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History of Techniques by Rick Story - Thu, 29 Mar 2018 10:41:40 EST ID:vnohrc/6 No.58009 Ignore Report Quick Reply
File: 1522334500211.gif -(3751980B / 3.58MB, 222x200) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 3751980
I was watching a Texan pro wrestling match from the 1950s and this flappy boi pulls out what kinda looks like a prototype crucifix armbar/cross armbreaker. I've long considered it an "MMA" move and presumed it's innovation, or at popularization & appropriation by exhibitionists, was relatively recent (probably Brazilian). Now I'm wondering just how deep the rabbit hole goes.

What's the origin of the armbar, /mma/? What about other common maneuvers? Any especially interesting timelines that've been taken for granted & forgotten?
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Rick Story - Thu, 29 Mar 2018 10:42:46 EST ID:vnohrc/6 No.58010 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>58009
*at least popularization & appropriation
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Hidehiko Yoshida - Fri, 30 Mar 2018 10:38:39 EST ID:dxQ7a5I7 No.58011 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>58009
AFAIK it's a Judo move. BJJ had a lot of Judo in its inception, the Japanese master who taught jujitsu to the Gracie patriarch was a member of the Kokodan.
Judo goes back to 1882, the arm-bar may be in Japanese jujitsu before that, and there's probably variations native to the catch-wrestling that pro-wrestling devolved from, as well as sombo, pancration, and any other country's martial arts and sports that explored submission-based groundwork.
Like Bruce Lee said, “I personally do not believe in the word style. Why? Because, unless there are human beings with three arms and four legs, unless we have another group of human beings that are structurally different from us, there can be no different style of fighting.”
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Junior Dos Santos - Wed, 09 May 2018 06:26:52 EST ID:Rge49gpP No.58035 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Pro wrestling as entertainment is based on the rules and techniques of the Combat sport called catch wrestling. Catch wrestling is what pro wrestling was when it was real.

It is oldest known to be a mishmash of European styles of local wrestling from throughout Scotland, Wales, and England, etc. both during that period and after there was a lot of cross pollination between styles as guys travelled through other countries from the Middle and Far East.

This kinda looks like a nonsense concession hold but the cross arm bar is a staple of all grappling arts as far back as you can go. It was often taught in localized Japanese systems of jiujitsu which have never been syllabized. Catch wrestling was also never syllabised which is why it almost nearly died out and has a murky history while judo and bjj flourished.

Bjj and judo are seperate martial arts which were separately syllabised from the common ancestor of Kano Jiujitsu, which was a collection of techniques encompassing ground grappling and throwing.

Might be interesting for you to know that the heel hook technique you see in pro wrestling or MMA is a native technique to the martial art of pro wrestling. You can still see the evidence in the name of the technique (“hook”, meaning incapacitating grappling technique, as by joint damage etc, old pro wrestling term). There are some other techniques with cross over terms between catch wrestling or pro wrestling as a martial art, and modern bjj or judo, where the techniques are the same or very similar but have seperate origins and names. Here’s some pro wrestling technique names and their modern title:

Sleeper = rear naked choke
Abdominal stretch = cobra twist = the twister
Front headlock = guillotine choke
Double wrist lock = Kimura lock
Cravat = baseballbat choke
Top wrist lock = Americana

There’s a bunch more.

In addition there are many techniques in catch wrestling which you still see today like the stf which many pro wrestling fans don’t realise are real applicable techniques in modern grappling.
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Duane Ludwig - Sat, 12 May 2018 07:31:41 EST ID:xfsaelmX No.58040 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>58009
>What's the origin of the armbar, /mma/?
This is a better question for /his/

Short answer - Armbars are as old as arms.


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