420chan now has a web-based IRC client available, right here
Leave these fields empty (spam trap):
Name
You can leave this blank to post anonymously, or you can create a Tripcode by using the float Name#Password
A subject is required when posting a new thread
Subject
Comment
[*]Italic Text[/*]
[**]Bold Text[/**]
[~]Taimapedia Article[/~]
[%]Spoiler Text[/%]
>Highlight/Quote Text
[pre]Preformatted & Monospace text[/pre]
1. Numbered lists become ordered lists
* Bulleted lists become unordered lists
File

Sandwich


Community Updates

420chan now supports HTTPS! If you find any issues, you may report them in this thread
A ridiculous sequence of courses by Doris Blatherstock - Sun, 04 Jun 2017 02:38:16 EST ID:HC1vVHLz No.37033 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1496558296564.jpg -(18091B / 17.67KB, 480x360) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 18091
Hello, I made and actually did all this (including the 'grad level' research electives, except for the coding theory book)
https://functionalcs.github.io/curriculum/

It's easier than it looks, it took me 3 years to do that. I did it about 3-4 hrs a day at first but then everything kind of snowballed and I finished it with only 1hr a day after the first year. These days I'm finishing The Art of Computer Programming series, I'm done up to book 4A and doing 4B draft at the same time. I just do it 20-30mins a day.

I cannot shill TAOCP enough, it totally changed me from amateur to professional computer scientist by just doing hundreds and hundreds of exercises. 20mins a day, for one year, it's all you need for the first book. Anyway, pick and choose what you want from this list and enjoy

I make money from cloning shopify apps, and I work P/T on https://turtle.ai/ though much more infrequently these days. I started out shilling myself on elance (now "upwork") as a jr developer and literally taking jobs from 3rd world countries for less than I would spend on lunch. I also work 2 days a week at my local university doing "ML" (statistics) for a cancer research lab making peanuts but it's research, and fun to do, and I don't need the money. The book in that above link, "Parallel and Sequential Algorithms" was directly responsible for the lab hiring me. Anyway anons I'm here to tell you to try this have a good day.
6 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Polly Boddlelock - Wed, 19 Jul 2017 00:15:00 EST ID:9plGIS8Y No.37114 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Thanks for the curricula brah. Currently learning about learning. Real interesting stuff. I'm already a fast learner but maybe knowing how it works will help me git gud faster.
>>
Lydia Buzzcocke - Wed, 19 Jul 2017 14:42:05 EST ID:hh4uYXvR No.37116 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37033
Thanks for the link, I could use a touch-up on specifically my math (esp. algrebra) and problem solving skills...

Lots of great reading in there. "Parallel and Sequential Algorithms" is really interesting

That's my summer vacation covered :-D
>>
Archie Fongerlodging - Thu, 20 Jul 2017 22:30:07 EST ID:eZVREo4y No.37120 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37033
Anon quit being a fag and mentor me on making money in crypto
>>
Shitting Chuzzledock - Mon, 14 Aug 2017 17:30:31 EST ID:MNLHjix1 No.37156 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37033
Simeltaneously doing the "How to learn" Course paired with the introductory Programming Course. I gave the "How to learn" course a 2 week head start.

What I like about it so far
  1. I already know a lot about anatomy, physiology and how the brain functions
  2. I already habitiually do 30 min-1 hour habits on a daily basis (DuoLingo, Guitar, puzzles, reading...) so this is easy to adopt.

Wish me luck, as I delve into this new frontier of CS
>>
Phyllis Blythegold - Tue, 19 Sep 2017 23:42:40 EST ID:eZVREo4y No.37194 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37033
this was posted on my birthday

anyway, do you have a blog I could follow anywhere anon? all your recommendatiosn are always solid


a phone os by Basil Gugglegold - Thu, 10 Aug 2017 09:59:00 EST ID:CZA5DFLp No.37145 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1502373540803.jpg -(80244B / 78.36KB, 1000x661) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 80244
How realistic would it be to create a very basic os for an arm phone?

