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Emacs as an OS by Nigger Nicklechet - Thu, 18 Sep 2014 18:36:02 EST ID:xUAnupXV No.32466 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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You can run emacs standalone beside the Vanilla Linux kernel.
http://www.informatimago.com/linux/emacs-on-user-mode-linux.html

I've been running my own Emacs shell since forever but had no idea you could also roll EmacsOS. Tried this as a Xen guest and never want to go back. Stallman apparently designed emacs as an OS replacement as he believed back then they would all become so expensive and proprietary nobody would be able to afford an OS.

Switching to Emacs for everything saves me at least 2-3hrs per day where before I was screwing around with Chef/Puppet, updating the platform, chasing down platform bugs, panicking over surprises like this: https://www.debian.org/security/2014/dsa-3025 no more.
>>
Charles Clinningwut - Sat, 20 Sep 2014 11:30:48 EST ID:liuqRIO1 No.32481 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Emacs: amazing at everything except being a text editor.

I guess its expected, given it was designed by the world's second most famous autistic manchild.


C revision 11 by Walter Deckledodge - Fri, 12 Sep 2014 01:14:23 EST ID:LaTAJ1ig No.32404 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
1410498863581.jpg -(28934 B, 300x300) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 28934
Going to be learning my first Language.
I am choosing C revision 11, because it's the closest to the hardware that I know of that is also a somewhat high level language as well.
I want to start off making very optimized fast and powerful programs and then work my way up to OS + Kernal.
I have a question though, well three really.
1.) Can I use it as well to do make android apps?
2.) If yes, will they have the ability to be just as optimized, powerful & fast?
3.) Is there a better language I should be learning for all this shit?
10 posts and 2 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Thomas Cronningpodge - Tue, 16 Sep 2014 18:32:25 EST ID:e10h57aa No.32453 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32452
I agree, Qt is good starting point. C++ for good computer and programming knowledge while also having free powerful easy to use GUI tools for making GUI
>>
George Sishketch - Tue, 16 Sep 2014 19:43:25 EST ID:Ri27kjQr No.32454 Ignore Report Quick Reply
learning any functional programming language on the side is a great idea. It teaches you how to reconsider you solutions so that your program's state becomes less relevant which is always great.
Learn Java, C++, or C# as your base, then Haskell, Lisp, or Scala to supplement. I transitioned to functional language through Python but any high order general purpose would do.

tl;dr instead of learning A language and be able to write code, learn many languages and be able to write programs.
>>
Emma Gondleson - Tue, 16 Sep 2014 20:37:45 EST ID:Ybv0zkiv No.32455 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Learning Python to understand computer science principles is fine, but you'll want to graduate to C++11 afterwards to expand even further.

Python can be great for prototyping projects, so there's a chance you'll even use it after starting C++11.

Also, there may not yet be enough examples of good coding principles demonstrated in C++11/14 yet, but it seems to be rolling in now. So definitely start looking for Software Craftsmanship books, especially those regarding C++11/14. I happen to really enjoy this book (https://leanpub.com/susodevcpp). It is in a progressive state and you name your price.


so yeah, tldr:
Either read SICP (free, just google) (Best Option for overall foundational skills) or learn Python (Not books that just teach syntax, but real cross-language principles).
Quickly go through beginner C++ to gather language familiarity, then start picking up non-beginner C++ books, especially Software Craftsmanship to guide you in better coding principles.
>>
Nigger Nicklechet - Wed, 17 Sep 2014 20:37:59 EST ID:xUAnupXV No.32456 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Don't make Android apps in C using NDK . Write Android apps in Clojure unless you want some kind of system daemon running on AOSP. Unless you're doing cryptography really no reason to use the NDK also it will be next to impossible to get it to work "optimized" for every various device unless you plan on releasing your own ROM, for a specific device.
>>
Nicholas Shittingwater - Thu, 18 Sep 2014 13:28:43 EST ID:/0Mp2fQG No.32464 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32455
Hey,
that SICP looks like a great book.
http://mitpress.mit.edu/sicp/

It seems dense and has good exercises. I always wanted to learn a LISP related language. I'm going to read the book.

MIT replaced SICT with 6.00
http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-00sc-introduction-to-computer-science-and-programming-spring-2011/unit-1/lecture-1-introduction-to-6.00/
http://sicp-s3.mit.edu/cs/6.01/information
It is Python based.


my sweet idea by Reuben Blackstone - Thu, 18 Sep 2014 01:01:36 EST ID:zhfY1tw5 No.32460 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Is this kind of program easy to make? I'm totally stupid and want to have something like this cause my friend's presenting all next week in our lecture hall and I want to make his computer fully SLAYER themed while he presents on religion. He has a good sense of humor and it'd be fun to see.


