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Extreme blazar thread by William Hartmann - Mon, 30 Jan 2017 14:35:44 EST ID:dz7Zv84F No.56774 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1485804944630.jpg -(147326B / 143.87KB, 985x739) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 147326
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2017/nasas-fermi-discovers-the-most-extreme-blazars-yet

Fuck yeah those black holes are massive


Aliens by Mars - Sun, 16 Mar 2014 20:44:47 EST ID:Jzd78Ub0 No.53216 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1395017087604.jpg -(188698B / 184.28KB, 1200x1200) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 188698
Yo guys. I just had an opifany or what you call it(english is not my first language), if you consider that ufos really exists and the are flying in the sky all the time but why wont they communicate? Then it hit me, we would have done the same, using Rovers! Basically the ufos we see are probably machines flying about and taking pictures and samples of earth. They dont care that we see them, they obviously treat us as beings not worthy to be spoken to. I think its kind of creepy
53 posts and 2 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Karl Swarzchild - Sat, 28 Jan 2017 04:20:34 EST ID:SD/dK0pb No.56770 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1485595234186.png -(671473B / 655.74KB, 569x629) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>quintuple post followed by triple post followed by triple post
>>
Roger Penrose - Sat, 28 Jan 2017 16:52:21 EST ID:gmm1Ygns No.56771 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Let this thread die, ffs.
>>
Kip Thorne - Thu, 02 Feb 2017 03:39:11 EST ID:10QI3ruX No.56776 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56771
Gonna have to agree, nb. No bueno. Was a nice read and all but I'm not gonna turn around and just start speculating wildly. Not that it isn't fun.But still. There is no way to put together an alien mind other than wild speculation. So there's not much to it as is.
>>
Friedrich Bessel - Fri, 10 Mar 2017 12:22:11 EST ID:bbe1VMqZ No.56856 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Well while we no-bump it back to oblivion maybe we should post some pictures.
>>
Fred Hoyle - Wed, 12 Apr 2017 23:46:48 EST ID:vwJ5gIk/ No.56912 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1492055208556.png -(264146B / 257.96KB, 600x301) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
nb


Gas Station by MOON FUEL - Sat, 17 Dec 2016 00:07:43 EST ID:3JvngLEe No.56726 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1481951263097.jpg -(106773B / 104.27KB, 720x480) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 106773
Right now, I'm working on opening a gas station in low orbit around the moon, mostly refueling for interplanetary & deep space exploration. It'll have mechanics on site, parking on the dark side, though a bag of doritos will be $70 and a diet coke will be $14, you'll thank me when you come through. The air force 109 airlift is testing our tech in their fuel depot on the south pole. So I'm still going to come back to earth quarterly to visit the black bear sanctuary that I work at, but they've been getting so used to human food that they're getting pretty aggressive when I see them. Accually I've been pretty good about being able to chase bears out of the front yard, just by waving a broom and yelling, but my parents were out there the other day and ran when they saw our bear, and the little guy chased them. That really gave my parents a shock!
So, tldr; space won't kill me, the planet won't burn, we'll just leave it to the bears and other fluffy animals.
1 posts and 1 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Robert Dicke - Sun, 18 Dec 2016 07:11:00 EST ID:gmm1Ygns No.56728 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Will you accept charons as payment, or just he-3?
>>
Irwin Shapiro - Sun, 18 Dec 2016 16:23:22 EST ID:rszf0FN0 No.56729 Ignore Report Quick Reply
What about me I can only pay in hiffwe?
>>
bob - Mon, 19 Dec 2016 02:09:33 EST ID:YR8vKebs No.56730 Ignore Report Quick Reply
derp
>>
Stephen Hawking - Sat, 14 Jan 2017 23:54:55 EST ID:veR+j0aW No.56759 Ignore Report Quick Reply
hey man I'll take a pack of zigzag blues, and a lighter too.
>>
Margaret Burbidge - Sat, 21 Jan 2017 22:04:37 EST ID:1xERvVrq No.56762 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56729
>pay in hiffwe?
is that like dogecoin?


