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Linear Algebra Review by Alice Finkinman - Mon, 27 Apr 2015 02:23:31 EST ID:AOEV1QdK No.14706 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1430115811548.jpg -(75522B / 73.75KB, 600x763) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 75522
I took a linear algebra class years ago and want to review. I have Axler's Linear Algebra Done Right and really enjoy it, but I want something with more applications and exercises to go along with it.

Suggestions? Online or texts
1 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Reuben Chacklefield - Sun, 17 May 2015 07:09:03 EST ID:WtAxPZi7 No.14735 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Gilbert Strang is pretty cool, he teaches Linear Algebra. Here's the playlist for all his lectures: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZK3O402wf1c&list=PL41A1C92F1766D4AB
>>
Shit Subberfoot - Fri, 29 May 2015 04:55:00 EST ID:HKah9GEZ No.14760 Ignore Report Quick Reply
If you really want to go deep inside Linear Algebra I suggest you study a little of Abstract Algebra. I used Fraleigh, it's a good book, you can find it online as a .pdf. With Abstract Algebra you will gain a deep knowledge about algebraic structures, such as groups rings and fields (as well as he other intermediate structures), and trust me Linear Algebra will become clearer. After that you will be able to go deeper into whatever you want, for instance Non-Linear Algebra or Group theory.
>>
Fuck Chorryford - Fri, 29 May 2015 10:00:06 EST ID:/JY7Oqfv No.14761 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Linear Algebra by Shilov
>>
Esther Binderford - Sat, 30 May 2015 12:40:05 EST ID:V731xQnT No.14763 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>14707
Lax is the one I just used for my class this spring. Pretty good book, easy if you have a basic understanding and use it in cojucntion with internet tutorials to refresh. LOTS of practical uses for the material
>>
Hannah Blittinglit - Mon, 24 Apr 2017 21:48:51 EST ID:jVVag+L0 No.15489 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>14706
work through every problem in linear algebra done
do some abstract algebra along the way
good luck


Hyperoperations by Hamilton Nudgebanks - Wed, 29 Mar 2017 16:37:10 EST ID:uqJv93qR No.15439 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1490819830015.png -(109711B / 107.14KB, 790x726) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 109711
Does anyone have any ideas about pic related?
22 posts and 5 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Jenny Ferrynirk - Sat, 22 Apr 2017 11:23:11 EST ID:u3qow64e No.15484 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15481
I've tried doing an analogue of Burton's method in two different ways but I'm not sure how you arrived at that sum. Can you prove that it works in general? I guess next steps are to check it for a bunch of values and then attempt a rigorous proof if it looks good.
>>
Basil Bardwell - Sat, 22 Apr 2017 12:12:54 EST ID:jKEmS4eI No.15485 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1492877574393.png -(42764B / 41.76KB, 1010x210) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
I checked the first thousand values of the proposed formula. It looks good.
>>
Basil Bardwell - Sat, 22 Apr 2017 12:18:30 EST ID:jKEmS4eI No.15486 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15485
Now that I've taken a second to just expand the formula I see that it obviously is true, and I have a complaint. I would still like to see how it's geometric, but this formula is not ideal in the sense that you are pretty much just summing the 4-hypersquares in disguise. The nice thing about the sum of squares formula is that it reduces a long computation to a short one, but this formula doesn't really do that. Arguably it takes more steps than the original expression.
>>
Samuel Lightfuck - Sun, 23 Apr 2017 16:05:01 EST ID:A2j/BW/W No.15487 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15482
>I've tried doing an analogue of Burton's method in two different ways but I'm not sure how you arrived at that sum.
Show me what you did first.
>>
David Blythestock - Sun, 23 Apr 2017 19:46:31 EST ID:KPDi1EOJ No.15488 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15487
Why so secretive? I'll draw you a picture of each of the ways I tried some time later this week. Can't be assed to describe it in words right now, and in any case I wasn't able to finish the double-counting either way I did it.


