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Learning Finnish by Molly Fuckingham - Wed, 15 Jan 2014 22:28:04 EST ID:uWRxXpm/ No.10987 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I want to learn Finnish. I've never learned a second language. I speak English. Does anyone know of a good free resource for becoming fluent in Finnish. I'm thinking a website, a book or a set of books. Piracy is ok. I also welcome advice.
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Hedda Dummerlock - Thu, 24 Jul 2014 12:05:17 EST ID:i0gwflFu No.11557 Ignore Report Quick Reply
There was a Brazilian on http://ylilauta.org/int/ who learned Finnish to fluency. He used these things, I think:

A free course at http://fsi-language-courses.org/

A Grammar Book of Finnish by Leila White

Finnish - an essential grammar by Fred Karlsson

both books are easied pirated, just use google
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Jenny Forrydirk - Sun, 27 Jul 2014 13:05:52 EST ID:3F0ALnSa No.11566 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Nothing makes me more madder than a fucker who wants to move here. Fucking 'migrant scums. "I'ts my dream to move to Finland blablabla" and all other kind of shit like that. I really want it that it's hard as fuck to gain citizenship, those fucking Finnboos make me mad.
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CrazyFolksTribe !loJSOMZg0g - Sun, 27 Jul 2014 17:52:24 EST ID:/NadvR2u No.11568 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11566
You're the reason why countries suck.
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Basil Smallgold - Tue, 29 Jul 2014 21:46:16 EST ID:Q5R8DPz7 No.11574 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>11566
Fuck you, I for one welcome any migrants who come through 420chan.
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Esther Dirringspear - Fri, 01 Aug 2014 10:23:02 EST ID:i0gwflFu No.11578 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>11568
>>11574


the Kaiser by Ebenezer Fuckingwell - Sat, 26 Jul 2014 17:24:16 EST ID:/+DZNG5Y No.11564 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Do Germans ever say Kaiser to refer to their boss? Would that be a normal thing for Germans to do, the same way in English you might say the Chief or the Guvnor to refer to your manager?
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Reuben Pinderman - Wed, 30 Jul 2014 16:00:13 EST ID:2YUuhjnM No.11577 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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No.
Outside of historic context, germans will think you're talking about Franz "Der Kaiser" Beckenbauer, soccer trainer and former player.

There's the formal "Der Vorgesetzte", then theres "Chef" or "Boss" (colloquial).
In the trades, it's "Meister".
The former is not used when adressing the person directly, the latter are.


Learning Arabic in a year by alkemest - Sun, 27 Jul 2014 06:35:43 EST ID:86jrGCuF No.11565 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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What's up guys, quick question, how do I learn Arabic at least passably in about a years time?
I'm graduating Uni in a year or so with a degree in journalism and polisci, and Palestine has been on my heart and mind for years. This current slaughter is really pushing me towards volunteering to teach English there when I graduate. The thing is that I'll probably want/need some understanding of Arabic before I head over. I can take classes, but I may also need to buckle down and get my required classes done this next year.

What are some tools that are available to learn Arabic? Primarily I'd want to be able to speak it with passable basic writing skills.
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Cornelius Fablingfield - Sun, 27 Jul 2014 15:57:02 EST ID:i0gwflFu No.11567 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I'm in the same boat, except I am trve misanthropist with no sympathy for mankind. I'm slowly working through Arabic through the Quran by Alan Jones. I made notes up to chapter 5, then lapsed for a few days. I'll start again tomorrow on monday.

For spoken language I have scoped out the free FSI courses, which also cover some dialects and have audio.
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Ghengis Dong - Wed, 30 Jul 2014 14:11:18 EST ID:5rSHWso6 No.11576 Ignore Report Quick Reply
It's not realistic to expect much results in a year without being immersed. Look up immersion programs at Universities. I studied Persian at the University of Maryland's Summer Institute. They also offered Arabic, it was 12 credits in 10 weeks, with classes 9-5 everyday. It's open to anybody who pays, I studied mostly with school-teachers, cops, ex-military, and federal agents. If you aren't exclusively using the language for most of the day and receiving formalised instruction, you're not going to get very far.


