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hyphenations german ancient greek what the fuck by Nigger Horryway - Tue, 18 Mar 2014 01:39:19 EST ID:Qv50Xuxw No.192234 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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>reading Being and Time for existential philosophies class
>trying, and failing, to understand any of it

halp, please?


American public schools neglect to mention a lot by Nigel Padgehirk - Sat, 08 Mar 2014 01:20:14 EST ID:rLhALARN No.192033 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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How many of you learned in school that the numerals "1, 2, 3..." and so on come from the East Indians?

How many of you learned that a huge part of the United States once belonged to Spain, and then to Mexico? Did you know that the language spoken by the first permanent European settlers in what is now the United States was in fact the Spanish language? Spanish speakers were settled in US American territory BEFORE English speakers

Many of us are taught fuck all about other cultures in school. Is it any wonder that Americans are often somewhat xenophobic and ignorant of where their culture even comes from?
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Samuel Chongerbuck - Sat, 15 Mar 2014 18:22:10 EST ID:HTudk1Je No.192190 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192181

It's a different culture. I must have said it ten ten ten ten ten ten ten ten ten ten times, we need to be more open minded.
>>
Samuel Chongerbuck - Sat, 15 Mar 2014 18:23:20 EST ID:HTudk1Je No.192191 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192187

Wow so stupid. I'm not a meme tard, I actually understand how world works and don't need sound bites to make me sound smart.
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Lillian Worthingdock - Sat, 15 Mar 2014 19:26:22 EST ID:G76E7nO3 No.192192 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192175
Holy shit this is a new low even for /pss/, cannot hit ignore fast enough
>>
Whitey Commledore - Sat, 15 Mar 2014 23:05:33 EST ID:GgIePlQR No.192203 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192191

>I actually understand how world works

Hah! No you don't.
>>
Samuel Crundergold - Sun, 16 Mar 2014 17:10:02 EST ID:ODId6GzL No.192219 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192191

well i tell ya hwat you would be the first non retard I've met who objected to "correlation does not equal causation"


Maps of Consciousness. by Caroline Blackway - Wed, 11 Dec 2013 23:40:39 EST ID:DHCsW0It No.189964 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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These are mine:

It's continually evolving but these are the most static components:

ChaOracle Key: http://imgur.com/a/aDUeK#0
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Polly Fanham - Wed, 12 Mar 2014 11:35:56 EST ID:YEGe0Axl No.192098 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192072
>So, the literal Journey in a Jungian sense as a character itself? Strange, I suppose that's Truth or the Godhead, though that would also be the destination.
I think Lacan's conception of big Other is more a of a superego thing. The imaginary skydaddy (which Lacan would probably call the great big phallus in the sky). Jung's journey, on the other hand, seems to be an archetypal expression of the collective unconscious which would be innate to the human being rather than culturally constructed. I suppose, however, a hardline Jungian approach would deny the difference between the two (cultural constructs inevitably come from the collective unconscious and so on).

>My friend's metaset is definitely an attempt at universality, mine wasn't really (maybe at first), but it's also been peer edited. Attached is my friend's one, I'd like your critic on it Lacan dude.
Interdasting. But you know, why 9 symbols? Why not 8 like Leary's circuits? Or 7 like the chakras? Or 10 like the kabbalah? And why stop at 10? Just cause we have ten fingers? Why not 12 like notes in the chromatic scale? Or 22 like major arcana? It all reminds me off occultism, to be perfectly honest, and I don't even mean that in a bad way either. Albeit more scholarly than practical, I think Frances Yates' The Art of Memory is a good work on the often neglected legitimate usages of occult systems (organizing memories, improving recall and increasing creativity). If structures of language and consciousness are universal then the difference between a personal index and a universal index is less than one might suspect at first glance.

>A sort of Akashic language is what you are referring to?
I suppose Akashic language would be an accurate poeticism for the idea.
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Kocoayello !jxaL03vL/Q - Thu, 13 Mar 2014 13:21:02 EST ID:AK4Vkp84 No.192122 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192098
>I think Lacan's conception of big Other is more a of a superego thing. The imaginary skydaddy (which Lacan would probably call the great big phallus in the sky).

Are you referring to the Christian "in my image" God or more the Source, Logos, Godhead type of God?

>(organizing memories, improving recall and increasing creativity)
This is exactly what my metaset does for me, it's even better in that usually distant concepts like say, flight and play/childhood are connected easier, flight in this context meaning "taking off" to meself, same idea as childhood.

