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Disadvantaged youth to young independent adult wanting to finally pursue his dreams by Wizzle710 - Sun, 22 Oct 2017 23:02:04 EST ID:YAuFJPxx No.37221 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1508727724535.jpg -(49540B / 48.38KB, 480x852) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 49540
Hey everyone. So this is the long and the short of it.
For as long as I can remember, I've wanted to be a computer programmer, work with computers, do really geeky stuff with technology. I remember at 12 getting a cracked version of Macromedia Flash and teaching myself how to animate, and also trying to teach myself HTML and CSS. Well, my piece of shy father has been in prison since I was 7 and my mom had five kids, so I really didn't exactly get to pursue my dreams while my mom lost her house, and all of us kids had to get jobs and go stay with friends or family members because she couldn't afford to house us and support us all through school, and I was kind of a bad kid and a slacker and got kicked out of school, so I never even considered a scholarship was kind of out of the equation .
I still want to go to school and get a job sitting on my computer all day doing nerdy interweb stuff, where should I get an education? How can I get help paying for it? I want to be a success story and not the bitter shell of an abandoned son who gave up on his creative dreams and ended up as a cook making $10 dollars an hour.

To;Dr
Im 25 and want to get an education and become a computer programmer or work in cyber security or something. I would like some recommendations as to where to go and how to get financial assistance.
2 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Polly Gerringnare - Fri, 27 Oct 2017 03:09:21 EST ID:BW3MomrQ No.37226 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37223
This. Get an internship.
>>
David Fiddlestone - Sat, 04 Nov 2017 04:49:13 EST ID:Ttug6D/U No.37229 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37221
I have a somewhat similar story to yours. Dad suicided when I was in my early teens, mom moved away and had a fifth kid, I stayed with strangers and had to feed myself while still in high school. I failed math in my final year and couldn't get into uni even if I had the money. However, since then, things have gotten better.

I started work as a wages clerk, then got into tech support in a small startup. I soon got involved in programming and eventually took over as the sole developer when the previous one got a better offer. I eventually got uni admission based on age and had to do a math bridging course. I was around your age when I started studying. I did my degree part-time over 10 years while working, even for a year and a half did an evening job for extra money in addition to my main job and studying. I completed my degree, then my employer got bought out by a bigger corporation. By this time I had qualifications, skills and experience and after a few years with the new company, I got promoted to dev team lead. So now I have a team of 7 people and I spend my time doing system analysis and design and advising and managing people.

My advice - try to get into a good company in a technical position, regardless of the level of that position. Even if it's tech support or writing help files or cleaning keyboards. You'll get exposed to the right environment, build relationships with the right people, and get the opportunity to grow and learn.
>>
Lydia Pellerban - Mon, 06 Nov 2017 15:47:48 EST ID:fC4UxU1U No.37230 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37229
Awesome declaration my brother, thank you. You gave us proud, hope and inspiration.
>>
Frederick Drovingcocke - Fri, 17 Nov 2017 22:55:35 EST ID:uWLieSb9 No.37236 Ignore Report Quick Reply
those bootcamps are really not that bad. or at least they wheren't 5 years ago, maybe the scams outnumber now.
>>
Jarvis Crebblehood - Sat, 18 Nov 2017 00:01:57 EST ID:9QSfnS0r No.37237 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37223
Internships are fine and dandy, but keep in mind that the road to full employment from there isn't as clear cut as you might think. Companies might keep you as an "intern" even if you are doing a full days work and it suits them.
So keep in mind that oral agreements often mean shit...

But that said, you can actually get companies to pay for one of those coding bootcamps after/during an internships.


TDD by Frederick Sushdock - Thu, 31 Aug 2017 10:33:41 EST ID:9cestl8h No.37169 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1504190021194.jpg -(324209B / 316.61KB, 503x376) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 324209
Hey how often is test driven actually used in the real world.

Arrange - act - assert...
1 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Oliver Cennerpetch - Fri, 01 Sep 2017 13:12:10 EST ID:P6PS9CBz No.37173 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I would agree with the above poster. Variants on "TDD-lite" are far more common than real full-on TDD. I think that asserts are pretty widely used (due to their low cost, low maintenance approach), though complete integration tests and even widespread use of functional testing are much less common.
>>
John Sockleson - Mon, 11 Sep 2017 19:29:18 EST ID:9QSfnS0r No.37189 Ignore Report Quick Reply
It one of the things teams wholeheartedly agree on to do for "the next project" during an intense debugging session.
After that it becomes irrelevant again.