I'd be content if I could just boot, and maybe send a blank sms by pressing the home button or something. Has anyone ever done something like this? Do you know of any good resources to get started?
I had a basic computer architecture class, so I know how to program simple startup code and taskmanagers for x64/x86 and some microprocessors, so learning arm assembly wont be a problem. Having access to I/O, and eventually the gsm functions will probably be the difficult part.

I never really wanted a smartphone, but now I got a 2015 samsung galaxy a3 because it was only 25 euro. The battery life is really shitty (40 hours at best), so an ultra efficient os would be really cool.
5 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Oliver Cemmlehood - Sat, 09 Sep 2017 13:41:24 EST ID:2mg3P58s No.37186 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37185
> because they're somewhat antiquated
yes, because of this. AT commands and telnet are similar in that way.
>>
Oliver Cemmlehood - Sat, 09 Sep 2017 13:44:06 EST ID:2mg3P58s No.37187 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37185
>>37186
this, by the way, is coming from someone who's a great fan of unix and lives on the cli basically so it's not that i'm *inherently* biased against "old" things. but with some things you feel that it should have been replaced a long time ago when you use it.
>>
Jarvis Sodgemon - Sun, 10 Sep 2017 00:33:33 EST ID:xLKzmVTo No.37188 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37187
> but with some things you feel that it should have been replaced a long time ago when you use it.

Agreed. AT commands are a pain in the ass.
>>
Ian Brookfield - Mon, 18 Sep 2017 16:27:34 EST ID:4MJeso9G No.37192 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37145
You should try flash it to lineage
many report huge battery time increases with all the bloat removed
>>
Fucking Hallymitch - Tue, 19 Sep 2017 02:19:40 EST ID:P6PS9CBz No.37193 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37192
This sounds like spam to me.


TDD by Frederick Sushdock - Thu, 31 Aug 2017 10:33:41 EST ID:9cestl8h No.37169 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1504190021194.jpg -(324209B / 316.61KB, 503x376) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 324209
Hey how often is test driven actually used in the real world.

Arrange - act - assert...
>>
Hamilton Shakeshit - Thu, 31 Aug 2017 21:14:15 EST ID:bkh8m0qR No.37172 Ignore Report Quick Reply
It has mainstream awareness and real traction, but I don't think it sees much use outside of agile teams which are themselves not the norm in most industries/places. I myself practice TDD-lite, writing tests for things that I don't fully understand or that I'm afraid of getting wrong.
>>
Oliver Cennerpetch - Fri, 01 Sep 2017 13:12:10 EST ID:P6PS9CBz No.37173 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I would agree with the above poster. Variants on "TDD-lite" are far more common than real full-on TDD. I think that asserts are pretty widely used (due to their low cost, low maintenance approach), though complete integration tests and even widespread use of functional testing are much less common.
>>
John Sockleson - Mon, 11 Sep 2017 19:29:18 EST ID:9QSfnS0r No.37189 Ignore Report Quick Reply
It one of the things teams wholeheartedly agree on to do for "the next project" during an intense debugging session.
After that it becomes irrelevant again.

Well sort of, this stuff is usually done for code that's intended to be shared on your github curriculum, because you want people to know you can if you must.
>>
Jack Chobblebot - Tue, 12 Sep 2017 10:50:53 EST ID:MEaLO7ku No.37190 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1505227853286.jpg -(89762B / 87.66KB, 493x396) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>37189
> Well sort of, this stuff is usually done for code that's intended to be shared on your github curriculum

The pretty well sums up the quality of my code. "Will anyone else else ever look at this code? If yes then pretty code, if no then garbage."
>>
David Blatherbury - Fri, 15 Sep 2017 02:43:23 EST ID:P6PS9CBz No.37191 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37190
Yep same here.


