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Philip AK Dickin you by Doris Pockshit - Mon, 10 Nov 2014 12:38:34 EST ID:AkbDuvRq No.66248 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Anyone else read any books from him? Not really into science fiction much but PKD is such a great writer. I've only read Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and right now i'm reading The World Jones Made which has been awesome so far. Don't hear anyone mention it too much. I'm almost done with it actually and wanting to pick up some more of his books, anything /lit/ would recommend reading next?
>>
Hugh Bardstock - Mon, 10 Nov 2014 14:48:33 EST ID:2JyuxDlE No.66250 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Read him in chronological order.
>>
Ebenezer Femmerhall - Mon, 10 Nov 2014 15:19:11 EST ID:+HbaeL9Q No.66251 Ignore Report Quick Reply
He's such a weird guy, but still really cool.

The Crack is Space is pretty cool, it's pretty 60's too
>>
Charlie of the Chans !!kWjRhGF5 - Mon, 10 Nov 2014 15:31:12 EST ID:FIu+AzFk No.66255 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>66248
I think there's a thread about him a few entries down but no matter. In it I declared for VALIS and was justly criticized (only at 420!) for it, because it's not his best book on technical grounds. At this point in his life he was definitely coming unglued, but in the process he experienced some truly exalted imaginings, which he did his best, IMHO, to put into words. That it's somewhat disorganized and lacking a final polishing, it's damned powerful a book.
>>
Charles Bissleladging - Mon, 10 Nov 2014 16:50:51 EST ID:X3lin2bb No.66257 Ignore Report Quick Reply
A Scanner Darkly and Ubik are both fantastic books.


Important books by Cornelius Podgesat - Mon, 03 Nov 2014 01:44:10 EST ID:y44ex+pl No.66188 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I believe books--for certain people perhaps but I am not inclined to preterition--are some of the most important things you can read. If you are someone who is social and actually has an active life within society, they are even more important. Snapshots in time, variegated viewpoints, creative ways of discourse and ideological expression, books can not only expand the mind in ways never thought of, but also improve or hurt your chances of influencing the world around you in ways never before thought of. Books that can shape and influence the way you look at the world, those books are the most important things you'll interact with, even more important to your reality than a psychedelic experience, more important than a Harvard lecture, is simply you listening to the words straight from the vineyard instead of hearing things through the grapevine. I could talk all day about books, but this thread is for listing other books that will improve your appreciation and understanding of books in general. In my opinion, I've come up with four books, the first three of which directly influence how you appreciate and comprehend books, and the last two directly influence the way you view and shape reality, and therefore by some extrapolation of logic, influence the way you read books.

-Mortimer J. Adler's How To Read A Book
-Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451
-Both testaments of The Holy Bible
-Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil

So go ahead, post some literature that influences how you perceive reality or books themselves in this thread.
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Whitey Mizzlebury - Sat, 08 Nov 2014 15:32:12 EST ID:X7E+Vpz5 No.66232 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>66223
>>66227
No kiddie books please.
>>
Cedric Dartgold - Sat, 08 Nov 2014 16:34:00 EST ID:X3lin2bb No.66233 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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IMPORTANT LITERATURE EVERYWHERE
>>
Archie Gabberfack - Sat, 08 Nov 2014 21:34:50 EST ID:Wsk5ZF2h No.66235 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>66233
Oh the Places You'll Go is better.

Also, Chuck Palahniuk's Haunted definitely shaped the way I view reality. Especially after I found out that the first short story is based on a real person's experience. That whole book makes me cringe at how beautifully terrible the world can be. Stranger Than Fiction also does the trick, but to a far lesser extent.
>>
Phyllis Geckledale - Sat, 08 Nov 2014 22:22:54 EST ID:PuoW0wiR No.66236 Ignore Report Quick Reply
-Any science textbook
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Augustus Subbleback - Sun, 09 Nov 2014 18:20:07 EST ID:5bIczp3f No.66239 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>Albert Camus' essay collections.
>Hunter S. Thompson's The Proud Highway

I think those are the only ones that have really changed the way I think about life in general. Camus' was the first philosopher who I really clicked with, and Thompson's letter showed me that it's okay to try and do what you love for a living.


What was this book? by Reuben Darringway - Sat, 27 Sep 2014 20:51:53 EST ID:RhiCHA9G No.65916 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I vaguely remember having to read part of this book back in school, and it was a bunch of small stories which were excerpts from people's lives, who I think all lived in and around Chicago.

There may have been a second book that followed the same premise.