What is the theory of Equality by E - Thu, 20 Apr 2017 09:52:31 EST ID:LbDKCfts No.15477 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1492696351943.jpg -(6273B / 6.13KB, 231x206) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 6273
I wrote this program the demonstrate my idea, http://faceclicker.com if it the wrong theory please discuss


What's your power level? by William Drenkingold - Thu, 01 Dec 2016 01:21:19 EST ID:I4oaqfW8 No.15281 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I'm new to this site and it struck me as pleasantly surprising that there's a whole set of science&math boards. I am however rather skeptical about the average level of education here, so let's make a little survery:

  1. Age
  2. Degree
  3. Specialty
  4. Dream job/profession
  5. Plans for the near future and long term strategy
15 posts and 5 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Ernest Dankinwill - Sun, 19 Mar 2017 10:34:36 EST ID:6/N17cz8 No.15423 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15413

How I'll afford it here in the US is a pretty important question. I realize there are scholarships and all but I gotta figure all of it out. Also if reputation is important can I not simply wave around a US Bachelor's degree in Germany if for some reason they don't like German degrees?
>>
John Drarrypon - Sun, 19 Mar 2017 15:09:40 EST ID:c0vo/Lfo No.15424 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15423
You shouldn't be paying for graduate school in anything technical. They should be paying you to teach and covering your tuition.
>>
Phineas Chacklestetch - Sun, 09 Apr 2017 02:31:07 EST ID:vrOFV9fT No.15462 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15285

I am at the end of an algebraic topology course right now, and my professor doesn't make much sense. I think I understand homology and cohomology pretty well, but spectral sequences have really fucked my brain. Since it's your area, do you think you can recommend a survey paper or something on it.

Other topics in algebraic topology have useful applications. Why should I give a shit about spectral sequences? Of course they are a generalization, but it seems it only has use for higher homotopy groups and etc.

Why should anyone outside of mathematics care about higher homotopy groups? They are notoriously difficult and at least to this day don't have the same applications that their homological counterparts enjoy.
>>
Phineas Chacklestetch - Sun, 09 Apr 2017 02:42:19 EST ID:vrOFV9fT No.15463 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15423
>>15424

This. If you get admitted you should get a teaching position with a survival wage. I am paid 20,000$ a year with tuition and health insurance free, and 100 students.

I could get more if I were to quit early and get a masters degree
>>
Fuck Billingfoot - Wed, 19 Apr 2017 19:41:06 EST ID:oXSM8l4D No.15476 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>15281
  1. 25
  2. Finance
  3. Real-Estate Finance
  4. Professional Investor
  5. Having a hot wife that loves me and a large bank account.

I'd also like to point out that your inquiry means very little, as even the smartest of men at one point were nothing.


Pleb Contemplates Curvature by Pleb - Mon, 23 May 2016 14:22:48 EST ID:BB0KLoxX No.15128 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1464027768468.png -(150891B / 147.35KB, 769x595) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 150891
I am certain i am missing information so i appeal to you brainy smarties to educate me However this also may be a physics questions. I dunno.

Do curves actually exist? Meaning at the smallest point possible (I would assume planck length) would it not be a straight line from point A to point B then a second straight line from point B to point C etc etc? Only upon pulling back far enough to no longer see the individual points does the curve appear?
25 posts and 3 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Martha Pibberforth - Thu, 13 Apr 2017 13:40:15 EST ID:c0vo/Lfo No.15470 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I feel like some people are missing that this is an ill-defined question. Science cannot answer questions like "What is the mathematical structure of space?" definitively. All it can say is that models using a certain type of mathematical space have been more successful than others. Since we can only take finite measurements you can always then produce a new model with a different topology at smaller scales than we have measured which agrees with everything we know so far. There can be no end to this game. Even if we could take infinite time and infinitely detailed measurements there would always be multiple valid models for what we have seen so far.
>>
Graham Piddleforth - Sat, 15 Apr 2017 13:22:07 EST ID:A2j/BW/W No.15472 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15469
>The article conflates planck distance and smallest distance.
No it doesn't. And the Stack Exchange responder you're referring to said this:

>At long distances spacetime can certainly be thought of as continuous. At short distances, the short answer is: we don't know.
>we don't know
Which agrees with what I said previously.
>>
Ian Denningfoot - Sat, 15 Apr 2017 20:06:57 EST ID:lub1zF0h No.15473 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1492301217927.jpg -(9135B / 8.92KB, 200x291) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>15472

Tell me this Mr. Science Man, if there is a smallest distance, why does it not make sense to talk about that distance divided by two?