Directly Imaging Planets by Kip Thorne - Sat, 12 Nov 2016 10:31:11 EST ID:L+GCCa0j No.56654 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1478964671170.jpg -(25943B / 25.33KB, 577x619) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 25943
Hey guys. Good Morning. We can see other planets directly now.

http://www.universetoday.com/131903/princeton-team-directly-observes-planets-around-nearby-stars/

https://youtu.be/tbu1l672uLc?t=2171

Now we can start getting spectra and figuring out what's out there.
>>
Henrietta Levitt - Sat, 12 Nov 2016 17:10:33 EST ID:rszf0FN0 No.56655 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Whao. I didn't expect us to get something like this this fast. I thought we were going to be stuck reading the tea leaves of Kepler mission transits for decades. Go team human!
>>
Heinrich Olbers - Mon, 14 Nov 2016 08:54:36 EST ID:1q2X8R/n No.56656 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56654
This news is really exiting, and im glad you posted this but that video is private you massive wonk
>>
Bruon Rossi - Mon, 14 Nov 2016 10:38:13 EST ID:L+GCCa0j No.56658 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56656

Shit, it wasn't private when I posted it. Maybe the video was moved or something. Here's a working link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCP3rgVj1c0&t=2171

Sorry bud.
>>
Edmond Halley - Sun, 08 Jan 2017 06:18:31 EST ID:LnHMc7oC No.56750 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56658
damn they're all just trying to sound smarter than each other and it's kind of taking away from learning about the whole thing


Star Wreck by Roger Penrose - Thu, 01 Dec 2016 05:49:18 EST ID:eoz06Vb6 No.56698 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1480589358801.gif -(16062B / 15.69KB, 304x234) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 16062
Finnish SciFi..

http://onnellinenhauskaablogi.blogspot.ca/2016/11/star-wreck-in-pirkining.html


Kessler syndrome, ablation cascades? by Concerned Galactic Citizen Commission - Mon, 14 Nov 2016 09:20:43 EST ID:1q2X8R/n No.56657 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Our planet has a steadily growing shell of orbital debris. This space junk is most concentrated in low earth orbit band. Currently there are somewhere over 1,100 active Gov't and private satellites in orbit, as well as over 2000 that have ceased functioning.
That's just the satellites, as it is estimated that there are over 600,000 pieces of bullshit between 1 and 10 CM just waiting to blow a bunch of holes in any given mission.
Now, if a large enough object were to collide in LEO, or some kind of explosion, these debris objects will begin colliding, creating shrapnel, and impacting MORE objects in a runaway feedback reaction.
This gives us a number of problems, the first being that it totally kills any launch viability for the foreseeable future as well as destroying all the satellites we already have in orbit. The other major problem is that as these thousands upon thousands of objects get kicked around much like atoms in a nuclear chain reaction, a good number of them will de-orbit and enter earth atmosphere causing heating due to air friction. That is bad for obvious reasons.
So /sagan/ how do we take preventative actions against this? Do we even need to worry? what would a post-cascade earth be like?
2 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Riccardo Giacconi - Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:45:44 EST ID:tQX5ylFX No.56661 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56657
https://www.watchcartoononline.io/anime/planetes

have fun OP
>>
William Lassell - Tue, 15 Nov 2016 23:11:16 EST ID:ybUJp2Le No.56662 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Get INTERPOL on this, immediately.
>>
William Fowler - Wed, 16 Nov 2016 13:32:50 EST ID:YHjXylC8 No.56663 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>56661
I wanted to like that so much just for the realistic setting, but holy fuck the dialogue, characters, and unnecessary cutesy Japanese shit randomly crammed in is just too cringeworthy.
It's just highschool drama, but japanese and in space.
>>
William Lassell - Sun, 20 Nov 2016 04:15:45 EST ID:tQX5ylFX No.56664 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56663
the high school shit gets real BTFO later on. it's part of the arc deal with it for a few eps
>>
Mike Brown - Mon, 21 Nov 2016 10:03:54 EST ID:89x/mOqK No.56669 Ignore Report Quick Reply
lookin pretty clean on google maps


Black hole instead of a planet x? by John Riccioli - Mon, 17 Oct 2016 18:06:57 EST ID:eY06FJul No.56529 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1476742017066.gif -(1621583B / 1.55MB, 277x283) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 1621583
Wouldn't it be more likely that a [stationary?] black hole is accounting for the gravitational effects thought to be responsible by planet x?
7 posts and 2 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Carl Seyfert - Sun, 23 Oct 2016 17:53:43 EST ID:gmm1Ygns No.56552 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56542

It's always aliens, bro.