>If structures of language and consciousness are universal then the difference between a personal index and a universal index is less than one might suspect at first glance.

We've arrived at the same conclusion ourselves. And since reality is entirely formal (to us) as well as color-full, our metasets, as well as OP's, using colors and shapes to describe the world may be as close to an Akashic language as we have gotten yet to this point.
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Graham Gimblefitch - Thu, 13 Mar 2014 21:42:48 EST ID:YEGe0Axl No.192137 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192122
>Are you referring to the Christian "in my image" God or more the Source, Logos, Godhead type of God?
I think you're wrong to differentiate the two. The Christian "in my image" can be interpreted to mean the Godhead type God with whom one possesses a mirror image within the self (according to certain mystical strains). As Meister Eckhart states: “The eye through which I see God is the same eye through which God sees me; my eye and God's eye are one eye, one seeing, one knowing, one love.” For Lacan it is somewhat of a paradox but I would not equate the concept of the big Other with Jung's journey except perhaps as some sort of force which organizes it.

>This is exactly what my metaset does for me, it's even better in that usually distant concepts like say, flight and play/childhood are connected easier, flight in this context meaning "taking off" to meself, same idea as childhood.
Good for you. There's a tendency to disorganize certain types of minds inherent in these enterprises.

>We've arrived at the same conclusion ourselves. And since reality is entirely formal (to us) as well as color-full, our metasets, as well as OP's, using colors and shapes to describe the world may be as close to an Akashic language as we have gotten yet to this point.
I can't speak the secret codes of the universe to take me to the next level with my metaset so I'm disappointed.
>>
Kocoayello !jxaL03vL/Q - Fri, 14 Mar 2014 00:23:20 EST ID:AK4Vkp84 No.192144 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192137
>I think you're wrong to differentiate the two. The Christian "in my image" can be interpreted to mean the Godhead type God with whom one possesses a mirror image within the self (according to certain mystical strains). As Meister Eckhart states: “The eye through which I see God is the same eye through which God sees me; my eye and God's eye are one eye, one seeing, one knowing, one love.” For Lacan it is somewhat of a paradox but I would not equate the concept of the big Other with Jung's journey except perhaps as some sort of force which organizes it.

I really like what you wrote here, but I was wondering if Lacan had any qualms with the Godhead I guess, as you described him describing It as "the big phallus in the sky".

>Good for you. There's a tendency to disorganize certain types of minds inherent in these enterprises.

Yes, I realize that you could possibly attach/link concepts together that would be detrimental, but I'm hoping such things wouldn't happen, as doing so in your own metaset would be basically self harm in a way.

>I can't speak the secret codes of the universe to take me to the next level with my metaset so I'm disappointed.

I can't either really, but if you post yours or a snippet of yours I could help figure it out or something along those lines.
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Graham Gimblefitch - Fri, 14 Mar 2014 10:04:42 EST ID:YEGe0Axl No.192156 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192144
>I really like what you wrote here, but I was wondering if Lacan had any qualms with the Godhead I guess, as you described him describing It as "the big phallus in the sky".
Lacan was an atheist but he also seems to make some comments about how even atheists believe in God at least subconsciously. His relationship with the ideas of mysticism are tricky but, like Freud and unlike Jung, he takes a more sexually grounded view of religion. As a post-structuralist, he is concerned with tearing down edifices of power and discourses of power -- this includes ideas such as God and a Godhead. A legitimate complaint might be that his own theories produce a new power discourse in their attempts to deconstruct psychoanalysis. Is it simply an inescapable trap? Hence why I speak of his views as somewhat paradoxical.

>I can't either really, but if you post yours or a snippet of yours I could help figure it out or something along those lines.
That was a joke. As mentioned before, I don't really possess any written metasets or maps of consciousness anymore. Any that I still apply to the world are possessed unconsciously at this point.


Theology by Charlotte Samblepire - Thu, 06 Mar 2014 17:06:47 EST ID:hgfltBKL No.191997 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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So I'm getting into theology. I was hoping there might be someone here familiar with it could make some recommendations on reading material. Don't bother recommending anti-theist stuff, I have a shelf full I've already been through.

I'm just getting into it. So far I've picked up Stanley Hauerwas and Oscar Romero, but I also have some Dietrich Bonhoeffer on the way. Some people would look at this short list and might suggest some political theology, but all theology has political implications.