help by Phineas Mabberhot - Fri, 25 Jul 2014 15:13:24 EST ID:NSiA5J4q No.11560 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I'm not a native English speaker and I want to start reading English novels but i'm afraid of not being able to read some of its words, especially the vowel words that seem like they have the short vowel sound but in reality the vowels or some are long.
How do you guys figure this out?
Are they rules?
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Betsy Sollytune - Fri, 25 Jul 2014 15:33:20 EST ID:i0gwflFu No.11561 Ignore Report Quick Reply
vowel length (or even "stress") is not a big deal in english, since varying it does not result in a different meaning. however i suspect your pronunciation is just all kinds of fucked, since vowel length is hardly the only thing that is vague in english orthography. watch some video game walkthroughs (with commentary) on youtube or something to improve.
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Samuel Hebbleson - Sat, 26 Jul 2014 16:54:31 EST ID:XnC1cGBX No.11563 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>seem like they have the short vowel sound but in reality the vowels or some are long
Could you give an example?
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Caroline Finderwot - Tue, 29 Jul 2014 21:01:57 EST ID:aGhz4jlt No.11573 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Vowel sounds in English are almost impossible to figure out just from looking at the written word. You could look into doing some phonics lessons or something but there are always tons of exceptions to any rule.
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Alice Guddleshit - Tue, 29 Jul 2014 23:00:37 EST ID:Nopi8P26 No.11575 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Don't worry about it. It doesn't really matter if you pronounce the word wrong at first; people will know what you mean anyway. Even native speakers fuck it up regularly.


What's even the point. by Phyllis Dottingmadge - Sun, 27 Jul 2014 19:55:53 EST ID:3PaB0X0O No.11569 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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No one wants to talk to you in their native language, they want to practice English with you. Or they'll get mad as if you were implying they don't know English. It's a required subject in every developed nation, everyone speaks English. Foreign media is available translated. I really enjoyed Spanish and French in school/college but now I'm disappointed I never get to use them and can't see the point of trying to pick up another. Why do you guys do it?
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Reuben Gundleletch - Mon, 28 Jul 2014 10:49:41 EST ID:dS7oKwOs No.11570 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11569
Tell them you don't speak English. Problem solved
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Augustus Pittlock - Mon, 28 Jul 2014 16:49:33 EST ID:qizTVHik No.11571 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I feel it gives you a different perspective on things, in general and just with languages themselves. I think languages extend well beyond just verbal/written, and when you start to get down concepts and ideas in something and go back to what you already know, it can be a bit refreshing and help you get a deeper understanding.

There are many reasons, but that's a good reason to just do it.
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Caroline Finderwot - Tue, 29 Jul 2014 20:57:34 EST ID:aGhz4jlt No.11572 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Go somewhere where nobody speaks English, problem solved.


WRITTEN Language by Sidney Sinkinkare - Wed, 23 Jul 2014 20:16:11 EST ID:24ygmyw9 No.11555 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Native Hindi and English speaker here . However I am learning the north Indian script . I can read Urdu - which is mutually intelligible but uses Arabic alphabet .

So got to thinking . Even tho i only speak 2 languages i can read 4 scripts : Latin Greek Arab Devnagar

So what spoken languages and what scripts are you fluent and what you want to learn ? Aside from the above I know a little spanish and franch but nowhere near fluent. As far as writing chinese interests me .
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Hedda Dummerlock - Thu, 24 Jul 2014 13:04:38 EST ID:i0gwflFu No.11559 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I know cyrillic and arabic, from having tried to study russian and arabic, though german is the only foreign language i'm anywhere near competent in. I'm planning to start learning chinese any day now, but it's summer so it might still postpone a lot.

Traditional mongol script, i.e. the one still used in china's inner mongolia, is what I would want to learn. It's quite pretty so it's unsurprising it's derived from older arabic scripts.
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Molly Murdway - Fri, 25 Jul 2014 21:52:10 EST ID:NqJL1ymG No.11562 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11559
Arab? No, Tibetan, ultimately through Nagari. Their LCA was either like sogdian or phoenecian I think. Although maybe I guess the caligraphies influenced one another? Like Arabic did on Latin or Latin on Cyrillic?