Help me as I ask questions by Samuel Gunningtack - Wed, 23 Aug 2017 18:12:33 EST ID:FzfAQ7sK No.37162 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1503526353355.gif -(2193920B / 2.09MB, 125x125) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 2193920
>1. Goal = define a function that takes input and then returns it in reverse
>2. result https://pastebin.com/BqUXJMxP
>3. Question = I somehow got it to work, but I dont even know how. I intended for this to just print the last part of an input, but it actually did it and I dont understand how


for i in text:
new_string = i+new_string


someone explain the code logic for why this returns the input in reverse for me, thanks
>>
Shit Blackham - Thu, 24 Aug 2017 12:03:01 EST ID:8B+9eE7j No.37164 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1503590581119.jpg -(50795B / 49.60KB, 1024x434) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
A good way to understand what's going on in code is to throw some output statements in there. Try this:

https://pastebin.com/SnShQ5qQ
>>
Charles Gallylat - Thu, 24 Aug 2017 12:05:26 EST ID:9QSfnS0r No.37165 Ignore Report Quick Reply
  • it start with an empty string:
  • it starts a loop over each character starting with one
  • takes a concatenation of character of the loop and the variable and stores it into the variable
    • it does that till there is no characters left

in python you'd actually can do:
"abcd"[::-1]
and get:
'dcba'
>>
Hedda Sevinglock - Sat, 02 Sep 2017 10:06:04 EST ID:umBY7e8A No.37174 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37162
Try this code visualizer: http://www.pythontutor.com/visualize.html#mode=edit
>>
Basil Duckspear - Fri, 08 Sep 2017 14:58:56 EST ID:2mg3P58s No.37183 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Inside of the reverse function your code creates an empty string and then for each character in the string provided as argument you are *prepending* the current character to the string that is defined in the function.

Say that you have the string "hello world", here's what happens:

you enter the reverse function and create an empty string ''

you take the first character of "hello world"; 'h' and put it in front of the empty string and then assign that to the variable that held the empty string. Now that variable holds "h".

Next iteration of the for-loop it takes the next character of the argument string, so 'e', and it puts that in front of what it has and it becomes "eh"

It then continues in this fashion until all of the characters of the argument string have been consumed.

"leh"

"lleh"
Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.


Data Structures by Alice Drissledig - Sun, 03 Sep 2017 19:28:25 EST ID:rvUFtpA8 No.37175 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1504481305294.gif -(530982B / 518.54KB, 360x362) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 530982
hey /prog/,

I'm looking for a good book or resource to help myself learn about data structures.
I'm in a college course next semester and for some reason they don't have a text for the class.
1 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Fanny Nishshit - Sun, 03 Sep 2017 21:14:40 EST ID:BBXKtFPn No.37177 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Don't reach for a book if you've never had exposure to algorithms. Do the lectures and problem sets for MIT 6.006.
>>
Henry Mollybire - Mon, 04 Sep 2017 00:06:09 EST ID:bUN1r2sV No.37178 Ignore Report Quick Reply
> for some reason they don't have a text for the class.

That kind of sucks. How are the course notes?
>>
Hannah Neshdale - Wed, 06 Sep 2017 01:37:32 EST ID:BBXKtFPn No.37180 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37179
You're not allowed to post here anymore. Please go away.
>>
Priscilla Trotwill - Wed, 06 Sep 2017 22:16:55 EST ID:rvUFtpA8 No.37181 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37178

Notes are bad, not allowed to use a computer to take notes during lectures.

>>37177

I know a little bit about Data Structures, I passed the introduction course with a C. I got mono during the first section, and after that the teacher pretty much hated me since I needed help catching up.

>>37176
I've seen that one already, was just wondering if anyone had other advice.

A friend of mine recommended a book called Cracking The Coding Interview
>>
Graham Clommlelad - Thu, 07 Sep 2017 13:04:24 EST ID:jt2fMkCV No.37182 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1504803864531.jpg -(70341B / 68.69KB, 620x372) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
Could you post a list of data structures that you need to know and maybe we can find resources for you or help explain things?

Also, what language are you using in the course?