It doesn't have to be liberation oriented or even Christian - if any of you are familiar with any kind of Buddhist theological works I'm also interested in that. If you'd like to make any other recommendations outside of that scope, feel free.

If you'd like to discuss theology, ask me questions, etc go for it.
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Matilda Blythebury - Thu, 13 Mar 2014 00:17:32 EST ID:VdKGrD9u No.192113 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192111
For me, something that used to make more sense as a mystical creative force of the universe began to make more sense as God the Father in the way that Christians teach. I'll be invested in reading the books recommended here for aome time. Thank you for making this thread, OP.
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Isabella Guddlebanks - Thu, 13 Mar 2014 14:36:57 EST ID:hgfltBKL No.192123 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192111
>relationship with God

I don't believe God can be related to individually. That is, I really believe God is Love, and the only way for the presence or the nature of God to be experienced is when love is experienced between two or more people, ie "two or three gathered in my name, I am in their midst".

In the sense that I believe Jesus is the incarnation of God, yeah it would be fair for another person to say it's a Christian take. But it isn't like I start with the proposition or ground my beliefs in the first principle that Christianity per se is true. My first principle is something more like God is Love. I believe Jesus Christ is the Lord because what he said and did strikes me as Truth, the truth Being/Love would reveal, and Christology (Dawkin's Fairyology) makes a lot of sense to me.

>>192112
It made me happy to read your post. I've never heard of Fox, but I was intrigued by the description and reviews. I'll put it on my wishlist
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Isabella Guddlebanks - Thu, 13 Mar 2014 14:44:26 EST ID:hgfltBKL No.192125 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192123
I should go further in explaining that while I do believe relating to God requires loving other people, I don't think prayer, which to me is one-way communication to God, is pointless. Whatever way a believer thinks the purpose of prayer is, it's not for God's sake, it's for the person who prays. That person's nature can be changed by prayer, and that's what I really believe prayer is about: changing one's nature, orienting yourself and concentrating on others, on Love itself maybe.
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Isabella Giblinghood - Thu, 13 Mar 2014 15:08:49 EST ID:/TWQS86w No.192126 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192053

Yeah, you came in to argue with a believer, seemingly to validate your own beliefs and/or to invalidate OPs beliefs. Then you played the victim when OP called you out on it.

This isn't a political discussion on fox news, your audience isn't retarded.
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Cyril Shittingson - Thu, 13 Mar 2014 15:49:25 EST ID:G76E7nO3 No.192128 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192126
>your audience isn't retarded.
You clearly are though. Notice how Ernest states he's not trying to debate and then proceeds to avoid that topic? All the bullshit came from OP's character assassination, which you fell for hook line and sinker.

"Hey OP so what's X all about?"
"You're obviously just here to fight, so let me ignore the question and explain to you why I don't need to talk to heathens"

This fucking board man


Funny stories of philosophy by Graham Mashbudging - Mon, 24 Feb 2014 12:24:24 EST ID:MqiT6KrB No.191814 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Who wants to share funny stories? Terrible arguments you've ran into about philosophy? Ridiculous events related to philosophy?
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Angus Duckcocke - Wed, 12 Mar 2014 15:39:37 EST ID:G76E7nO3 No.192100 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>192095
>Yes, they did, there was this thing called the Renaissance.
You mean the thing which started over a century beforehand? Yeah, pretty sure Galileo didn't invent a fucking time machine.

>Conversely, if you could prove free will exists, than no on would ever look for hard determinism ever again
>I don't want it to be true, therefore I can't imagine why anybody else would
Check your ego at the door son
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Angus Duckcocke - Wed, 12 Mar 2014 17:46:12 EST ID:G76E7nO3 No.192103 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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A while ago on this board we had a great exchange with somebody who took issues with capitalism and profit before people etc.
Nothing wrong with that right? Only he had some rather odd convictions about who invented capitalism and who is to blame for the plight of the working man.

Want to know who the bad guy is behind all this?
Martin Luther. Yeah. THE Martin Luther

He was so utterly convinced of this he refused to even debate it, and said he would just leave rather than discuss something so personal to him. Hm? Why yes, he WAS Catholic! How did you guess?
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Whitey Hattingpat - Wed, 12 Mar 2014 22:11:36 EST ID:P/NdTuyf No.192109 Ignore Report Quick Reply
What do you guys think about this argument?