It was non-fiction. And it was focused on some point in time in the 1900's.
Does anyone know what I'm talking about?
>>
Samuel Dittingmitch - Sun, 28 Sep 2014 18:54:09 EST ID:509sZTkD No.65929 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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DICKS EVERYWHERE
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Ebenezer Gattingstotch - Sun, 28 Sep 2014 21:32:28 EST ID:RhiCHA9G No.65931 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>65929
Sorry, I don't think that was it. Less of an actual history and more just normal people's lives.
>>
Polly Grandshit - Mon, 29 Sep 2014 01:25:02 EST ID:dxAiNzpr No.65933 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>65931
So, are you asking about the contents of the book you pictured, or looking for another book that your teacher paired along with J.D.'s Three Stories and hoped one of us had a similar curriculum?
>>
Ebenezer Gattingstotch - Mon, 29 Sep 2014 11:44:15 EST ID:RhiCHA9G No.65936 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>65933
This thread has nothing to do with J.D. Salinger or his books.

I'm just trying to remember what the book I'm trying to think of was.
I guess it's possible but kind of unlikely that anyone else would have come across this book in the 10-14 y/o age range?
>>
Fuck Pittstone - Sun, 09 Nov 2014 15:00:05 EST ID:pOL9jBe2 No.66238 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>65916
Turns out it was "Working" by Studs Terkel. Thanks for playing.


Rough psychotherapy for your own good by Charlie of the Chans !!kWjRhGF5 - Sun, 09 Nov 2014 10:43:22 EST ID:FIu+AzFk No.66237 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I ran into Alice Miller's For Your Own Good: Hidden cruelty in child-rearing and the roots of violence shortly after it was published in an English translation here in the USA in 1983. She is a psychoanalyst and as all psychoanalysts must do, herself underwent analysis with another practitioner of this arcane discipline. I hope that I do her no injustice by simply stating that this book is one outcome of her therapy. It became apparent to her that the way in which she was raised by her parents was not only wrong, it was evil. What she learned from her own childhood can be readily applied to the majority of the rest of us. It boils down to this: parents who hit, humiliate, beat, spank or belittle their children are causing them immense harm. Many of us in the West are used to such things because of our ubiquitous Judeo-Chrisitan-Islamic traditions. "He that spareth his rod hateth his son: but he that loveth him chasteneth him betimes." Proverbs 13:24 If you're not used to the Jacobean English of the King James Bible, what this verse is telling us is that it's good to beat your kids sometimes. You wouldn't go to a doctor who practiced medicine as it was in the days when this verse was written; you likely as well wouldn't want to cross the Atlantic Ocean on a ship built according to the technology of these days either. So why on earth would you heed advice from a people who were at the least were superstitious and ignorant? Thankfully the Bible as a guide and corrective for "sinful humanity" is falling further and further out of favor as time goes by, being held to by a dwindling number of fanatics who still take it to be the "Word of God." In the meantime, contemplate if you can the millions and millions of parents who, over the millennia, have beaten their kids; contemplate the injured bodies and psyches which have accrued during all of this time. Aside from my having taken a shot at the "authority of scripture," there are probably many who will read this and will say, "Hey, my parents hit me and I turned out okay!" Very likely, you did not "turn out okay." If you spank, slap, humiliate or otherwise abuse your child y…
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What ereader by Priscilla Porrywadge - Fri, 19 Sep 2014 11:19:28 EST ID:dgHJYvu8 No.65849 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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kindle has broke on me somehow.I know I had dropped it a few tmes in the past,it had a blured line on the bottom an then out the blue half of the screen isnt visable just like the top right cornor,fuck knows whats happpened I think someone dropped it on me or somthing.

ANy way what shoul I buy next ? I was thinking the nook but it seems more like a tablet and they seem harder on the eyes,I liked the kindle because of the e ink or what ever it's called.

What I didnt like about the kindle though was that you couldnt read pdfs,and there are so many good ufcking books out there what are only in pdf.

So what would you guys suggest I buy ??

and btw I just want to read books on it dont give a fuck about games and cams and shit like that.rather not have shit like that other wise ill just ge distracted
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Angus Habbletore - Fri, 31 Oct 2014 10:16:51 EST ID:Q5Sq3jYW No.66163 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>66162
sr, ebook? i'm on drugs. ereader.
>>
Jarvis Canderfuck - Tue, 04 Nov 2014 01:36:27 EST ID:wnPsxWNb No.66194 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>65849
I use my tablet for reading and use an app called moonreader I downloaded the pro version however. As for straight ereaders I'm not sure about
>>
Basil Dattingkock - Wed, 05 Nov 2014 09:46:53 EST ID:yJgxwfKL No.66200 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>66194
Yeah, I used to want an e-reader but didnt really have the money to waste on toys. I mean you don't really need one after all.. If you want to read e-books you can use a computer and if you want to read while out, you can take a bloody paperback.
Now, that I've succumbed to peer pressure and finally gotten a smart phone, I happily use my phone to read. It can store as many e-books as I could possibly want, can deal with every format, does everything an e-reader can do, plus it's a phone.

