AnonAccount: What is it, and what does it do? - Q&A Thread
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What happens when the original axioms are bad? by Albert Greenspear - Sun, 03 Aug 2014 14:47:07 EST ID:1ZrGQpKH No.195315 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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If A is proven wrong or rather proven to be false and if B follows from A, does that make B equally bad?

I ask because Schopenhauer here believe that Hegel was an "illiterate charlatan", and let us say that he in fact was one, does that mean that Marx and all the other things that followed from Hegalian thought were equally bad and unfruitful?
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Fuck Buckletodging - Tue, 05 Aug 2014 09:30:41 EST ID:eB4+2hhb No.195338 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195337

thanks for reading my whole post, nb
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William Fishson - Tue, 05 Aug 2014 22:06:24 EST ID:mHYR4NYL No.195339 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Marx first and foremost was an economist. His observations about capitalism hold true to this day. If you're going to criticize Marx (or anyone for that matter) actually state what you're in disagreement with.
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Eliza Hudgestud - Tue, 09 Sep 2014 14:24:04 EST ID:YHQ90Hzg No.195787 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195315
were Adolf Hitlers soldiers bad men?
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Edwin Greenbanks - Tue, 09 Sep 2014 23:49:00 EST ID:1heTqcJX No.195796 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195787

some of them
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Molly Niggerlock - Wed, 10 Sep 2014 12:06:02 EST ID:ZGi1tDkn No.195798 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>and let us say that he in fact was one,
Attacking person, not his argument or substance of his claims
ad-hominem


Time is an illusion by Fuck Drossleforth - Fri, 29 Aug 2014 19:45:06 EST ID:HWOLvodq No.195650 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Anyone have a decent argument against this proposition? Here's one for time being an illusion by Mr Borges himself for anyone interested:

http://heavysideindustries.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/borges-a-new-refutation-of-time.pdf
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Thomas Ponderbock - Mon, 08 Sep 2014 05:23:46 EST ID:0l1qVRpg No.195769 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195768
I have to think it through.

Usually, I take a four-dimensionalist stance on time, so bear in mind I'm trying to present a novel (for me) POV I usually don't present, which is why it might sound awkward.
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Kocoayello !jxaL03vL/Q - Mon, 08 Sep 2014 09:05:27 EST ID:BVMklPf1 No.195770 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Well, time is just change or motion of objects, and yes it's not objective. A year to a child is much longer than a year to a 99 year old, a watched pot will never boil, and bees have a faster "flicker vision" and therefore see us humans go in slow motion. Time is completely subjective. How exactly this works, I've no idea. Brian Green (e?) has a good documentary on time I tried to watch once but was too distracted by other homework at the time to fully pay attention.


One thing that's especially weird about time as a temporal dimension, is that it pushes us forward at a variable, non fixed rate. Perhaps in higher Bulk spaces time isn't a one directional dimension, but moveable along both directions? Who knows.
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Cornelius Fodgestone - Mon, 08 Sep 2014 13:42:36 EST ID:Im1aT5e5 No.195771 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195770
>Well, time is just change or motion of objects
Aaaaaaaaaaaaa
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Thomas Ponderbock - Mon, 08 Sep 2014 18:40:49 EST ID:0l1qVRpg No.195774 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195770
Hey, you actually make some semblance of sense.
>Time is completely subjective.
Yes, but the question is whether it's only the perception of time that is subjective, or whether time *itself* is. That the perception of time is subjective is undeniably true, but the latter isn't as obvious.

Let's talk physics now. General relativity is the preferred way of describing large-scale phenomena, while quantum mechanics (let's say the copenhagen interpretation) is the way to go for learning how the building blocks of reality behave. But the two can't be reconciled, and one of the things that stand in the way of reconciliation is time (the problem of time, as it is called). The problem here being that in general relativity, there is no "time" as it is usually talked about in mechanics; rather, it is married to space to form spacetime, which then changes, stretches, and so forth (which is one of the dimensions of the issue I was talking about before, only I hadn't finished thinking about it back then). Quantum mechanics, on the other hand, need time for the equations to make sense. This makes it difficult to merge the two. For instance, the Wheeler–DeWitt equation needs to drop time altogether to work.

Reading about all of that led me to ask: what *is* time? If it is inherently tied to space and gravity, then can we really say that it exists independently in the way we are used to assuming it does? If it is relative, then how come we cannot make quantum mechanics work without removing that from the equation?