Well sort of, this stuff is usually done for code that's intended to be shared on your github curriculum, because you want people to know you can if you must.
>>
Jack Chobblebot - Tue, 12 Sep 2017 10:50:53 EST ID:MEaLO7ku No.37190 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1505227853286.jpg -(89762B / 87.66KB, 493x396) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>37189
> Well sort of, this stuff is usually done for code that's intended to be shared on your github curriculum

The pretty well sums up the quality of my code. "Will anyone else else ever look at this code? If yes then pretty code, if no then garbage."
>>
David Blatherbury - Fri, 15 Sep 2017 02:43:23 EST ID:P6PS9CBz No.37191 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37190
Yep same here.
>>
Frederick Drovingcocke - Fri, 17 Nov 2017 22:51:43 EST ID:uWLieSb9 No.37235 Ignore Report Quick Reply
tdd?

everyone wants to do it and you'll get points in an interview for familiarity with it, but I've never actually seen someone really do it. it's like agile, lot of people want to do it, they just have no idea how to actually make it really happen.


They don't want to solve this simple math by Anonymous - Thu, 16 Nov 2017 15:34:35 EST ID:/Irek0az No.37234 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1510864475496.jpg -(63851B / 62.35KB, 1200x599) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 63851
Find out before it is taken down from the web: https://youtu.be/7GbsO-CFNMo


Security, FTP and MITM attacks by Samuel Grandville - Wed, 11 Oct 2017 16:15:57 EST ID:fDdwArgq No.37213 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1507752957499.jpg -(83736B / 81.77KB, 883x431) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 83736
I'm not going to perform any attacks whatsoever, I'm more interested about securing my server and learning more about possible attack scenarios. So pardon my stupid questions.

I'm not going to explain every detail why my current system uses technology x or protocol y, because I'm writing this on my phone and I don't want to write too much with this, so please, let's just assume!

My server acts as a FTP server. FTP credentials are transfered in plaintext, what are the possible ways to steal my precious FTP login credentials? I would assume that a MITM attack would be one of them? Does the attacker need an access to my server's router or to the router I'm logging in from? If I disable WiFi, what kind of attack vectors still exists?

Please do explain! Thanks for in advance!
>>
Alice Wullerbury - Wed, 11 Oct 2017 17:11:28 EST ID:4Jf4geC2 No.37214 Ignore Report Quick Reply
If you're connecting to the server over 3G wireless, then that's a lot more easily sniffable than 4G wireless is, and someone might be able to pull the plaintext FTP packets from that.

Otherwise, your workplace could sniff the packets (if you're connecting from work). Your work's or home's ISP could sniff the packets, and your server's ISP could sniff the packets as they come into the server itself.
>>
Rebecca Fuckingham - Wed, 11 Oct 2017 17:54:26 EST ID:BBXKtFPn No.37215 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>If I disable WiFi, what kind of attack vectors still exists?

That depends. When was your Windows 98 box last patched?
>>
Caroline Blackgold - Thu, 12 Oct 2017 00:36:17 EST ID:4Jf4geC2 No.37217 Ignore Report Quick Reply
There's also the gamut of typical attack vectors that might affect any computer system, such as somebody remotely compromising your router or hacking your operating system, or you accidentally getting some malware onto the same machine that you're using for FTP hosting.
>>
Albert Saddlelock - Thu, 12 Oct 2017 16:07:56 EST ID:fDdwArgq No.37218 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37214
Interesting, didn't know about that at all...
>>
Cedric Brookridge - Sat, 11 Nov 2017 22:19:13 EST ID:XBm2HhG+ No.37232 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37213
>FTP credentials are transfered in plaintext, what are the possible ways to steal my precious FTP login credentials?

  1. As you mentioned, an MITM attack
  2. Any attack that can actively listen in on your connection (including a spliced cable)
  3. Direct password attack(bruteforce or dictionary)
  4. hacking other weak points on your server (like VNC,RDP,SSH and so forth)

>Does the attacker need an access to my server's router or to the router I'm logging in from?

not nescessarily, as long as the proper ports are opened or forwarded. As long as a given TCP/UDP port is opened to the net, it can be exploited.