I use Calibre to read on my netbook cause it opens most formats and is free
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Graham Panningway - Thu, 06 Nov 2014 14:25:32 EST ID:WPITcQdU No.66209 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>66200>>66200
yeah but... that's not e-ink?
i thought that's an important feature
>>
Hedda Bardfoot - Fri, 07 Nov 2014 17:55:26 EST ID:uNTYj5yK No.66221 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Get a kobo glo, or a more advanced one if you like. They are great, and better to pirate on


Free audiobooks by Charlotte Greenshit - Fri, 07 Nov 2014 03:42:52 EST ID:FkrqUvVV No.66211 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I have a four hour plane ride tomorrow, I'm looking for a quick site to find free audio books (particularly in the classics, but anything works)
>>
Charlotte Greenshit - Fri, 07 Nov 2014 03:52:50 EST ID:FkrqUvVV No.66212 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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found this almost immediately through google, sharing with y'all
http://www.openculture.com/freeaudiobooks
>>
Nell Gamblebune - Fri, 07 Nov 2014 13:06:08 EST ID:xrDLPR+Z No.66219 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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audiobook bay
Piratebay
Librivox (this one's even legal)

I have shitloads. Are you looking for anything in particular? I could upload some for you if you like
>>
Cedric Murdfuck - Fri, 07 Nov 2014 13:31:59 EST ID:1+V19EDa No.66220 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>66212

I came here to talk about Critical Theory...

...Instead I'm just going to say that that's a fabulous pair of tits.

nb
>>
Betsy Buttingbit - Sat, 08 Nov 2014 04:23:46 EST ID:+DEAGbb4 No.66225 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>66220
>pair of tits.

You can only see the left one in that picture.
>>
William Snodwill - Sat, 08 Nov 2014 06:23:56 EST ID:1+V19EDa No.66226 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>66225
I'm just assuming the other is also perfect

nb


wrote this, still in editing, and smoothing out the wording by Anu - Tue, 04 Nov 2014 03:41:54 EST ID:R+GvWM2y No.66197 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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My dad he just bought a new Harley,top of the line
but he seems to always have a reason to enjoy free time.
So it still has its new shine,
and my father's in recline,while the bikes tire air is always in decline
as father says "he just needs to unwind, relax the spine"
Sure he then takes some pills to help him feel fine.
When he speaks he can hardly seek the words to define
Always saying his sad heart is his only crime.
<chorus >
My brother from birth was gifted good sight
He seemed to always know his left from his right
Teenage years went by and his heart turned contrite
Out late every night
Comes home late signs of fights
A soft heart turned into such a scary type
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Simon Pesslehall - Thu, 06 Nov 2014 17:01:49 EST ID:cN+du5ts No.66210 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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DICKS EVERYWHERE


Most recent lit pick-ups by Frederick Sovingfidging - Sun, 02 Nov 2014 18:21:31 EST ID:Wsk5ZF2h No.66186 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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A couple of days ago I picked up three books. The Doors of Perception (with Heaven and Hell included) by Aldous Huxley, an old 1960's copy of Animal Farm that for copyright reasons isn't even supposed to be sold in the US, and the last Harry Potter book because I still haven't read it even though I finished the 6th one ages ago. Got all of them for under $20 because AF and HP were secondhand. Already finished Animal Farm and, holy shit, I'm in love with it. Thinking about starting H&H/Doors next.

So what about you guys? What are your most recent finds/buys?
>>
Edward Wishdadge - Mon, 03 Nov 2014 14:15:04 EST ID:QHsLeNMW No.66190 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Forty stories by Chekhov, Brief interviews with hideous men by David Foster Wallace, Crying of Lot 49 by Pynchon, and a book of short stores by Raymond Carver. Chan
>>
David Blocklelock - Mon, 03 Nov 2014 17:13:13 EST ID:nPm+g1DH No.66191 Ignore Report Quick Reply
The Pale King by DFW and my university's Journal of Undergraduate Research... Broke as anything but needed to feed my addiction.
>>
Charles Bringerbury - Tue, 04 Nov 2014 18:56:00 EST ID:I4JvlpJv No.66199 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Steppenwolf, Goulds book of fish by Richard Flannagan (which was weird as fuck but good), Decline and Fall by Evelyn Waugh and East of Eden.