Now, if we assume that time is the way of ordering based on causality (so, the order of any given chain of events), then maybe cross-reference between events is enough to infer the "duration" of the events - since physical time is already established to be relative (at least for the macroscopic world), then that wouldn't be this much of a leap of faith.
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Molly Sevingpire - Tue, 09 Sep 2014 00:14:15 EST ID:PMR6/8EW No.195777 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195774
I like your initial description of time. I think its the most coherent I've ever read, if I'm reading it right. I think your right in attributing time to a measure of causally linked events. If I were assuming right, then you're not against calling into question the universality of causality. Causality, after all, might be an illusion itself. In that, not all events might necessarily be linked causally. Or, in other words, all phenomena might not be all linked causally. The paradoxes of general relativity, I would say, are enough to warrant the skepticism. The paper linked in the OP I think gives the most complete explanation of what is meant by "time is itself a perception". When we take it within the contexts provided, it doesn't reduce to "time is non-existence", since we're using the language of Hume and especially Berkeley, where the terms non-existent don't differ much from the existent, since they both refer to similar phenomena depending on the speaker.


Birth by Isabella Gubberman - Sun, 24 Aug 2014 17:29:13 EST ID:lEK2RtpJ No.195610 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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How do I become born?
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Shitting Pundlemut - Mon, 25 Aug 2014 21:56:46 EST ID:lEK2RtpJ No.195613 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195612

but how, I mean really, birthed into life?
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Wesley Dellerfuck - Tue, 26 Aug 2014 02:01:14 EST ID:gFe9zdD6 No.195614 Ignore Report Quick Reply
FIRST YOU DIE
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Emma Nallystock - Tue, 26 Aug 2014 05:28:59 EST ID:5q+Zf1cH No.195616 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195613
First, there's impregnation of an egg cell. Then it divides until it becomes an embryo, and then, the embryo develops until it enters fetal stage. The fetus then develops and grows until it is ready to survive outside the womb, and when that happens, bam, birth.

But really, the moment one comes into existence depends on what people understand as defining their existence. If by "you" you mean "your self-awareness", then that arguably doesn't happen until much later in your development; if a cocktail of feelings is enough to define your humble person, then the moment the fetus' nervous system is advanced enough to feel is the mark. If it's mere existence, then conception. This is actually pretty hotly contested in areas where abortion debates rage on.
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Cyril Binnerdun - Thu, 04 Sep 2014 10:43:53 EST ID:O8E01Zb7 No.195734 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195610
"Life is like a nodal point born in an overwhelming sea of information" - The Puppet Master (Code name: Project 2501)
{when being asked to prove it's existence}
"Proving it is impossible because modern science cannot explain what 'life' is...I am not an AI. am a living, thinking entity who was created in the sea of information." - The Puppet Master (Code name: Project 2501)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PF9kw1-FH94
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Oliver Bonkindock - Mon, 08 Sep 2014 18:43:32 EST ID:HCMXWO6z No.195775 Ignore Report Quick Reply
To become born, You must first make an apple pie from scratch.
and also a sandwich, oh whilst you're at it, a beer as well.


ZIMMERMAN OR TRAYVON = CHRIST? by Phoebe Sorrykitch - Wed, 27 Aug 2014 18:05:39 EST ID:xl9cpeO3 No.195635 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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what if we are meant to look at Trayvon and Zimmerman with the same philosophical distance as is viewed on christs divinity? was Christ and judas divine intervention or not? was Zimmerman judas or Christ? was Trayvon judas or Christ>?

who Is the guilty? the forlorn Zimmerman, now homeless, or was tray tray an emblem of something bigger?

Is it better that society believes that Trayvon martin was just a poor kid much like it is better for society to believe that Christ existed?
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John Blandlelock - Fri, 05 Sep 2014 12:47:38 EST ID:hgfltBKL No.195745 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195732
those four can't have the same job, the same property, the same relations, the same anything material and possessive that people come to desire and attempt to acquire by mimesis
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Frederick Pablingdale - Fri, 05 Sep 2014 14:09:22 EST ID:r3npQJG7 No.195746 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195745
You have a flaw in there though, people may or may not want it because of others but certainly something that is mimetically attractive others will want they then may in turn have conflict when they realize others want it because they each individually think that is them. The problem with thinking that they can't is that in reality there are four falcos because mimesis led to copies of the object as well as the desire. That withstanding it will be a copy as well as a change. That's reproduction.
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Ernest Tillingham - Fri, 05 Sep 2014 20:41:30 EST ID:hgfltBKL No.195751 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195746
Virtually speaking in your example there are four falcos because theyre virtual falcos