I would go to a VBS forum, but... by breakabond - Sat, 11 Feb 2017 07:27:55 EST ID:1joa5uVv No.36502 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1486816075377.png -(11163B / 10.90KB, 359x171) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 11163
I want to make a better GUI for this script. The script is supposed to accept an input string and a number -> wait -> type that string and simulate enter key in loop.
Like a basic emergecny beacon of sorts

set shell = createobject("wscript.shell")

strtext = inputbox("Message :")
strtimes = inputbox("Number of times to spam")

if not isnumeric(strtimes) then
wscript.quit
end if
msgbox "You have 5 minutes to end wscript.exe"
wscript.sleep(300000)
for i=1 to strtimes
Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.
1 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
breakabond - Sun, 12 Feb 2017 10:23:21 EST ID:1joa5uVv No.36504 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>36503
What's your going rate?
>>
Cedric Pickwell - Sun, 12 Feb 2017 16:45:51 EST ID:cpPd0VLJ No.36505 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>36504
I don't have a going rate. You should post this question on the Windows subsection of Stack Overflow.
>>
Martha Manderfield - Mon, 13 Feb 2017 20:38:18 EST ID:1joa5uVv No.36506 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>36505
cmonnnn make it for me
>>
Graham Farryfock - Mon, 06 Mar 2017 16:31:04 EST ID:rAGFRmkY No.36598 Ignore Report Quick Reply
It's called VB6
>>
Edward Himmermock - Wed, 08 Mar 2017 05:14:37 EST ID:YL0YFsWq No.36605 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>36603
BrU strikes again


What is the cheapest way to add co-op support to my video game? by Hamilton Handleteg - Sun, 20 Aug 2017 23:17:46 EST ID:9venZ0d6 No.37160 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1503285466870.jpg -(633274B / 618.43KB, 1745x1229) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 633274
I want my players to be able to play co-op but portforwarding and explicitly hosting a server would kill off a lot of potential players. Aside from hosting servers myself, is there a way to let people play co-op without anyone allowing incoming traffic from the internet?
>>
Ernest Waddledale - Mon, 21 Aug 2017 13:23:00 EST ID:bkh8m0qR No.37161 Ignore Report Quick Reply
You can use a server to mediate the network transversal of two clients and then let them talk to each other. That's how WebRTC works and it's dirt cheap to run the server.
>>
Charles Gallylat - Thu, 24 Aug 2017 11:55:42 EST ID:9QSfnS0r No.37163 Ignore Report Quick Reply
The steam framework has a multiplayer network api that is sort of "free" to use, with the exception that your game will now be locked into their platform.
>>
Polly Choffinggold - Sat, 26 Aug 2017 15:49:38 EST ID:P6PS9CBz No.37167 Ignore Report Quick Reply
You can try NAT traversal techniques like hole-punching, but there's still going to be some routers that won't let people host game sessions without explicit port-forwarding.


C++: TRY-CATCHING for Bounds by Nicholas Blacklock - Thu, 03 Aug 2017 20:40:54 EST ID:HsZblEoz No.37132 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1501807254829.png -(32495B / 31.73KB, 500x386) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 32495
Hay PROG!
With C++, I'm doing a lot of computation with arrays/vectors and always running into bounds/BAD_ACCESS errors. I'm here to ask if using try-catch blocks to handle these guaranteed thrown exceptions is a good idea.

