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All This Talk About Lovecraft by Martha Heckleway - Tue, 11 Mar 2014 19:09:40 EST ID:5lVHTqvX No.64456 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Is making me sick. Let's get a Clive Barker thread going. I feel that his work most emulates the Romantic era, like Lewis' The Monk.

Pic related.
>>
Graham Hindlechat - Thu, 29 May 2014 21:02:06 EST ID:/+Njb9ul No.65005 Ignore Report Quick Reply
read galilee, recently started american gods. the holiday house scared the shit out of me when i was younger. i dig clive barker, definitely. unfortunately i know nothing of roman literature and so on that topic i am essentially useless.
>>
Lydia Drabblefield - Fri, 30 May 2014 10:43:52 EST ID:bq5scg8g No.65009 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Barker wishes he could touch on Lovecraft's talent.

I've been following Clive Barker and Mark Millers comic collaboration, Next Testament, it's awesome.
>>
Shitting Bullercocke - Fri, 30 May 2014 21:50:54 EST ID:1K8uo5oS No.65013 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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The Great & Secret Show! Oh man that is my favorite Clive Barker. It's so twisted and thought provoking. I loved how crazy it got just by the second act; I couldn't even fathom where the third act would take me and I wasn't disappointed when it got even stranger.


serial killer books? by Hedda Brendleville - Fri, 30 May 2014 05:02:08 EST ID:eBDLocQL No.65006 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Anyone know of any non-fiction books about serial killers/ mass murderers that I could check out? maybe some memoirs? I'm curious about this subject but don't know where to start.
>>
Nathaniel Goodfield - Fri, 30 May 2014 09:11:41 EST ID:vzgarAjQ No.65007 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>65006

Unabomber wrote a manifesto.
>>
Lydia Drabblefield - Fri, 30 May 2014 10:41:30 EST ID:bq5scg8g No.65008 Ignore Report Quick Reply
That recent young mass murderer left a long, insane manifesto on-line, check that out. It's both an insight into a psychopath and also hilarious how dumb he is.
>>
Hedda Brendleville - Fri, 30 May 2014 19:57:04 EST ID:eBDLocQL No.65011 Ignore Report Quick Reply
thanks, reading unabomber manifesto right now, will take a look at elliot rodger's later
>>
Yojimbo !zuhmdSRuSE - Tue, 03 Jun 2014 10:41:11 EST ID:7KD2lVFx No.65033 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>65011
Prepare for cringe. It isn't a cool manifesto of a warped mind saying some edgy goodbye to the world and explaining their sickness, instead it's the fifty minute crying of an egotistical jackass.


War, Heh! What is it good for by David Ferringtin - Mon, 26 May 2014 23:38:38 EST ID:u6xLmRny No.64984 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Hi

I had an argument with my brother a couple of days ago.

Hes in the army, wants to go special forces and all that jazz.

I personally am against the idea of being objectified the way soldiers are. I dont believe in the whole pyramidal structure of obediance, and I would like some reading material in order to inform myself.

I would like recommendations of books against the whole concept of the war culture, but I would also like to read about the failed attempts at military intervention, or just good historical examples of wars which were motivated mainly by economic interests.

I'd like books on the last things i've cited.

I'd also like to read material from the other side of the fence. I'd like to read books about the legitimacy of military intervention in some situations, and I would also be interested to read something that talks about the value of the individual military enterprise and how it builds the individual and how all of it relates to the individual sense of freedom.

Whether its being breached or accentuated within the military structure.
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Charlotte Smallcocke - Tue, 27 May 2014 01:07:24 EST ID:9KIRjmUJ No.64989 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Out of all unnecessary things in human life, war if by far the most necessary. If you think about it, war was from the start not entirely a human invention. Insects wage war on other colonies as a means of sustenance, sometimes abducting the ant colonies' larvae and raising them under their own. This is analogous to the administrative commands of war in itself: it brings new ways of life upon new generations.

An example of conflicting ideologies would be Britain and Germany in world war II. If you think about it, neither country viewed the world in the same way, and while they were both for centralization of power, neither of them wanted each other's members in power. Thus, when Hitler took control, the vicissitudes of war including the annexation of Czechoslovakia forced the little island to start it's own war machine. But what did we get out of the conflict? Hitler's Mein Kampf. Churchill's The Second World War volumes (which are themselves somewhat philological and philosophical in nature at times). And we also received new ways of forming government and controlling duties. War keeps people honest. Death is a treatment which evil and good men alike fear, and keeps both sides intelligent and progressive.