But beyond this there are only four controllers on a single console, im assuming?
And only a limited number of people who can afford the console, game, electricity, television, and the wealth and conditions of procuring this wealth, such as being born into a high income working class or bourgeois family

All of these are the real scarce material objects which people desire through mimesis. Whether or not that scarcity is artificial is unimportant, even if we commonly owned and controlled production mimetic rivalry would continue simply because we desire things and people outside the limited realm of capital
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Walter Pizzledutch - Sat, 06 Sep 2014 17:38:07 EST ID:F5RtLyIS No.195758 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195751
uh huh, but none of the commplace examples you listed, or even the philosophy of mimesis listed in the thread had scandal arise because of there being not enough of the desired thing, it was all under the imposition of the threat of scarcity. The principle that because they are limited we must act as if there will never be another reproduced, which is false.

you've narrowed your argument to include objects of material wealth. But originally it included relationships, positions, ideas, statuses.

It was broader, and to be more central at its core scandal being the driving force for a scapegoat, it has to be about the want to be or have something in general. There is a plato thread at the top of the page so this is why i am probably thinking it but think of the force of this desire of mimetic rivalry the nice car with which one covets another being able to have, is the example of a situation that is its form. It's a situation playing out that is a manifestation of something broader.

Indeed it has to be if your claiming its at the root of all problems dating back to martyrdom and the basis behind the anti coveting doctrine of our neighbor.

This whole thing is about territory and how we occupy it. The thing is two nerds walk up to each other, in each of their ego they are the best nerds of an field of interest. They have lived there life in an intentional and also fateful way with a special bond to a given thing.

When they meet each other they feel threatened by that, because even though by virtue of existence, they have already lived their lives before the knowledge of one another even presented itself with the attachment and indentication and love of this material already existant. But when they meet they act as if they are highlanders.

They believe their can be only one.
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Walter Pizzledutch - Sat, 06 Sep 2014 17:48:38 EST ID:F5RtLyIS No.195759 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195751
Also people desire the the metaphysical status or value that happens to be a physical object. The new movie is cool, many people want to see it, because its cool. That's the real process of mimemis. If many people are copying or replicating a certain thing because of mimemis, it's not because of the object. I'm sure there are people who want specifically electricity not because electricity is the thing a family has, or it represents a normal life of a family, but because they want the electricity.

But if people want certain things because it will give them the family life, or it will help make up or composite, an image and status that they percieve that works kind of like a ticket to a certain life "or the good life." It's not always the material or phycical things that they are chasing or experiencing upon retrieval.

Some people are pursuing a family and kids, because that's what you do, that's their goal. That certainly isn't physically easier, or materially or financially easier. It's harder. But yet that's more satisfying.

And that would be something mimetic to all cultures. Sometimes the objects of mimesis are meaning. And in that token the objects will be like a copy in that they are absorbed and reproduced, they are not invented or unique to the indivdual or a first time. But yet they are altered, because even though the individual was observing something entrenched in culture by the time they finish playing along with that tune, that they heard on the cultural radio. It will be altered, upon it's next generation reproduction like anybody singing a song at kareoke, or recording a show of the television on a vhs, ripped onto youtube, and then downloaded again by firefox.


love as a physical, psychic force that kils enemies by John Finkinridge - Wed, 03 Sep 2014 03:02:56 EST ID:k9NfBdqF No.195706 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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love can be so concentrated and pure that it can blast forth from the heart of the channeling host and literally tear apart a grown man or woman who is attacking a christian baby?
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Beatrice Bibblemudge - Wed, 03 Sep 2014 07:38:52 EST ID:Im1aT5e5 No.195708 Ignore Report Quick Reply
/spooky/
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Nigel Buttinghall - Wed, 03 Sep 2014 11:55:52 EST ID:7sJ/68Ak No.195709 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195708

