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Restricted movement by Ian Cinderworth - Sun, 26 Feb 2017 18:58:58 EST ID:ncb8UBjg No.15412 Ignore Report Quick Reply
File: 1488153538709.png -(45484B / 44.42KB, 1152x799) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 45484
I like to ask here, because it's chill here and I the thought of citing /math/ on my bachelor's amuses me.

Pic illustrates a truck with a trailer, reversing in a clockwise circle. The axles are illustrated with a green wheel on the end of each radius.
The axle on the trailer can be steered.
Suppose the wheels on the trailer are turned slightly, creating a new radius and triangle shown in blue.
So after the truck has reversed for a bit, shown in pink, I think the trailer would move like shown, with the triangle intact, dragging it's point C along the "old" radius of the truck rear axle. (Old being the instance where the new angle of the trailer wheels were established)
My questions are: Do I reason correctly? and How does the angle B in the yellow triangle change, according to the trailer wheel angle, the trucks turning circle and distance traveled? You see, I'm interested in the point where yellow A an B are equal.


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