Is it impossible for a tiny extended distance in space to exist, even though it is too small for us to measure? No. You cannot measure nanometers using just your eyes, does that mean they do not exist? No.
>>
Esther Hunningman - Wed, 19 Apr 2017 02:15:42 EST ID:A2j/BW/W No.15474 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15473
You're conflating limitations of measurement based on technology and fundamental limits. Imagine you're an image on a digital display screen. The space you inhabit is made of pixels. There is no way for you to measure a distance smaller than the width of a pixel. This is a fundamental limit. No matter how powerful your technology becomes, you can never probe distances smaller than this. And if you can't measure something, does it physically exist? No.
>>
Thomas Peckleway - Wed, 19 Apr 2017 16:23:05 EST ID:j58znr37 No.15475 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15474
You can't know that you're on a screen made of discrete pixels. What if you "really are" in such a space but the laws of physics in your world make models which take space to be continuous much more accurate than any dicrete models you can produce? You can't know that way down there is some discrete object which makes everything up, so Occam's razor says that you should behave as though space is continuous. This absurd disconnect between what is "real" and your model comes from believing there is some fundamental true mathematical description of nature. Very smart people have discussed why this is unreasonable. It doesn't mean that physics isn't the only sane way to understand the world, but it does mean that there is no one correct mathematical description of things like space.


Best language for math by Simon Sattingbury - Wed, 22 Mar 2017 03:37:13 EST ID:lwS34rUW No.15429 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1490168233477.jpg -(75572B / 73.80KB, 620x1014) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 75572
German?
1 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Jenny Nillercocke - Sun, 09 Apr 2017 00:39:18 EST ID:AzT2mDEq No.15458 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15429
According to my South African professor English is basically the worst language for maths, his personal notebooks are all in Afrikaans despite him also being a native English speaker.
>>
Phineas Chacklestetch - Sun, 09 Apr 2017 02:10:22 EST ID:vrOFV9fT No.15459 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15458

I'd be interested in his reasoning if you ask him. It seems to me the language doesn't matter, as you are dealing with abstract objects it doesn't matter what language because the same deductive rules apply. If you call a semi-simple ring a 半简单戒指 it serves no purpose other than preventing a portion of the world from reading it.
>>
Phineas Chacklestetch - Sun, 09 Apr 2017 02:12:13 EST ID:vrOFV9fT No.15460 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15429

I want to add that some German words are things that would be lengthy phrases in english. For instance a famous theorem is Hilbert's Nullstellensatz theorem, which roughly and shittily translated in to english means the zeroes places theorem.

German isn't a better language for math, because mathematical objects are independent of language.
>>
James Sinkinbitch - Sun, 09 Apr 2017 17:24:13 EST ID:6m87/9/+ No.15467 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15459
I do agree, but I also think that sometimes language gets in the way of learning.

for instance, closed/open/clopen in topology (using words which have binary meaning to talk about objects which arent binary)

or 'imaginary' numbers

Those things arent hurdles for math people, but I do think they are hurdles when someone is trying to learn math
>>
Fucking Crocklemack - Thu, 13 Apr 2017 22:08:40 EST ID:c0vo/Lfo No.15471 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15460
It takes roughly as long to say Nullstellensatz as it does to say Zeros Places Theorem. All that German accomplishes is reducing the number of spaces you have to type.


