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Fap Script. by noname - Mon, 14 Jul 2014 20:45:20 EST ID:jaqLWMrW No.32061 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
1405385120918.png -(406970 B, 1366x768) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 406970
her /prog/, I was wondering if anyone can help me with jmy fap script in python3

[code]
seen = []

def no_repeat(l):
seen.append(l)

if len(sys.argv) > 1:
if int(sys.argv[1]) > len(links):
sys.arv[1] = len(links)
if len(sys.argv) > 1:
for i in range(int(sys.argv[1])):
link = random.choice(links)
while 1:
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1 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Nathaniel Dicklemadging - Mon, 14 Jul 2014 21:42:07 EST ID:xtelIQ1k No.32064 Ignore Report Quick Reply
pip install beautifulsoup4
>>
Nathaniel Dicklemadging - Mon, 14 Jul 2014 21:43:34 EST ID:xtelIQ1k No.32065 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Actually, you may need a full-on web browser with javascript support. In that case, Ghost.
>>
Martin Goodstock - Tue, 15 Jul 2014 01:12:19 EST ID:jaqLWMrW No.32066 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32065
for viewing the video?
no, you see, mpv(a video player) can network stream videos.
>>
Martin Goodstock - Tue, 15 Jul 2014 01:14:02 EST ID:jaqLWMrW No.32067 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32064
thanks, and is that the only way?
>>
Martin Goodstock - Tue, 15 Jul 2014 05:28:48 EST ID:jaqLWMrW No.32069 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32061
I came to say that thanks to BeautifulSoup, I was able to acomplish my task, thanks to everython who helped


Tips? Knowledge? by Graham Middlestine - Sun, 27 Apr 2014 19:59:09 EST ID:4wpKJieo No.31632 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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What is programming a lot like?
What're some things you've come across that made programming a lot easier?
What're some of the neat things you've programmed?

Is there a master language like 'ECMAscript', that I should learn first?
32 posts and 5 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Phoebe Pullerbit - Wed, 09 Jul 2014 23:33:06 EST ID:7alaund4 No.32042 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>'var x = 0; for (elem in container): x += elem' you write ' x = fold(+, container)'

1) You can write fold in C++ and other languages, too. It's not exactly unique to Haskell.
2) I'd argue that the fold application is actually less clear to someone skimming the code - and most programmers are going to skim your code when they read it. Yes, there's less code, but you need to think more about each line of code, and that stuff adds up. I would rather see code that's broken down an algorithm into small steps that are each easy to understand than code that has one big step that's hard to understand.
3) accumulate(begin(container), end(container), 0, plus<int>());
3a) accumulate(begin(container), end(container), 0);

>>32037
>Complete lies.

Then why do so many people have trouble with it? I know of very few people who advocate recursion over iteration, and most of them do so because they were forced to learn a functional programming language as a first language and don't know any better. Why do so many people have trouble following terse code?

>It is useful 1% of the time. The other 99% of the time, it's a hard to find mistake. It's also hard to read and edit.

So what? Sometimes I need a thing, and if it's not there code gets very convoluted. Languages that try to enforce theoretical purity on me are usually languages that I don't use, because real software development sometimes necessitates doing impure things. Like using switch case fallthrough, macros, templates, and sometimes even the dreaded "goto."
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Archie Marrytark - Thu, 10 Jul 2014 02:13:38 EST ID:vhgZIlcV No.32043 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32042
>1) You can write fold in C++ and other languages, too. It's not exactly unique to Haskell.
>3) accumulate(begin(container), end(container), 0, plus<int>());
>3a) accumulate(begin(container), end(container), 0);
For the love of god. I was not saying a fold is not possible in language X. Any language that supports higher order functions can to it (I guess).
I was saying it can be useful to know. I'm glad you do know it.
>2) I'd argue that the fold application is actually less clear to someone skimming the code - and most programmers are going to skim your code when they read it. Yes, there's less code, but you need to think more about each line of code, and that stuff adds up. I would rather see code that's broken down an algorithm into small steps that are each easy to understand than code that has one big step that's hard to understand.
It's a balancing game. You want to find the mid point where the code is succint, but not obfuscated. To me folds are clear, but I admit it needs some extra thought for the first few times.
>>
Ebenezer Drepperridge - Fri, 11 Jul 2014 02:13:08 EST ID:SVZjhRzL No.32046 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I haven't used Haskell for anything in production. I tinkered with it a lot doing Haskell the Hard Way but haven't found anything suitable for it to do.

