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Fukushima by Cornelius Blobblesidging - Mon, 13 Mar 2017 20:56:01 EST ID:KztxZ82A No.156662 Ignore Report Quick Reply
File: 1489452961331.jpg -(76182B / 74.40KB, 867x326) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 76182
All this because they were too lazy to build the water wall a few meters higher...

https://www.extremetech.com/extreme/245324-cant-see-inside-fukushima-daiichi-robots-keep-dying
Tepco, the utility company tasked with overseeing cleanup and waste processing for the former Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, hit another snag this week.

Last month, we reported on new findings about Reactor #2 that showed it was far more radioactive inside than previously measured. At the time, we noted that Tepco was working on a new robot that could handle up to 73 sieverts of radiation, but the measured level of 530 sieverts vastly exceeded that tolerance.

Initial attempts to see into Reactor #2 via robotic probe have all failed. We’ve only been able to estimate contamination levels by checking the amount of interference in the video feed the robot relays. The new hardened robot built by Toshiba and meant to give Tepco a much-improved ability to survey the damage reactor died 5x faster than expected and stalled 10 feet from the grate it needed to inspect.


Tepco continues to insist it can meet a 2021 goal of beginning actual site clean-up. This will require enormous investments in the field of robotics and may require the company to create entirely new designs to ensure their hardware doesn’t die in a matter of minutes. If the company’s survey robots keep dying, how are they going to field robots that can cut and gather the nuclear fuel that melted into concrete?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vR8v0tSpxKQ
>>
Cornelius Blobblesidging - Mon, 13 Mar 2017 21:18:44 EST ID:KztxZ82A No.156666 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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https://www.extremetech.com/extreme/243904-fukushimas-reactor-2-far-radioactive-previously-realized-no-sign-containment-breach
Earlier this week, Tepco, the Japanese company in charge of cleanup operations at Fukushima Daiichi, seemed to be on the verge of announcing rare good news. Specifically, the company had found some of the fuel debris associated with the failure of Reactor #2 at the bottom of the reactor’s containment vessel. Locating the damaged reactor’s fuel (or what’s left of it) is critical to the clean-up effort.

What the company ultimately discovered, however, is that the amount of radiation pouring off the damaged reactor below the reactor pressure vessel is 530 sieverts per hour, vastly higher than had previously been communicated. Previous measurements of the radiation inside the containment vessel had pointed to an exposure level of 73 sieverts per hour.

>One sievert is the maximum amount of radiation exposure NASA allows for astronauts over their entire lifetime.

“Unshielded spent nuclear fuel can produce over 1 million Rem per hour on contact (10,000 Sv) the year after its removed from the reactor. This decays over time naturally.”
>>
Cornelius Denningdork - Mon, 13 Mar 2017 21:42:32 EST ID:B7EBVJHu No.156667 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>156666
I don't like the way news articles tend to handle radiation.
I know journalists are journalists and tend to have no background in science or engineering, but sentences like "radiation pouring off the damaged reactor below the reactor pressure vessel is 530 sieverts per hour" just serve to scare people who don't know any better as it implies significant radioactive particles leaving the containment instead of a significant amount of EMR in a single spot.
>>
Cornelius Blobblesidging - Mon, 13 Mar 2017 21:43:24 EST ID:KztxZ82A No.156668 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1489455804331.png -(164005B / 160.16KB, 628x468) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T65rW_SIzg0
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Cornelius Blobblesidging - Mon, 13 Mar 2017 21:48:19 EST ID:KztxZ82A No.156669 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>156667
It doesn't imply or infer that at all.
>>
Cornelius Denningdork - Mon, 13 Mar 2017 22:20:05 EST ID:B7EBVJHu No.156670 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1489458005095.jpg -(209579B / 204.67KB, 1363x900) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>156669
The verb "pouring" implies fluid motion.
Someone who doesn't understand how radiation works would assume that means it's leaking out.
You can find hundreds of articles using the "530 sieverts" measurement to compare the effects of Fukushima to Chernobyl.
>>
Betsy Dapperworth - Mon, 13 Mar 2017 23:56:17 EST ID:EjFN0ri2 No.156672 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>156668
prophetic
>>
Alice Pingerstone - Tue, 14 Mar 2017 05:20:26 EST ID:cbhMfSls No.156675 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>156662
Retard, the reactor isn't more radioactive than previously measured. Keep up with what fucking physics professors have to say on the subject.

The reactor appears more radioactive than previously measured - BECAUSE THE NEW DRONES CAN GET A LOT CLOSER TO THE REACTOR BEFORE GETTING FRIED BY THE RADIATION! CLOSER TO THE REACTOR = MORE RADIATION!

You are FUCKING RETARDED and you should just shut the fuck up.
>>
Wesley Denderstick - Tue, 14 Mar 2017 21:58:02 EST ID:jEOyOVdO No.156698 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>156675
Are you ok? you need to talk about something?
>>
Nicholas Hinkindale - Tue, 14 Mar 2017 22:29:56 EST ID:NuDb/mEX No.156699 Ignore Report Quick Reply
so the nuclear waste is what, a sludge? a semisolid? it's just this goopy glowing green shit like in fallout? someone show me an example of this waste. and the main problem is the radiation obviously, im guessing simply due to heat? are the robots just melting apart? why dont we make bots out of those ceramic space ship tiles or some shit? cant we supercool these niggabots with liquid nitro or something? someone fill in the dumbass here with some deets. also it says the waste melted through concrete, does this mean its like melting into the earth? is the radiation going into the ocean just... energy? suspended in the water? or is actively radiating waste material leaking into the water?
>>
Charlotte Pevingchare - Tue, 14 Mar 2017 23:47:26 EST ID:B7EBVJHu No.156700 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>156699
>so the nuclear waste is what, a sludge? a semisolid?
The reactor is in cold shutdown, so the radioactive material is solid to semi-solid, but some of the decay products are water soluble.

