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Comet dances with the Snake by Friedrich Bessel - Fri, 22 Aug 2014 17:37:16 EST ID:qjY4VCQP No.54332 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1408743436264.jpg -(688499B / 672.36KB, 1600x1200) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 688499
Comet Jacques is fairly high in the Northern Hemisphere for the next little while, in a relatively easy location to spot. This hardy bugger comes in at about +11 magnitude (although some say it's more like +7), meaning you will probably want a solid telescope to be able to see it but you could maybe use binoculars if you have a big pair. It will look like a fuzzy, blurry ball.

What's convenient is it's placement in the sky (Which I will post in the thread)
Comet Jacques is located in the constellation Cassiopeia, which looks like a W or M triangley shape of fairly bright stars about halfway up in the North East direction. It's a very noticeable constellation and you won't miss it after you've seen it a few times.

Pic is the comet itself
>>
Friedrich Bessel - Fri, 22 Aug 2014 17:39:17 EST ID:qjY4VCQP No.54333 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1408743557264.png -(12281B / 11.99KB, 400x400) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
This is where it will be tonight on August 22nd. It will continue shooting upward at an angle every night.


Generation ships? by Kocoayello !jxaL03vL/Q - Thu, 01 May 2014 00:44:07 EST ID:FFrIb9VN No.53643 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1398919447854.png -(801854B / 783.06KB, 1440x900) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 801854
WIll, and how, will they work? Where will the water, air, etc come from? Or should we just start pooling money into stargate research?
14 posts and 4 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Karl Swarzchild - Thu, 21 Aug 2014 13:39:42 EST ID:j5S69k77 No.54323 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54322
You're talking complete bollocks. Centripetal force does not generate gravity. Centrifugal force can simulate gravity, completely different. No, gyroscopes don't change that. Please take claims of secret projects to /tinfoil/.
>>
Nicolaus Copernicus - Thu, 21 Aug 2014 17:51:21 EST ID:4iCWeNb1 No.54324 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54323
FTL is actually a thing http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/11/29/nasa-is-actually-working-on-a-faster-than-light-warp-drive-but-it-might-blow-up-any-planet-it-travels-to/
>>
Isaac Newton - Thu, 21 Aug 2014 21:53:14 EST ID:Rxep1UCE No.54325 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54324
a) Not a secret project b) The experiment is not testing anything approaching FTL propulsion.
>>
Edwin Hubble - Fri, 22 Aug 2014 15:37:02 EST ID:ZstOB5GX No.54330 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54320
Picture a bucket filled half way with water.
Now spin the bucket in a large circle. With enough moment the water will be forced to the bottom of the bucket, even if it's upside down.
That's centripetal force.

Now take the same bucket half filled with water.
Put it in the car. and go for a drive
As the car accelerates, the water will move in the opposite direction of velocity. (Ie, backwards) It will slowly angle towards the back of the bucket.
This is known as a pseudo or fictitious force. It's not an anctual force, It's just the delay between the transfer of kinetic information throughout an object.
So technically, The object is resisting being pull apart.
It's why you will feel acceleration in the car, but not the velocity.

Now mix the two forces together.
Except the centripetal force will be a lot more than you can do with a bucket and water. And the fictitious force will be a continuous acceleration of a multi ton mass going to speeds which we as humans have never seen before.

Essentially every part of that spaceship will be under a different amount of stress every second, No matter how well it's designed, Just one single failure will cause that force to be routed and well the Spaceship turns into tissue paper in a fan blade.
>>
William Lassell - Mon, 01 Sep 2014 19:19:27 EST ID:ksAXy5yQ No.54345 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54330
I believe this "fictitious force" you're talking about is inertia.