Consider the fact Mark Tarver wrote a dialect of Lisp called Qi. It is less than ten thousand lines of macros running atop Clisp. It implements most of the unique features of Haskell and OCaml. In some respects, Qi surpasses them. For instance, Qi's type inferencing engine is Turing complete. In a world where teams of talented academics were needed to write Haskell, one man, Dr. Tarver wrote Qi all by his lonesome because he used Lisp which made it easy.

With Lisp you can dream up huge projects and make them happen in 1/4 the time of any other language that exists. If you want security you code your own DSL that does specific things that your program needs and nothing else. No bugs, no undocumented APIs or gigantic libraries somebody will come along and abuse. For stuff that needs mass deployment, Lisp also works since you can build your own DSL minimalist interpreter and just make a source code change and done.

So whenever I need lazy eval I can just turn it on/off myself with easily, same with other Haskell features. The one thing I can't use Lisp for is crypto engineering since you never make your own crypto libraries unless you're djb or the team that designed openssh so I just call to them and use djb's blackbox to handle that.
>>
Doris Gudgechen - Mon, 14 Jul 2014 02:00:40 EST ID:OvcVpyS4 No.32059 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32042
>1) You can write fold in C++ and other languages, too. It's not exactly unique to Haskell.
Indeed, but how often do you actually use a fold instead of loops?

>2) I'd argue that the fold application is actually less clear to someone skimming the code - and most programmers are going to skim your code when they read it. Yes, there's less code, but you need to think more about each line of code, and that stuff adds up. I would rather see code that's broken down an algorithm into small steps that are each easy to understand than code that has one big step that's hard to understand.
You are mad. 'fold' is much clearer than a 'for' loop. I will always take '(fold + 0 list)' over 'sum = 0; for(int i = 0; i < list.length; i++) { sum += list; }' You are arguing against the very idea of abstraction. Would you rather see the assembly instructions that your code gets compiled to? or the machine code?

>Then why do so many people have trouble with it? I know of very few people who advocate recursion over iteration, and most of them do so because they were forced to learn a functional programming language as a first language and don't know any better. Why do so many people have trouble following terse code?
This is ridiculous. Learning to write loops is notoriously hard for beginners.

>That's an API/OS thing, not inherent to the language itself. Totally separate issue. It's probably the default because most files people want to open are text files.
Yes, technically it's an API thing, but you can't write code without using a library. For example, it's not Python's fault that its libraries choose different naming schemes, but it is Python's fault that it *allows* it's libraries to do it. If naming schemes are so important to understanding code (which they are), then the language should standardize them.

This reminds me of the time I wanted to transfer a binary file without a filetype with FileZilla. When the file was done transferring, I found out that it didn't work. I eventually found out that the problem was that FileZilla transfers files with a filetype as text by default. I also found out that others had complained about this to the dev team before, but they were rebuffed and told that it wasn't a bug, but a feature, and that they're too stupid to deserve to use the program. I've never used FileZilla again.

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>>
Caroline Furringmock - Mon, 14 Jul 2014 02:30:55 EST ID:7alaund4 No.32060 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32059
>'fold' is much clearer than a 'for' loop

Not to me, or literally any other programmer I know. Trot out that statement to a programming instructor and they will almost certainly laugh at you.

>You are arguing against the very idea of abstraction.

Spoken like a true, if misinformed, computer scientist. Computer science is not software engineering. Abstraction isn't everything, and there's a limit to how far it should be taken. Fold is, in many cases, too much abstraction. I argue that the right tool for the job should be used. Sometimes that's introducing abstraction; other times it's keeping things as simple as they could possibly be and still work, which usually means keeping programmers from introducing too much abstraction.

Too much abstraction (or abstraction applied incorrectly) leads to code that is difficult to understand, difficult to maintain, and difficult to extend.

>This is ridiculous. Learning to write loops is notoriously hard for beginners.

And folds are easier? You must be joking. Terseness does not mean easy.
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How does it feel to be a programmer? by NCR - Sun, 13 Jul 2014 19:42:30 EST ID:bjtCVm5/ No.32056 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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PLZ Describe your work as a programmer and the advantages and disadvantages of it; also expectations vs reality.