Person 1
>conforming to a major religion is often a way to cope with life
Person 2
>what you think you're better than them because of their thoughts on life and how it started and how it will end?
Person 1
>not at all. I just don't think most people apply to a certain religion because its logical and supported by evidence. I think on some level they're kidding themselves to think they have the answers. Which is okay, it helps people cope.
Person 2
>oh wow look at you judging all the religious people, you think they are not worth something to society because of their perceptions on life? You think their morals are inferior to you! Well they're not
Person 1
>No, I simply think it was not a conclusion that took a lot of critical thinking and pondering to come to, they accepted what their heard believed and if it helps them, that's fine with me. That doesn't make them unable to use critical thinking or stupid as a person because I think their oversimplification of life is nonsensical.
Person 2
>well all people should be able to study whatever religion they want and that doesn't mean they are inferior to you as a person
Person 1
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Charles Sanningfuck - Wed, 12 Mar 2014 22:57:40 EST ID:E6o2NHvo No.192110 Ignore Report Quick Reply
magnetism in this shit everday, without these faggy and stupid shit of the secret
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Jenny Pisslefuck - Thu, 13 Mar 2014 00:34:12 EST ID:HLtfQa6Y No.192114 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192109>>192083
>dimensional ability
fittingly called freedom of movement or degrees of freedom.
>>192109
>I just don't think most people apply to a certain religion because its logical and supported by evidence
joy of the english language. you are missing a comma here and there.

are you sure your not just having that argument in your head with some made up caricature of a believer? there is nothing wrong with the opening line, that makes me wonder how person 2 could become upset.

the first person's rhetoric is weak. when he picks up questions that don't pertain to former statements, he opens up to passive aggressiveness, so the initial argument can't come through. he seems to be glad to escalate the discussion on every step without making sure both are on the same ground. that's bullshit.
also, he seems to contradict himself, saying it's ok to cope with live in irrational ways while insisting or implying believe might contradict logical thinking. the obvious convolution between those is that denying logical thought in something that they themselves hold to be a very important decision in their life is aching to calling them stupid. of course that's putting those people down, just not in an all around fashion as person 2 implies, but putting it in fancy words doesn't make it any less aggravating.

person 2 doesn't acknowledge religion as means to cope, basically dismisses the thought. yet, defends the alleged people, but without making clear what his point of view on the use of religion is. the whole discussion is terrible.

>That doesn't make them unable to use critical thinking or stupid as a person because I think their oversimplification of life is nonsensical.
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Valuable knowledge by Charles Wockleshaw - Mon, 10 Mar 2014 21:25:02 EST ID:xXisYHJa No.192067 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Share with me ideas that have had a powerful influence on you. Things that you have come to learn over the years, either through life or reading philosophy.

If it's valuable knowledge your willing to share, then I think it's best we keep the arguing on this thread to a minimum. Instead of complaining what people post, give either constructive feedback or post your own learnings. I'm making this thread because I'm tired of all the childish arguing on the board. Let's create something that will truely change each other's minds so that we can all grow from each other's progress. I'll be posting my own learnings in the comments

Feel free to post anything. From observations in science, religion, social systems, or life lessons. Anything that matters to you
>>
Kocoayello !jxaL03vL/Q - Tue, 11 Mar 2014 11:45:40 EST ID:AK4Vkp84 No.192073 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Huxley's idea of the mind as a tap that can be "opened and closed" really changed my view of the world. The idea that we do not view the world or reality in It's full Glory is not only scientifically verifiable (the huge EM spectrum that we do not detect, sonar imaging that dolphins view the world in, etc), but philosophically imbuing, there is something to literally look forward to, both in psychedelic trips but also such phenomenon as meditation, dream states, and astral projection. We are but Flatlanders to the 4d gods that nurture our reality simulation of the Infinite Multiverse.
>>
Charles Figgleville - Tue, 11 Mar 2014 16:31:23 EST ID:ODId6GzL No.192081 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192073

