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Anomalous Thrust Device and other potential replacements for chemical thrusters by Tycho Brahe - Mon, 04 Aug 2014 03:50:04 EST ID:qrJEl2Cn No.54211 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2014-07/31/nasa-validates-impossible-space-drive

So this seems pretty rad. I'm suprised there wasn't a thread about this all ready. I recall also reading somewhere and seeing in one or two different NOVA episodes other things about promising future propulsion systems that might replace chemical rockets one day soon. What do y'all know? What's the most promising up and coming propulsion technology?

For instance, the image I have provided is apparently one taken by a camera aboard the IKAROS spacecraft, which is one of the first spacecraft powered by a solar sail and sent out by Japan in 2010. That's another technology that I am personally looking forward to. So what is /sagan/ most excited about?
16 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Alan Guth - Fri, 22 Aug 2014 10:14:21 EST ID:Onsl/yzs No.54327 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Hydrogen fuel.
It's the cleanest and most efficient form of combustion fuel out there.
It honestly makes way more sense for a green society than gasoline for cars, though the possible explosion thing is a little off-putting.
>>
Alan Guth - Fri, 22 Aug 2014 10:23:29 EST ID:Onsl/yzs No.54328 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Also, this technology isn't that new.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/space/deep/cosmic-concept-laser-powered-space-travel-16020462
>>
Carl Seyfert - Sat, 23 Aug 2014 17:28:51 EST ID:ZstOB5GX No.54334 Ignore Report Quick Reply
This technology provides the thrust equivalent of an infant battling a de-clawed kitten.

It's worse than a solar sail. I'll admit it's the cheapest option.
But even the cheapest set of tools won't last more than a day or two in an industrial setting.
>>
Grote Reuber - Sat, 23 Aug 2014 19:07:52 EST ID:riVRYHVm No.54335 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54334

Thrust isn't everything. In deep space, efficiency is quite a bit more important than raw thrust.
>>
Vera Rubiin - Mon, 25 Aug 2014 15:56:21 EST ID:ZstOB5GX No.54341 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54335
That's true, But its only real use is a backup to xenon thrusters.
It's like trying to power a hybrid car on AA batteries.

Possibly after a lot of research it could be useful, But right now I doubt any agency would use it for anything more than research purposes


Comet dances with the Snake by Friedrich Bessel - Fri, 22 Aug 2014 17:37:16 EST ID:qjY4VCQP No.54332 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Comet Jacques is fairly high in the Northern Hemisphere for the next little while, in a relatively easy location to spot. This hardy bugger comes in at about +11 magnitude (although some say it's more like +7), meaning you will probably want a solid telescope to be able to see it but you could maybe use binoculars if you have a big pair. It will look like a fuzzy, blurry ball.

What's convenient is it's placement in the sky (Which I will post in the thread)
Comet Jacques is located in the constellation Cassiopeia, which looks like a W or M triangley shape of fairly bright stars about halfway up in the North East direction. It's a very noticeable constellation and you won't miss it after you've seen it a few times.

Pic is the comet itself
>>
Friedrich Bessel - Fri, 22 Aug 2014 17:39:17 EST ID:qjY4VCQP No.54333 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1408743557264.png -(12281B / 11.99KB, 400x400) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
This is where it will be tonight on August 22nd. It will continue shooting upward at an angle every night.


Generation ships? by Kocoayello !jxaL03vL/Q - Thu, 01 May 2014 00:44:07 EST ID:FFrIb9VN No.53643 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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WIll, and how, will they work? Where will the water, air, etc come from? Or should we just start pooling money into stargate research?
14 posts and 4 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Karl Swarzchild - Thu, 21 Aug 2014 13:39:42 EST ID:j5S69k77 No.54323 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54322
You're talking complete bollocks. Centripetal force does not generate gravity. Centrifugal force can simulate gravity, completely different. No, gyroscopes don't change that. Please take claims of secret projects to /tinfoil/.
>>
Nicolaus Copernicus - Thu, 21 Aug 2014 17:51:21 EST ID:4iCWeNb1 No.54324 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54323
FTL is actually a thing http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/11/29/nasa-is-actually-working-on-a-faster-than-light-warp-drive-but-it-might-blow-up-any-planet-it-travels-to/
>>
Isaac Newton - Thu, 21 Aug 2014 21:53:14 EST ID:Rxep1UCE No.54325 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54324
a) Not a secret project b) The experiment is not testing anything approaching FTL propulsion.
>>
Edwin Hubble - Fri, 22 Aug 2014 15:37:02 EST ID:ZstOB5GX No.54330 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54320
Picture a bucket filled half way with water.
Now spin the bucket in a large circle. With enough moment the water will be forced to the bottom of the bucket, even if it's upside down.
That's centripetal force.