[C++] Which uses less resources by Simon Pockworth - Sun, 14 Sep 2014 21:51:59 EST ID:TZ2ht1Xk No.32429 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
1410745919683.gif -(209216 B, 231x200) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 209216
bool check(){
if(a>b) return true;
else return false;
}


OR

bool check(){
if(a>b) return true;
return false;
}


I guess the question is, how much resources does that else use?
5 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Reuben Murryville - Mon, 15 Sep 2014 02:19:59 EST ID:TOlsmCgx No.32436 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32430
Just trying to learn here. Very interesting and I wouldn't have thought of that right away! There are supposed to be arguments passed to that function to make it work, right? You're not just referencing global variables or something are you?
>>
Nathaniel Smallhood - Mon, 15 Sep 2014 03:47:34 EST ID:zxwvWO2P No.32437 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Branches on modern CPUs are only slow if the branch predictor unit fails to predict which way the branch will go.

Read up friends, fill yourselves with knowledge:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Branch_predictor

/* For an example, try running this code on an array of over 50 million bools of various values. Note the differences in how the function runs if you replace the inside of the for-loop with the branchless version, also note the difference in performance if your array of bools are all random versus if they're in some sort of pattern or arrangement. */
unsigned count_true_bools(bool* array, unsigned numBools)
{
unsigned sum = 0;
for (unsigned x = 0; x < numBools; ++x)
{
if (array[x]) ++sum; // this is quite slow if the array has about a 50% random distribution of trues-to-falses

// A much faster way of doing this same thing is instead:
// sum += (int)(array[x]); // Faster by 17x because it avoids any branching
Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.
>>
Simon Pockworth - Mon, 15 Sep 2014 08:56:38 EST ID:TZ2ht1Xk No.32438 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32436
correct, it's just a quick example
>>
Caroline Tillinghood - Mon, 15 Sep 2014 21:34:23 EST ID:0fDyrctt No.32444 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32432
>>32432
>Anyway, I tend to focus more on readability than speed

return a > b IS more readable to a real programmer. Real programmers know what boolean expressions are.
>>
Cornelius Brookdale - Mon, 15 Sep 2014 21:42:05 EST ID:KmxmS4eT No.32445 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32444
Absolutely agreed, hence suggesting that first. I was referring to his original question about the optional `else` there, implicitly in the cases where you aren't returning a boolean.


[C++] Simpify Input Function by Ernest Smallwill - Sat, 13 Sep 2014 21:56:37 EST ID:TZ2ht1Xk No.32422 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
1410659797471.jpg -(304817 B, 2560x1600) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 304817
char inputFunction(){
char a;
cin >> a;
return << a;
}

Is there anyway to simplify this function and combine some of those steps into one line?
>>
Ernest Smallwill - Sat, 13 Sep 2014 22:58:40 EST ID:TZ2ht1Xk No.32424 Ignore Report Quick Reply
return a;
typo
>>
Cyril Sugglebanks - Sun, 14 Sep 2014 06:38:52 EST ID:zxwvWO2P No.32425 Ignore Report Quick Reply
It's difficult to get much smaller than that function. If you're worried about the performance overhead of calling such a small function, just mark it with the "inline" keyword.

Also I'm a bit fuzzy on the workings of std::cin, but I think you could do this equivalent code if you like it more:
char inputFunction()
{
char a;
std::cin.get(a);
return a;
}
>>
Ernest Smallwill - Sun, 14 Sep 2014 12:54:07 EST ID:TZ2ht1Xk No.32426 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Thanks just making sure.
I guess the alternative is to pass by reference and set it right there in the function, but not sure if that's more efficient.

void inputFunction(char& a){
cin >> a;
}


Where do you keep your code? by Cornelius Hicklefatch - Sat, 06 Sep 2014 01:30:02 EST ID:ZKISjmJz No.32341 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Where do you keep your work?
>Local folders?
>Flash drives?
>Cloud storage?
>Notebook paper?
I'm just now getting to where I'm writing enough script to where I don't know what to do with it.
9 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Fanny Buzzwill - Fri, 12 Sep 2014 11:23:25 EST ID:LjyDzg4D No.32412 Ignore Report Quick Reply
This thread is exactly the reason why I don't use git. Every time someone makes the slightest complaint about git there's 100 gittards ready to jump down your throat and tell you why they think you're wrong. Why does git attract so many condescending version control nazis?
>>
Henry Decklebudge - Fri, 12 Sep 2014 12:05:54 EST ID:dUqCye/w No.32413 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32412
What do you use instead? If you don't use any version control, you deserve to have someone jump down your throat. If you just use something different that you prefer more, most people won't give you any shit about it. Git, Mercurial and Fossil are all excellent and even SVN is fine in many environments. If you use something like CVS, you should at least consider migrating to something more modern and robust. If you're not using any VCS at all, you're making work a living hell for the people you collaborate with.
>>
Ian Clidgesodge - Fri, 12 Sep 2014 16:17:25 EST ID:vhgZIlcV No.32415 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32412
Which part of "SVN is simpler and most likely enough for your needs" did you intentionally miss?
[?]For a system, being simple a good thing[/?]

