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What's the best ethnic food? by Troisgros family - Wed, 21 Mar 2018 19:56:23 EST ID:+NJAlw4Q No.154662 Ignore Report Quick Reply
File: 1521676583310.jpg -(175460B / 171.35KB, 1000x662) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 175460
I've been trying to branch out because I've never really been in a city that has good ethnic food until recently. The most we had growing up was a shitty chinese food place.
I recently tried some Thai and loved it. I also had some real Italian food and didn't like it nearly as much as Olive Garden Italian (which is probably heresy to say). Ethiopian food has always looked delicious so maybe I should see if I can find a place around here.

What's are some that you like?
>>
Duff Goldman - Wed, 21 Mar 2018 20:09:31 EST ID:V36efD0T No.154663 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Moroccan, Korean, Vietnamese, Nepalese.

It sounds like I'm just listing off a bunch of countries but do your research and you'll find some dank recipes in there. These cuisines I mentioned have in common is that there's easy to make, basic wholesome foods.

Also Spanish (primarily tapas).
>>
Hubert Keller - Wed, 21 Mar 2018 21:44:18 EST ID:gwccFEMl No.154664 Ignore Report Quick Reply
if i had to choose one national cuisine to subsist off of for the rest of my life it'd be mexican.

that said, if your real question is more like "what ethnic foods should i try that i probably haven't" then for sure go for etheopian like you mentioned. if you can find a good place it's bonkers. also taiwanese > chinese if you can find a real taiwanese place/place that even bothers to differentiate. i mean culturally they draw from the same similar sources of course, but it seems the taiwanese were just better able to preserve/recreate the cuisine of their heritage.

i'll also throw out turkish. whether it's street food or gourmet shit is good.
>>
Amy Finley - Wed, 21 Mar 2018 23:13:22 EST ID:KI9siIJe No.154665 Ignore Report Quick Reply
i mean i'll say all ethnic food is good tbh. even the english get a bad rap but i'll eat the shit out of some fish n chips; hell curry you get in the UK might as well be its own thing anyway so we can credit them for that too.

thai is probably my favorite. i love the richness of a spice-based curry but the thai give me sweet sour and hot in such magical combinations i gotta rank them above their neighbors to the west. no fear of beef in their dishes too which is also a plus.

i've never tried korean, but i'm real interested in trying bulgogi. or is that what i should go for on my first venture?
>>
Spike Mendelsohn - Thu, 22 Mar 2018 05:52:39 EST ID:jLjYdwhR No.154667 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I like Northern European and French food the most. Cream instead of tomato and butter instead of oils makes everything taste a lot better.
>>
Marcus Samuelsson - Thu, 22 Mar 2018 07:47:26 EST ID:8eaqa6FP No.154668 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I find Italian to be pretty robust, wholesome and delightful to eat. Not much of a purist though and tend to adulterate dishes and mish-mash with other aspects of mediterranean cooking, or just things i think will work well with whats there

they have some great soups, know how to do ish, like a thousand types of pasta. They also appreciate that meat doesnt have to be the centerpiece of a meal
>>
Curtis Stone - Thu, 22 Mar 2018 12:12:27 EST ID:ATTEhYAS No.154672 Ignore Report Quick Reply
chinese food is basically the best in the world. mix it up with jap or kor sometimes
>>
François Massialot - Thu, 22 Mar 2018 14:21:25 EST ID:ci54O6Tw No.154675 Ignore Report Quick Reply
What city are you in, OP? Or what region? Just about every culture has great food, it's just a question of finding the good restaurants. cities/regions have different ethnic groups, and numbers of those good restaurants.

I love indian restaurants, and they seem pretty ubiquitous. Make sure to get apetizers (naan, samosas, pakora, chutneys).

> I also had some real Italian food and didn't like it nearly as much as Olive Garden Italian (which is probably heresy to say).
LOL. You do you, man.

>>154672
But it's kinda like saying "european food." China is huge with multiple cuisines. In most US cities, the only chinese restaurants are the typical chinese-american general tso chicken, etc. I love that type of food, but china has soooo much more.

>>154665
Yeah, Curry is an english spice mix/dish. It's a bastardization of indian cuisine... in a good way. Like how general tso's chicken is an american dish.

Fish and chips is amazing. Full english breakfast (or some variation) is incredible. Pairing either of those with a pale ale is godly. Tea and sweet baked goods? Great snack. Cheddar cheese? Come on.