Now take the same bucket half filled with water.
Put it in the car. and go for a drive
As the car accelerates, the water will move in the opposite direction of velocity. (Ie, backwards) It will slowly angle towards the back of the bucket.
This is known as a pseudo or fictitious force. It's not an anctual force, It's just the delay between the transfer of kinetic information throughout an object.
So technically, The object is resisting being pull apart.
It's why you will feel acceleration in the car, but not the velocity.

Now mix the two forces together.
Except the centripetal force will be a lot more than you can do with a bucket and water. And the fictitious force will be a continuous acceleration of a multi ton mass going to speeds which we as humans have never seen before.

Essentially every part of that spaceship will be under a different amount of stress every second, No matter how well it's designed, Just one single failure will cause that force to be routed and well the Spaceship turns into tissue paper in a fan blade.
>>
William Lassell - Mon, 01 Sep 2014 19:19:27 EST ID:ksAXy5yQ No.54345 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54330
I believe this "fictitious force" you're talking about is inertia.


Lunar Meteorite by Edward Pickering - Mon, 18 Aug 2014 12:35:21 EST ID:UpiDqeof No.54303 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Kickstarter campaign to purchase Lunar Meteorite

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1141594225/lunar-meteorite-boxes
>>
Antony Hewish - Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:54:11 EST ID:ksAXy5yQ No.54304 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54303
I am having trouble figuring out the purpose of this without context.
>>
William Herschel - Wed, 20 Aug 2014 01:21:51 EST ID:4iCWeNb1 No.54315 Ignore Report Quick Reply
are there moonrocks on the open market?
>>
William Herschel - Wed, 20 Aug 2014 01:30:07 EST ID:4iCWeNb1 No.54316 Ignore Report Quick Reply
watched 1/2 the video and apparrenty, yes. there are moonrocks for sale.


Your own pictures from space by Karl Swarzchild - Tue, 12 Aug 2014 08:20:59 EST ID:inbFqjv5 No.54275 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I was out camping last week and brought along my telescope. It was the first time i've seen another planet with my own eyes. Seeing the rings around Saturn was fucking amazing man. I was even able to see one of it's moons. So goddamn cool. Can we have a thread dedicated to pictures we took ourselves? This one is pretty shitty, but it's the best i could do holding my phone up to the eye piece. It was still a pretty badass experience.
6 posts and 3 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Johan Galle - Tue, 19 Aug 2014 16:00:34 EST ID:qjY4VCQP No.54310 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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This Month's Super Moon
>>
Johan Galle - Tue, 19 Aug 2014 16:01:42 EST ID:qjY4VCQP No.54311 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Here's a few days earlier, when the Moon skimmed a nearby mountain.
>>
Johan Galle - Tue, 19 Aug 2014 16:02:32 EST ID:qjY4VCQP No.54312 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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This one was taken a few months ago.
>>
Johan Galle - Tue, 19 Aug 2014 16:03:16 EST ID:qjY4VCQP No.54313 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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a feeble attempt at Jupiter
>>
Johan Galle - Tue, 19 Aug 2014 16:06:18 EST ID:qjY4VCQP No.54314 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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I tried saturn but it's pretty hard to get, due to the dimness and my awful camera


upcoming sky stuff by Joseph Lockyer - Thu, 14 Aug 2014 01:17:06 EST ID:KQKPdIiT No.54282 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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How will the super-moon happening September 9th compare to the one 3 days ago? What's the difference in distance, will it be smaller?