You can find my code snippet at https://pastebin.com/uWM3MXxs
6 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Shitting Tillinglock - Mon, 07 Aug 2017 19:16:16 EST ID:Kaw49/tj No.37141 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37140
The speed of try/catch is hard to think about. First you have to understand the compiler's implementation then have you have to consider what kind of memory penalty the catch is likely to entail. If it's not high performance code or the exceptions are truly exceptional, it's not worth thinking about it.
>>
Phoebe Chimblewell - Mon, 07 Aug 2017 23:38:55 EST ID:JneGddQE No.37142 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37141
well since you told me not to think about it, I wanna think about it now. Care to explain??
>>
Rebecca Crunderned - Tue, 08 Aug 2017 02:41:20 EST ID:P6PS9CBz No.37143 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Often times try-catch semantics are more expensive than a simple if-check. The reason for this is because of all the work that modern operating systems have to set up in order to make try-catch blocks work. When an exception is thrown, what tends to happen is that the processor's hardware exception interrupt vector is triggered (which punts you over to kernel-mode to handle it). When the interrupt vector determines that this is a software-initiated exception, it hands the exception off to the OS kernel to handle. Then when the OS kernel deems that this exception isn't one the special kernel software interrupts, it hands it off to the usermode program's exception handler. After all of that, your program goes into a special mode where it gets the chance to handle the exception or get force-exited by the OS. That's *a crapton* more work that the processor has to do versus a simple if-check.
>>
Jack Heshfield - Tue, 08 Aug 2017 18:32:03 EST ID:akqfogJa No.37144 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37143
That's not how exceptions are always handled. It's a different story for every implementation, but in general the catch can stand around looking dumb for a long time.
>>
Charles Gallylat - Thu, 24 Aug 2017 17:54:54 EST ID:9QSfnS0r No.37166 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37143
That may be true, but I doubt that modern compilers won't optimize exceptions you handle yourself to the point where there's practically no difference because 99% of the time you already know exactly which exceptions you want to catch in which order at compile time.


SQL???? by Frederick Billingham - Thu, 29 Jun 2017 23:03:54 EST ID:CWRrpPJ1 No.37095 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1498791834108.jpg -(13839B / 13.51KB, 312x311) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 13839
heya proggers

what are the career prospects for those proficient in SQL and SQL alone?

Took a year long course in marketing research and I realize the databasers seem more of my folk than than the marketeering knobs.

What languages complement SQL? What are some good resources for learning SQL?

Thanks proggies
3 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Priscilla Bingerworth - Mon, 17 Jul 2017 07:47:32 EST ID:2Zau/Z1R No.37113 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Building databases is a hefty job and is usually split in three phases, sometimes assigned to different teams: analysis, design and realization. Writing SQL is involved only in the last part, and is merely a translation of the output of the "design" phase (which is based on the output of the analysis, duh)
If you want to get serious about databases, I suggest learning first and foremost about relational algebra, ensuring the integrity of data, Entity-Relationship diagrams, use-case design, first order logic (FOL) and the relational model of data. That is required and necessary to having the logical and semantically correct model for your data, independent of which DBMS you are going to chose. It is a very tricky subject at first and you should never start writing any SQL code without first analyzing what you want to build, because there are often many ambiguities in our imagination and lots of stuff that just needs to be analyzed in order to get an optimal, coherent result.
>>
Lydia Buzzcocke - Wed, 19 Jul 2017 15:10:59 EST ID:hh4uYXvR No.37117 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37095
> what are the career prospects for those proficient in SQL and SQL alone?
not many, unless you're a Microsoft SQL (TSQL) guru. You do need to know your way around the OS the DB is on as well, if you are to solve problems with the SQL server.

Unless you're also a programmer in some way, you're unlikely to get your foot in, as you are expected nowadays to not only manage the DB and be able to query, but to expand it and integrate it in a product as well.
Where I work (as a sysadmin), the programmers take care of DB layout, integration etc... I just take care of the server, user rights and make sure it all runs smoothly and is backed up.

The REAL challenge is balancing the workload properly between DB and programs...

What languages complement SQL? What are some good resources for learning SQL?
Any language can speak to any language, provided there's an API or library
The answer really depends on if you want to make practical apps or websites. C# is a good (albeit Microsoft-centric) start, as you can both do .exe apps and websites (with ASP.NET) quite easily. I find both MSSQL and Visual Studio have some good features to help beginners along and save time.

If you decide on C#, have a look at LINQ to SQL and Entity Framework (and linqpad for debuggin' and tweakin') as those can help you make safe DB calls without too much fuss.
Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.
>>
Betsy Bommlebut - Thu, 20 Jul 2017 12:50:07 EST ID:xjxP6QN5 No.37118 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37117
> Entity Framework
If you do this you'll never really understand data. Avoid object-relational mappers like the plague (cause they are a plague), see >>37113 for the straight dope
>>
Wesley Bardhood - Fri, 21 Jul 2017 14:41:06 EST ID:9QSfnS0r No.37121 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37118
Sometimes you are forced to, because your colleagues are using it or your boss wants you to use it because they think it makes your codebase portable across database daemons.
I hate ORMs with fervor but I still use one almost every day.
>>
Isabella Packleson - Tue, 25 Jul 2017 15:57:46 EST ID:V7eGwZUD No.37123 Ignore Report Quick Reply
OP, get into PostgreSQL. It's a legit good analytical tool and my company uses it everywhere.