Like that newly discovered star that has a funky dimming effect. Totally an alien Dyson sphere under construction. I refuse to believe anything else.
>>
Walter Baade - Mon, 24 Oct 2016 22:49:24 EST ID:M/g1akbS No.56554 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>56540

> >something would've collided with it within 4 billion years.
>That would be true if you had a mathematical equation for it

So I feel compelled to add this. Something would always hit it, due to dust. I mean, check these links out and read up on dust:
http://atropos.as.arizona.edu/aiz/teaching/nats102/mario/solar_system.html
http://stupendous.rit.edu/richmond/answers/dust.html

So like, if there was a black hole out there, with dimensions of 7"....If it lasted for this long [hawking radiation and all that], then it would probably have a faint infrared glow from the accretion disk formed around it. It would have an accretion disk because all that gas its running into has to go somewhere. Its hill sphere is the effective radius of a planet with mass x, not just 7".
>>
William Lassell - Thu, 03 Nov 2016 16:21:01 EST ID:OXINl/7g No.56617 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56529
No, because black holes are rarer in the universe than planets, and a black hole with a small enough mass to cause those effects but without eating the rest of the Kuiper Belt and Oort cloud would be pretty hard to form in the first place. And if it did form, the supernova that caused it would have blasted the rest of the solar system to bits.
>>
Russel Hulse - Thu, 03 Nov 2016 17:35:06 EST ID:eY06FJul No.56620 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56617
Ty
>>
William Lassell - Fri, 04 Nov 2016 08:14:50 EST ID:FBGYqnRT No.56634 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>56529


MOTHERFUCKING ALIEREMS! by George Herbig - Fri, 28 Oct 2016 17:32:07 EST ID:rszf0FN0 No.56560 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1477690327717.gif -(97224B / 94.95KB, 400x332) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 97224
I can't believe no one has posted this yet:
http://www.techtimes.com/articles/183699/20161025/evidence-of-alien-life-2-scientists-say-strange-signals-from-stars-are-from-alien-civilization.htm

TL;DR: We looked at a bunch of stars and found 234 -- that's right, two-hundred and fucking thirty fucking four -- stars that appear to have aliens trying to contact us with optical beams.

Go nuts.
3 posts and 1 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Roger Penrose - Mon, 31 Oct 2016 05:11:06 EST ID:gmm1Ygns No.56607 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56563

>And, presumably, they are using lasers to send the signals -- how else would you send a coherent optical signal over such a great distance?