Long story short (not so short): I'm 26, got a medicine degree as I liked biology; but at hearth I've always wanted to be a programmer. My first year of practice as a surgeon (neurology pathway) failed terribly (not to the harm of anyone, luckily) and I've considered giving up and getting a degree as a programmer. I'm insecure and obsessive, so I work very slowly; I'm way too much introverted to be a surgeon (I discovered this late, lol). My social skills are appaling, which worsens small mistakes or deviations.
The only tasks I'm good at at work are computer related. I learned C at 14 and C++ at 18 (such hacker) and when I'm programming I forget about everything and time goes fast. I have an old computer collection.

The purpose of this message is to hear other programmers telling me how much their work sucks so that I reassure myself I shouldn't get a new career in computer science; (and so that I pursue a white coat medical specialty that I can adapt to better; maybe working in a closed desk as I talk to classical music without talking to anyone.
Also I'm clever but not that clever (IQ 130 at best some years ago); things went fine for me at tests because I work hard but I've seen many doctors more intelligent than me.)

Pic related; I've seen non-salvageable people dying with things like this connected to their head. Humans are very fragile.

inb4: This doesn't go here, this goes into Personal Issues

Thank you very much.
>>
Charles Worthinggold - Sun, 13 Jul 2014 22:19:12 EST ID:SkgVApkK No.32057 Ignore Report Quick Reply
there's a gigantic field of computational biology/bioinformatics
combine both. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_free_online_bioinformatics_courses
>>
Betsy Sirrywork - Mon, 14 Jul 2014 00:29:27 EST ID:cEQ9BUYB No.32058 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Depends on where you work; I can only speak about startups from experience. The environment is generally very comfortable, the work is varied and you get to see the result of it almost immediately, you learn a lot about both technical and non-technical things quickly by necessity, you get a fair amount of autonomy if you can show that you understand business a little bit and aren't 100% dweeb, and your coworkers will probably be about as socially skilled as you so you should fit right in there. (I'm on the upper end of programmer social skills, which is even better because of effective politicking and cushy technical management positions. Consider striving for this)

The main thing I don't like is the never seeing any women, but that's probably less of a problem in larger companies that aren't pure tech. You'll probably work more than full-time, but you're a surgeon right now so I assume that won't be a huge deal to you.


Shit you probably didn't know about /dev/urandom by Polly Pupperfoot - Sun, 29 Jun 2014 20:19:23 EST ID:SkgVApkK No.31986 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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So, /dev/urandom is the official recommended source of all entropy on GNU/Linux. During the LibreSSL rewrite that OpenBSD (and now also 2 cryptographers from Google) are doing, they have discovered that /dev/urandom is unreliable.

http://www.openbsd.org/cgi-bin/cvsweb/src/lib/libcrypto/crypto/getentropy_linux.c?rev=1.2;content-type=text%2Fplain

"This code path exists to bring light to the issue that Linux does not provide a failsafe API for entropy collection." Notably /dev/urandom will fail if the process is in a chroot, or if file descriptors are exhausted.

So if you run Nginx, SSH daemons and other things in a Linux chroot which many people do then you're effectively handing out deterministic entropy for all TLS connections. Plenty of embedded systems also use chroots to limit damage, so they are generating shit PRNG too. Like ATMs who have switched since XP is now no longer maintained.

I'd also be interested in looking at all those Linux "security" releases that spawn a bunch of VMs with chrooted apps like the Tor daemon. If the source of entropy is bad the Tor onion encryption scheme is completely worthless.

There is no way to fix this without completely redesigning the Linux kernel. OpenBSD devs working on the SSL library for porting to Linux will have to write their own extractors to tumble PRNG together and wait for it to be suitable to pass entropy. Ridiculous. Commercialization of the Linux kernel continues to be it's downfall. Too many chiefs cramming junk in there and not paying attention to seriously important shit like random numbers.

