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Getting into Physics ---> Quantum stuff by Beatrice Sepperhall - Thu, 21 Aug 2014 13:14:21 EST ID:t/8wjLF3 No.14296 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1408641261077.jpg -(125896B / 122.95KB, 1200x930) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 125896
Where should I start? Should I learn a bunch of calculus first? I was recommended University Physics With Modern Physics (Young & Freedman) to start with and then to move to Quantum Mechanics (Bransden & Joachain). At least to start off with.

Any other recommendations or whatever? Besides college and stuff, just on maybe the order you began learning it or w/e? thanks.
5 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Hamilton Docklekane - Tue, 02 Sep 2014 22:21:50 EST ID:n1HpAHmU No.14344 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>14341
I personally think the study of differential equations is more important to have down before the linear algebra when learning the basics of QM, because then you can get a feel for what Shrodinger's equation is saying, but there is much debate on the proper pedagogy for teaching it. Vibrations and Waves by French is my personal choice for learning diff eq.s and linear algebra/ their applications to physics all in one nice bundle. Also Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences by Boas has been a life saver for soooo many areas in physics. I still keep my copy of it from sophomore year in college on my bookshelf.
>>
Archie Worthingfield - Sun, 07 Sep 2014 18:26:47 EST ID:xvgqavvT No.14354 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Here ya go, a full list of exactly what you need to be a good theoretical physicist
http://www.staff.science.uu.nl/~Gadda001/goodtheorist/index.html

Many of the links don't work anymore, so substitute with MIT Open Courseware lectures on Math/Physics or whatever modern books you can find. http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/physics/8-05-quantum-physics-ii-fall-2013/video-lectures/
>>
Barnaby Brellyhick - Sat, 20 May 2017 21:48:22 EST ID:EJeHrwkJ No.15507 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>14296
Write a paper suggesting a link between chemistry and physics
>>
Martin Murdman - Mon, 19 Jun 2017 22:10:21 EST ID:q/daWEW+ No.15522 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>14296
Learn calculus, differential equations, linear algebra, and abstract algebra/group theory. Read Quantum Mechanics by Shankar. When they start about euler lagrange equations as a way of doing classical mechanics problems check out Give Taylor's Classical Mechanics.

If you want to go deep the Landau Lifshitz books are essential. Griffith has a good E&M book if you are only interested in learning enough E&M to do advanced quantum. Gordon Baymn's lectures on quantum are really dense, but really well summarize the most essential aspects of quantum, and teach you how to solve some really practical problems (spectroscopy/scatter/super conductivity class shit). Messiah's and Sakurai's textbooks are each good in their own ways.

take acid
>>
Jack Brookham - Sat, 26 Aug 2017 12:25:01 EST ID:wgTUzquz No.15552 Ignore Report Quick Reply
You need calc 1 and maybe calc 2 (techniques of integration) for undergrad level physics books (specifically Newtonian mechanics and Electromagnetism). I used University Physics which you mention and Fundementals of Physics by Halliday and Resnick, either will do (get an old edition for cheap) but I personally liked University Physics more.

As for QM you'll need linear algebra and differential equations, both of which you should study after calculus. I'd recommend getting an old edition of Calculus by Stewart, Spivak might be too much if you've never seen calculus or if your algebra and trig is weak. Undergrad math textbooks are generally shitty money grabs, and MIT has some of their's up for free.

For other book suggestions I'd recommend looking at a university's physics courses and their respective syllabi.


how i relearned erry mathsz by Lydia Lightshit - Fri, 05 Feb 2016 02:37:19 EST ID:mVsq12K/ No.15040 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1454657839252.png -(56956B / 55.62KB, 722x768) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 56956
Everyday before work, I woke up 2 hours early and forced myself to read/do exercises of the following books. (this later became 3 hours). I averaged 3 books per month if they were survey books, and about 1-3 months for a rigorous book. This became an easy routine after the first week, and I'm still doing this.

>1) Daily Rituals by Mason Currey
https://books.google.ca/books/about/Daily_Rituals.html?id=hA-MoAEACAAJ
This is where I got the idea of making a routine from, it's a survey of historical artists, philosophers, scientists ect who all had a routine in order to get work done consistently. Franz Kafka would split his sleep up into 2 section in order to fit in work beside his regular office job.