For me personally, I can only speak German, English, and a little itty bit of Latin from High School. But I can read the Cyrillic (the most beautiful proper alphabet imo), Armenian, Greek, Latin, Coptic, with extremely marginal competence with Hanzi and of all things Egyptian Hieroglyphics....

I'm currently learning Mongolian though, partly for the reasons above, mostly because I want do something about the Altaic hypothesis.... I'm dumb maybe


Books by Hedda Dummerlock - Thu, 24 Jul 2014 12:11:39 EST ID:i0gwflFu No.11558 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Recommend me a good language (text)book that is nevertheless not easily available on the net or in libraries (i.e. relatively recent and on an obscure topic). I need to make a 17e purchase from amazon.de and something extra would help with the shipping costs.


Suicide note.. by Oliver Bomblehall - Thu, 10 Jul 2014 14:38:04 EST ID:HmrDo+U8 No.11533 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Can someone who speaks french tell me exactly what this means, please? Someone I loved left this behind

>Certaines personnes qui comptaient à mon coeur me manque terriblement ... je vous aime et je vous embrasse fort au revoir

I don't speak French and google translate seems to mess it up a bit. Could someone please tell me exactly what he's was trying to express?

It's very important to me that I understand, please.
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CrazyFolksTribe !loJSOMZg0g - Sun, 13 Jul 2014 00:20:21 EST ID:wT/piNfP No.11540 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>11539
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Henry Wirryforth - Thu, 17 Jul 2014 09:07:01 EST ID:A+W5xLuM No.11544 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11539

It's not your fault. That person made the decision. If they decided their entire life wasn't worth living how is that the fault of anyone one tiny individual in their life?

Anyway, he said "certain PEOPLE" plural, not singular.

Most people lose a lot of loved ones in their lSives, and it sounds like this person did as well. Life is really hard. Too hard for some people. Nobody's fault.
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Basil Neblingkedge - Sun, 20 Jul 2014 16:51:43 EST ID:mPRdrUeT No.11550 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11539
note that the you (vous) is plural, if thats any help. the note is addressing more than one person throughout
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Basil Neblingkedge - Sun, 20 Jul 2014 16:52:10 EST ID:mPRdrUeT No.11551 Ignore Report Quick Reply
well shit, someone already said that


nb
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Nell Nedgeworth - Sun, 20 Jul 2014 21:40:13 EST ID:gPIGtUk4 No.11553 Ignore Report Quick Reply
it wasn't your fault, or doesn't matter if it was.
read a book: Giovanni's Room by James Baldwin
it's about unrequited love with a frenchman, makes you think, you'd like it.


Language Learning on the Internet by Barnaby Woblingnutch - Sun, 20 Jul 2014 06:30:58 EST ID:dI81Dve+ No.11548 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Tell me, what is your favorite website for learning languages? Mine is duolingo.com. But if I had money, it would be busuu.com.
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Nell Nedgeworth - Sun, 20 Jul 2014 21:35:05 EST ID:gPIGtUk4 No.11552 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Facebook.
I have friends all over the world who I chat with, sometimes using google translate, but increasingly I start to get the hang of the language and am able to communicate without a crutch.
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Nigel Muzzleson - Mon, 21 Jul 2014 05:43:23 EST ID:/B/BFMOS No.11554 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Here's one you might not think of: Wikipedia. Articles on things you're interested in written by (probably) native speakers in any language you're likely to want to read.

On a side note, there's a galling lack of Busuu on Busuu. There was apparently a campaign to "save Busuu", except saving meant sharing a video with your friends and possibly learning enough Busuu to fill one side of an index card. I do hope the handful of Busuu speakers are getting something in exchange for this co-opting.


Japanese by Natalie - Fri, 18 Jul 2014 21:40:44 EST ID:9jHF7Nhs No.11546 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Hi everyone thank you for your time... I went to Japan for a religious studies study abroad program and I absolutely fell in love. The only problem I had was the language barrier between the Japanese people and me.