Android lead developer from Google is also porting LibreSSL changes directly to the master branch. This is excellent, though we will all have to use a crazy complex extractor but at least we can finally trust Android SSL.
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Esther Bardspear - Fri, 04 Jul 2014 15:25:54 EST ID:2PLGUfus No.32007 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>31989
>use /dev/random at startup
>when the entropy pool has only been seeded by loading the system
>not seeing problems with this

Fuck.
>>
Emma Blidgelock - Wed, 09 Jul 2014 20:03:05 EST ID:SVZjhRzL No.32041 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32007
A read from the /dev/urandom device will not block waiting for more entropy. As a result, if there is not sufficient entropy in the entropy pool, the returned values are theoretically vulnerable to a cryptographic attack on the algorithms used by the driver. That's why every Linux app UPON STARTUP uses /dev/random.. shit like ASLR relies on it instead of /dev/urandom.

So your app UPON STARTUP should rely on it too, then for all future seeds pull it from /dev/urandom. Theodore T'so has mixed in CPU TRNG into the pool so even a headless VPS will have decent entropy.
>>
Fanny Duckman - Fri, 11 Jul 2014 15:23:22 EST ID:2PLGUfus No.32047 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32041
Um, you misunderstood me. I assumed startup meant the machine startup, not the program. The rest of your post was what I said in the first reply to the topic.

Now, when you want to talk about theoretical vulnerabilities, systems that only have entropy collected from starting the system are systems where even /dev/random is vulnerable. Ie. any freshly started machine with a more or less stock system. There was a paper about shared primes in these situations. nb
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Nigger Dommleson - Fri, 11 Jul 2014 23:00:46 EST ID:EMsIIdyI No.32052 Ignore Report Quick Reply
use additional sources of entropy, problem solved. im a fan of haveged
>>
Nicholas Fingerway - Sat, 12 Jul 2014 00:46:05 EST ID:SVZjhRzL No.32053 Ignore Report Quick Reply
In other news LibreSSL is now ready to port http://marc.info/?l=openbsd-tech&m=140510291304119&w=2 though they obviously haven't finished running tests where they force core dumps and crashes to expose bugs and fix them forever. That will probably take months.

Meanwhile over at OpenSSL... the roadmap is predicting "many years" for them to fix OpenSSL and for the first time in a decade they actually closed open bug reports.


Polymorphism and Base class pointers returning derived class? by Ernest Fiblingway - Fri, 11 Jul 2014 22:21:16 EST ID:43+Cp8qc No.32050 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Why doesn't this work:

Command * Input::handleInput( bool input )
{
if ( input == true ) // if the user inputs
{
return onInput; // return the input command
}
else
{
return nullptr; // return nothing
}
}
>>
Ernest Fiblingway - Fri, 11 Jul 2014 22:45:56 EST ID:43+Cp8qc No.32051 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Nevermind, it does. It was a really obvious solution in a differnt part of the code.


OOP uses by Charlotte Banningpitch - Thu, 03 Jul 2014 17:00:32 EST ID:lr8q479+ No.31998 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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So I just finished making pong, and have been looking at other peoples code for game loops and games in general.

I personally did not declare much of the core engine as classes, but in looking at other peoples code they have made a game class that inherits an event class and rendering class.

When and why should I program like this?

Pic not related.
>>
Esther Grimgold - Thu, 03 Jul 2014 17:29:17 EST ID:FaQqdZHU No.31999 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Might be useful
http://gameprogrammingpatterns.com/
>>
William Sirringfet - Thu, 03 Jul 2014 17:37:20 EST ID:2OdEhbdO No.32000 Ignore Report Quick Reply
This guys videos help a lot
https://www.youtube.com/user/thebennybox
>>
Charlotte Banningpitch - Thu, 03 Jul 2014 18:48:59 EST ID:lr8q479+ No.32001 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I should note that I used c++

>>31999 Excellent. I prefer reading while learning as opposed to video. My mind is already blown by decoupling haha.
>>
Hamilton Pezzlehene - Thu, 03 Jul 2014 22:20:16 EST ID:FaQqdZHU No.32002 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32001
Glad the link is some help, the author only just finished his multi-year journey to completing that site. Definitely some useful stuff there.