I've been looking for a special day. Are there any upcoming night-sky phenomena in 2014?
6 posts and 1 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Fred Hoyle - Sat, 16 Aug 2014 03:17:04 EST ID:5O93DDXg No.54295 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54294
it can be .99999999999999 eccentric. not circular. Even if the perapsis is less than an inch below the apoapsis. it's still an ellipse.
>>
Fred Hoyle - Sat, 16 Aug 2014 03:19:33 EST ID:5O93DDXg No.54296 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54295
Wait sorry 1 is parabolic. 0 is circular. no orbit can have an eccentricity of 0.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orbital_eccentricity

nb
>>
Joseph von Fraunhofer - Sat, 16 Aug 2014 07:42:19 EST ID:ZICqXJKU No.54297 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54296
Thats bollocks. You've just stated it can't be zero but have given no reason why. It is no more unlikely than any other value. In any case if it was circular as well as we could measure, we would call it circular.
>>
Fred Hoyle - Sat, 16 Aug 2014 13:35:19 EST ID:5O93DDXg No.54298 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54297
artificial satellites can do it. but it requires constant course corrections to pull off as any perturbations from other bodies can mess every thing up. Naturally speaking it cannot happen, or is so rare that we have not observed it naturally occurring.

All the information as to why is contained in the link I posted. Plus a few other links on that link.
>>
Joseph von Fraunhofer - Sat, 16 Aug 2014 14:39:43 EST ID:ZICqXJKU No.54299 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54298
But as I said if something is circular to within error then it is circular. No satelite is perfect, it has limited precision, it's orbit is only as good as the precision of the system. If you state that satellites can do circular orbits then so can natural ones. It's contradictory to state one is circular and the other is not.

There are several pulsars which have no detectable eccentricity.

http://iopscience.iop.org/0004-637X/701/2/1161/article


DROPPIN BOMBS ON YOUR WORLDVIEW by Isaac Newton - Mon, 11 Aug 2014 22:19:20 EST ID:TRhiJN4K No.54268 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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What if the Big Bang didn't really happen? I know there's a lot of fanciful math that is really eloquent and beautiful regarding the subject, but the Big Bang relies on very shaky ground. Hubble noticed that the Frauenhoffer lines of light from distant cosmic objects was shifted almost always towards the red end of the spectrum. The further-seeming objects appeared to have a greater magnitude of this effect. It was deduced that this effect was solely from a Doppler effect upon light. Thus, everything seemed to be moving away from everything else... and the Theory of the Big Bang came to be. We came to find more things which seemed to support it, as well.

Problems?

Barnard Effect- for an as-yet-unexplained reason, sunspots have a detectable redshift. They are not moving away from us as stationary blemishes on the face of the sun, but the effect is the same as the cosmological one, just of a lower magnitude. This effect was discovered around the same time that the Big Bang theory was developed and was largely swept under the rug due to its embarrassing discontinuity with that theory.

Quasars- According to our understanding of the redshift, these objects are both very distant and gigantic. Yet, we observe variations in their luminosity which occur across the entire object, as well as jets suggesting superluminal velocities. Most likely they are not hypergiant-protogalactic star monsters, but are actually much closer, smaller exotic stars exhibiting an extreme version of this Barnard's effect.

The motion of spiral galaxies does not fit with the known laws of gravity. As if it were a single object, a galaxy's furthest stars rotate fast enough to keep a congruent shape compared to the innermost stars.. the exact opposite of how gravity works in the solar system. So how do we fix this? Throw in a non-detectable, non-reactive, exotic matter that takes up most of the mass in the universe, but can never be proven to definitively exist. Whatever happened to Occam's Razor?

That's just a start. Truth be told, modern cosmology is showing that it is not unlike the epicycles and phlogiston of the past. Take dark matter for example. An exciting idea in science fiction, but…
Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.
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Henry Russell - Tue, 12 Aug 2014 00:17:07 EST ID:riVRYHVm No.54269 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>for an as-yet-unexplained reason, sunspots have a detectable redshift.
>as well as jets suggesting superluminal velocities.

Sources?

>Whatever happened to Occam's Razor?

As far as I recall, introducing dark matter WAS the application of "Occam's Razor" in this particular case. Do you have a better explanation? Got a new formula for gravity for us to review?

>How is this different from aether?

Dark matter hasn't been shown to be bunk yet. Work is ongoing.