yeah and to add to that, studies on psychedelics have suggested that one mechanism by which they work is surpressing a part of the brain which "filters" out perceptual signals sent by the eyes/ears/etc, and when you are sober, this part of the brain "funnels" your perceptions into common simplified patterns. This has an evolutionary advantage because it probably allowed our ancestors to focus on getting food and nothing else, etc, but with psychedelics we can allow our minds to process extra "data" it receives from the world, in some sense. Considering psychedelic visuals then, It seems likely that light manifests in fascinating and beautiful formations/colors that our minds naturally filter out because they do not represent objects that helped us in our ancestor's fight or flight, hunting/scavenging lives.
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Lydia Snodman - Wed, 12 Mar 2014 15:42:29 EST ID:bd5qsRrF No.192101 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192081
One of my most profound encounters with substances (and their consequent abuse) was taking a breakthrough dose of benzydamine (a rather powerful deliriant). Partly to see what would happen, partly to punish myself (because if there's one person I unconditionally hate, it's me). What followed was reality, as perceived by me, turning into a complete and utter warzone (thoughts like: "we're going to hell, and I'm driving the bus" or "if that won't sentence me to eternal damnation, nothing will"). Visiting the realms of dark figures prowling around shadowy mist, unspeakable horror, impending doom and eternal damnation.

When all was over, I have gained one, rather profound insight: The bad part's over. It can't possibly get worse than that. Something to remember whenever I encounter a hurdle in my life. Substance abuse, emotional problems, personal problems? I just remember the shadowy figure emanating the feeling of doom whispering: "You want to go back?" No, I fucking don't. No worldly power will force me to repeat the mistakes that led to me punishing myself like that.

It may not change the fact that I'm doing my best out of fear of punishment from... myself (I *seem* to have some mental problems), as long as there's a force driving me to at least seek a way to *behave* like a good person, it's OK. At least I'm not happily riding the doom train into oblivion of being an irate, egotistical drug user ever again.


Thoughts by Simon Fodgeham - Thu, 20 Feb 2014 18:03:36 EST ID:xMmvmjRR No.191674 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Do thoughts manifest into our reality?
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George Bublingstin - Mon, 10 Mar 2014 13:12:39 EST ID:MqiT6KrB No.192065 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192063
You don't get to decide what's objectively wrong, only what's subjectively wrong.
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Graham Blullyway - Tue, 11 Mar 2014 03:58:05 EST ID:AGX1SMQ8 No.192068 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192065
oh man, you are so subjectively right.
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Charlotte Goodworth - Tue, 11 Mar 2014 09:06:00 EST ID:xz6LaaXu No.192070 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192064
But they exist in a manner different to other things such as physical phenomena
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Kocoayello !jxaL03vL/Q - Tue, 11 Mar 2014 11:26:49 EST ID:AK4Vkp84 No.192071 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192070
How so? Shouldn't they just be vibrations just the same as the waves/particle dualities that make up our reality? They could be just "vibrating faster" or something, giving them less density or so. Suggesting thoughts are metaphysical in some sense is in no way wrong, but then it becomes determining where they "reside" if not in the physical plane, I suppose. And if they aren't traceable physically, how do we "trace" a train of thought in our head?

Or, they could just be the tip of an iceberg on a spectrum of physical/mental/spiritual phenomenon.
>>
William Sonnerdock - Tue, 11 Mar 2014 18:42:28 EST ID:5q+Zf1cH No.192086 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192070
And the evidence pointing to this conclusion would be...?

So far, all the evidence we have suggests that houghts, whatever they may be, are a product of our nervous system, which is material. Therefore, thoughts - which are states of this nervous system, are material as well. These thoughts only have bearing on what your nervous system has control over, to a degree limited by biological constraints.

I'm of course excluding all spiritual assertions that the human mind ("soul") somehow inhabits a different plane of existence than the body does. It's fun to discuss, but it's an unfalsifiable idea not backed up by any evidence.


Philosophical reads by Matilda Bardshaw - Fri, 07 Mar 2014 19:51:03 EST ID:gWjwj2mm No.192020 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Got any good suggestions for books to read?
I'm almost finished the Adventures of Alice in Wonderland, and it was a great read that I'd recommend for an aspiring philosopher. The dialogue constantly plays games with logic; the writer was a logician. I'm excited to look into his next 2 books in the series.
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Sidney Bemmerdat - Fri, 07 Mar 2014 20:52:13 EST ID:0ezH3w2M No.192023 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I seem to recall Dune had a fair bit of philisophical value, and Asimov's various robot stories bring up a lot concerning ethics etc.
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Graham Ferrymut - Fri, 07 Mar 2014 21:17:27 EST ID:Uvcp/Iyr No.192025 Ignore Report Quick Reply
The Third Bank of the River is nice.
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Kocoayello !jxaL03vL/Q - Sat, 08 Mar 2014 01:19:41 EST ID:AK4Vkp84 No.192032 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192023
Asimov's Last Question is very mucho related. Alway's been a favorite story of mine:

https://filer.case.edu/dts8/thelastq.htm
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Nigel Padgehirk - Sat, 08 Mar 2014 01:35:00 EST ID:rLhALARN No.192035 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I enjoyed The Elements of Moral Philosophy by James Rachels.