And I fucking hate the british otherwise.
>>
Chen Kenmin - Thu, 22 Mar 2018 16:29:26 EST ID:bnDwnI8O No.154676 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>154675
>Fish and chips is amazing. Full english breakfast (or some variation) is incredible. Pairing either of those with a pale ale is godly.
That seems like a slightly odd pairing to me. It's all good stuff but both those dishes are very filling which doesn't go all that well with drinking pints of ale, then there's the whole thing where you're with drinking ale with your breakfast.
Beer and a curry makes more sense, but don't let me stop you.
>>
François Massialot - Thu, 22 Mar 2018 18:54:17 EST ID:ci54O6Tw No.154682 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>154676
>then there's the whole thing where you're with drinking ale with your breakfast.
AND?!
>>
Duff Goldman - Thu, 22 Mar 2018 19:48:42 EST ID:V36efD0T No.154686 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>154665
>i've never tried korean, but i'm real interested in trying bulgogi. or is that what i should go for on my first venture?
Bimimbap with some spicy kimchi and a cold ass beer.

Finish with some Soju for desert.
>>
Keith Floyd - Thu, 22 Mar 2018 21:13:56 EST ID:+NJAlw4Q No.154687 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>154664
>if i had to choose one national cuisine to subsist off of for the rest of my life it'd be mexican.
Whole heartedly agree. I forgot to mention Mexican food because I hardly call it ethnic here in Texas when there's a Mexican place on every corner. I could eat enchiladas and beans and rice eternally and forever be satisfied.

One thing that a lot of people who enjoy Mexican food haven't had the privilege of experiencing is New Mexican food. In New Mexico they have their own spin on Mexican food and it's fucking amazing. It's essentially very similar to traditional Mexican food and Tex Mex but more spicy and they put chile peppers in fucking everything. They also like to soak a lot of their dishes in that brown sauce that I can't remember what it's called. I could easily subsist on Mexican or Tex Mex food every day but I'd be blissful if I could live off of New Mexican food every day. Love me some chile stew.
>>
Michel Roux - Thu, 22 Mar 2018 22:24:50 EST ID:3wicUByW No.154688 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Ethiopian. Reminds me a bit of idian with the spices and lentils and veggies. But it's less saucy, and injera is great once you get over the initial weirdness. Very filling too.
>>
Keith Floyd - Fri, 23 Mar 2018 04:01:40 EST ID:+NJAlw4Q No.154689 Ignore Report Quick Reply
To anyone who has any kind of knowledge about korean cuisine, what do you think of this list of easy Korean recipes?
https://www.thespruce.com/easy-korean-recipes-to-make-at-home-4118388

And also, if I make a trip to the Korean market here in town, what are some things I should keep an eye out for? Stuff that's interesting in general or tastey/spicy and good to cook with. I'm really pretty clueless so any tips of things to look for would be cool.
>>
Keith Cholewinski - Fri, 23 Mar 2018 12:28:21 EST ID:ci54O6Tw No.154691 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>154689
>if I make a trip to the Korean market here in town, what are some things I should keep an eye out for?
If they make the kimchi there, get it. They'll probably have different types (like cucumber). You can also get the ingredients to make your own kimchi. That's fun.

Shrimp chips are a good snack. Dried shrimp are good for cooking.

Gochujang is great for grilling/marinading meats. Google it, the packaging (red plastic tub) is easy to spot in the market.
>>
Seymour Karp - Sun, 25 Mar 2018 17:38:18 EST ID:N9Aea4/Y No.154704 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>154687
>They also like to soak a lot of their dishes in that brown sauce that I can't remember what it's called.
Mole?
>>
Guillaume Tirel - Sun, 25 Mar 2018 17:42:30 EST ID:+NJAlw4Q No.154705 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>154704
Yes that's it. They often use a spicy version that's dope
>>
Bud Lightly - Mon, 26 Mar 2018 17:12:34 EST ID:j7+XQ+a0 No.154725 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>154688

Ethiopian food made me like marrow
>>
C-Higgy !lfsExjBfzE - Mon, 26 Mar 2018 21:11:27 EST ID:xpX6q/o8 No.154727 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Mexican, Italian, Brazilian and Japanese/Korean BBQ for me. Been getting more into Indonesian through a friend of mine.
>>
[name redacted] !h55/E7mIo6 - Sat, 31 Mar 2018 23:32:21 EST ID:MDquhZnB No.154809 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I think Greek is my favourite, but that might be just because I don't have a Greek place in my town, so I only get to eat it on when I travel for work.
>>
Ted Allen - Sun, 01 Apr 2018 21:10:14 EST ID:Tm8ohWtY No.154818 Ignore Report Quick Reply
wtf mate
>>
Philippe Rochat - Mon, 02 Apr 2018 11:56:40 EST ID:1s3YOQ5U No.154821 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>154809
Clearly this isnt true.. You pretty much documated your food history pedo food goblin.
>>
Masahiko Kobe - Mon, 02 Apr 2018 14:21:54 EST ID:DD2R5oKD No.154822 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>154662
Ethiopian food is greatly recommended, especially with others to share it with.
Morrocan food is also very tasty.
If you want a spicy challenge, find yourself a proper Indian or chinese (szechuan ) restaurant and tell them NOT to hold back because you're a weak-ass westerner :)
Spanish is also a good recommendation. If they serve a well-stocked paella (if you like seafood) or tapas table, you have found the right place.
Proper Chinese and Japanese food can be harder to find, but are well worth it in the end. The quality varies a lot, so just keep looking for those.
Properly made Greek food is also a good choice.