/meds/
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Kocoayello !jxaL03vL/Q - Thu, 04 Sep 2014 20:28:34 EST ID:BVMklPf1 No.195742 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Repost this thread in /spooky/ and I can give you an answer that /pss/ posters willnot understand.
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Faggy Worthingwater - Fri, 05 Sep 2014 20:08:08 EST ID:k9NfBdqF No.195748 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195742
You can tell me here
it is safe to talk here
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Henry Figgleman - Sat, 06 Sep 2014 09:15:55 EST ID:Im1aT5e5 No.195756 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195748
No go away nobody wants this shit on this board


Philosophags & Stupid Sciences by Emma Greenham - Thu, 31 Jul 2014 13:13:02 EST ID:qRHsQbQA No.195279 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Does anyone else look at this board and think that all of it is pseudo-philosophical armchair bullshit? Why is all of the discussion about New Age "theories," ancient (read: outdated) religions, consciousness (read: New Age talk for the outdated concept of the soul), and leftist circlejerking/self-fellatio? Judging by this board I get the impression that all of the intelligent people really DON'T do drugs.
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Oliver Gellermitch - Thu, 28 Aug 2014 13:32:48 EST ID:1tiw482i No.195643 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195642
Right, so it's the genetic fallacy duct taped to the appeal to nature
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Charles Pommersudge - Fri, 29 Aug 2014 07:14:44 EST ID:uHerTrm2 No.195648 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195643
Yeah, I wish I could post something as straightforward like that but I engage in philosophical discussion simply because it's fun and mildly enthusing for me to do when the moment's right, not because I want to try to make a superficial conscious effort to look smart.

I mean, I'm not at all saying you're pretensing yourself to just look smart but I'm just describing why I don't express my thoughts as concisely as you do.
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Molly Firrytot - Fri, 29 Aug 2014 13:15:31 EST ID:1tiw482i No.195649 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195648
sorry I don't even remember this conversation. I'm one of those inebriated faggots lol.

You know I was watching Ed, Edd, n Eddy the other day and I realized something. It's a Capitalist, a Socialist, and a Fool. One day they each eat three lard-burgers
The Fool (Ed) eats his contentedly. The Capitalist (Edd) vomits up a gear to symbolize wasted production to make extra room for the fatty burger. The Socialist (Eddy) nibbles daintily at his burger when he's disturbed by the fact that the three troll girls (feminists) want something in return for their burgers.

The entire show is a political cartoon. I just never knew it. Start with season 1. (only past season 2 is available on Netflix. Go figure government funded everything not wanting to accidentally publish propaganda decrying the state.)
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Shit Claywater - Sat, 30 Aug 2014 02:17:07 EST ID:DwIX8PJp No.195653 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195649

When I was younger I always wanted the Kanker sisters to keep me as their sex slave.
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Lydia Guddletatch - Thu, 04 Sep 2014 10:04:12 EST ID:1cAbu+OX No.195730 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195653
Well unless you're particularly sexy....


Consciousness by William Honderbidge - Sat, 24 May 2014 03:47:51 EST ID:iKiIyFsH No.193919 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Let's say that the universe is consciously creating itself.

The observer and thing being observed are essentially the same thing, or made from the same cloth; consciousness.
Separation is an illusion.

How was anything created before anything was around to observe it?
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Shitting Sucklenit - Tue, 02 Sep 2014 21:01:27 EST ID:jgUq9TXB No.195701 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195698
We're cycling towards becoming bona fide Gods. Creators of the next universe. We must advance ourselves to the point where we can harness all the power of the universe to create another big bang.
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John Finkinridge - Tue, 02 Sep 2014 21:36:03 EST ID:k9NfBdqF No.195703 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195701
and I am also cycling toward this, and I have some kind of soul/structure that can defy these realities and keep me on this psychedelic train of life? there's nothing to be afraid of?
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Shitting Sucklenit - Tue, 02 Sep 2014 22:20:40 EST ID:jgUq9TXB No.195704 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195703
You have a finite amount of time to exist. Your soul is a floor joist in the timeless structure called human experience. Your floor joist isn't complete until you die. Whether you're a good floor joist or not, future structures will be built on top anyway, long after your last nail has been hammered. Whether you want to embrace that or be afraid of it is your choice.
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John Finkinridge - Wed, 03 Sep 2014 02:59:36 EST ID:k9NfBdqF No.195705 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195704
does it matter what I do in this life, except grow old and die and complete my cycle?
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Phineas Snodfoot - Thu, 04 Sep 2014 01:15:01 EST ID:jgUq9TXB No.195720 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195705
What do you think? Does it matter what your parents did?