Also saying a system is bad because of its users is as stupid as it sounds like.
(I know, I used to use nano because of the vim--emacs -war.)
>>
Fanny Buzzwill - Fri, 12 Sep 2014 16:37:06 EST ID:LjyDzg4D No.32416 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32413

I'm another svn loyalist

>>32415

A system can very easily be a horrible system just solely because of the kinds of people its users are. What's the point of using a particular system if the users are rude and condescending to you if you ask them a question or present them with criticism?

It could be the best system in the world but if most of the people that use it are insufferable assholes then why would you even be motivated to use it in the first place?
>>
Henry Decklebudge - Fri, 12 Sep 2014 17:58:18 EST ID:dUqCye/w No.32418 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32416
>It could be the best system in the world but if most of the people that use it are insufferable assholes then why would you even be motivated to use it in the first place?
I guess I don't actually care what the other people who use what I use do with it or how they act unless I am contributing code to the project. It's not like I'm going to stop using OS X or something just because a bunch of morons and haters also happen to have a Mac. However, I would hesitate to contribute my work to an open source project if the community were abrasive to me, which is part of why I prefer the BSD license and GPLv2.

Either way, you use SVN which is perfectly fine most of the time, especially if you are controlling the central repository where your code lives. IMO, the top advantage of distributed systems like Git and Mercurial is that you can safely let a 3rd party like Github or Bitbucket manage the repos for you without ever having to worry about losing any of your work unless the entire internet explodes at once.


Javascript by Nigger Ballerchane - Wed, 10 Sep 2014 10:01:50 EST ID:fYzdXjM5 No.32385 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Hey guys! So I finished the Learnpythonthehardway course a few months back and I've been enjoying myself tinkering with different code and whatnot. But I've seen that Javascript comes up more and more frequently, so I was wondering if there is a course similar to the LPTHW, except for Javascript. Thanks!


Php stuff by Dogglyllama - Mon, 08 Sep 2014 23:16:11 EST ID:B+L1GGxk No.32375 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Does anyone know a way to get a php code to execute on a forum based website without having to embed it in image codes?


Here, have a glass munny.
>>
Edward Seshlure - Mon, 08 Sep 2014 23:29:55 EST ID:xtelIQ1k No.32377 Ignore Report Quick Reply
That would be some staggeringly poor forum software.
>>
Dogglyllama - Mon, 08 Sep 2014 23:47:28 EST ID:B+L1GGxk No.32378 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32377

No other alternatives than embedded into images eh?
>>
Nigger Driffingsun - Tue, 09 Sep 2014 00:54:43 EST ID:wt9P62m4 No.32379 Ignore Report Quick Reply
$2B lol
https://bitquark.co.uk/blog/2014/08/31/popping_a_shell_on_the_oculus_developer_portal
>>
David Clayhall - Tue, 09 Sep 2014 14:50:27 EST ID:GmcnP553 No.32381 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32377
This.

What are you trying to accomplish though?
>>
Fucking Gepperfoot - Tue, 09 Sep 2014 15:37:51 EST ID:vhgZIlcV No.32382 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32375
In the forum software add an extra eval call where you would print the code to run it instead.

Do note that using this any user is able to run any code they wish on the server, meaning they can do anything on the machine (well, limited to the user privileges php runs as, but anyways way too much).


periodically obtain dynamic IP of home network. by Emma Ninningdale - Mon, 08 Sep 2014 08:51:42 EST ID:3+Lc5t2a No.32363 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Hey anons, I need some input on my particular case,

I have 2 linux machines and one windows machine at my home network. The router is provided by the ISP. I am trying to ssh into my home network from university. The issue is the router IP is determined by DHCP.