Java versus Python by Anon - Mon, 31 Jul 2017 22:09:34 EST ID:ddyPydmV No.37128 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1501553374819.jpg -(49279B / 48.12KB, 559x254) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 49279
If I'm interested in programming simple, 2D games, which language am I better off with? Perhaps Python is the answer? It seems to be good for making simple games due to its pygame program. On the other hand, Minecraft is programmed in Java and is a great game.

What does /prog/ think?
>>
Thomas Hottingfuck - Tue, 01 Aug 2017 02:54:32 EST ID:cR7sUKFo No.37129 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1501570472742.jpg -(63422B / 61.94KB, 640x490) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
I would recommend you use Java because it is more akin to industrial standard languages than python is.

If you can pick up Java, Python will be piss easy.
Same is true the other way around, just not as much so.

BUT MOST IMPORTANTLY MORE IMPORTANT THAN WHATEVER LANGUAGE YOU DECIDE TO PERSUE:

You are not locked into that language. You can do other things. You can learn different languages. You can be AnonOfCode
>>
James Callerwodging - Wed, 02 Aug 2017 14:12:18 EST ID:9QSfnS0r No.37131 Ignore Report Quick Reply
For simple 2d games you'd actually should have a look at processing, it has been made for this kind of stuff and just feels like programming a retro home computer.

Don't try to write games in java unless you already are proficient in it for other purposes. Using unity and c# may sound like overkill for something simple but you sure as hell would be faster than using freakin java.
>>
Hannah Gablingdale - Sun, 06 Aug 2017 08:20:25 EST ID:Ybduti9u No.37137 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I had the exact same question. Didn't answer that completely but turn out that pyglet and pygame are piss easy to use, while in java there is just a lot more boilerplate code but maybe with more possibilities with low level stuff (?? Didn't look into that much, probably you'd have more luck with c++ with low level shit like memory management)
Plus pyglet and pygame are both easy to get started with as well as possible to do advanced stuff with. For 2d games they are pretty much complete, in the end you only need images to "blit" into the window, math for collision detection, physics, 2d depth effects (if you wanted), plus basic shapes like lines, circles or rectangles. OOP should probably take care of the rest, which python is completely capable of. I'm not an advocate of OOP but for game programming it fits very well.
>>
Ebenezer Nollystone - Sun, 06 Aug 2017 18:05:27 EST ID:gLfws0AG No.37138 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37131
>For simple 2d games you'd actually should have a look at processing,
Yeah no, unless you want to code a pong or something extremely simple like that. It's very barebone and very slow. It's good as a pure learning experience (like bouncing squares around or whatever), but you'll probably want to switch to something else fairly quickly.

Java is fairly fast if you use an OpenGL binding like LWJGL, that's what Minecraft does. Performance is "similar" to a C++/OpenGL game speed-wise. It's also hard to do stuff the wrong way since there isn't that many ways of doing something in the first place, unlike Python. The language can get very verbose, but this is not really an issue if you use Eclipse.

I wouldn't recommend Python as a beginner because you'll most definitely use the language wrong. It can get very slow if you don't know what you're doing. This probably won't matter for whatever you will be doing, though. You will get results faster, but you won't learn as much.

I guess it depends on your abilities as a programmer.
If you don't know shit about programming then processing might be a good start.
If you programmed a few things but want to delve into game-programming big time then Java/LWJGL would be OK. Or even C++/OpenGL. The amount of things you will have to learn will be overwhelming at first, but it will definitely be worth it in the long run. It's standard and these kind of technologies will still be around for a looong time.
If you have some experience and just want to play around with shapes/colors/motions etc then Python/Pygame would be great. Python is more of a scripting language for me, I'm sure you can make great commercial games with it, but the bar is lower than with other languages.