SRS PSS by Cedric Nammleforth - Mon, 01 Sep 2014 21:09:46 EST ID:4Ts/85EW No.195685 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Name of the game is serious piss, or rather, a thread for more serious discussions.

A more rational forum, that indulges in rational and useful thought. Opposite to /jenkem/ and all of the like threads on this board, this single thread will be the shining light, like a nugget of gold that has been discovered within a newly birthed shit.

This will be a formal thread, degenerate language like the above is frowned upon; It can be used, but to a limit.

Rational as in unemotional thought, only made impure, or rather enriched, by ones experiences.

Useful as in something that can be practiced is gained. Something that can be used to augment or change our lives for the better.

Philosophy & Social sciences isn't a fitting title, analysis and discussion of the human mind is more fitting.

Does anyone have a topic they would like to begin with? Maybe questions?
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Cedric Nammleforth - Mon, 01 Sep 2014 21:11:44 EST ID:4Ts/85EW No.195686 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>human mind
Human State
Human Culture
Human

All good titles, I can't chose one.
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Hannah Lighthall - Tue, 02 Sep 2014 19:55:31 EST ID:k9NfBdqF No.195697 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195686
I like Human State, the state of humanity and all it entails
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Walter Honeyfield - Tue, 02 Sep 2014 20:12:10 EST ID:4Ts/85EW No.195699 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195697
Then that's what it will be called.
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Nell Fegglefoot - Tue, 02 Sep 2014 20:57:04 EST ID:MMz3wHbG No.195700 Ignore Report Quick Reply
The speculative realists might object to that naming.
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Walter Honeyfield - Tue, 02 Sep 2014 21:17:55 EST ID:4Ts/85EW No.195702 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195700
Useful is part of the game.

They will be gladly accepted if they and their thoughts are rational, and of physical use.


Social economics by Caroline Wumblestone - Fri, 15 Aug 2014 11:50:54 EST ID:54PBc7Id No.195559 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I consider social interaction as completely economic in nature. I think the way the economy functions and the way people function with each other, socially, are absolutely the same in process, only what's put in and what's taken out are different. We invest in others the same way we invest our money; in a way that's easiest for us and that generates the most personal gain. The gain isn't in dollars, though. The gain could be happiness, comfort, safety; essentially any good feeling/state. I cannot think of a single social interaction that does not parallel economics or trading, as it seems everyone interacts only with the hope of gaining the most/losing the least.
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Hannah Socklefudge - Fri, 15 Aug 2014 12:33:58 EST ID:2S3ZnYuQ No.195561 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I mostly agree, though I rarely share this view, as it's often seen as "cynical" or "calculating" or "cold".
I don't know what's cynical in engineering your own happiness and fulfillment though, or what's cold about this vision. I find that considering "the good life" something mystical that can only be achieved by not thinking about it too much a much more despairing view, that leaves you completely stranded and vulnerable to others, when you're lost.

I'd also add that something else you gain from others is learning a new and useful skill, which is incredibly valuable and often gets unrecognized as such.
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John Dollerstone - Fri, 15 Aug 2014 17:05:41 EST ID:pLTeIYuw No.195562 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Not all trades between people are the same...each has a certain level or selfishness/selflessness attached. Can either extreme actually exist? Who knows?
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Archie Punninghall - Sat, 16 Aug 2014 07:38:39 EST ID:5q+Zf1cH No.195572 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195562
The thing is, depending on a person and the situation, altruism or egoism can be the preferrable attitude.
It depends on whether in a given situation one feels that the effort, expenditures, and possibly sacrifices one needs to commit are outweighted by the projection of the benefits of other people on oneself or not. If they are, then one chooses the option that is self-centered, if they are not, then one choses to focus on others.

Reciprocity and reputation also factor in. One finds it easier to focus on others if those other people's view of them is going to become more favorable thanks to that (with all the benefits that brings), and if the people who are treated well are expected to return the favor in one way or another.

Of course, we're not factoring in the dimension of deceit here (it'd crash the party, because the whole world runs on bullshit).