Lunar Meteorite by Edward Pickering - Mon, 18 Aug 2014 12:35:21 EST ID:UpiDqeof No.54303 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1408379721430.jpg -(106749B / 104.25KB, 960x741) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 106749
Kickstarter campaign to purchase Lunar Meteorite

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1141594225/lunar-meteorite-boxes
>>
Antony Hewish - Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:54:11 EST ID:ksAXy5yQ No.54304 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54303
I am having trouble figuring out the purpose of this without context.
>>
William Herschel - Wed, 20 Aug 2014 01:21:51 EST ID:4iCWeNb1 No.54315 Ignore Report Quick Reply
are there moonrocks on the open market?
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William Herschel - Wed, 20 Aug 2014 01:30:07 EST ID:4iCWeNb1 No.54316 Ignore Report Quick Reply
watched 1/2 the video and apparrenty, yes. there are moonrocks for sale.


Your own pictures from space by Karl Swarzchild - Tue, 12 Aug 2014 08:20:59 EST ID:inbFqjv5 No.54275 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1407846059236.jpg -(91938B / 89.78KB, 640x1136) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 91938
I was out camping last week and brought along my telescope. It was the first time i've seen another planet with my own eyes. Seeing the rings around Saturn was fucking amazing man. I was even able to see one of it's moons. So goddamn cool. Can we have a thread dedicated to pictures we took ourselves? This one is pretty shitty, but it's the best i could do holding my phone up to the eye piece. It was still a pretty badass experience.
6 posts and 3 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Johan Galle - Tue, 19 Aug 2014 16:00:34 EST ID:qjY4VCQP No.54310 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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This Month's Super Moon
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Johan Galle - Tue, 19 Aug 2014 16:01:42 EST ID:qjY4VCQP No.54311 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Here's a few days earlier, when the Moon skimmed a nearby mountain.
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Johan Galle - Tue, 19 Aug 2014 16:02:32 EST ID:qjY4VCQP No.54312 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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This one was taken a few months ago.
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Johan Galle - Tue, 19 Aug 2014 16:03:16 EST ID:qjY4VCQP No.54313 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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a feeble attempt at Jupiter
>>
Johan Galle - Tue, 19 Aug 2014 16:06:18 EST ID:qjY4VCQP No.54314 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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I tried saturn but it's pretty hard to get, due to the dimness and my awful camera


upcoming sky stuff by Joseph Lockyer - Thu, 14 Aug 2014 01:17:06 EST ID:KQKPdIiT No.54282 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1407993426425.jpg -(57385B / 56.04KB, 1280x853) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 57385
How will the super-moon happening September 9th compare to the one 3 days ago? What's the difference in distance, will it be smaller?

I've been looking for a special day. Are there any upcoming night-sky phenomena in 2014?
4 posts and 1 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Urbain Le Verrier - Fri, 15 Aug 2014 15:39:33 EST ID:YOJeQJFe No.54294 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54293
You can have a circular orbit, nothing forbids it.
>>
Fred Hoyle - Sat, 16 Aug 2014 03:17:04 EST ID:5O93DDXg No.54295 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54294
it can be .99999999999999 eccentric. not circular. Even if the perapsis is less than an inch below the apoapsis. it's still an ellipse.
>>
Fred Hoyle - Sat, 16 Aug 2014 03:19:33 EST ID:5O93DDXg No.54296 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54295
Wait sorry 1 is parabolic. 0 is circular. no orbit can have an eccentricity of 0.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orbital_eccentricity

nb
>>
Joseph von Fraunhofer - Sat, 16 Aug 2014 07:42:19 EST ID:ZICqXJKU No.54297 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54296
Thats bollocks. You've just stated it can't be zero but have given no reason why. It is no more unlikely than any other value. In any case if it was circular as well as we could measure, we would call it circular.
>>
Joseph von Fraunhofer - Sat, 16 Aug 2014 14:39:43 EST ID:ZICqXJKU No.54299 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54298
But as I said if something is circular to within error then it is circular. No satelite is perfect, it has limited precision, it's orbit is only as good as the precision of the system. If you state that satellites can do circular orbits then so can natural ones. It's contradictory to state one is circular and the other is not.

There are several pulsars which have no detectable eccentricity.

http://iopscience.iop.org/0004-637X/701/2/1161/article


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