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Probate Court Records by Hunter S. Nodson - Thu, 06 Apr 2017 12:47:18 EST ID:9HzRFqxV No.45809 Ignore Report Quick Reply
File: 1491497238511.jpg -(1991495B / 1.90MB, 1800x1200) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 1991495
I'm a wholesaler in Florida and I'm currently building my seller lists through public court records. I noticed as I'm going through the formal administration cases that sometimes they will have 3 separate cases back to back with the petitioners having the same last name/maiden name. Now.. clearly to me this means its a family is fighting over the descendant's estate and the brothers/sisters all filed for separate probate cases, if my understanding it correct.

Now here's my dilemma, if say I acquire a property through a scenario like the one above, is it possible for the other family members to sue if say, the brother short sells the property to me without the others consent? Can they sue the person on the other side of the contract?

I try to get answers from other wholesalers, realtors, and brokers and they all tell me I'm thinking too much about it and they've never had a lawsuit etc etc. Personally, I do care because one lawsuit could mean the end of my business as I'm just starting with very little capital.

TL;DR: Can I get sued for selling a property in an open probate case that is being litigated by multiple relatives of the seller? I tried getting answers from a family attorney and he couldn't even say yes or no for legal reasons. Can someone just answer the damn question?? lol
>>
George Seblingham - Thu, 06 Apr 2017 14:50:04 EST ID:37zVoeS6 No.45810 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Anyone can sue you for anything, genius. What you have to ask yourself is what boxes you need to check to make sure you can have such a suit thrown out on day one. Pay a probate lawyer in Florida for a consultation.


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