Never Again Shall You Pocket Another Comrade's Lighter By Accident by Phoebe Gacklegold - Wed, 05 Mar 2014 08:17:28 EST ID:EmlEceCc No.191983 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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What up /pss/

Posted this on weed.. Not sure if I'm just being totally illegible tonight but I thought I pretty much nailed this. Thus far no responses I was expecting.

Here goes. COPY PASTA

~~~~~~

Comrades!

A thought just occurred to me, and I would gladly appreciate your input to either approve of or improve upon the idea.

It occurred to me that it might be possible to pair a truly memorable moment (more on that in a moment) to the forcing of the question in the mind:

"Does the lighter I'm currently putting in my pocket truly belong to me?"
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Matilda Febblenotch - Wed, 05 Mar 2014 16:31:09 EST ID:0ezH3w2M No.191988 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>191987
>Ideas about changing a social norm for the betterment (although however slight) of society isn't philosophy?
THAT'S what the topic is about?
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Phoebe Gacklegold - Wed, 05 Mar 2014 16:57:48 EST ID:EmlEceCc No.191989 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>191988

Note the 'however slight'.

Obviously on a scale of 'grandeur of philosophical thinking' this would be a pixel in the bottom left, but hey - we're all African Apes - a lot of the time we can't help what sporadic thoughts pop into our minds..

Just because it's not a perfect new political system doesn't mean by implication that it's a bad idea.

>After a night of revision, I can sum up my question thus:

> " Is a truly unforgettable moment enough of a catalyst to force your subconscious mind to ask your conscious self a question and thus break a habit? "


And in a rather arbitrary continuation of this, if there is agreement, could you use this to break the habit of accidentally pocketing lighters?
>>
David Puzzlebury - Wed, 05 Mar 2014 19:25:46 EST ID:MqiT6KrB No.191990 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>191986
Woah ho ho, got a /pss/ elitist in the house, doesn't rag on religious talk in the forum but definitely can't stand someone talking about social norms.
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Alice Gittingshaw - Thu, 06 Mar 2014 09:06:19 EST ID:rLhALARN No.191992 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I have never stolen a lighter in my entire life, as far as I can remember.
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Nell Giddlelock - Thu, 06 Mar 2014 09:13:36 EST ID:ODId6GzL No.191993 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>191983

clearly the best soluton is for stoners to simply abdicate their claims to individual lighters, and recognize that we all just tryna burn, they dont cost but a buck or two, and its not like you can argue that somebody else is gonna make worse or less efficient use of your lighter

what if when somebody took your lighter it was simply them deciding to carry around that particular lighter, no stealing involved? then you dont have to get mad when your lighter is gone after a sesh


New greatest website on philosophy emerges by Doris Murdway - Thu, 09 May 2013 13:32:55 EST ID:WX5Hi7Gf No.184451 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Just thought I'd mention this here.

Alex Kierkegaard, a.k.a. Icycalm, just put up his new website (the first one was insomnia.ac, a video games focused site) that'll be all about philosophy: http://orgyofthewill.net/. He already has the preface to his upcoming book posted on it, which is over 13,000 words and definitely worth reading (like anything he writes). He's basically a modern Nietzsche, except he himself has said he plans on overstepping Nietzsche, and I don't doubt this for a moment.

Anyone else with experience reading Icycalm? I haven't subscribed to his site yet because I'm too young, but I respect him and what he's doing tremendously. I also love that someone's actually capable and doing it.
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Magnus Anderson - Tue, 18 Mar 2014 03:42:39 EST ID:yGt2Jtkb No.192236 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192196

No, I don't. That explanation is too weak.
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Magnus Anderson - Tue, 18 Mar 2014 03:43:58 EST ID:yGt2Jtkb No.192237 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192236

I don't hate him.
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Magnus Anderson - Tue, 18 Mar 2014 04:04:32 EST ID:yGt2Jtkb No.192239 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192196

Here is how I see it.

ACTIVE

Instinctive, passionate, commanding, strong will, ability not to react, ability to forget/suppress memories, unconditional faith in oneself, becomes who he is, good conscience, aggressive, they live their passions to the fullest, therefore they GROW.

REACTIVE

Mechanical, compulsive, submissive, weak will, inability not to react, inability to forget/suppress memories, conditional faith in oneself or lack of faith altogether, becomes who he is not, bad conscience, passive, they suppress their passions in order to avoid conflicts, therefore they SHRINK.