Perhaps the form of war may change, but war itself will never be undesirable, because as long as there is a centralization of power, a way to consolidate resources, a form of moral condensation, there will always be resistance, and it is when this resistance reaches it's peak (Hitler's secret uprising in Germany) when you will find that the people's support speaks for itself.

Again, as people get more intelligent, the form of war will change, but it will always be necessary. I need not mention that the kings of old testament Israel would not have engaged in the rather obsequious and pellucid politics they treated all kings with in 700BC in today's political realm. Behavior changes, but history has a funny way of repeating itself, time and time again. Sometimes birds find themselves in the same place their grandfather's generations were at, picking at the same grains of rice, in the same spot. And they are none the wiser, nor are they at any loss, for the grai…
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Sidney Sedgehood - Wed, 28 May 2014 10:01:10 EST ID:u6xLmRny No.64999 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>64984So, as of now, this is my list:

one soldiers war by arkaday babchenko
all quiet on the western front
Rising Up and Rising Down
Cath-22
War and Peace

any other suggestions?
>>
Nigger Trotridge - Wed, 28 May 2014 12:13:21 EST ID:NOOuLlVh No.65000 Ignore Report Quick Reply
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_v._Stanley

Tell him to have fun.
>>
Polly Trotwill - Thu, 29 May 2014 17:43:33 EST ID:LHmvr1pu No.65003 Ignore Report Quick Reply
The Republic of Whores by Josef Škvorecký first comes to mind.

It lays bare the military life, stripped of all glorification and shows it for what it is. It's a satirical book, very intelligent, very humorous, very fun to read.
Despite being written in '69 and situated in Czechoslovakia, anyone who has been in the army anywhere in modern times can highly relate to it - the army life has a lot of universal themes covered by this book.

Absolutely recommended for your brother, but I'm betting you yourself will also find it insightful and fun to read.


Book bargain thread by Faggy Pittfoot - Wed, 30 May 2012 17:13:06 EST ID:rszcYKHg No.54678 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Post your new books ITT

Pic related, which one should I start first?
81 posts and 29 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Alice Cizzledeck - Mon, 14 Apr 2014 14:49:29 EST ID:gs/30c5A No.64662 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>63493

>>>it smells great.

Ah, the smell of old books...
Got a german edition of Moby Dick (with a 2 site long ad for Shell petrol, right in the middle) and I couldn't read a page without sniffing.
>>
Walter Duckfield - Mon, 14 Apr 2014 15:02:48 EST ID:h0+gGFQN No.64663 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>64662
I once bought a Diary of Anne Frank and half the pages had a soaked-through puddle of urine on them. The smell of urine was unmistakeable, but I read through it.
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Phyllis Goodman - Mon, 14 Apr 2014 16:38:09 EST ID:j7quxT0j No.64664 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Today I acquired Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie, White Noise by Don DeLillo, a collection of Kafka's short stories, and critical editions of Moby Dick, A Portait of the Artist as a Young Man and The Sound and the Fury. With my Kindle serving as storage/reader for all the free books I could ever want, I limit my new pickups to those versions of books with substantial extras like critical commentary (or particularly insightful/numerous/structured margin scribblings), or those that I think would make nice collectibles or gifts. I stalled on a vintage vest-pocket copy of Spinoza's Ethics, which I was recommended recently, but opted to stick with my ebook version.
>>
Martin Pittville - Thu, 17 Apr 2014 03:44:38 EST ID:EieTKyZb No.64713 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Sorry for the shittiness of this photo, took it with a shaky webcam since I can't upload from my digital camera right now and I don't have a cellphone. I've gotten these over the past month or so. I also got a comic but I figured it wouldn't really fit the thread.
The books are Jpod by Douglas Coupland, The Green Mile, Michael by Joseph Goebbels (had to pick it up if only because it was cheap and looked like it would be interesting), a collection of Heinlein novels (haven't read any of his stuff yet but I've gotten recommendations of stuff by him), Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors by Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan and, out of this shot, a fairly interesting biography on the Wright Brothers. That's the one I've gotten the farthest along in.

>>62805
You're in for something great, Hard Boiled is my favorite Murakami book (though admittedly I've only read that and Sputnik Sweetheart). Haven't read Valis yet but I have read a lot of Philip K Dick's other books and I loved pretty much all of them, especially Dr. Bloodmoney and Do Androids Dream.