If I understood it correctly, the supposed signal is not lasers but 'spectral modulation'. Whatever that means, I take it that it's the light from the stars themselves that's supposed to be the signal. The fact that over 200 stars seems to show the same phenomenon either means it's an incredibly advanced interstellar civilization, or an as of yet unknown natural effect.
>>
Cecelia Payne-Gaposchkin - Tue, 01 Nov 2016 11:19:18 EST ID:eY06FJul No.56610 Ignore Report Quick Reply
This seems a little bit far fetched. There's plenty of astronomical/astrophysical problems still unsolved, so calling it already and saying it's aliens seems a little bit premature.
>>
George Hale - Wed, 02 Nov 2016 23:34:33 EST ID:6+AQCLDz No.56613 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56610
Agreed, probably more likely it's a yet-to-be understood stellar phenomenon, I mean would aliens seriously spend the time and resources necessary to modify STARS just to send messages? There has to be more efficient methods of stellar communication than modifying an entire fucking star. Like just the amount of engineering to construct a device able to modulate a stars light output seems retardedly complex for communication
Thy being said, maybe it is aliens and the fluctuations in signals has to do with some sort of Dyson sphere like device, not ruling it out. Just saying that aliens are PROBABLY not trying to talk to us by fucking with stars' outputs
>>
Russel Hulse - Thu, 03 Nov 2016 17:34:05 EST ID:eY06FJul No.56619 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>56613
Man, I just wanna chill with some ATLiens
>>
Henrietta Levitt - Thu, 03 Nov 2016 19:37:16 EST ID:rszf0FN0 No.56621 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56613
Ways to change the spectral qualities of a star:
-pass a prism in front of it
-pass a planet with a spectrally modulated atmosphere in front of it (fancy prism.)
-drop mass with a different spectrographic profile than hydrogen or helium into it
-ignite mass with the desired spectrographic profile with a probe in the photosphere
-like I said before, just send a laser beam with different spectral properties in the same direction as photons from the star are travelling
All of those things would be trivial for a 1K civilization. Does that mean it is aliens? No. But we can't rule it out just because the method seems exotic. It might be hugely practical. I mean, the only thing they can see about our system is the star too, right? If we wanted to send them a message, and knew nothing about whether they are looking for radio signals or anything, the one thing we know they can see about us is our star, so if it can be used to send a message, why not?


If you flush a toilet by The Boat - Thu, 20 Oct 2016 18:56:39 EST ID:P9AJW3+2 No.56545 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1477004199582.jpg -(44211B / 43.17KB, 400x300) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 44211
In the northern hemisphere vs the Southern Hemisphere will the rotation be different? / how is this effected by these new low flow toilets?

>side note thanks a lot Al Gore now when I go to del taco I have to flush like 20 times... thanks a lot
1 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Arno Penzias - Sat, 22 Oct 2016 16:23:28 EST ID:KgKlYmGv No.56547 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I highly doubt that any force Earth generates, except gravity, amounts to difference in the rotation of water in sinks / toilets on northern / southern hemispheres.
The forces in sinks / toilets are so miniscule compared to Earth's. It would only make sense if the water was somehow magnetized.

I'm pretty sure any difference in rotation is due to the shape of the sink / toilet.
>>
Edward Barnard - Sat, 22 Oct 2016 20:55:03 EST ID:Kz5Q207u No.56549 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56546
This. To add a little bit to what anon said, for the Coriolis effect to actually have an effect on the direction of rotation, the body of water or fluid (why it effects storms, air is a fluid) has to be very large. Something as small as toilet bowls or even sinks have their direction of flush determined by the shape of the bowl and in the case of toilets, how much water comes out around the bowl each flush on each side (more might come out on one side for whatever reason).
>>
Edward Barnard - Sat, 22 Oct 2016 20:55:52 EST ID:Kz5Q207u No.56550 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Shit, didn't see that someone already said the last bit of my post in this post:
>>56547
>>
The Boat - Sun, 23 Oct 2016 00:16:26 EST ID:UZoVrGk1 No.56551 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56547
So like we don't vibrate, right?
>>
Joseph Taylor Jr. - Sun, 23 Oct 2016 23:44:22 EST ID:u7UMnSpi No.56553 Ignore Report Quick Reply
i just hope that the poop goes away