Don't use unity or unreal because all you'll learn is either unity or unreal. You can literally drag'n drop FX from a store into your game, use visual programming for gameplay, etc. This sounds great on paper (and it is) but you'll never learn anything that way. You're a programmer, not an artist.

I never liked Python and I wrote my first game in Java so I'm pretty biased.


Java by Anon - Sun, 30 Jul 2017 21:21:21 EST ID:ddyPydmV No.37126 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1501464081485.png -(37854B / 36.97KB, 500x500) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 37854
Is Java worth learning? I want to get into software development but I'm not sure what language to pick up.
>>
Reuben Durringwill - Sun, 30 Jul 2017 23:58:13 EST ID:WLOo3E7i No.37127 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37126
Yes. The important thing is to just pick one language and learn it really well.
Then if you even need to switch to a different language, it will just be a matter of syntax.
>>
Thomas Hottingfuck - Tue, 01 Aug 2017 02:57:35 EST ID:cR7sUKFo No.37130 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37127

To expand on what Reuben means by "knowing a language well":

You need to be able to understand what sentences and chunks of code accomplish. This can be done using any language, but since Java is one of the more standard languages used today, it is a good choice. Get yourself some good webresources on Java and crank at it.

Make sure you aren't trying to explicitly memorize every single shred of syntax. You have to try to think in computer grammar.

Think like you're trying to tell your mom how to build a computer and your programs should be fine


Scheme and C in one project by Clara Nicklewater - Wed, 28 Jun 2017 07:36:33 EST ID:M2B2u4Js No.37091 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1498649793698.jpg -(230329B / 224.93KB, 595x596) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 230329
I am working on a project in C.
It would be real neato if I had a way to evaluate a Scheme expression in the same project also.
Is there a (preferably BSD-licensed, but any open-source one will do) implementation of Scheme which can be statically linked to my program?
2 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Ernest Pummerkotch - Sun, 16 Jul 2017 12:51:29 EST ID:e7bTcYy7 No.37112 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37092
Guile is exactly what op wants but Guile does not compile to C nor does it even compile. Its a c library that allows you to call guile-scheme code from C and also define C methods and values that can be called from that code.

https://www.gnu.org/software/guile/docs/guile-tut/tutorial.html
This tutorial will have you make a simple tortoise api to GNU plot then forward that api to a guile script or repl.
>>
Nell Fanbury - Wed, 19 Jul 2017 00:17:16 EST ID:puU0YpJr No.37115 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Is that a little kid or a midge?

I feel like this is one of those images around the internet that's always seen but the backstory is never found. Until a few years later you read the context in some Taiwanese website randomly bumped into online and it's anti-climatic because the context you had envisioned was so much better.
>>
Molly Dellystock - Thu, 20 Jul 2017 16:56:18 EST ID:WwsCpz20 No.37119 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Thanks for the recommendation guys,
I eventually went for one called tiny-lisp. https://github.com/matp/tiny-lisp
Conveniently, the license permits me to take it and use it in my project, modifying it as I want.

>>37115
I think I found it on one of those clickbait shits called "Top 10 awkward family photos" or something. The children were told they could wear what they wanted or something
>>
Jarvis Crirrychot - Sat, 22 Jul 2017 13:02:29 EST ID:T/bDhTRa No.37122 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37115
it's a spaz/tard/whatever...
look closely at his hands... it's armrests on a wheelchair. mom has her hands on the headrest.
especially the brother in the middle looks like he had a talking-to about his "special" family member.

kid clown can't sit properly and might have lost his right index finger as well... or the costumer lost patience.
>>
Augustus Buzzson - Fri, 28 Jul 2017 04:16:09 EST ID:PsIPU8jR No.37125 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37122
Good shout, I never spotted that.


Pages Next>>
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Report Post
Reason
Note
Please be descriptive with report notes,
this helps staff resolve issues quicker.