Previously, i used Dyndns for tracking my IP but i have found them to be getting more commercial oriented these days. The alternate idea is to write my small script and run in periodically to get my IP address. basically something like

curl ifconfig.me > dynamic_ip.txt

I am looking for ways to store so that it is accessable from the internet. So far, i am face with two option, either install dropbox integration with filemanager to make this file available from outside or write a script which automatically send this file as email. Is there any other elegant way of doing this? .
>>
Clara Bovingnadging - Mon, 08 Sep 2014 13:31:39 EST ID:4t/Nsm8d No.32365 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Parse.com, Google Cloud, Pastebin, Github, Twitter, or make an online profile on a site with an API like LinkedIn, YDN or Google Apps.
>>
Walter Nondleson - Mon, 08 Sep 2014 13:55:39 EST ID:xtelIQ1k No.32367 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Just use no-ip?


Learning Javascript by Cornelius Pungerwill - Wed, 03 Sep 2014 13:59:35 EST ID:Ei+vUY1X No.32319 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Sup /prog/

I feel like I am pretty proficient when it comes to HTML and CSS, and all my life until now I've always tried using CSS3 over Javascript whenever possible (which in itself isn't such a bad solution at times). If I've needed some JS effects I've just used pre-made plugins or libraries.

However, I can no longer avoid using JS from the get-go, so I come asking for tips on efficient ways to get the learning underway. I know very little about how it works, except that it utilizes boolean logic.

I got myself JavaScript: The Good Parts, but I wonder if there's another way to start learning. Should I just stick with the book or would you recommend some other way to get going?
>>
Nigger Hittingchock - Wed, 03 Sep 2014 18:59:56 EST ID:/yVfOuai No.32320 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32319
codecademy.com

What are you trying to become as a programmer?
>>
Martha Greenbanks - Wed, 03 Sep 2014 22:01:47 EST ID:3P+30G+p No.32324 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Similar situation here, OP. I've been comfortable with HTML and CSS for a very long time, but only got my hands on jQuery within the last few years. I'm very proficient with jQuery and its UI and Mobile libraries but have only recently started to learn pure JS.

I read through the first few chapters of The Good Parts and while I enjoyed it, I felt like it was more of a reference than a skill-builder. I will return to it someday. In the meantime I have been reading Secrets of the JavaScript Ninja by John Resig, the guy who created jQuery. It's been immensely helpful so far.

It certainly doesn't cover JS from the ground up (i.e. no "Baby's first alert box" or anything like that) and, if given the choice, I would still prefer to use jQuery for working with the DOM; I have yet to find a reason not to. But the book is thorough in its explanations and progresses at a fast but reasonable pace. When in doubt I always refer to the MDN (blows W3Schools out of the water) for anything I'm not 100% clear on. But in terms of writing clean, functional, pure JS and techniques for debugging and refactoring, I've made great progress since starting the book.

Otherwise I learn a lot just from tinkering with code in my spare time, referring to Google only when I'm really stuck. I recently wrote an HTML/JS particle emitter (someone on this board helped me with some of the math on that one) and a procedural tile-based map generator from scratch, both just for fun. If nothing else I find completing little "sandbox" projects like that gives me confidence to continue learning.

Best of luck :) I hope you find my anecdotal suggestions helpful!
>>
Polly Pockworth - Sun, 07 Sep 2014 21:31:07 EST ID:IMUsvCCA No.32360 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Tutorials/practice for familiarization. References for questions. Books for deeper knowledge.

I usually go to mdn as my reference:
https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript

You could also try w3schools if you're one of those kids that picks their nose while they code.

Get familiar with Jquery once you have a basic understanding of javascript. That way you will get a better idea of what you should implement for understanding and what you shouldn't implement to avoid reinventing the wheel. Jquery makes your life hell of a lot easier in most cases. Move on to your book after that if you're still not satisfied.

I found this on mdn don't know if it is useful to you:
http://www.codeavengers.com/

There is also codeacademy which someone already wrote.


micro controllers by Emma Wommlehon - Wed, 27 Aug 2014 05:44:52 EST ID:P+Esx9s1 No.32284 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Is there a cheap way to program pic18 µc's?
Buying a bunch of pics is tempting, as they are so cheap, but Microchip's pickit costs like a million dollar or something.
They've got pickits at my school, but I'd prefer being able to hack at home.