>>61489
Catch-22 is good. I like Naked Lunch but I still haven't gotten past the wall of sodomy that you smack into halfway through it.
>>
Charlotte Smallcocke - Tue, 27 May 2014 00:04:41 EST ID:9KIRjmUJ No.64985 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>being bilingual
I'm jelly OP


Wilde by Shitting Bibberford - Mon, 26 May 2014 09:44:16 EST ID:1K8uo5oS No.64980 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Was wondering if anyone would be willing to share the most insightful or at the very least the most interesting accounts/biographies of Mr. Wilde. I'm woefully uneducated with his material or life so any and all suggestions would be most appreciated.

On a side note. De Profundis. I'm having some trouble finding good information about the events surrounding this piece of writing. I'm quite intrigued about whether or not Alfred Douglas read the damn thing or not. All accounts seem to say he dodged it like it was the plague but I'm hoping I'm missing something.

Please focus on the first if the second is off topic or too shadowy to piece together as I'm sure that when I'm reading the various accounts of Mr. Wilde's life I'll no doubt come to my own conclusions.
>>
Isabella Hackledale - Mon, 26 May 2014 21:18:22 EST ID:Pg6Z3jcV No.64981 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>64980
Mr.Wilde is one of the most confussing chartcters in all of literature he is this crazy, mad scienst sort who is the main angonist of the novel, im pretty sure he is the baseis for the emperor from the foundation trilogy, it remimdes me of a story about the little fishey who could, there was a little fish and he died because of the ICE AGE!!!!


Balthasar's Odyssey by John Billingfuck - Sun, 25 May 2014 23:20:45 EST ID:3lZIU1c4 No.64979 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I went to a friends house the other day and he hates when people talk while he cooks so I ended up picking this up, really enjoyed the first chapter it kind of reminded me of Burroughs narrations of The Western Lands.

Has anyone else read this or anything by Maalouf? Looking forward to reading the rest.
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Edward Fessleham - Tue, 03 Jun 2014 13:36:19 EST ID:AjZeD4Dg No.65036 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>he hates when people talk while he cooks
I'm the opposite, so I find that strange.


Depressing Novels/Writers by Jenny Lightlock - Sun, 11 May 2014 18:12:24 EST ID:WMhNzl+9 No.64873 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I was doing Google searches on the greatest depressing novels written and the greatest novels written by depressed writers. After reading lots of plot summaries I decided to go out and get The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath. Before I begin reading though I wanted to see what type of other books would you fine people recommend that match my aforementioned criteria and also if anyone has read The Bell Jar, what did you think?
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Fanny Clemmerpud - Wed, 21 May 2014 09:46:23 EST ID:7NCkcIJe No.64931 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Sylvia Plath's poetry is great too if you've been through depression. It's all about how she can't keep a fixed self because her anxiety and breakdowns keep annihilating it, as well as the pain of being tied to her miserable existence by love of her son. And a lot of it is about getting stimulation from insignificant things that draw you out of your depressed baseline. It's really easy to read too, hence its popularity.
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Alice Blushpere - Wed, 21 May 2014 10:38:03 EST ID:DwSkGEj2 No.64932 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Russian writers like Tolstoy, Gogol, and Dosto might be considered depressing. Their novels may have depicted sad universes, however, I believe for them the point was to illustrate the human condition and its ability to remain human and alive even inside a depressing society.

It's sort of unrelated here, however, I've read the Manifesto both in an angry mindset and in a positive mindset. In an angry one, the ideology made absolute perfect sense to me without any flaws whatsoever. In a positive mindset, it still did, though more on paper than a practical one. That said, it's a perspective thing.

American writers like Hemingway (and maybe Fitz) can also be thrown into the pile.
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Cyril Blarrykure - Fri, 23 May 2014 19:33:25 EST ID:u7H28ffN No.64954 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Emille Zolla, germinal

not a depressing author, pessimistic rather.

It creates hope and then crushes you,
unlike depressing authors that just set an aesthetic tone of depression.

Saddest novel i've read.
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Frederick Narryhood - Sun, 25 May 2014 10:15:41 EST ID:KV9OHFxL No.64975 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>64954
Zola's whole Rougon-Macquart cycle is one grim read yeah
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John Billingfuck - Sun, 25 May 2014 23:14:44 EST ID:3lZIU1c4 No.64978 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Notes from Underground by Dostoyevsky is pretty stellar.