I wanted to rebuke OP's post by mentioning that in social interactions, people very often base their decisions and actions on sentiments with little consideration of gains and losses, but then I thought: Don't they do that the same on the market?
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John Murdworth - Tue, 26 Aug 2014 08:51:03 EST ID:miGT5B+J No.195619 Ignore Report Quick Reply
"It’s a fact, I mused to myself, that in societies like ours sex truly represents a second system of differentiation, completely independent of money; and as a system of differentiation it functions just as mercilessly. The effects of these two systems are, furthermore, strictly equivalent. Just like unrestrained economic liberalism, and for similar reasons, sexual liberalism produces phenomena of absolute pauperization. Some men make love every day; others five or six times in their life, or never. Some make love with dozens of women, others with none. It’s what’s known as ” the law of the market”. In an economic system where unfair dismissal is prohibited, every person more or less manages to find their place. In a sexual system where adultery is prohibited, every person more or less manages to find their bed mate. In a totally liberal economic system certain people accumulate considerable fortunes; others stagnate in unemployment and misery. In a totally liberal sexual system certain people have a varied and exciting erotic life; others are reduced to masturbation and solitude…………

Love as a kind of innocence and as a capacity for illusion, as an aptitude for epitomizing the whole of the other sex in a single loved being rarely resists a year of sexual immorality, and never two. In reality the successive sexual experiences accumulated during adolescence undermine and rapidly destroy all possibility of projection of an emotional and romantic sort; progressively, and in fact extremely quickly, one becomes as capable of love as an old slag."

Taken from Whatever by Houellebecq, you should read his stuff.


Sociopaths by Sophie Finningson - Mon, 04 Aug 2014 08:19:51 EST ID:C6QsteKY No.195325 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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How do you identify a sociopath. I feel disconnected from the idea if I have to deal with an actual person. I don't feel like concepts of the mind work on actual people because they are always more complex and don't conform to the label. I'm convinced if i ever met a sociopath I would not even know it even though I know what he definition is. So If I want to deal with the psychology of people around me, how should I go about doing so in practice?
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Lillian Buzzfoot - Thu, 21 Aug 2014 03:40:28 EST ID:eB4+2hhb No.195596 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195595

i'm just saying the guy you are vehemently criticizing is not overstepping his bounds as far as you claim
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James Semblesurk - Thu, 21 Aug 2014 10:07:19 EST ID:q+dVyNYa No.195597 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195596
I am? how?
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Lillian Buzzfoot - Thu, 21 Aug 2014 18:45:13 EST ID:eB4+2hhb No.195598 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195597

exactly in the way i described in my first reply to you
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Oliver Wummerwater - Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:17:12 EST ID:Y10U/maN No.195601 Ignore Report Quick Reply
There actually is an experimental way to determine if someone is a sociopath. I don't think it's been used as a diagnostic tool, but it looks like it could.

Basically, put someone in an FMRI and subject them to some stimulus (like a pin prick or rubbing on the arm). Record what the brain looks like when that's happening. THen show them a video of the same thing happening to another person.

In normal people, the same regions in the brain light up faintly. They're empathizing with the person in the video. In psychopaths, they don't.

It suggests there's a basic neurological function not present in sociopaths. THey can't put themselves in someone else's shoes.
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Wesley Dellerfuck - Tue, 26 Aug 2014 02:09:32 EST ID:gFe9zdD6 No.195615 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195601
None of us is normal. A person having a bad day will also have less (or no) empathy for others. A person under acute or chronic stress will also be unable to empathize as well as someone who feels well about their life. Anxious and depressive disorders could also contribute, there are a million factors. Sociopathy is presented in black and white in this thread, and it is a billion shades of gray. "Normal people" have shades of sociopathy, and sociopaths have degrees of empathy, especially for family members and close friends.


Every living creature is a god by Whitey Blunnerwill - Wed, 06 Aug 2014 18:26:39 EST ID:9e/EoPTD No.195347 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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DICKS EVERYWHERE
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Eliza Farryhurk - Sat, 23 Aug 2014 11:48:27 EST ID:1heTqcJX No.195604 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195602

your car example makes no sense

you don't have to drive a car but NOW YOU CAN, whereas before, you had one choice, not driving a car
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Oliver Darringsurk - Sun, 24 Aug 2014 06:56:01 EST ID:PMR6/8EW No.195607 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195604
>you don't have to drive a car but NOW YOU CAN, whereas before, you had one choice, not driving a car
I don't really see how this post relates to my point. Can you explain?
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Priscilla Blenderpit - Sun, 24 Aug 2014 07:39:02 EST ID:2S3ZnYuQ No.195608 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195602
>I do personally do not find any validation in his idea that a mode of awareness can exhaust itself usefulness