Is colonizing space really a good idea? by Vera Rubiin - Thu, 13 Oct 2016 22:44:38 EST ID:kkqIA5n0 No.56515 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1476413078998.jpg -(228458B / 223.10KB, 1161x480) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 228458
There are more than enough resources on Earth to feed and cloth and house the entire world population several times over, but people are still starving and homeless due to our greed and incompetence. We can't make phones that don't blow up or cars that don't drive themselves into a wall. We're still dicking around with fossil fuels and nuclear reactors and steam turbines when we have a natural self-sustaining fusion reactor in the sky that could power the whole planet for millions of years if we just put more research into making better solar cells and superconducting materials and large-scale energy storage. With all our intelligence and resources, we can't make shit work on a planet that gives us everything we need, how the hell are we going to survive on a hostile world where just making food to eat and water to drink and air to breathe is a massive costly endeavor, and one tiny malfunction in our machines will result in horrible catastrophe and death? Is mankind really ready to live in space?
7 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
John Wheeler - Mon, 17 Oct 2016 06:23:11 EST ID:rszf0FN0 No.56526 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56525
To be fair, a lot more people than just Elon are working on it. He just grabs all the headlines because he's fucking Ironman.
>>
Bernard-Ferdinand Lyot - Mon, 17 Oct 2016 10:29:14 EST ID:tQX5ylFX No.56527 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56526
really who else is seriously doing it? I mean I hear the government agencies say they want to do it all the time but it doesn't sem like they are doing more than shooting probes at things. Which is still good, but it isn't colonizing. Hell I'd be happy if some production stations were built here, even Lunar mining would get me hard.
>>
John Wheeler - Mon, 17 Oct 2016 16:56:39 EST ID:rszf0FN0 No.56528 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56527
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Categoryrivate_spaceflight_companies
Also on that list you won't see Hawking's Breakthrough Starshot project.
Musk's SpaceX and Bezo's BlueOrigin get all the press because everyone likes the idea of billionaires having a pissing match in space, but private space industry is growing very rapidly and many of the 'visionary' founders are doing it expressly because of their understanding of humanity's predicament being stuck on earth.
>>
Arthur Eddington - Wed, 19 Oct 2016 12:06:23 EST ID:3t/weoS/ No.56543 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56527

NASA's new orbital craft, Orion, is supposed to be capable of manned Lunar missions. Shit's really happening now that the tech is moving beyond the bootstrap suicide missions of the 60/70ies, we just don't hear much of it because the public is so disinterested.

The West ain't gonna let China's space ambitions go uncontested though, so expect more ambitious state-level missions in the future.
>>
Arno Penzias - Sat, 22 Oct 2016 17:05:33 EST ID:KgKlYmGv No.56548 Ignore Report Quick Reply
You know, OP, you say we have all the resources here on Earth, yet still there's a lot of people living a life of distress due to lack of things and violence. You say we could fix it all, only if everybody started being logical and humane.
But therein lies the problem - it's just that difficult to change humans on that level. So difficult in fact, that it will probably be easier to build a spaceship, living pods and all that's necessary and send it all to another planet with like-minded people that are focused on one goal - making it work there.

In the sense of the mission, the monetary cost is completely irrelevant. 500 years from now nobody will give a shit about how much it cost. Even if there are failures and people will die, it only makes sense for us to keep reaching out there. Once any life arises, it wants to reach out as far as it can.

I don't think mankind really is ready to live in space, until we actually do it and get ready doing it.


balck on black crime part2 by Bernard-Ferdinand Lyot - Thu, 13 Oct 2016 22:29:28 EST ID:XnHvuJOm No.56514 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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do you think it would ever be possible for 2 black holes to meet? they say they are growing.. which makes it highly probably they will have a meeting one day.

i don't think anything special would happen other than they merge basically. but i had been thinking because of what they eat, what if one day a black hole has consumed to much...

like a pressure bomb, eventually it'll all be to much. what do you think
3 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Edwin Salpeter - Mon, 17 Oct 2016 20:17:22 EST ID:rszf0FN0 No.56532 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56530
>>it stops "evaporating" at a certain mass
No it doesn't. The evaporation occurs on scales longer than the age of the universe where the mass is greater than one solar mass, but eventually they entirely dissipate.
>>Not that Hawking radiation is proven
It's got a lot of data behind it, it seems to be a necessary component of black hole dynamics. To be fair, black holes aren't even proven, they are theoretical objects that have never conclusively been observed.
>>
William Herschel - Tue, 18 Oct 2016 08:06:25 EST ID:eY06FJul No.56534 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56532
>"A black hole of 4.5×1022 kg (about the mass of the Moon, or about 13 µm across) would be in equilibrium at 2.7 K, absorbing as much radiation as it emits."
>>
Johannes Kepler - Tue, 18 Oct 2016 20:38:53 EST ID:Kz5Q207u No.56536 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56514
You realize we confirmed gravitational waves when LIGO detected the waves caused by two black holes coming together and eventually combining, right?
>>
George Airy - Tue, 18 Oct 2016 22:05:52 EST ID:y/fkgY/C No.56537 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56536
I posted a thread about that when it happened. This board is so fucking slow, it's still there >>56038
>>
Henrietta Levitt - Wed, 19 Oct 2016 00:22:46 EST ID:rszf0FN0 No.56538 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56534
But that presumes there is an unlimited amount of radiation in the interstellar medium. By the time black holes are evaporating en masse, all matter will already have fallen into black holes, so there's no way it could replenish itself with ambient radiation.