Trying to find a book. by dan - Sat, 24 May 2014 22:41:44 EST ID:SI15wPQs No.64967 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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It's a book about a philosopher in purgatory who argues with a god, I think it was Socrates arguing with Zeus. I think it was a Russian author. Chekhov?
>>
Fucking Sassleman - Sat, 24 May 2014 22:42:28 EST ID:Pg6Z3jcV No.64968 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>64967
troll detected !!! alert the internet
>>
dan - Sat, 24 May 2014 22:55:20 EST ID:SI15wPQs No.64969 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>64968
?
>>
dan - Sun, 25 May 2014 00:11:41 EST ID:SI15wPQs No.64970 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>64967
I found it. It's called The Shades, A Phantasy by Vladimir Korolenko.
>>
Fucking Sassleman - Sun, 25 May 2014 04:02:57 EST ID:Pg6Z3jcV No.64972 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>64970
narp is a troll


Please someone rate my short story by Thomas Fuckingwater - Sat, 24 May 2014 15:30:51 EST ID:qeZ/S+we No.64959 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I’m plastered. My head is swimming and I can’t care. But this isn’t some whim. I put the note on top of her Dear John letter; it only seemed fitting. Carefully I undress making sure to savor each and every second, feel every fiber brush against my skin. I stand there waiting… looking at the home around me, A little messy but nothing unheard of for a 20 year old bachelor. My eyes pull towards the many items around me, Rope, several pills of Xanax, A half empty bottle of vodka, a gun, All laying there strewn around the room from my many failures and past epiphanies of hope. But with hope gone I pick up my phone. I look up her phone number, it’s saved under whore. “I’m not weak but everyone has their breaking point. You were mine.” I hit send and grab the cold metal grip of the gun and slowly slide the barrel down my face. It’s surprising how anxiety meds chased by half a bottle will stop the fear of death but not the pain of living, but that’s a lesson I learned long ago. I stagger to the window and fall against the pane with my last friend in hand. It’s A gloomy rainy day, my favorite. I try different positions. First above the ear, but it’s too far back, it feels wrong. I try eating it but the metallic taste is to harsh for my last second. I try the right temple and it feels amazing. I press it hard against the skin to feel the thin bone hiding underneath. I take one more glance out the window… it’s beautiful. My eyes are closed, the gun is raised, and my finger is ready. First a bang…then relief.
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Betsy Chettinghood - Sat, 24 May 2014 17:10:52 EST ID:7eHvGWSo No.64960 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>64959
nope nope nope
your a faggot you posted this on random and everyone hated it
your an emo fag
>>
Jack Drarringstane - Sat, 24 May 2014 17:23:40 EST ID:b3hsrQga No.64961 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>64960
It's technically OK, in the sense that it's not rife with sloppy spelling/editing errors. (There are still a few.) Stop fishing for compliments and write something worth reviewing.
>>
Charles Huzzlekut - Sat, 24 May 2014 17:25:02 EST ID:kYFMHJc1 No.64962 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>64960
Some people seemed to enjoy it.
You ran right over to lit just to shit on this guy huh?
Enjoying your saturday?
>>
Thomas Gobbermat - Sat, 24 May 2014 19:00:21 EST ID:7NCkcIJe No.64964 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I’m plastered. My head is swimming and I can’t care. But this isn’t some whim. I put the note on top of her Dear John letter; it only seemed fitting. I undress savoring every second, feeling each fiber brush against my skin. I stand there waiting, just looking at the home around me. A little messy, but not unusual for a 20 year-old bachelor. My eyes pull towards the items around me: rope, Xanax pills, half-empty bottle of vodka, gun. They're strewn around the room from many past failures and epiphanies.
Hope gone, I pick up my phone. I look up her phone number. It’s saved under 'whore'. “I’m not weak but everyone has their breaking point. You were mine.” I hit send and grab the cold metal grip of the gun and slowly slide the barrel down my face. It’s surprising how anxiety meds chased by half a bottle will stop the fear of death but not the pain of living. I stagger to the window and fall against the pane with my last friend in hand. It's a rainy day. My favorite. I try different positions. First above the ear, but it’s too far back, it feels wrong. I try eating it but the metallic taste is too harsh for my last second. I try the right temple and it feels amazing. I press it hard against the skin to feel the thin bone hiding underneath. One more glance out the window - it’s beautiful. My eyes are closed, the gun's raised and my finger is ready. First a bang…then [you don't feel relief if ur ded nigga. rule of focalization. it has more impact if you end it here anyway].

I did a five-minute pass for grammar and readability. The changes improve it in
my opinion, and I do this for a living. I didn't really touch the content. Done with all the love in the world.

I really don't want to get into an overlong analysis of it, but I'll mention a couple of the changes I made. This guy "." is good enough for Raymond Chandler and he's good enough for you. The run-on sentences, ellipses, listing were excessive and undermined the tone you were developing. Short staccato sentences can be very effective in some circumstances: they heighten tension and can intensify apprehension, anxiety, pretty much anything adrenaline-related. The end of a semantic unit should be …
Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.