>the main problem is the radiation obviously, im guessing simply due to heat?
Gamma radiation penetrates into surfaces and heats up/radiolyses molecules deep inside. It takes several inches to a few feet of material to effectively block gamma radiation, depending on the amount and material.
This messes up electronics since a gamma ray can hit a bit inside a CPU or RAM and break it.

Chernobyl literally knocked out a helicopter flying above the exposed nuclear reactor by cooking the electronic system and shut down remote-controlled bulldozers they sent in to clear rubble.

>also it says the waste melted through concrete
It melted into concrete, before reaching the cold-shutdown state.

>is the radiation going into the ocean just... energy? suspended in the water?
No, that wouldn't be of any concern. The concern is radioactive material.

>is actively radiating waste material leaking into the water?
Maybe? They measured Caesium-137 at some monitoring well awhile ago and since then they've built several concrete walls, groundwater pumps, and an ice wall to prevent further infiltration.
I don't think they know if it was due to a leak or not.


When 3-mile island melted down, they put the plant into cold shutdown and waited 11 years before bothering to remove the fuel.
>>
Charlotte Turveyforth - Thu, 16 Mar 2017 12:52:59 EST ID:okcxXpDl No.156723 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>All this because they were too lazy to build the water wall a few meters higher...
Ironically the sea-wall was initially high enough but the earthquake caused the ground-level to fall.

The biggest derp has to be building their backup-diesel generators underground where they got flooded.
>>156700
>Chernobyl literally knocked out a helicopter flying above the exposed nuclear reactor by cooking the electronic system and shut down remote-controlled bulldozers they sent in to clear rubble.
Luckily it was the USSR so they could use expendable people to deal with it.
>>
Wesley Brishville - Thu, 16 Mar 2017 16:38:03 EST ID:B7EBVJHu No.156727 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>156723
>Luckily it was the USSR so they could use expendable people to deal with it.
They didn't expend their people willingly, this wasn't ww II.
When they had an area that required work, they'd calculate how long it would take to receive a lifetime dose of radiation, divide 10,000 men into shifts, then set up a horn to sound every shift change.
People shoveling reactor debris off the roof for instance could work for 45 seconds.

I mean a bunch of them died, but they did what they could to preserve life.
>>
Charlotte Turveyforth - Thu, 16 Mar 2017 19:40:45 EST ID:okcxXpDl No.156732 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>156727
>They didn't expend their people willingly, this wasn't ww II.
Some of them they did. Not that they had much choice. It could actually have been much much worse. Still, plenty of people were unknowingly sent on suicide missions but someone had to do it.
>>
Angus Shittingman - Thu, 16 Mar 2017 22:45:25 EST ID:aIivaRsS No.156742 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>156727
It wasn't forced, but they were fed lies about the danger. Claiming Vodka would clear Radiation from the body, or those white paper clean lab suits would block it.
>>
Frederick Danderwill - Fri, 17 Mar 2017 23:46:28 EST ID:okcxXpDl No.156752 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>156742
Or they just didn't tell them shit.
>>
Ebenezer Messlekene - Sun, 19 Mar 2017 10:13:21 EST ID:6EwAlMvP No.156779 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>156752
"Hey you, yeah, go into this power plant and remove this debris. Here's a shovel."
>>
Molly Fashdale - Sun, 19 Mar 2017 23:58:49 EST ID:BjGlxu/T No.156790 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>156732
The first responders mostly bit the bullet, but there were some in the military, termed "liquidators" operating under orders that suffered heavy exposure after the situation transistion from fire response to conrainment.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deaths_due_to_the_Chernobyl_disaster
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chernobyl_liquidators

It's funny, because the kncident only directly killed about 30 to 60 people, but ruined tens of thousands, beyond maybe 50,000 and affected hundreds of thousands, which is a staggering number.
>>
Samuel Lightfoot - Mon, 20 Mar 2017 17:05:46 EST ID:lYEV514W No.156810 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>156790
Yeah, outright death from recent radiation exposure is oddly rare in these incidents. It is the lingering shit that is the problem. The rare cancers that show up 10-20 years later or even in the next generation. Even then, some will live long lives even through long-term exposure.
https://www.pri.org/stories/2016-04-26/30-years-after-chernobyl-these-ukrainian-babushkas-are-still-living-their-toxic
Radioactive contamination is more like a game of Russian Roulette with cancer instead of bullets. Which makes it so fucking scary. Hell of a way to die, and as fucking random as hell.
>>
Ian Meddleford - Fri, 24 Mar 2017 21:14:49 EST ID:4S8JJgkK No.156976 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>156810
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/coal-ash-is-more-radioactive-than-nuclear-waste/

Even Coal Ash is radioactive wtf?
>>
Nicholas Sendleson - Fri, 24 Mar 2017 22:04:35 EST ID:cbhMfSls No.156977 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>156976
Knew that for years. Yay for friends that studied physics and chemistry.
>>
Ebenezer Hecklechore - Fri, 24 Mar 2017 22:27:09 EST ID:aIivaRsS No.156978 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>156977
Yeah, I've shut up alot of anti-nuclear moonbeams with that fact.


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