>2) Basic College Mathematics by M. Lial et all
https://books.google.ca/books?id=ucUDMAEACAAJ&dq=basic+college+mathematics
As mentioned before in here this covers elementary school and Jr. High math basically. You can just survey this for the most part (not do any exercises) unless you don't understand something, then do the exercises. Took 3 days to survey this. When I later took Harvard's CS50 computer science course, the first lecture about Binary numbers directly was related to this book's first chapter on whole numbers. I torrented this book.

>3)Basic Mathematics by Serge Lang
https://books.google.ca/books?id=gBtvo480ng4C&dq=basic+mathematics
I got out the notepaper and did most of the exercises by hand. This was all focused on reasoning, why is this true, how do we prove this is true, ect. This book teaches you so well that applied calculus is your bitch afterwards. I torrented this book too since author dead, copies are like $80 on amazon.

>4)Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning by Eccles
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Frederick Wicklesadging - Wed, 18 Jan 2017 12:25:37 EST ID:bkgMqk62 No.15326 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15324

That's a slow pace, but good. I think if you are reading three math books in a month you are missing a lot of details. It took me a year to read Shoenield's mathematical logic and I have been reading Kunen's set theory for a year nearly and I'm only half way through. Shit takes time.
>>
Emma Drundlestock - Mon, 06 Feb 2017 13:38:21 EST ID:0v0QG0m/ No.15330 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1486406301032.gif -(1998868B / 1.91MB, 268x453) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>15326
>That's a slow pace,
Yes, I know it. That's because I got my bachelor degree in maths but never studied it seriously until now, that I have noticed my lack of foundations; and it's because of that that I don't go on unless I'm pretty sure I have solved and understood every single part of the text and the problems, specially set theory and logic, wich are basic for all mathematics. Solving all the doubts arising when studying mathematics is a very important part of our study routine if one really wants to understand them... and it's probably the most tedious part.

>Shoenield's mathematical logic
I'd swear it was a model theory book. I remember I didn't buy it due to that, and bought Richard E. Hodel's An Introduction to Mathematical Logic instead.
>>
Jarvis Pessledale - Tue, 14 Mar 2017 17:19:17 EST ID:ueMHQ1BO No.15419 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15040
sick, now read a Math physics textbook and become a god
>>
George Blatherbanks - Sat, 18 Mar 2017 16:35:05 EST ID:ck7N7PYR No.15422 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Frankel's The Geometry of Physics: A very good way to learn what modern geometry tastes like.
>>
Albert Bivinghall - Tue, 22 Aug 2017 03:01:37 EST ID:OVoqDNaY No.15550 Ignore Report Quick Reply
bump


Physics. Forces. Springs. by Cyril Nucklepodging - Sun, 16 Jul 2017 10:24:40 EST ID:tgwdoW8d No.15535 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1500215080231.png -(16883B / 16.49KB, 973x331) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 16883
Does it matter what ordeer 2 springs are in, if youre stacking them and measuring the total force?
>>
Esther Dartfield - Thu, 20 Jul 2017 19:06:29 EST ID:A2j/BW/W No.15541 Ignore Report Quick Reply
no