Bout 2/3 of the way through Steppenwolf atm. Best thing i've read in a while.
>>
Shitting Bludgedodge - Wed, 05 Nov 2014 18:08:23 EST ID:eSCDlcpx No.66202 Ignore Report Quick Reply
found Mao II and Libra by Delillo on the floor at the used bookstore, one should be my next read after I finish my dad's book
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Graham Panningway - Thu, 06 Nov 2014 14:21:16 EST ID:WPITcQdU No.66208 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Just found some Adorno and Nagel in my native language a few days ago at a local store so I got those most recently, I think


Dreamcatcher by TheTiredOne - Thu, 23 Oct 2014 18:09:04 EST ID:HdMbc3F0 No.66123 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Can anybody tell me about this book by Stephen King?

I've seen both good, bad, and in-between reviews of it on Amazon. Just checked it out from my local library, after nothing else honestly interested me. I'll probably start reading tomorrow.

And quite honestly, I'm not even a big fan of Stephen King. The only other book (and movie) I've read from him is "IT." and I heard bad things about his last book, "Mr. Mercedes".

So, any thoughts on this book? Also,

>Stephen King General
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Beatrice Penkinnudging - Sun, 02 Nov 2014 10:06:05 EST ID:Bsv0Ahky No.66179 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>66140

I kind of agree. You could leave out 50 pages of most of his novels.
>>
Thomas Snodfoot - Mon, 03 Nov 2014 12:10:15 EST ID:bq5scg8g No.66189 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>66178
Dark Tower > Lord Of The Rings
Dark Tower > The Illiad
Dark Tower > Shakespeare
>>
Cyril Shakecocke - Tue, 04 Nov 2014 03:31:05 EST ID:Y8mVhfiP No.66196 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>66189
Nothing is better than Shakespeare.
>>
Walter Chaddlelidging - Tue, 04 Nov 2014 17:51:24 EST ID:bq5scg8g No.66198 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>66196
For some reason, people are allowed to say this, and if you argue about it, you are just treated like a total idiot.
But I'm going to say that Sandman comics about Shakespeare are better than actual Shakespeare.
>>
Ernest Hablingfot - Sat, 08 Nov 2014 12:32:21 EST ID:d6Jqrkwy No.66230 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>66189
TDT is far from better than the Illiad


Can I link to my book downloads? by Charlie of the Chans !!kWjRhGF5 - Fri, 15 Aug 2014 15:11:25 EST ID:FIu+AzFk No.65606 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Hi there, 420 /LIT/, I'm in the midst of uploading a bunch of scholarly books in .pdf format (in .zip files) to Deposit Files. I've gotten nearly a thousand such books from Internet Archive dot org or Gooogle books, all are copyright-free / in the public domain. What I'm uploading today are the available-online copies of the Loeb Classical Library, Greek and Latin classics which feature the original text on the left page and a modern English translation on the right. I've a couple of other .zip files which are potpourri of archeological, philosophical and religious texts. I'm asking before I post the links and get kicked out of here.
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Charlie of the Chans !!kWjRhGF5 - Tue, 07 Oct 2014 21:19:45 EST ID:FIu+AzFk No.66036 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Just finished uploading 1.25 GB of lexicons and dictionaries at my cloud host. These are out of copyright .pdfs and are older books from Oxford University Press. If you're heavy into ancient literature they include Anglo-Saxon, Coptic, Hebrew, Greek and Patrisitc Greek, Latin, Middle Persian, Sanskrit and Syriac. By way of Pastebin:

http://pastebin.com/cyf0JQSd

I'd like to thank all you good folks here at 420 for downloading what we've offered so far ~ more to come. Pictures is a mind map I made in Windows Paint.
>>
Phoebe Clettinglock - Sat, 11 Oct 2014 20:54:14 EST ID:Vwg8+K2i No.66062 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>65950
Bless you OP, thank you.
>>
Frederick Gozzleridge - Sat, 11 Oct 2014 21:13:24 EST ID:FIu+AzFk No.66063 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>66062