> If I disable WiFi, what kind of attack vectors still exists?
All of them, except those that apply specifically for wifi...


A ridiculous sequence of courses by Doris Blatherstock - Sun, 04 Jun 2017 02:38:16 EST ID:HC1vVHLz No.37033 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1496558296564.jpg -(18091B / 17.67KB, 480x360) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 18091
Hello, I made and actually did all this (including the 'grad level' research electives, except for the coding theory book)
https://functionalcs.github.io/curriculum/

It's easier than it looks, it took me 3 years to do that. I did it about 3-4 hrs a day at first but then everything kind of snowballed and I finished it with only 1hr a day after the first year. These days I'm finishing The Art of Computer Programming series, I'm done up to book 4A and doing 4B draft at the same time. I just do it 20-30mins a day.

I cannot shill TAOCP enough, it totally changed me from amateur to professional computer scientist by just doing hundreds and hundreds of exercises. 20mins a day, for one year, it's all you need for the first book. Anyway, pick and choose what you want from this list and enjoy

I make money from cloning shopify apps, and I work P/T on https://turtle.ai/ though much more infrequently these days. I started out shilling myself on elance (now "upwork") as a jr developer and literally taking jobs from 3rd world countries for less than I would spend on lunch. I also work 2 days a week at my local university doing "ML" (statistics) for a cancer research lab making peanuts but it's research, and fun to do, and I don't need the money. The book in that above link, "Parallel and Sequential Algorithms" was directly responsible for the lab hiring me. Anyway anons I'm here to tell you to try this have a good day.
16 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Lillian Follyhone - Fri, 20 Oct 2017 18:24:30 EST ID:qXcTInin No.37220 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I got into a top 30 school in the US and I'm going for computer programming. I'm probably going no matter what, but I'd still like your opinions as to if this is a good idea or not.
>>
Beatrice Mimbledatch - Thu, 26 Oct 2017 12:59:37 EST ID:VU0UgEAS No.37224 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37219
Can you go into more detail regarding how this won't provide you with typical ccs graduate knowledge? Where are the differences?
>>
Beatrice Mimbledatch - Thu, 26 Oct 2017 13:01:23 EST ID:VU0UgEAS No.37225 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37033
hey opcan you repost that online linear algebra resrouces? I see you edited on the 24th and that really rustles my goddam jimmies man
>>
David Dingerhall - Fri, 27 Oct 2017 16:27:58 EST ID:FXkQatto No.37228 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37225
nvm found it, just pls don't delete your github history. Bookmarking what I can, but I don't want to lose anything
>>
Alice Blundersine - Sat, 11 Nov 2017 22:16:46 EST ID:oPY6s1zJ No.37231 Ignore Report Quick Reply
OP will u fukn respond u jolly african-american

make a similar curriculum but for math, pls.


Website by notavailableanymore - Sun, 08 Oct 2017 16:41:03 EST ID:MaIITRSI No.37212 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1507495263354.png -(9099B / 8.89KB, 800x800) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 9099
my first website ever, www.notavailableanymore.com


C++: TRY-CATCHING for Bounds by Nicholas Blacklock - Thu, 03 Aug 2017 20:40:54 EST ID:HsZblEoz No.37132 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1501807254829.png -(32495B / 31.73KB, 500x386) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 32495
Hay PROG!
With C++, I'm doing a lot of computation with arrays/vectors and always running into bounds/BAD_ACCESS errors. I'm here to ask if using try-catch blocks to handle these guaranteed thrown exceptions is a good idea.