A good rule to remember; If you see ethnic chinese, japanese, ethiopians etc. among the other customers, then you know it's going to be good. Have a good look at the restaurant before you go in
>>
Jean-Baptiste Troisgros - Mon, 02 Apr 2018 22:09:43 EST ID:ucYLGzQP No.154824 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>154662
Shout out to Iranian food; I recommend y'all give it a try it y'all like meat and rice. Koobideh is a delicious greasy fatty mince meat kabob, ghormeh sabzi is an amazing hearty stew over rice. But to top it all off, tahdig which comes in many forms but is essentially crunchy rice made on the bottom of the pot.

I recommend y'all to try it.
>>
Chuck Hughes - Tue, 03 Apr 2018 06:20:01 EST ID:ATTEhYAS No.154827 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>154809

you just posted a picture of a 2'x2' fucking box of burger king slop that you ate in one sitting and you have the audacity to make a post in a thread about real food? don't you have some underage relatives to lust after?
>>
Melissa d'Arabian - Tue, 03 Apr 2018 12:14:00 EST ID:fGsZJBNm No.154828 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I'd echo the comments around Ethiopian, I was really impressed when I went.

If you can find a place that does Keralan curry and you like seafood, would also recommend.
>>
Aida Mollenkamp - Tue, 03 Apr 2018 14:29:26 EST ID:sEywcPEv No.154830 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>154822
>If you want a spicy challenge
>recommends Szechuan
Listen up my chink chank, I know that's the main province that we Westerners associate with spicy Chinese food, but there are actually two hotter provinces. You see, there's an old saying in China...

The Sichuanese are not afraid of chili heat.

However, no amount of hotness will afright the people in Guizhou.

But those Hunanese are afraid of food that isn't hot!

Further reading on the differences between spicy food in Hunan, Szechuan, and Guizhou:
http://www.jeanniecholee.com/asian_palate/comparing-spices-in-guizhou-hunan-and-sichuan/
>>
Keith Floyd - Wed, 04 Apr 2018 01:11:52 EST ID:EXK+Pn9B No.154834 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>154830
When I was living in the middle of NC I landed in a city chock full of Vietnamese ex-pats and their families. We had one shitty China Dragon in the middle of town, but it was surrounded by 3 Vietnamese places. One was all pho. (This was back in 2007 and I had never had anything remotely similar in flavor to pho) They had multiple spiciness levels and oddly enough, Thai spicy was on the menu as their hottest pho.

I smoked weed with a few of the Viet folks in the town and when I asked them what that meant, they told me that it was just a jab at the Thais for liking insanely spicy things. The soup was built the same way as a traditional pho, but then ludicrous amounts of spice were added. Not even a traditional Thai or Vietnamese style.

I never ordered it or saw anyone order it, but I like to think that at some time a poor soul who had no idea what he was getting into ordered the thai spicy pho and never came back.
>>
Martín Berasategui - Wed, 04 Apr 2018 07:43:31 EST ID:ZGeKcLU7 No.154835 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>154834
Idj where it lands compared to those Chinese foods, but Thai food is pretty hot. Fuck those phockers for dissing spicy food though.
>>
Nicolas Stohrer - Wed, 04 Apr 2018 12:16:16 EST ID:bnDwnI8O No.154836 Ignore Report Quick Reply
If you wanted a spicy challenge, why would you eat ethnic food?
Yeah it's all hotter than most Westerners are used to but it's the 0.01% of Westerners who like heat who make utterly ridiculously spicy food. 'Ethnic' food is sensibly and nicely spiced in ways that complements the food itself but as a challenge it's nothing compared to lathering your fries in something from >>153444
Or you can add a few dabs of pure heat extract to your pho that's good too.
>>
Daniel Boulud - Wed, 04 Apr 2018 12:42:54 EST ID:+NJAlw4Q No.154837 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>154836
This is why I keep some death sauce. Every time I tell the Thai food place make it a 5 on the spicy scale it's more like a 3, I guess because they're worried about some sissy mouthed manboy asking for a refund, so I dilute it in the red chili sauce they give me and cover that shit in it.

