtube polyglots like Luca Lampariello or Richard Simcott, that's where shit gets really crazy


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