You can find my code snippet at https://pastebin.com/uWM3MXxs
7 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Phoebe Chimblewell - Mon, 07 Aug 2017 23:38:55 EST ID:JneGddQE No.37142 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37141
well since you told me not to think about it, I wanna think about it now. Care to explain??
>>
Rebecca Crunderned - Tue, 08 Aug 2017 02:41:20 EST ID:P6PS9CBz No.37143 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Often times try-catch semantics are more expensive than a simple if-check. The reason for this is because of all the work that modern operating systems have to set up in order to make try-catch blocks work. When an exception is thrown, what tends to happen is that the processor's hardware exception interrupt vector is triggered (which punts you over to kernel-mode to handle it). When the interrupt vector determines that this is a software-initiated exception, it hands the exception off to the OS kernel to handle. Then when the OS kernel deems that this exception isn't one the special kernel software interrupts, it hands it off to the usermode program's exception handler. After all of that, your program goes into a special mode where it gets the chance to handle the exception or get force-exited by the OS. That's *a crapton* more work that the processor has to do versus a simple if-check.
>>
Jack Heshfield - Tue, 08 Aug 2017 18:32:03 EST ID:akqfogJa No.37144 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37143
That's not how exceptions are always handled. It's a different story for every implementation, but in general the catch can stand around looking dumb for a long time.
>>
Charles Gallylat - Thu, 24 Aug 2017 17:54:54 EST ID:9QSfnS0r No.37166 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37143
That may be true, but I doubt that modern compilers won't optimize exceptions you handle yourself to the point where there's practically no difference because 99% of the time you already know exactly which exceptions you want to catch in which order at compile time.
>>
Fanny Wondleson - Sat, 07 Oct 2017 16:29:47 EST ID:JfbkjUm/ No.37211 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37143
Yep.
But if you know that the exception will happen infrequently, and you have a lot of if's, then it's possible that all branch mispredictions you might get add up to an even greater penalty. As you say, unless it's performance critical it's not worth thinking about.
And if it is performance critical, the only way you'll know is by measuring.


my little project by Henry Hondledock - Mon, 02 Oct 2017 10:12:55 EST ID:JLm2mO7q No.37207 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1506953575466.png -(119125B / 116.33KB, 407x409) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 119125
is it possible to make a file automatically open after downloading (any brower)?
>>
William Hickleshit - Mon, 02 Oct 2017 19:16:15 EST ID:gezKXAce No.37208 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37207
Sure, in Firefox, you can go to about:preferences#applications and set up what you want to happen.
In Chrome, after you download a file, you can click the little arrow beside it and choose to always opens files of this type.


Porn scraper by William Sicklespear - Sun, 01 Oct 2017 05:52:25 EST ID:+UW/1Srw No.37203 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1506851545125.png -(1964993B / 1.87MB, 1140x642) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 1964993
I have a login to nubilefilms.com and am considering writing a quick scraper.

There is somewhere in the ballpark of 500GB of 1080p content plus loads of images.

Any interest?
>>
Edward Nellyfoot - Sun, 01 Oct 2017 14:05:29 EST ID:9QSfnS0r No.37204 Ignore Report Quick Reply
It might be faster just to download an webrip that already exists and then manually get the stuff that's missing from the site.

Anyway you have 2 approaches:
  • Use something like beautifulsoup and make sure you get all the auth working
  • Inject jQuery into the site with tampermonkey and try to find some way to save the extracted elements to disk.
>>
William Sicklespear - Sun, 01 Oct 2017 22:11:46 EST ID:+UW/1Srw No.37205 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37204
I write scrapers for a living, BeautifulSoup is my favourite soup.
>>
Doris Blackcocke - Mon, 02 Oct 2017 09:03:59 EST ID:BBXKtFPn No.37206 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37205
If you're getting paid to write scrapers with Python, you should invest in Scrapy.


School Project by Thomas Sanningstock - Sat, 30 Sep 2017 20:59:23 EST ID:33yd9LRh No.37201 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1506819563741.jpg -(16329B / 15.95KB, 290x290) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 16329
Soo.. I'm soon going to start working on my school project and I've decided to make DIY electric drums. I'll use piezo senzors. The problem I'm having is how should I connect 4-6 drum pads to my computer and what program to use... I'd be very glad if u could help me out with this one progs ;)
>>
Eliza Lightdock - Sun, 01 Oct 2017 04:32:59 EST ID:P6PS9CBz No.37202 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Grab some simple piezo sensors and wire 'em up to your Arduino, then wire your Arduino up to your computer. All the common Arduino boards have 6 analog inputs. Write a simple program that reads analog values from these analog inputs and detects beats, then simply send the beats (also probably with their beat amplitudes) from the Arduino to your computer and have the computer do whatever you want with the info.


C++ delete not working on (I believe) allocated pointer by Matilda Bandlechutch - Wed, 27 Sep 2017 21:44:16 EST ID:5sC0bueS No.37196 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1506563056371.jpg -(111717B / 109.10KB, 1920x1080) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 111717
Sup my people, I come here, humbly, once again to seek your guidance of C++.