Idk about most other ethnic foods but Thai food flavor often goes great with super spicy.
>>
Cat Cora - Thu, 05 Apr 2018 13:33:14 EST ID:ca1pZQ6n No.154840 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>154830
Think it might have been me and you chatting before but I spent chinese new year in Hunan recently and even the spiciest shit didn't hold a candle to one thai dish I had in Hong Kong.

And see when all this discussion is going on, the hottest conventional supermarket food I've been able to find are those red korean noodles. They are pretty much my limit, I can eat and enjoy them but if they were a bit hotter then they would be too hot for me.

Next up I wanna try some chongqing food, it's between Szechuan and Hunan so they probably know how to fuck stuff up.

Szechuanese food is usually the numbing heat, which is an interesting experience but I far prefer the chillies that you get with Hunanese and thai food.

I'll tell you what's fucking great though, stinky tofu. Damn that stuff tastes good.
>>
Susur Lee - Fri, 06 Apr 2018 01:29:49 EST ID:+NJAlw4Q No.154842 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Thanks for the tips on the Korean market groceries earlier in the thread, got a decent, and I think fairly comprehensive shopping list for a Korean food noob now.

Gochujang
Nam Prik Pao
Korean BBQ
Chili Garlic sauces
Spices
Potstickers
Tea
Bim Bim Bap
Ban Chan
Pocky and other snacks/candy
Oyster Sauce
Soy Sauce
Hoisin Sauce
Sesame Oil
Panko
Ramen
Bamboo Shoots
Baby Corn
Shalots
Red Pepper Flakes
Red/Thai Chilis
Spicy Kimchi
Pickled Mustard Greens
Sesame Seed
Roasted Seaweed
Bulk Beans and/or Rice

So that's my full list though I probably won't get all that, I'll narrow it down a bit when I get there but this is just a list of possibilities for the H-Mart. I'll post my haul tmro.

First thing I plan to make is some spicy korean beef and rice and maybe have some bim bim bap and kimchi on the side.
>>
Geoffrey Zakarian - Mon, 09 Apr 2018 16:32:08 EST ID:EcCtzS9q No.154856 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>154840
>Think it might have been me and you chatting before
You're probably right. Can you post those red noodles? Stinky tofu sounds pretty gross. I mean, when is "stinky" a positive attribute? Now, stanky tofu, that might be worth trying, but I don't think I'd go anywhere near stinky tofu.
>>
Koumei Nakamura - Mon, 09 Apr 2018 19:21:08 EST ID:SY51HKOc No.154857 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>154856
Yeah it's an awful name for it but trust me it was the best food I tried in Hunan.
>>
Guy Fieri - Tue, 10 Apr 2018 03:36:06 EST ID:+NJAlw4Q No.154858 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>154857
That shit is really hot. I grabbed one when I was at H Mart and wasn't expecting it to be so spicy. I looked at the back when I got home and realized it's labeled as almost 10k scoville heat units. I required a bit of milk to get through it. It was alright but the other couple of ramens that I got there had better flavor.

First foray into Korean food was dank. Went with some spicy korean beef on white rice (can't see the rice because of white bowl and crappy phone). Between the beef and rice is some spicy sauteed onion and bell pepper. This came out amazing, pretty much restaurant quality shit. Perfect spicy level where it's just enough to get you to sweat a bit by the end. Those thai chilis are dope, great flavor and heat level.
>>
Heston Blumenthal - Tue, 10 Apr 2018 14:49:36 EST ID:mHds8rNU No.154865 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>154858
10K schoville is like a red jalepeno. Which doesn't sound much till you think "hey I'm eating a whole bowl of jalapeno". I can eat one off the planet but that's like buying 2 jars and eating them all in one go.
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Alain Ducasse - Sun, 15 Apr 2018 21:43:30 EST ID:+NJAlw4Q No.154927 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Second foray into Korean food.

Made a spicy Korean chicken stew (very hot, take out heat scale 4.5/5) and some red pepper sauce green beans over white rice. About 3/4 of the way through the bowl I had to give in and throw some white rice in there to make it a bit easier to finish.
>>
Caesar Cardini - Sun, 15 Apr 2018 23:42:09 EST ID:C1LaAlri No.154928 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>154857
i got a 4 pack of those on amazon. holy fucking shit. the taste is actually good so I kept eating but god damn. I ate the whole thing and for about 30 minutes my lips were in agony. I haven't touched the other packets yet.


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