>A neat idea, but by its very nature, it is unobservable.
Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.
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Edward Pickering - Tue, 12 Aug 2014 04:33:08 EST ID:ruPFqd4c No.54274 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>Barnard Effect

Bro, you're just making up shit. Also, you seem to be under the impression that galaxy motion is the only evidence for dark matter. This is wrong. Case in point, because of gravitational lensing, astronomers have actually mapped its distribution (pic related). Please educate yourself before attempting to "drop bombs on my worldview" again:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Bang#Observational_evidence
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_matter#Observational_evidence
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitational_lensing
>>
Johan Galle - Tue, 12 Aug 2014 22:48:40 EST ID:YOJeQJFe No.54279 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Pretty much everything you said is wrong.

>the Big Bang relies on very shaky ground
No. It really doesn't. We say the universe is expanding not because it is the only possible explanation for redshift but because it predicted so much. Baryonic accoustic osculation, the CMB, the acoustic peaks and the multipoles in the CMB, angular size scale tests, the Sunyaev–Zel'dovich effect the Sachs Wolfe effect, primordial abundances, reionisation... In my book it is on quote firm footing. I consider the first to be perhaps the strongest evidence.

>Barnard Effect- for an as-yet-unexplained reason
I believe you mean Evershed. The exact mechanics are not understood but there is no reason to believe it is not non-doppler effect. It is not discontinuous with the expanding universe.The evershed effect shows both positive and negative shifts and yet comic ones are allays the latter at great distance.This effect of yours explains redshift but nothing beyond that. It doesn't explain any of the features above or even why there is a Hubble law to begin with.

>Quasars- According to our understanding of the redshift, these objects are both very distant and gigantic. Yet, we observe variations in their luminosity which occur across the entire object, as well as jets suggesting superluminal velocities. Most likely they are not hypergiant-protogalactic star monsters, but are actually much closer, smaller exotic stars exhibiting an extreme version of this Barnard's effect.
No. Quasars have a finite reaction time to changes. See reverberation mapping. Showing the scale of the disk. Quasars are not close, they are seen behind galaxies and show no parallax. They also all happen to be aligned with the centers of galaxies of the same redshift, why would this be true in they were not distant and not associated with these galaxies? Jets do not suggest superluminal motion, this effect was predicted and is simply due to geometry.

>As if it were a single object, a galaxy's furthest stars rotate fast enough to keep a congruent shape compared to the innermost stars
No again. Galaxies have flat rotation curves but this is not solid body rotation (linear increasing, not flat) so they don't keep shape.

>Whatever happened to Occam's Razor?
Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.


Do elementary particles have surface? by Bernard Burke - Thu, 23 Jan 2014 18:37:20 EST ID:CvBrhfpC No.52866 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Or are they just spherical packets of energy?
18 posts and 2 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Paul Goldsmith - Fri, 31 Jan 2014 23:49:40 EST ID:ZNVNOuFx No.52914 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>52907
Because of the fundamental forces of the universe, and quantum mechanics. Really it all comes down quantum theory - if you don't have a good grasp of it you're not going to get much more than a dumbed down explanation. I found this blog post which does an ok job of explaining it to laymen

http://www.fnal.gov/pub/today/archive/archive_2013/today13-02-15_NutshellReadMore.html

String theories is not part of the standard model. Not all, or even most physicist think of it as being the underlying phenomenon to particle physics. You also have to be very careful using the term dimension. While we often use it to mean spatial dimension, scientifically it just means the number of variables needed to describe something. These could be spatial extent but it could also be charge etc.
>>
George Hale - Sat, 01 Feb 2014 03:51:40 EST ID:3nUT6QAF No.52915 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>52909
Check your naive realism, bro.
>>
Giuseppe Piazzi - Sat, 01 Feb 2014 07:38:20 EST ID:QuyP+R2q No.52916 Ignore Report Quick Reply
goddammit /sagan/
why are you always shitting on my birthday cake?!
>>
Henrietta Levitt - Sun, 10 Aug 2014 20:01:31 EST ID:FgL9rJVX No.54259 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>52866

Theoretically they might. Instruments we have may be imprecise and unable to measure their surface. Quantum particles don't behave physically like other packets of matter, so defining any relative surface by their movements is tricky if impossible because it may not exist.
>>
Edwin Hubble - Mon, 11 Aug 2014 12:45:24 EST ID:NY5AqFwk No.54264 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Elementary particles are scalar fields which are defined across the entire universe, not little billiard balls.