Now, all of these attributes are related to each other and I could probably link them in a sentence and show each one of them leads to the other but I won't do that now.
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Walter Maddlesud - Tue, 18 Mar 2014 05:45:24 EST ID:5bwTpyk9 No.192244 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>192239

>Now, all of these attributes are related to each other and I could probably link them in a sentence and show each one of them leads to the other but I won't do that now.

Too difficult 4 u?
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Phoebe Brushkud - Sun, 30 Mar 2014 22:18:43 EST ID:74rBBsWl No.192511 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Huge update


Abortion shapes our perspective and vice-versa by Nicholas Tillingcocke - Mon, 17 Feb 2014 07:11:05 EST ID:BDn02QyZ No.191566 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Forget the philosophical implications of abortion. We only ought to look when does abortion become dangerous for our psychology.

People search for mirrors (other people, animals, teddy bears and so on). Everything is a possible mirror. So is a fetus.
But it can't be that much of a mirror when the fetus is merely some weeks old.
You could even show the mother the aborted bunch of cells and she wouldn't even know.
But it becomes awful if we can see the fetus as a reflection of us, as an extension of humanity. This boils down to its shape: is it human-looking enough? Does it have hands, feet and a face? Or does it look like some meaty balls glued together?

I say forget about life/death and human rights. What matters is whether an abortion is going to make us more tolerant of killing, depending on the baby's development.
If 1.000.000 women have their human-looking fetus terminated, it's going to have an impact on them. Besides guilt. It's going to make us more "cannibalistic".
But you can't be more desensitized to death, if you can't see yourself in it.



I'm saying that the only biological organisms that should have any sort of rights are the ones that remind us of ourselves, whether that's based on looks or how the behave (e.g.: dolphins don't look like humans that much, but their intelligence may make you develop some feelings for them).
What do you think?
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Jenny Siffingwater - Fri, 28 Feb 2014 18:39:42 EST ID:yjii3Ic7 No.191913 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>191912

You're still dodging. The post I was quoting said:
>What about deaths that result in no saved lives in any visible or sensible or rationalizable way?

Surely when you said this you had some definition of "rationalizable" in mind? Or of "sensible?" What did YOU mean when you said that?
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Nathaniel Samblestone - Fri, 28 Feb 2014 19:18:17 EST ID:rLhALARN No.191915 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>191913

What I intended to describe by "sensible or rationizable" was potentially existent knowledge of saved lives that could not be seen, but could be sensed in some other empirical way, or potentially existent knowledge of saved lives that could be deduced by reasoning, respectively.

Hope that clears things up.
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Whitey Smallson - Fri, 28 Feb 2014 19:36:55 EST ID:yjii3Ic7 No.191916 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>191915

Okay. Then I'll amend my question to one of a similar flavour that gets closer to what I'm actually asking: does every death need to mean something?
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Nathaniel Samblestone - Fri, 28 Feb 2014 19:49:46 EST ID:rLhALARN No.191917 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>191916

>does every death need to mean something?

Well, every death is the end of a life, every death is the culmination of the chain of events that led up to the end of that life, and every death is the beginning of the chain of events that will follow from the end of that life.
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Nathaniel Samblestone - Fri, 28 Feb 2014 19:50:30 EST ID:rLhALARN No.191918 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>191917

But, if you're asking, "is every death important", I would have to say that I'm not sure.


How can mirrors be real if our eyes aren't real by MAdTRIX - Wed, 26 Feb 2014 19:38:50 EST ID:etrPzAHm No.191880 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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but how can our eyes not be real if real eyes realise real lies
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XIɹ┴p∀W - Wed, 26 Feb 2014 19:42:52 EST ID:etrPzAHm No.191881 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Paradox
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Sophie Saddlewadging - Wed, 26 Feb 2014 20:36:50 EST ID:aJEuVlHt No.191883 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>191881
SAME
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Kocoayello !jxaL03vL/Q - Thu, 27 Feb 2014 09:26:26 EST ID:AK4Vkp84 No.191890 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>191880
>>191881


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