Math Problems you came up with by Charles Fundlepeck - Thu, 22 Jun 2017 16:37:54 EST ID:jadYTFeE No.15524 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1498163874635.gif -(2096042B / 2.00MB, 338x252) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 2096042
A rectangular piece of cardboard has a length that is twice its width. Squares with sides that measure 1/10 of the length of the cardboard are cut from each corner and the resulting flaps of the cardboard are turned up to form an open box. A maximum of 24 cubes that measure 2 inches on the sides can fit perfectly inside the box. What are the dimensions of the box? What were the length and width of the rectangular cardboard before it was cut and made into a box?
2 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
James Gembleford - Thu, 22 Jun 2017 21:09:11 EST ID:j58znr37 No.15527 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15526
The number I gave before is close to 11. I checked and unless this is a rounding issue I'm either right or setting up the problem incorrectly.
>>
Betsy Cenderhall - Thu, 22 Jun 2017 21:12:25 EST ID:jadYTFeE No.15528 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15527
I think you're setting the problem incorrectly. Here's a hint: The width consists of just two digits.
>>
James Gembleford - Thu, 22 Jun 2017 23:49:39 EST ID:j58znr37 No.15529 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15528
Oh I was doing squares which are 1/10 the width of the cardboard, not the length.
>>
James Gembleford - Fri, 23 Jun 2017 10:43:03 EST ID:j58znr37 No.15530 Ignore Report Quick Reply
So I now realise that my other answer doesn't really make sense because the resulting box would be the right volume to contain the cubes but not the right height. With that in mind, the solution is easy. Let x be the width of the original cardboard. The length is then 2x and the side length of the squares removed is (1/10)2x=(1/5)x. But this number becomes the height of our box, which must be 2in if the cubes are to fit perfectly inside. Solving (1/5)x=2in we find the width can only be 10in and the length 20in.
>>
Betsy Cenderhall - Fri, 23 Jun 2017 10:54:59 EST ID:jadYTFeE No.15531 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15530
Congrats, you got it! I hope others here had fun with my little problem.


Star by Black Hole Son - Thu, 01 Jun 2017 18:14:15 EST ID:Mfduv5of No.15517 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1496355255705.jpg -(92361B / 90.20KB, 960x918) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 92361
How do you determine the quantity of a thing mixed up in other things to a point where the sum total gets blurred by the myriad factors of an æquation?
>>
John Cannerway - Fri, 02 Jun 2017 14:34:58 EST ID:BI+jncva No.15520 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Try stating your question more clearly, if possible. It sounds more like you're not able to determine the quality of that thing because your definition of what thing is lacks the enough specificity for you to even know where to start when trying to extract the appropriate information from where and in what ways to manipulate it to give you a quantity for the exact thing it is you are trying to determine the quantity of.


Best language for math by Simon Sattingbury - Wed, 22 Mar 2017 03:37:13 EST ID:lwS34rUW No.15429 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1490168233477.jpg -(75572B / 73.80KB, 620x1014) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 75572
German?
3 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Phineas Chacklestetch - Sun, 09 Apr 2017 02:12:13 EST ID:vrOFV9fT No.15460 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15429

I want to add that some German words are things that would be lengthy phrases in english. For instance a famous theorem is Hilbert's Nullstellensatz theorem, which roughly and shittily translated in to english means the zeroes places theorem.

German isn't a better language for math, because mathematical objects are independent of language.
>>
James Sinkinbitch - Sun, 09 Apr 2017 17:24:13 EST ID:6m87/9/+ No.15467 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15459
I do agree, but I also think that sometimes language gets in the way of learning.

for instance, closed/open/clopen in topology (using words which have binary meaning to talk about objects which arent binary)

or 'imaginary' numbers

Those things arent hurdles for math people, but I do think they are hurdles when someone is trying to learn math
>>
Fucking Crocklemack - Thu, 13 Apr 2017 22:08:40 EST ID:c0vo/Lfo No.15471 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15460
It takes roughly as long to say Nullstellensatz as it does to say Zeros Places Theorem. All that German accomplishes is reducing the number of spaces you have to type.
>>
Thomas Pammerdale - Sat, 20 May 2017 21:41:47 EST ID:1puAuUud No.15506 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15429
The lost language of babbaganoosh
>>
John Bliffingson - Wed, 24 May 2017 03:05:51 EST ID:lub1zF0h No.15512 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15471

Yes, but there are fewer "z" letters in Zero Places Theorem, and the space key is already one of the most used buttons. It is more economic and eco-friendly over the long run to use long and complicated words that have lots of "z" and 15+ characters.