NIGGAZ ON THE MOON! CHINA STRONG! by James Christy - Sun, 10 Aug 2014 05:20:20 EST ID:SPDJPldQ No.54248 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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I think I'm doing too many drugs because I swear I didn't think it was all the way back in December when this happened.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=khsVmq8v2CI

Didn't see a thread. It's so cool to see landers on the moon again, eve if they are droids. I'd love it if they got any shots of the U.S./U.S.S.R. landing sites but I feel that's unlikely.

It's so disheartening to know even this won't shut up the hoaxnuts.
>>
Urbain Le Verrier - Sun, 10 Aug 2014 15:09:25 EST ID:5O93DDXg No.54256 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Got me all exited thinking they secretly had men on moon. But it was just that rover.
Still awesome.
>>
Arno Penzias - Sun, 10 Aug 2014 15:32:37 EST ID:Zbe0PVOU No.54257 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54248
>It's so disheartening to know even this won't shut up the hoaxnuts.

Why is it disheartening? It's not like anyone believes them.
>>
Urbain Le Verrier - Sun, 10 Aug 2014 16:45:01 EST ID:5O93DDXg No.54258 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54257
Exactly this. There is observable man made shit on the moon including mirrors to bounce lasers off of for measurements.

Some dumb ass in the comments there is claiming he can see more detail with his telescope so therfore it's a fake. Not even considering how cost and weight ineffective strapping an HD IMAX camera on would be.

In short dumb asses who don't consider the difficulty of such a feat annoy me. That's all they will even do though. We can leave them behind while they continue to tell us there is nothing to see out there.
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Edwin Hubble - Mon, 11 Aug 2014 05:49:18 EST ID:H3af7FdZ No.54260 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54258
Just because people went to the moon doesnt mean that Stanley Kubrick didnt film it in a studio for propaganda purposes.
Do you realize how hard is it do do quality television on the moon?
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Edwin Hubble - Mon, 11 Aug 2014 05:53:52 EST ID:H3af7FdZ No.54261 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54260
heres a documentary about it with all of the insiders.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=26EicKfNYPg
its actually disguised as a mockumentary so all of the dumb people will disregard it


drunk ideas by Margaret Burbidge - Sat, 09 Aug 2014 00:22:31 EST ID:dL+21hmf No.54230 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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so im moderately drunk here so forgive me for the stupidity of this post and try to enjoy it as something to laugh at rather than get angry over.

I know nothing of astronomy, my knowlege of the subject consists of only shitty usually misinformed images im semi-knowledgeable in biology though, and that shits the tits despite being the lowest level of what i consider real science(fuck pych, thinking theyre not just bullshit)

apologies, more to the point. I've heard that theoretically, if you were viewing the universe from inside a black hole, you would see the universe from all time perspectives rather then in just the present. now as i've stated, i know dick about shit regarding anything outside of shit on earth BUT do you think what with time being relative and (if im not mistaken) the majority of black holes' properties being unknown, that black holes could be connected to the big bang or the "origin" of the universe.

(using this example because i can see the 1st image on thsi board is an hourglass. so maybe its kinda like the universe is an hourglass but the bottem of the hourglass is connected to the top (im gonna make some shitt ms paint right meow) with gravity removed from the equation thanks of black holes.

i dunno man, i hope you guys can decipher this post to some degree, as well as the image.Hope the ignorance is stupidity makes you laugh rather then become upset at my absurdity)
2 posts and 1 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Viktor Ambartsumian - Sun, 10 Aug 2014 01:53:50 EST ID:LovWryZQ No.54242 Ignore Report Quick Reply
No but I got a really high concept out of it.

Cosmic deities that sit on the other side of black holes, able to see the entire universe at once.

Sounds like something out of a fantasy lore generator
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Jocelyn Bell - Sun, 10 Aug 2014 04:34:54 EST ID:ruPFqd4c No.54245 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>mfw this thread
>>
Joseph-Louis Lagrange - Sun, 10 Aug 2014 05:08:11 EST ID:dL+21hmf No.54246 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>54245
im sober now and FUCK YOU FAGGOT, MAKE THAT FACE TO MY FACE BITCH


nb though kentucky gentlemen for days though
>>
Kocoayello !jxaL03vL/Q - Sun, 10 Aug 2014 06:49:09 EST ID:Ar8ZIqLY No.54249 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Can no one else see that OP is clearly describing the universe as a Torus, a topological object that many scientists axually DO think the universe is shaped as?
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George Herbig - Sun, 10 Aug 2014 12:50:33 EST ID:NY5AqFwk No.54253 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54230
> inside a black hole, you would see the universe from all time perspectives rather then in just the present
http://www.phys.vt.edu/~jhs/faq/blackholes.html#q11

> the majority of black holes' properties being unknown
The no-hair theorem states that black holes are fully characterized by mass, electric charge and angular momentum. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No-hair_theorem, but also http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/black-holes-may-have-hair/

> black holes could be connected to the big bang
I don't think this is a meaningful idea.