Truth by Edward Barnard - Tue, 20 Sep 2016 10:12:23 EST ID:+4KamMvj No.56439 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1474380743780.jpg -(24054B / 23.49KB, 500x431) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 24054
>If the universe was born from a white hole it solves everything.
if black holes turn into white holes and birth new universes, that means holographic universe theory is real, multiverse is real (every black hole is its own universe), every single equation is solved, if science simply realized that it was not a singularity but rather a white hole.
>Our universe is inside a white hole, or event horizon.
>Looking at a star 90 million lightyears away is like looking at the star as it was 90 million years ago. is it possible we have not detected life, as we can only view stars in the past - and not as they currently exist?

For example, the big bang theory says the universe started as a singularity. But scientists have no satisfying explanation for how such a singularity might have formed in the first place.

If our universe was birthed by a white hole instead of a singularity, Poplawski said, "it would solve this problem of black hole singularities and also the big bang singularity."

Wormholes might also explain gamma ray bursts, the second most powerful explosions in the universe after the big bang.

Gamma ray bursts occur at the fringes of the known universe. They appear to be associated with supernovae, or star explosions, in faraway galaxies, but their exact sources are a mystery.


Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.
5 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Edmond Halley - Sat, 24 Sep 2016 03:24:08 EST ID:Kz5Q207u No.56469 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56439
It's not about realizing anything. I'm sure plenty of physicists and cosmologists have entertained the idea, but it isn't science when you just make shit up that isn't able to be tested, measured, proven, or disproven to any degree. Cosmology has a bad habit of sometimes delving into the realm of psuedo-science. None of these are even hypotheses, they're simply musings. It could very well be true, but there isn't currently a way to tell one way or the other.
>>
Nicolaus Copernicus - Sat, 24 Sep 2016 04:05:13 EST ID:rszf0FN0 No.56470 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56461
It was sarcasm. 'Like that would ever happen' was implicit.
>>
Vesto Slipher - Thu, 29 Sep 2016 13:56:14 EST ID:KgKlYmGv No.56499 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>56496
I know you\re trolling but since it\s a chilled out night and im really laid back i'll take the bait cause reading them got me entertained.
While reading this got me thinking, do the people that write these up actually believe these "facts" or they just go with the thread for the kick of it. Or maybe they're just 15, eager to belong into some kind of social group and wanna feel special/entitled, with their mind not exactly made up what they're experiencing.

Basically the first 18 something disregard gravity (pic related).

19. is a funny one, based on a 16th century argument that stars in the sky should be visibly moving "back and forth" since we're on solar orbit and move somewhat closer and further to them.
20. says a cannon shot straight up should land slightly west because by the time the ball falls back the earth and the cannon should've moved east due to earth's spinning. except the atmosphere spins with the planet.

the rest just made no sense or were downright dumb and i got bored
>>
Hannes Alven - Thu, 29 Sep 2016 15:36:29 EST ID:tQX5ylFX No.56500 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56499
Maybe some one should also tell them that gravity is non-shperical. but the planet is. Might cause some explosions of rage.
>>
Maximilian Wolf - Sun, 16 Oct 2016 17:47:26 EST ID:f/Tl+D5o No.56524 Ignore Report Quick Reply
it's centered on a couple, man and woman in space holding us together, there's a black hole that gets turned into white when there's enough gathered to break the threshold, the quantum dynamics are designed so that the people are part of the equation.


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