Mandlebrot Set Via WEbcam Iteration Discoved By Me by Eric Alan Frazin - Sun, 14 May 2017 03:01:43 EST ID:Cv411eOF No.15498 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1494745303297.png -(157083B / 153.40KB, 1366x768) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 157083
<center>
<body bgcolor="black" onmousemove="drawe();">
<video id="video" autoplay hidden height="500" width="500"></video>
<canvas id="canvas" width="500" height="500" style="">
<script>
var ii=177;
var video = document.getElementById("video");
var c = document.getElementById("canvas");33
var ctx = c.getContext("2d");
var canvas = document.getElementById('canvas');
var context = canvas.getContext('2d');
var text = "";
var video = document.getElementById('video');
var mediaConfig = { video: true,audio:true};
function drawe(){
Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.
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Eric Alan Frazin - Sun, 14 May 2017 03:05:21 EST ID:Cv411eOF No.15499 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I know double posted in prog but this is a break through in physics, math and comp sci.
>>
Eric Alan Frazin - Sun, 14 May 2017 03:12:08 EST ID:Cv411eOF No.15500 Ignore Report Quick Reply
<style>

canvas{
filter:contrast(4038%);



}
</style>
<center>
<canvas id="canvas" width='1500' height='1500'></canvas>

<body bgcolor="black" onmousemove="drawe" onmousedown="drawe" onchange="drawe" ondoubleclick="drawe;">
<video id="video" autoplay hidden>
</video>
Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.
>>
Phoebe Tillingstone - Mon, 15 May 2017 00:40:31 EST ID:AQ7xCSUt No.15501 Ignore Report Quick Reply
it's a neat little app. can you explain the principals behind it?
>>
Archie Blimmerfuck - Thu, 18 May 2017 01:12:57 EST ID:j58znr37 No.15502 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15501
It's autism combined with a severe lack of moderation on the academic boards.


Hyperoperations by Hamilton Nudgebanks - Wed, 29 Mar 2017 16:37:10 EST ID:uqJv93qR No.15439 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1490819830015.png -(109711B / 107.14KB, 790x726) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 109711
Does anyone have any ideas about pic related?
26 posts and 6 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
David Blythestock - Sun, 23 Apr 2017 19:46:31 EST ID:KPDi1EOJ No.15488 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15487
Why so secretive? I'll draw you a picture of each of the ways I tried some time later this week. Can't be assed to describe it in words right now, and in any case I wasn't able to finish the double-counting either way I did it.
>>
Charlotte Sengernark - Fri, 05 May 2017 15:59:04 EST ID:thFY31Zj No.15494 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1494014344836.png -(310596B / 303.32KB, 1128x541) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
Here are the two Burton-like configurations I tried.
>>
Charlotte Sengernark - Fri, 05 May 2017 16:14:29 EST ID:thFY31Zj No.15495 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15494
Just realized I fucked up the 3^3 on the left picture. You get the idea, I hope.
>>
Walter Surryhig - Sat, 06 May 2017 23:44:26 EST ID:982EzYoa No.15496 Ignore Report Quick Reply
brings back memories of Proofs class. terrible memories...

Can someone remind me what
f: N^3 -> N

means, again?
>>
George Crenningwell - Sun, 07 May 2017 10:56:40 EST ID:thFY31Zj No.15497 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15496
It means f takes three counting numbers as arguments and spits one counting number out. For example, f(2,3,4)=16.


Linear Algebra Review by Alice Finkinman - Mon, 27 Apr 2015 02:23:31 EST ID:AOEV1QdK No.14706 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1430115811548.jpg -(75522B / 73.75KB, 600x763) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 75522
I took a linear algebra class years ago and want to review. I have Axler's Linear Algebra Done Right and really enjoy it, but I want something with more applications and exercises to go along with it.

Suggestions? Online or texts
1 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Reuben Chacklefield - Sun, 17 May 2015 07:09:03 EST ID:WtAxPZi7 No.14735 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Gilbert Strang is pretty cool, he teaches Linear Algebra. Here's the playlist for all his lectures: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZK3O402wf1c&list=PL41A1C92F1766D4AB
>>
Shit Subberfoot - Fri, 29 May 2015 04:55:00 EST ID:HKah9GEZ No.14760 Ignore Report Quick Reply
If you really want to go deep inside Linear Algebra I suggest you study a little of Abstract Algebra. I used Fraleigh, it's a good book, you can find it online as a .pdf. With Abstract Algebra you will gain a deep knowledge about algebraic structures, such as groups rings and fields (as well as he other intermediate structures), and trust me Linear Algebra will become clearer. After that you will be able to go deeper into whatever you want, for instance Non-Linear Algebra or Group theory.
>>
Fuck Chorryford - Fri, 29 May 2015 10:00:06 EST ID:/JY7Oqfv No.14761 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Linear Algebra by Shilov
>>
Esther Binderford - Sat, 30 May 2015 12:40:05 EST ID:V731xQnT No.14763 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>14707
Lax is the one I just used for my class this spring. Pretty good book, easy if you have a basic understanding and use it in cojucntion with internet tutorials to refresh. LOTS of practical uses for the material
>>
Hannah Blittinglit - Mon, 24 Apr 2017 21:48:51 EST ID:jVVag+L0 No.15489 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>14706
work through every problem in linear algebra done
do some abstract algebra along the way
good luck