I'm trying to implement my own linked list in a search algorithm and am running in to memory leaks. I define a node struct, create a 4 element array of pointers (because of the search algorithm), use new to fill those pointers, add those pointers to a linked list, and then create 4 new elements using the same array of pointers. HOWEVER, when I go to iterate through the list later to delete everything, I get an error saying:

malloc: *** error for object 0x7fff5fbfe4f0: pointer being freed was not allocated

I don't understand why I saying it was never allocated? Here is some of the code highlights and I'll also paste a link to the full code on pastebin:

//USING NEW TO (ALLOCATE?) NEW MEMORY (THIS IS IN A LOOP)
list_node* neighbors[4]; //The FOUR neighbors
neighbors[0] = new list_node;
*neighbors[0] = {nullptr, nullptr, q, (q->x)-1 , q->y , 9999, 9999, 9999};
neighbors[1] = new list_node;
*neighbors[1] = {nullptr, nullptr, q, (q->x)+1 , q->y , 9999, 9999, 9999};
neighbors[2] = new list_node;
Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.
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Eugene Hillynore - Wed, 27 Sep 2017 22:29:49 EST ID:gezKXAce No.37197 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37196
At the start of your code

list_node temp = {nullptr, nullptr, nullptr, x1, y1, 0, 0, 0};

need to use new there
>>
Matilda Bandlechutch - Thu, 28 Sep 2017 19:36:34 EST ID:5sC0bueS No.37198 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1506641794371.png -(807B / 807bytes, 48x48) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>37197
Holy shit, that worked! Thank you so much.

I forgot to initialize the very first node with new and delete somehow knew. Does that function check the address and it's able to tell what's on the heap or something?
>>
Thomas Brindleworth - Thu, 28 Sep 2017 23:13:20 EST ID:gezKXAce No.37199 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37198
I believe calling delete on something not created with new is undefined, so it depends on your compiler.
>>
George Senningstone - Fri, 29 Sep 2017 13:08:19 EST ID:P6PS9CBz No.37200 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37198
At least on Windows with the debug CRT there's a mechanism built in to detect you calling delete or free on a pointer that did not come from the current process heap. You can easily do this in constant-time by simply checking the address against the lower and upper address bounds of your heap region.


a phone os by Basil Gugglegold - Thu, 10 Aug 2017 09:59:00 EST ID:CZA5DFLp No.37145 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1502373540803.jpg -(80244B / 78.36KB, 1000x661) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 80244
How realistic would it be to create a very basic os for an arm phone?

I'd be content if I could just boot, and maybe send a blank sms by pressing the home button or something. Has anyone ever done something like this? Do you know of any good resources to get started?
I had a basic computer architecture class, so I know how to program simple startup code and taskmanagers for x64/x86 and some microprocessors, so learning arm assembly wont be a problem. Having access to I/O, and eventually the gsm functions will probably be the difficult part.

I never really wanted a smartphone, but now I got a 2015 samsung galaxy a3 because it was only 25 euro. The battery life is really shitty (40 hours at best), so an ultra efficient os would be really cool.
5 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Oliver Cemmlehood - Sat, 09 Sep 2017 13:41:24 EST ID:2mg3P58s No.37186 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37185
> because they're somewhat antiquated
yes, because of this. AT commands and telnet are similar in that way.
>>
Oliver Cemmlehood - Sat, 09 Sep 2017 13:44:06 EST ID:2mg3P58s No.37187 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37185
>>37186
this, by the way, is coming from someone who's a great fan of unix and lives on the cli basically so it's not that i'm *inherently* biased against "old" things. but with some things you feel that it should have been replaced a long time ago when you use it.
>>
Jarvis Sodgemon - Sun, 10 Sep 2017 00:33:33 EST ID:xLKzmVTo No.37188 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37187
> but with some things you feel that it should have been replaced a long time ago when you use it.

Agreed. AT commands are a pain in the ass.
>>
Ian Brookfield - Mon, 18 Sep 2017 16:27:34 EST ID:4MJeso9G No.37192 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37145
You should try flash it to lineage
many report huge battery time increases with all the bloat removed
>>
Fucking Hallymitch - Tue, 19 Sep 2017 02:19:40 EST ID:P6PS9CBz No.37193 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>37192
This sounds like spam to me.


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