Volume optimization? by Duffman - Sun, 09 Apr 2017 11:19:17 EST ID:Rhgh4/nK No.15464 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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How does one go about doing these problems? are there formulas I'm missing for this? My professor covered this in the last 5 minutes of class and he was pretty unclear.
>>
Henry Mondlechot - Sun, 09 Apr 2017 14:54:04 EST ID:pPgJY+De No.15465 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Does this help?
>>
George Pittway - Sun, 09 Apr 2017 15:00:05 EST ID:Rhgh4/nK No.15466 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15465

Yes, Somewhat. Thank you


Ncea Level 3 calculus Help by David Bellamy - Sun, 26 Mar 2017 03:46:39 EST ID:yAgFpYsL No.15435 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I need help with bloody conics
>>
HazeyNZL - Sun, 26 Mar 2017 04:02:02 EST ID:v+/egmbA No.15436 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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DICKS EVERYWHERE
>>
Ernest Binningstidge - Sun, 26 Mar 2017 10:59:32 EST ID:KW3RHxlP No.15437 Ignore Report Quick Reply
What have you tried? You can't just come to someone and ask for help without doing anything. We're not going to teach you the whole course here, since there are numerous places online you can learn these things.
>>
Henry Fattingdodge - Tue, 28 Mar 2017 21:15:01 EST ID:AvE/EBRJ No.15438 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Your friend looks like a fag, and underaged, so you probably are twice both. Ask a fucking question next time.


Watch my set please by Basil Fussletut - Fri, 18 Nov 2016 11:24:03 EST ID:FFd5rNZG No.15275 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Hey /math/, can you guys watch my set for me? I'll be right back.
13 posts and 6 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Ebenezer Genkinnadge - Thu, 12 Jan 2017 14:29:49 EST ID:jD/Lrc1O No.15322 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15321
Both of those systems you mention seem to be exploiting the idea of different "levels" of sets, which sounds like a type-theoretic way of dealing with the problem to me.
>>
Augustus Bambleson - Thu, 12 Jan 2017 19:13:32 EST ID:zauFrAWR No.15323 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15322

Yeah, there are different "types" of objects, but often times it's not apparent what a given object is. From this perspective you could make an argument that every set theory is a type theory, with just one type in consideration, which seems to obfuscate what distinguishes what is considered type theory as opposed to something else. In type theory you know exactly what sort of element you are dealing with, while this might not be the case in set theory.
>>
Caroline Burringfoot - Thu, 23 Mar 2017 03:22:14 EST ID:zYLZ69Gw No.15432 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15275
no, fuck sets
>>
Thomas Derringbock - Thu, 23 Mar 2017 10:27:39 EST ID:2BTsxPZ9 No.15433 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15432
What do you advocate instead of sets? Topoi or some new-fangled nonsense?
>>
Nigel Nublingstock - Fri, 24 Mar 2017 01:19:20 EST ID:vrOFV9fT No.15434 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>15432

fuck you


Measuring turds by Jarvis Smallford - Tue, 21 Mar 2017 20:36:07 EST ID:Yl5i51yi No.15427 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Ever wanted to be able to find the volume of your weirdly-shaped poops through a mathematical model? Try Calculus! Thanks, Newton and Leibniz!
>>
Basil Gunningfutch - Tue, 21 Mar 2017 22:28:39 EST ID:2BTsxPZ9 No.15428 Ignore Report Quick Reply
No love for Archimedes in here I suppose.
>>
Molly Poffingbury - Wed, 22 Mar 2017 19:55:35 EST ID:LCy6AKHb No.15430 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15428

Do not disturb my circles.