Thanks, it makes it worth the effort! Check this whole thread if you haven't already, there are LOT of sets at my cloud host (the name of which triggers a word filter here).
>>
Charlie of the Chans !!kWjRhGF5 - Thu, 23 Oct 2014 09:31:45 EST ID:FIu+AzFk No.66117 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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I'd like to thank everyone who's supported our "free books" initiative. The stats from our cloud host shows good traffic and a significant portion of it comes from here. While this may seem like a bit of shameless whoring aka bumping, it means a lot to us here. Thanks again
>>
Charlie of the Chans !!kWjRhGF5 - Sun, 02 Nov 2014 17:37:15 EST ID:FIu+AzFk No.66185 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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If you'd like a .pdf of EVERYTHING that H G Wells ever wrote, folla teh Pastebin ~

http://pastebin.com/MErPfdCp


Philip K Dick thread by Jack Grandfoot - Sun, 12 Oct 2014 23:04:05 EST ID:m/xRLoWd No.66067 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I'm 70% done with Ubik by Philip K Dick. I've also read a few of his short stories, but this is the first novel of his I'm reading. I like what I've read so far of his work and want to know what books of his you'd recommend. Please avoid spoilers or if you want to have a discussion that contains spoilers, indicate to the rest of us that there will be spoilers in your post.
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Charlie of the Chans !!kWjRhGF5 - Mon, 27 Oct 2014 23:32:48 EST ID:FIu+AzFk No.66148 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>66147
To both your comments: I keep seeing references to Lem on this board and now I shall check him out! And, no! Didn't know Crumb did a number featuring him, but I'll find it! Thanks!
>>
Thomas Cammernudge - Tue, 28 Oct 2014 12:25:04 EST ID:zF/Q9Sbt No.66152 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I love A Scanner Darkly. I think it's my favourite book.
Do Androids Dream is a close second.
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Charlie of the Chans !!kWjRhGF5 - Tue, 28 Oct 2014 22:14:41 EST ID:FIu+AzFk No.66154 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>66147
In a general sort of way I would say Burroughs was nuts but as a writer, when he left aside the quirky cut-ups he was a gifted writer. I'm not disparaging the cut-ups in his novels, they rather made Zen Koans out of his own words; but in straight narrative he could be absolutely astounding. The ending of "The Cities of the Red Night" actually made me weep.
>>
John Pollerbury - Sun, 02 Nov 2014 14:23:28 EST ID:KkAyu1JC No.66182 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Just started VALIS. Not his best work. Kinda boring.
>>
Fanny Sevingson - Sun, 02 Nov 2014 15:14:39 EST ID:X3lin2bb No.66184 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>66182
I didn't love VALIS either, kind of just "meandering paranoia: the book". It wasn't bad I just didn't really enjoy it. His other stuff is great though.


Romance/Poetry by Jenny Blunkinwill - Mon, 13 Oct 2014 17:53:59 EST ID:/4qXkaU9 No.66071 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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effectAfter being emotionally unstable for a few years, then turning into the complete opposite to become socially adept and be productive with regards to studies and then work, I'm having some difficulty professing my sentiments to my new-found partner (who I've known since childhood). I'm a person who enjoys reading quite a bit, but I haven't focused at all in such literature to be proficient in lurid expressions of emotionality. I'm wondering if you could be of some much needed help.

In effect, what are some good pieces of romantic poetry you enjoy reading? What are some that have helped you embrace your romantic side?
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Walter Buzzwill - Fri, 17 Oct 2014 16:50:15 EST ID:5bIczp3f No.66095 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>66071
Baudelaire for me. Really opened the flood gates of honest romantic poetry.
>>
Charlie of the Chans !!kWjRhGF5 - Thu, 23 Oct 2014 18:41:58 EST ID:FIu+AzFk No.66124 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Something from the Romantic era, quirky, quite other-worldly at times but always charming and well-written poetry - Novalis
>>
Doris Nicklestock - Wed, 29 Oct 2014 08:35:53 EST ID:JGNb4/Rl No.66155 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Bump for interest
>>
Reuben Brookwater - Sun, 02 Nov 2014 10:56:05 EST ID:GoJpanfc No.66180 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>66124

Novalis is amazing. Sadly I had to buy a copy since none of the local libraries had any.

To anyone that is into this kind of thing, look into Rainier Rilke. Him and many others part of the German Romantic movement are really great despite the negative stigma over the things that happened a few decades later...

My eyes already touch the sunny hill,
going far ahead of the road I have begun.
So we are grasped by what we cannot grasp;
it has its inner light, even from a distance –

and changes us, even if we do not reach it,
into something else, which, hardly sensing it, we already are;
a gesture waves us on, answering our own wave ...
but what we feel is the wind in our faces.
>>
Alice Ceffingchure - Sun, 02 Nov 2014 14:29:17 EST ID:t4uV66R4 No.66183 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Octavio Paz has some good shit, OP. I'm currently reading a bunch of his stuff to help me learn Spanish. This is one of my favorites:

Touch

My hands
open the curtains of your being
clothe you in a further nudity
uncover the bodies of your body
My hands
invent another body for your body


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