Also, general microcontroller thread! What are you guys doing with your arduinos?
>>
Edwin Clundlefan - Wed, 27 Aug 2014 19:38:59 EST ID:SFwGSzW3 No.32288 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I remember when I was fucking around with PICs they had chip programming hardware for like a hundred bucks. And there was some IDE that was free too called like MPI or MCI or something ... I don't remember its been like 10 years since I've fucked around with electronics.
>>
John Turveycocke - Tue, 02 Sep 2014 14:57:35 EST ID:vhgZIlcV No.32316 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32284
There are a bunch of designs if you google "pic usb programmer diy" or similar.
I haven't worked in PICs myself, but I made one of these for my AVR hobby: https://learn.adafruit.com/usbtinyisp
I chose not to spend my money of prefab pcb, but make one myself. This forced me to redesign the layout for single layer. The whole project took me about 2 days, given I had access to a clubroom with the required tools and parts. Cost of parts was likely around $5.
>>
Albert Cligglehood - Wed, 03 Sep 2014 19:38:12 EST ID:+LFVi/DX No.32323 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32284
check newark.com or element 14 (same company, uk based I think)
>>
Reuben Hogglestat - Sat, 06 Sep 2014 09:53:14 EST ID:o20v/jC8 No.32346 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I'm not sure what chip it was, but it's one of the lower capability arduino ones.

The k8055 (n) kit is like $20, and by remove a resistor you can put an arduino chip in it, and program it in the same device.


Anyone want Java help? by Samuel Barddale - Thu, 04 Sep 2014 18:02:33 EST ID:JoFDuQ6D No.32329 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Junior Java developer here, bored waiting for a pizza. Anyone have any questions?
1 posts and 1 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Phineas Duckham - Fri, 05 Sep 2014 14:31:36 EST ID:ASPwn4re No.32334 Ignore Report Quick Reply
https://gist.github.com/anonymous/f07d138708ded089cab8

My professor in my Java lecture wrote this program out during class. I've copied it into BlueJ and tried to compile it, but I'm running into this error. Any ideas?

copypasta:

[code]
Scanner keyb = new Scanner(System.in);
variable = keyb.nextInt();
import java.util.Scanner;
public class Average3b{
public static void main(String[]args){
int value1, value2, value3;
int sum, average;
//Get the values
Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.
>>
Phineas Saddlechog - Fri, 05 Sep 2014 18:54:47 EST ID:KmxmS4eT No.32335 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1409957687283.png -(289878 B, 500x281) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 289878
>>32334
The problem is that there are a bunch of problems and your editor doesn't do a good job of telling you what the problems are. You could download IntelliJ or Eclipse, or just go to http://www.compileonline.com/compile_java_online.php and try to paste and compile it there.

Anyway, those two first lines go inside the class file somewhere, some lines don't end with a semicolon, you have "ouprintln" or "outprintln" instead of "out.println", and "variable" is never used.

Please tell your professor that I hate them and they need to make code from lectures available online, instead of asking you to handwritten-copy down their handwritten copy of the thing that actually compiles.
>>
Edward Crommledeck - Fri, 05 Sep 2014 19:35:58 EST ID:6ui0N+F9 No.32336 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32329
Which would be better to learn

Java or C#?

I am a novice at programming.

I'm interested in either one and also want to learn C++
>>
Ebenezer Chezzlefuck - Fri, 05 Sep 2014 21:43:37 EST ID:ASPwn4re No.32338 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32335

>Please tell your professor that I hate them and they need to make code from lectures available online, instead of asking you to handwritten-copy down their handwritten copy of the thing that actually compiles.


That's literally what happened. The "t" missing was a legitimate typo that I copied and pasted because I'm a humongous stupid retard asshole, but the lack of periods where there were supposed to be is because he writes it on a fucking markerboard and makes tiny dots for his period that aren't visible if you aren't sitting right up front (which I can't do because I have a class right beforehand and can't get early to the good seats). His kerning is awful, so I can't tell what's supposed to have a space and what's not, and FURTHERMORE, he runs out of room on the markerboard and just writes a line of code and draws an arrow to where it's supposed to be.

FUCKING

KILL

ME
>>
Eliza Chubberson - Sat, 06 Sep 2014 09:47:11 EST ID:J1KthLSY No.32344 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>32338
Sounds so awful. Hope you have enough motivation to try to become good despite the quality of your education. I hope you understand that you're not a stupid retard asshole just because you lack the knowledge (and/or knowledge of tools) needed to debug your code. It's the professor who's a stupid retard asshole.

Anyway, I'd say that without solid experience - actually having done and fixed the same slips, typos and errors so many times yourself that they're engrained in the back of your mind - it's really difficult to spot what the problem is just by looking at the code.

Exceptions and related stack traces are what you need to be looking at, and definitely should've pasted here. Although some nefarious bugs will point to the wrong place, usually this is where you find the line number of what has caused your program to fail. Study the lines it points to, character by character if needed: keep in mind that it's too easy to scan over blindly the parts you think should be fine. If you can't figure it out, just google the exception [and related keywords], the results should at least give you some idea what the problem could be.

Get a proper IDE (my university recommends Eclipse), but remember that you should try to understand every line of code you write, instead of using your IDEs functionality as a crutch.


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