I don't think he was talking about the modes of awareness per se, but how they interact with the world we live in, especially our emphasis on and at the same time ignorance about the limits of the mental mode.
I'll take your advice in mind anyway.
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Oliver Tootridge - Sun, 24 Aug 2014 14:14:11 EST ID:1heTqcJX No.195609 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195607

being able to drive a car, and live without a car, would be "more" than only being able to live without a car, i dont see how driving a car changes your "mode of perception" in a way that destroys other perspectives
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Fucking Blemmleson - Sun, 24 Aug 2014 23:43:09 EST ID:PMR6/8EW No.195611 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195609
>being able to drive a car, and live without a car, would be "more" than only being able to live without a car, i dont see how driving a car changes your "mode of perception" in a way that destroys other perspectives
Well the phenomenon is much more complex than that. Driving a car, itself, does not quite create a new mode of perception. It rather creates the groundwork so that a new mode of awareness might proliferate. Like I said, it is the lack of awareness that is the real danger. Once the car became a common commodity, it created an entirely new way of life. Life moved away from the farms, from the towns, and into the cities. Not only could product be moved at rapid speed (we have the train to thank for that), but now people could be too. A man didn't have to work near to his home any longer. Cities expanded, and there was new room to grow. The roaring twenties would not have been possible without the demolishing of old sensibilites, established by the new mode of awareness. Now we have TV, radio, most recent of all the internet. We all move faster, disembodied, than ever and our behavior reflects that. Of course it couldn't have an effect on us any longer, but back then of course.


Why not to stop economic crises before they start? by Betsy Trotshit - Mon, 28 Jul 2014 20:59:52 EST ID:eB1toxKQ No.195261 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Why not to stop economic crises before they start? Like this:
>detect if the economic output falls significantly enough and act as soon as it does
>then, stimulate the sectors which have endured the highest output losses
>stimulate the sectors which are connected to the most losing (in terms of output) sectors to prevent the crisis from spreading
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Hamilton Dartville - Sat, 09 Aug 2014 16:45:30 EST ID:m6XZ0r81 No.195424 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195420
Then we should look for better solutions for everyone.
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Fucking Pickdale - Wed, 13 Aug 2014 13:49:03 EST ID:5q+Zf1cH No.195537 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195422
>In other words crises' are inherent to the capitalist mode of production? Can't say I disagree.
Well, yeah. I dare say it's *still* better than the shortage-plagued command economy of the days of yore. I happen to live in a country that was subject to that one for 50 years. Capitalism is shit, but centrally planned economy was way more shit than that. It was quantum shit.
>And full employment to Keynesians is usually about 5% unemployment.
FULL EMPLOYMENT, AT ALL TIMES FOR ALL ABLE-BODIED PEOPLE, ACCEPT NO SUBSTITUTES.
And it's post-keynesianism. There's a difference.
>PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE point out where in my posts I was defending those policies, because I shure as fuck can't find it.
I, uh, I just said that you yourself noted how they were NOT benefactory, and then... You know what, nevermind, let's call it a misunderstanding.
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Faggy Nablingwork - Wed, 13 Aug 2014 14:21:57 EST ID:ANaFMr0N No.195538 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195537
>FULL EMPLOYMENT, AT ALL TIMES FOR ALL ABLE-BODIED PEOPLE, ACCEPT NO SUBSTITUTES.
What? Eliza is right, full employment is still a nonzero number. When people switch jobs, they're going to be unemployed for a time. When a business goes under, there's gonna be some unemployment. You need at least some unemployment for flexibility within the economy. Unemployment insurance lessens the human cost.

Long term unemplyment should be practically 0. Also, the 5% is for older methods of measuring unemplyment, which includes discouraged workers, and part time workers looking for full time work. The US BLS U-6 numbers are closest to that.
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Fucking Pickdale - Wed, 13 Aug 2014 15:00:25 EST ID:5q+Zf1cH No.195539 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>195538
Well, I did mean zero structural and cyclical unemployment, but not frictional unemployment. I didn't look at the figure, which does seem right now taht you mention it.
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Wesley Pimbledut - Thu, 14 Aug 2014 12:41:29 EST ID:mS99whpg No.195544 Ignore Report Quick Reply
The market already takes into account future actions. The reason they wait before implementing measures sometimes, is that surprise can often be the only way to actually jolt the market in one direction or another. Alan Greenspan was famous for this tactic.


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