Dabble by Hugh Wicklelatch - Tue, 21 Mar 2017 08:41:37 EST ID:6dRMI9a4 No.15425 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1490100097900.jpg -(73609B / 71.88KB, 600x400) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 73609
I have hardly a basis for math and forgot most of it anyway.
I'd like to get my math level a bit up, it seems like fun now

How do i start?
>>
Fanny Dommlestock - Tue, 21 Mar 2017 09:13:09 EST ID:1If8Lhdp No.15426 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Get a textbook, read it, and do the exercises. You can also do online courses. Even though it's not arithmetic I would recommend doing a basic logic textbook since it's fun and important for mathematical reasoning. Math is some kind of meta-language, so you will advance faster if you have people you can talk to about it. In person is probably better than online, but even that is great. You can check out mathexchange or just post whatever you're thinking about on here.


how i relearned erry mathsz by Lydia Lightshit - Fri, 05 Feb 2016 02:37:19 EST ID:mVsq12K/ No.15040 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Everyday before work, I woke up 2 hours early and forced myself to read/do exercises of the following books. (this later became 3 hours). I averaged 3 books per month if they were survey books, and about 1-3 months for a rigorous book. This became an easy routine after the first week, and I'm still doing this.

>1) Daily Rituals by Mason Currey
https://books.google.ca/books/about/Daily_Rituals.html?id=hA-MoAEACAAJ
This is where I got the idea of making a routine from, it's a survey of historical artists, philosophers, scientists ect who all had a routine in order to get work done consistently. Franz Kafka would split his sleep up into 2 section in order to fit in work beside his regular office job.

>2) Basic College Mathematics by M. Lial et all
https://books.google.ca/books?id=ucUDMAEACAAJ&dq=basic+college+mathematics
As mentioned before in here this covers elementary school and Jr. High math basically. You can just survey this for the most part (not do any exercises) unless you don't understand something, then do the exercises. Took 3 days to survey this. When I later took Harvard's CS50 computer science course, the first lecture about Binary numbers directly was related to this book's first chapter on whole numbers. I torrented this book.

>3)Basic Mathematics by Serge Lang
https://books.google.ca/books?id=gBtvo480ng4C&dq=basic+mathematics
I got out the notepaper and did most of the exercises by hand. This was all focused on reasoning, why is this true, how do we prove this is true, ect. This book teaches you so well that applied calculus is your bitch afterwards. I torrented this book too since author dead, copies are like $80 on amazon.

>4)Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning by Eccles
Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.
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George Honningham - Sat, 14 Jan 2017 20:50:27 EST ID:pPw7QUKx No.15324 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>3 books per month
How do you do that? I've been reading A book of set theory by Charles C. Pinter for about six months and have only read the first 70 pages. Some of the excerces took me days to solve them, and after two months i could finally understand the resolution of the Russell's paradox. However, I've reading it over and over again until being pretty sure my proofs of every single problem are indeed proofs.
>>
Frederick Wicklesadging - Wed, 18 Jan 2017 12:25:37 EST ID:bkgMqk62 No.15326 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15324

That's a slow pace, but good. I think if you are reading three math books in a month you are missing a lot of details. It took me a year to read Shoenield's mathematical logic and I have been reading Kunen's set theory for a year nearly and I'm only half way through. Shit takes time.
>>
Emma Drundlestock - Mon, 06 Feb 2017 13:38:21 EST ID:0v0QG0m/ No.15330 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>15326
>That's a slow pace,
Yes, I know it. That's because I got my bachelor degree in maths but never studied it seriously until now, that I have noticed my lack of foundations; and it's because of that that I don't go on unless I'm pretty sure I have solved and understood every single part of the text and the problems, specially set theory and logic, wich are basic for all mathematics. Solving all the doubts arising when studying mathematics is a very important part of our study routine if one really wants to understand them... and it's probably the most tedious part.

>Shoenield's mathematical logic
I'd swear it was a model theory book. I remember I didn't buy it due to that, and bought Richard E. Hodel's An Introduction to Mathematical Logic instead.
>>
Jarvis Pessledale - Tue, 14 Mar 2017 17:19:17 EST ID:ueMHQ1BO No.15419 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15040
sick, now read a Math physics textbook and become a god
>>
George Blatherbanks - Sat, 18 Mar 2017 16:35:05 EST ID:ck7N7PYR No.15422 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Frankel's The Geometry of Physics: A very good way to learn what modern geometry tastes like.


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