Decoupling is one of the basic tenets of good design, I'd suggest working with one other person on a small project, someone else who codes not just an artist, and you'll soon discover why it's such a useful design pattern.
>>
William Clacklewine - Tue, 08 Jul 2014 19:28:08 EST ID:5M822B0h No.32039 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>31998
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Encapsulation_(object-oriented_programming)

Don't kick yourself for doing it the quick and dirty way. As long as it works and works well then I see no reason to put yourself down. Just try to conform to the best practice standards in the future I guess.


shi painter by Clara Sammerteck - Tue, 08 Jul 2014 13:28:41 EST ID:9agYKwHZ No.32036 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I have a website and i run it through something like word press. How would i get a shi painter without making a whole html doc. i just have a section i put my code in.
sorry if this sounds vauge
>>
Phoebe Crengerhood - Thu, 10 Jul 2014 19:33:34 EST ID:kZ/qry9q No.32044 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32036
http://wordpress.org/support/topic/plugin-oekaki-shi-painter-plugin-version-12-for-wordpress

Literally the first Google result for "shi-painter wordpress". nb
>>
Phoebe Crengerhood - Thu, 10 Jul 2014 19:39:20 EST ID:kZ/qry9q No.32045 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32044
Sorry, I missed the "something like word press" part of your post and felt like a bit of a dick so I did some more digging:

https://github.com/malyw/Paint-board

HTML5 Canvas-based thing. There's a link to a demo which worked great for me and allows you to 'save' your art in several formats (file, share, data URL) so I imagine you could just change the save action to store that data on your site's server somehow. nb


My attempt at c programming by Emma Suffinglet - Fri, 04 Jul 2014 03:37:53 EST ID:KH9l0Yka No.32003 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Idk where else to turn to but I cannot get my code to count the number of times a user defined "codon" appears" within my first char array (gene).
So far ive gotten it to return values of 0 and 6.
I don't know what Im doing wrong.
can someone show me where my code is wrong?

http://pastebin.com/tyksqNZA


PS the while loop is unfinished. I still need to add a "do you want to continue y/n" type deals but that's not the part im having issues with.
13 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Molly Sarringwill - Mon, 07 Jul 2014 20:06:56 EST ID:ZMQnkpih No.32030 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32029
Another thing, you are searching 'user' at [0], [1] and [2], but declare it as user[2], which is going beyond the bounds of the buffer. You need a character for each of the characters you are going to enter into the buffer as well as one additional one for the terminating zero.

Using scanf() for strings is pretty dangerous, if someone enters a string into your program that's longer than 1 character then it will begin to overwrite the "count" variable and then will start eating into whatever next is placed on the call stack. You might want to look at fgets(), it takes a size parameter so that it can't exceed the given buffer length.

char boo[2];
fgets( boo, sizeof( boo ), stdin );
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Ebenezer Fanridge - Mon, 07 Jul 2014 22:27:48 EST ID:KH9l0Yka No.32031 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>32029
Thanks, I didnt catch this.

>>32030
I'm not sure if I'm allowed to use that function.
Only thing we've learned in class so far is scanf.


also, i got my code working for the most part.
Not sure why my while loop isn't breaking when a user inputs 'n'.
and if you enter the same codon twice it just adds the result to the previous result. (attatched screenshot)
actual code: http://pastebin.com/AYLKYFv2


Also, not sure if it matters but Im writing/compiling/running the code using codeblocks in Ubuntu 14.04
>>
Edwin Hibblefield - Mon, 07 Jul 2014 23:45:11 EST ID:I31z+CiS No.32032 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32031
>my while loop isn't breaking when a user inputs 'n'
Just read in a string instead of a character and compare the same way you are comparing the codons

>it just adds the result to the previous result
This is because you are declaring and initializing your count variable to 0 outside the loop
>>
Ebenezer Fanridge - Tue, 08 Jul 2014 00:16:06 EST ID:KH9l0Yka No.32033 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32032
thanks!!
>>
Molly Sarringwill - Tue, 08 Jul 2014 02:10:54 EST ID:ZMQnkpih No.32034 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>32031
>I'm not sure if I'm allowed to use that function. Only thing we've learned in class so far is scanf.

I don't know if you're interested in pursuing this sort of thing long-term or if this is just a class that you need to slog through, but you might want to ask about scanf() use in class.

Buffer overflow vulnerabilities have laid a carnage-filled road to hell and back (including heartbleed) and I think it's worth knowing about those things right from the start. When you're first learning you'll fuck up with pointers, memory allocation and the like (at least, I know I did...and still do from time-to-time). But telling someone who isn't in the know to grab strings with scanf() is kind of like telling someone to hammer in fence posts with a large container of nitroglycerin.

There are certain functions in C that you can really fuck yourself with if you're not careful or don't know about beforehand. Food for thought maybe, you can decide if this sort of thing is important to you or not.