I plan on going back in 6 months and while I know I won't be fluent by then, I'm wondering if anyone can extend to me some advice on how to learn Japanese and what programs/methods were effective for you. Thank you!
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Ian Wemmlemane - Sun, 20 Jul 2014 12:42:16 EST ID:DIxzy9/G No.11549 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I personally learn best in a classroom setting, preferably five days a week. I studied Japanese in high school for two hours a day, and watching movies and reading (easy) books helped me cement what I already learned and to learn some new vocabulary. Since you're going in such a short time, have you looked to see if there are any tutors or anything teaching basic classes specifically for travelling? They make books and tapes for that sort of thing, too, but, like I said, the classroom worked for me.

I guess you could also see if your local community college offers Japanese and you could take a semester and at least learn some basic phrases and how to read a bit. Shouldn't be too terribly expensive for just one class.

Another thing I've used on and off is the Erin ga choosen! Nihongo dekimasu website. It's from a video series made in Japan to teach grammar and some cultural things. I like the website because it has different little quizzes/activities after the video clips.
https://www.erin.ne.jp/en/

You could also try getting a Japanese penpal and doing a language exchange or something. If you have a mic, you could do Skype or something so that you could get the pronunciations/inflections down. Plus, you could have a friend to meet up with once you get there.

If you get lost or something, I found people to be really nice and helpful...except for this guy at the train station that tried to help me and my friends find the right train even though we already knew what we were doing. Then he wanted us to pay him (we didn't, obviously, because wtf dude). Otherwise, everyone was really nice. I met a little old lady at an inn I stayed at and she was tickled pink that I spoke Japanese.

Anyway, good luck to you! The Japanese language and culture is really fun and interesting.


GREEK / ELLNVIKA by Eugene Budgedin - Fri, 02 May 2014 01:40:17 EST ID:SRz+MrWT No.11331 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Any advice for learning Greek?
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Ian Lightson - Fri, 02 May 2014 06:29:15 EST ID:NqJL1ymG No.11333 Ignore Report Quick Reply
ELLHNIKA would have been more etymological and more intuitive. Greeks on Latin keyboards only use h for eta anyways.

Pick a kind of Greek. Modern has modern uses, koine has liturgical (religious) uses, ancient has classical uses (mainly if you want to a classicist/ancient Historian).

The modern language gets a lot of Slavic influences on grammar, phonology etc. Spells almost as irregularly as English; there's like 8 different ways to write the ee sound.

Koine is mildly irregular, not nearly as slavicised.

Ancient is as close to regular as you'll get but covers the greatest area of time.


I recommend modern Greek, personally, though Ancient Greek can be fun in a Geeky way. There's only a loose connection between the two now, so you basically have to pick between the Illiad and the Modern language.
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Hugh Hebbertork - Sat, 19 Jul 2014 07:41:34 EST ID:SRz+MrWT No.11547 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>11333
yea im learning modern. Do you know any good resources I could use or where I could get any literature in the language?


pimsleur is fucking boring by Martin Trotdock - Mon, 07 Jul 2014 19:43:23 EST ID:3xDq++i+ No.11521 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I've been trying to teach myself Russian for about 6 months now. I figured I'd do it the same way I did spanish (finish rosetta stone, then read the news with the help of google translate, then watch movies I know well dubbed in it), but that hasn't worked out, either because the alphabet kind of slows things down or because it doesn't share as much vocabulary as English (thank you Roman Empire).

So I'm thinking I'll just brute force it with Pimsleur. Problem is, Pimsleur is boring as fuck. Is there anything I can do while Pimsleuring that can keep me from falling asleep without distracting me too much? Whoever can solve this problem wins a slice of Ukraine.
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Lydia Blettingfield - Fri, 11 Jul 2014 16:27:24 EST ID:gPIGtUk4 No.11538 Ignore Report Quick Reply
you could try spending time with people who speak Russian, also listen to Vladmir Vysotsky, he's kinda like the Kurt Cobain or John Lennon of Russia.
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Henry Wirryforth - Thu, 17 Jul 2014 09:24:08 EST ID:A+W5xLuM No.11545 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Try to use as many different resources as you can at the same time for learning any language. Pimsleur for an hour, bored, flashcards, bored, online flashcards, bored, Russian music, bored, some other audio course, bored, a phrasebook, bored, a teach yourself book, bored, and start over again.


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