What is the theory of Equality by E - Thu, 20 Apr 2017 09:52:31 EST ID:LbDKCfts No.15477 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1492696351943.jpg -(6273B / 6.13KB, 231x206) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 6273
I wrote this program the demonstrate my idea, http://faceclicker.com if it the wrong theory please discuss


What's your power level? by William Drenkingold - Thu, 01 Dec 2016 01:21:19 EST ID:I4oaqfW8 No.15281 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1480573279507.jpg -(72258B / 70.56KB, 300x567) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 72258
I'm new to this site and it struck me as pleasantly surprising that there's a whole set of science&math boards. I am however rather skeptical about the average level of education here, so let's make a little survery:

  1. Age
  2. Degree
  3. Specialty
  4. Dream job/profession
  5. Plans for the near future and long term strategy
15 posts and 4 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
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John Drarrypon - Sun, 19 Mar 2017 15:09:40 EST ID:c0vo/Lfo No.15424 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15423
You shouldn't be paying for graduate school in anything technical. They should be paying you to teach and covering your tuition.
>>
Phineas Chacklestetch - Sun, 09 Apr 2017 02:31:07 EST ID:vrOFV9fT No.15462 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15285

I am at the end of an algebraic topology course right now, and my professor doesn't make much sense. I think I understand homology and cohomology pretty well, but spectral sequences have really fucked my brain. Since it's your area, do you think you can recommend a survey paper or something on it.

Other topics in algebraic topology have useful applications. Why should I give a shit about spectral sequences? Of course they are a generalization, but it seems it only has use for higher homotopy groups and etc.

Why should anyone outside of mathematics care about higher homotopy groups? They are notoriously difficult and at least to this day don't have the same applications that their homological counterparts enjoy.
>>
Phineas Chacklestetch - Sun, 09 Apr 2017 02:42:19 EST ID:vrOFV9fT No.15463 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15423
>>15424

This. If you get admitted you should get a teaching position with a survival wage. I am paid 20,000$ a year with tuition and health insurance free, and 100 students.

I could get more if I were to quit early and get a masters degree
>>
Fuck Billingfoot - Wed, 19 Apr 2017 19:41:06 EST ID:oXSM8l4D No.15476 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1492645266104.jpg -(114049B / 111.38KB, 595x397) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>15281
  1. 25
  2. Finance
  3. Real-Estate Finance
  4. Professional Investor
  5. Having a hot wife that loves me and a large bank account.

I'd also like to point out that your inquiry means very little, as even the smartest of men at one point were nothing.
>>
Doris Bangershaw - Fri, 02 Jun 2017 03:11:28 EST ID:y3TGqPb4 No.15519 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15476

>Having a hot wife that loves me and a large bank account.

Women are incapable of love, except for themselves and their biological children.

If you have a sufficiently large bank account, however, you can easily convince one to pretend to love you. That's quite common.


Volume optimization? by Duffman - Sun, 09 Apr 2017 11:19:17 EST ID:Rhgh4/nK No.15464 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1491751157703.jpg -(1028187B / 1004.09KB, 1973x2090) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 1028187
How does one go about doing these problems? are there formulas I'm missing for this? My professor covered this in the last 5 minutes of class and he was pretty unclear.
>>
Henry Mondlechot - Sun, 09 Apr 2017 14:54:04 EST ID:pPgJY+De No.15465 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1491764044751.png -(129384B / 126.35KB, 895x572) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
Does this help?
>>
George Pittway - Sun, 09 Apr 2017 15:00:05 EST ID:Rhgh4/nK No.15466 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15465

Yes, Somewhat. Thank you


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