Creative hint fiction by Graham Gemmersare - Mon, 14 Apr 2014 17:19:40 EST ID:FQltgfDs No.64665 Report Reply Quick Reply
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Hint-Fiction is a story of 25 words or fewer that suggests a larger, more complex story. e.g. is Hemingway's famous shortest story, "For sale: baby shoes, never worn." You can have a lot of fun with this genre.

Let's see what /lit/ comes up with

"Me and her used to fight a lot. We never fight anymore and I'm really glad, but I still get a little sad reading her obituary."
37 posts and 3 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Nathaniel Dobblestock - Sun, 18 May 2014 00:47:26 EST ID:QIYgqzhc No.64908 Report Quick Reply
>>64906
Old Who is way better
>>
Priscilla Pullycheck - Mon, 19 May 2014 20:47:42 EST ID:WMSEBCNF No.64920 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>64908
i agree. i honestly started with 11. checked out 10. eventually got tired of it and looked up recommended classic who episodes on various boards through google and was thoroughly impressed. it definitely makes a statement about modern-day writing compared to the effort and skill demonstrated in the past (in my opinion, anyway. i may be biased)
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Nell Hingerford - Fri, 23 May 2014 08:39:22 EST ID:cDSyWuOy No.64952 Ignore Report Quick Reply
OP you need to check out H.P. Lovecrafts unfinished notes he had scribbled down but never had chance to use them before he died. Accidental hint-fiction gold.

http://10ptt.com/smf/index.php?topic=227.0
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Nigger Barddock - Sat, 24 May 2014 07:15:02 EST ID:h0+gGFQN No.64956 Ignore Report Quick Reply
he held me down all night, thrusting. in the morning i saw my father under my covers
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Rebecca Bennerwill - Sat, 24 May 2014 11:59:34 EST ID:bq5scg8g No.64957 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>64952
this is awesome, thanks


Foundation Trilogy by Isaac Asimov by Phineas Smallford - Thu, 22 May 2014 02:26:58 EST ID:+tF7tb2G No.64937 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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My dad gave me a copy of the Foundation Trilogy a while ago. Just picked it up last night. What's /lit/'s thoughts about the series?
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William Buppergold - Thu, 22 May 2014 02:30:52 EST ID:Pg6Z3jcV No.64938 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>64937
ten long boobless hours, no pictures, no plot, and no boobs
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William Buppergold - Thu, 22 May 2014 02:31:27 EST ID:Pg6Z3jcV No.64939 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>64937
p.s.

yes because I frequent the /jenk/ board
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Emma Summleman - Thu, 22 May 2014 02:50:33 EST ID:C5lny9KQ No.64940 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>64937
It's good... but dry... dryer than satan's sunburn. Like the whole thing is middle-aged males talking to each other. Asimov isn't very good at the razzle dazzle. It's hard to get sucked in by the universe the way you'd do with other seminal scifi.

It's certainly worth a try.
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William Buppergold - Thu, 22 May 2014 03:01:54 EST ID:Pg6Z3jcV No.64942 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>64940
AND IT HAS NO BOOBS!!!!!!


Catcher in the Rye/ SIster Novel by Hedda Gaffingdire - Sun, 18 May 2014 19:54:59 EST ID:hYUtk2Q9 No.64910 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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What's the female coming of age novel as opposed to the CitR?
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Nigel Fucklechetch - Sun, 18 May 2014 21:48:58 EST ID:8sAgHl0E No.64911 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Hmmmm good question.

I don't think there is an obvious parallel. Not in subject matter anyway. Maybe the loner archetype is one that applies a lot easier to men.

Some titles jump out that women often cite as an adolescent favourite in the same way, though. The Handmaid's Tale for one, but that's not an easy fit.

Actually, now that I think about it, many of the literate chicas I've spoken to have described Little Women as their "coming of age" novel. Since it's from the late 1860s and is about adolescent girls coming into traditional womanhood, that probably speaks volumes about gender differences today when you compare, say, Jo March with the likes of Holden Caulfield. But that's anecdotal, so there might be nothing in it.
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Betsy Gucklewark - Sun, 18 May 2014 23:59:11 EST ID:cYNECG8C No.64912 Ignore Report Quick Reply
"The Bell Jar" by Sylvia Plath is a pretty typical coming-of-age story for young women.
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Ernest Nocklepuck - Mon, 19 May 2014 20:30:29 EST ID:hYUtk2Q9 No.64919 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>64912
I always thought it was a long suicide note.


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