> "origin" of the universe
The Big Bang model describes the ongoing metric expansion of space and shows that the universe long ago was hot and dense, but says nothing about its origin.


Reverse time travel by Karl Jansky - Sun, 10 Aug 2014 04:19:28 EST ID:415JX8nG No.54244 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Just another crack pot idea on time travel, this would not be able to send a concrete object back in time, just decay particles from weak nuclear interactions.

But in theory could it be possible to entangle a w or z boson at the points marked on the diagram? Since the weak force does not completely obey the arrow of time, would this phenomenon be exploitable in a relatively high mass environment? just to get time going faster to get more information to the past, I don't know the math of the weak force, but would being in a field of higher gravity also magnify the frequency of the bosons time line?

I guess you would have to entangle it before it even existed, which im not sure is possible, but why not? It's not like quantum mechanics makes perfect sense to anyone
>>
Fred Hoyle - Sun, 10 Aug 2014 10:48:32 EST ID:YOJeQJFe No.54250 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54244
The wavey line is just how you draw photons, w and z bosons. It has nothing to do with it not obeying causality or the arrow of time. I personally was taught to draw meak interactions as a dashed line, it makes no difference. These are just there to make it clear what is what, it does not represent the path of the particle.
>>
Fred Hoyle - Sun, 10 Aug 2014 10:49:08 EST ID:YOJeQJFe No.54251 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54250
>weak* interactions
>>
George Herbig - Sun, 10 Aug 2014 12:18:55 EST ID:NY5AqFwk No.54252 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54244
What Fred said. Also, what do you want to entangle it with? Nothing is interacting at the marked points.

It's interesting that you mentioned entangling a particle before it exists - the nonlocality of entanglement isn't limited to spacelike intervals, it can apply to timelike intervals as well - see http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/156673-the-first-quantum-entanglement-of-photons-through-space-and-time.


Time as a function of total mass by Roger Penrose - Thu, 24 Jul 2014 03:16:32 EST ID:415JX8nG No.54151 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1406186192412.jpg -(23102B / 22.56KB, 600x399) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 23102
I just had the idea that time becomes more consequential the smaller of an object you observe.
Many quantum effects have zero time dilation
Atomic effects have whatever incredibly small fraction of interaction with time
Molecular effects operate on the range of seconds
Macro objects and change over minutes
Large masses change over years
Stars change over thousands of years
Galaxies noticeably change over tens of thousand of years
Galaxy clusters interact over millions of years
and galactic clusters interact over billions of years.

Am I just high, or would their be a way to correlate the size of a defined system with the Einstein field equations?
7 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
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William Lassell - Tue, 29 Jul 2014 16:14:33 EST ID:wT0xmtkP No.54180 Ignore Report Quick Reply
The smaller something is the less efficient its surface area to space occupied is (Not mass, The actual amount of space it occupies).
As such, Reactions are more likely to happen.

You can also add in the fundamental forces and the long distance behaviour. But that's just crazy complicated.
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William Lassell - Tue, 29 Jul 2014 16:16:48 EST ID:wT0xmtkP No.54181 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Also, As a side note, Just because noticeable change happens over a long period, does not at all effect the fact that change is constantly happening at the same rate.
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Kocoayello !jxaL03vL/Q - Thu, 07 Aug 2014 10:57:18 EST ID:Ar8ZIqLY No.54226 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54165
Doesn't M-Theory negate general relativity?
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William Fowler - Thu, 07 Aug 2014 18:35:04 EST ID:b1iFE80O No.54228 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54226
No. Unified models seek to explain GR, not to negate it. This anyway is more a case for special relativity which is not going anywhere.
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Karl Swarzchild - Thu, 14 Aug 2014 16:30:35 EST ID:ksAXy5yQ No.54285 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54226
Only in higher, more theoretical levels of multiverse.


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