Anyhow, I'm glad your stuff is working now.


Determining the color of a pixel by Brick Shittington - Sat, 05 Jul 2014 18:39:07 EST ID:Ao5vURDI No.32014 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I'm trying to make a program that determines the color of a pixel at a specific point on the screen. I tried to do it in C using the code given at RosettaCode.

When I attempt to compile it (gcc using cygwin on a windows 8 pc) I get this error. Tried to find some more information elsewhere but I couldn't find anybody experiencing the same error.
>>
Brick Shittington - Sat, 05 Jul 2014 18:42:07 EST ID:Ao5vURDI No.32015 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32014
My source code
http://pastebin.com/
>>
Brick Shittington - Sat, 05 Jul 2014 18:43:17 EST ID:Ao5vURDI No.32016 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32015
fuck
http://pastebin.com/5GhWvwht
>>
Lillian Sopperstone - Sat, 05 Jul 2014 19:53:02 EST ID:ZMQnkpih No.32017 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32014
You've got to link to the library that holds those missing functions. I think this is what you're looking for,

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/11302318/linking-issue-with-x11-in-c
>>
Brick Shittington - Sat, 05 Jul 2014 20:53:31 EST ID:Ao5vURDI No.32018 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32017
Linked the library and it's compiling now, thanks!


Bump When Unraring by Edwin Borringbad - Mon, 23 Jun 2014 04:55:36 EST ID:P68obXhY No.31950 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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>BWUR Don't know if it's a thing, don't give a fuck
Post your steaming pile of "holy fuck I wish this shit would Unrar already" Because you're bored
Currently unpacking the delicious and nutritious OMNISPHERE!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zF8SYLjl07g
>>
Basil Blatherwater - Mon, 23 Jun 2014 12:31:27 EST ID:FaQqdZHU No.31951 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Extracting Caustic Window lost album, fuck yes
http://boards.420chan.org/m/res/426946.php
>>
Eliza Worthingspear - Tue, 24 Jun 2014 03:30:53 EST ID:P68obXhY No.31955 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>31951
That's pretty fuckin cool, I like when people come together for the artists
>>
Ernest Pommermat - Fri, 04 Jul 2014 21:48:15 EST ID:P68obXhY No.32012 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>31950
Sony Soundforge, get iiiit!


why start coding? by Nigger Sugglefug - Tue, 24 Jun 2014 06:47:49 EST ID:GHX510P7 No.31956 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xq_eU4tehac
>>
Jack Gonnernick - Thu, 03 Jul 2014 06:01:57 EST ID:GHX510P7 No.31997 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>31956
http://www.andrews.edu/~aldy/women_and_programmers.html


kali linux by Eliza Lightdock - Wed, 25 Jun 2014 14:10:00 EST ID:fs9BcuOp No.31971 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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trying to create a persistent usb but at boot it wont recognize any suggestions everything is aimed to correct position. had it working without persist also
"on a 64gb 3.0"
>>
Jarvis Pittwill - Wed, 25 Jun 2014 20:37:29 EST ID:SVZjhRzL No.31975 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Try another USB, I have no idea I don't use Kali linux.
What I do know is USBs are generally big pieces of shit, poorly made and die frequently so just go buy another one for $10
http://docs.kali.org/installation/kali-linux-live-usb-persistence

I wouldn't trust persistence whatsoever, especially on a device with wear levelling (all USB/SDmicro/flash drives). Instead just create a LUKS container with cryptsetup, and put your evilware in there. Then back it up to bitbucket or github so when you boot you simply type 'git clone https://bitbucket/derp.git' and your container full of evil is ready to go.
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Isabella Bassleworth - Mon, 30 Jun 2014 22:43:38 EST ID:ssOAU605 No.31993 Ignore Report Quick Reply
grab a bootable iso, use the dd command to drop iso onto a usb stick.

been like 5 years since I played with those =/ they're not that interesting and usb sticks don't have enough write cycles to do anything really interesting, use something like puppy linux that unpacks into a ram disk or it'll die fast.
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Isabella Bassleworth - Mon, 30 Jun 2014 22:46:06 EST ID:ssOAU605 No.31994 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>31993
ooo putting grub on the stick and installing to it can work too; if you have a bootable partition and the motherboard is smart enough to pick it up.


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