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Engineering in the UK by Phoebe Hengerfuck - Thu, 31 Oct 2013 16:41:12 EST ID:xgUR8wWn No.5981 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1383252072740.jpg -(1943708B / 1.85MB, 2048x1536) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 1943708
Hi /tesla/

24 year old employee of an engineering company in the defence sector. At the moment I have an HND in Electrical/Electronic Engineering and after this year will have an HND in Mechanical Engineering. I'm looking to top this up to a degree in Mechanical Engineering (currently doing all the UCAS bollocks) starting this September.

Any UKfags here able to advise on the best universities, experiences with applying with different qualifications, etc etc.? Also, as an older student does anyone have any experiences of this to share. Should be noted I also have A-Levels in Maths and Physics (they are poor grades, E and D respectively - I wasn't so committed at college but like to hope any University would take into account my two Higher National Diplomas.)

I know Bristol, Bath, Manchester are pretty good for Mech Engineering.

Thanks all!
>>
Matilda Fomblepad - Sun, 03 Nov 2013 14:51:30 EST ID:DTQaxF9M No.5983 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Birmingham and Brookes are pretty good for mech eng I think.


Programming and CAD by Nicholas Bommercocke - Wed, 11 Sep 2013 17:22:42 EST ID:YnFlrW9/ No.5895 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1378934562383.jpg -(232929B / 227.47KB, 540x720) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 232929
Hey /tesla/, just hoping you might be able to offer some advice.

I will be applying to study engineering at uni in the near future and heard that programming is taught as part of many engineering courses. I have no previous experience of programming and thought it might be useful to gain a basic understanding of a language before I apply, as it could boost my chances of getting an offer as well as making the course slightly easier. However, I know that CAD is also important for engineering, especially mech.

My question is would my time be better spent learning a language such as MatLab or learning to use a CAD program such as Solidworks? Bearing in mind I will be doing a general engineering course so will cover most of he more traditional disciplines. Also, which language/CAD program would be most useful/easy to learn? I would love to do both but currently don't have the time due to a work and school.

tl;dr Should I learn a programming language or CAD for a general engineering course, and which language/CAD program?

Thanks in advance and sorry for the wall of text.
2 posts and 1 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Frederick Wanningdudge - Sun, 06 Oct 2013 16:11:38 EST ID:D8N1xh14 No.5943 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>5940
>MatLab applies in general to all engineers though, so if in doubt go with that.
Not really.
>>
Sophie Dreffinghood - Sun, 06 Oct 2013 17:15:02 EST ID:5cJ/AB1P No.5951 Ignore Report Quick Reply
matlab is one of those things that engineering schools poorly expose their students to, then 90% of them will never see again unless they go into academia.

You know what most engineers at a real company use? Fucking excel. Why? Not because it is better than anything, because it isn't. Because the company already paid for all those Microsoft office packages.
>>
Graham Gimbledag - Sat, 12 Oct 2013 18:06:42 EST ID:X3RZJwjY No.5962 Ignore Report Quick Reply
i'd learn matlab first if i were you. it's actually easy as fuck.
>>5943
true. my college recently stopped teaching it to CEs. but it's a god send for mech and aero.
>>5951
you can write up everything in matlab and export it as an excel file. or whatever format you want, really.
>>
Nigger Dunderford - Thu, 17 Oct 2013 00:59:10 EST ID:5cJ/AB1P No.5965 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>5962
>>you can write up everything in matlab and export it as an excel file. or whatever format you want, really.

it doesn't matter if you can, if your company won't pay for matlab. There isn't a company in the english speaking world that won't give you office. There are tons that you will have to argue with to get matlab.
>>
Shit Grandway - Wed, 30 Oct 2013 16:59:21 EST ID:KoI0JFUs No.5980 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Currently in my 3rd yr of a general engineering degree. We've used MatLab and some other languages as well as Solidworks and AutoCAD and a few other tools. I think we got around 10 hours of labs for both MatLab and Solidworks in my first year and that's about it. The philosophy is that the course isn't aiming to teach you how to use those tools but giving you a favour of what tools are out there and what sort of things they can do in order to aid you to solve a problem. Ultimately, we have complete freedom over what programs we use, or if we do things by hand.

The most important skill I have developed is how to RTFM since it's likely I'll be using a piece of software for a single lab (one 6 hour day) and won't ever touch it again.


Logging data from sensors and plotting data by Jack Breffingkat - Mon, 20 May 2013 00:08:27 EST ID:N2gcVF14 No.5670 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1369022907730.gif -(162151B / 158.35KB, 1998x1096) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 162151
So I am designing something for a friend. I am not very far into my basic of basics electric circuits book, and I've hit a wall. The device itself is very simple, just 2 CDS cells acting as a voltage divider. I want to take a snapshot of the voltage output...say every 100ms and be able to plot this over time

I haven't the slightest clue where to start with logging the data and being able to plug it into a computer.

The end user is basically illiterate in these things, and I want them to be able to see what is happening with the device, without them getting frustrated.

I have about 4 months to figure this out.
>>
Jack Breffingkat - Mon, 20 May 2013 00:12:20 EST ID:N2gcVF14 No.5671 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I should also mention that I would preferably log to an SD card, not having the device tethered 24/7. nb
>>
Cyril Murrybanks - Tue, 21 May 2013 16:47:22 EST ID:/PYTFAuP No.5680 Ignore Report Quick Reply
You can import values into the office packet and make graphs and staples out of it

I think it even can do live plots with a ODBC driver
>>
Lydia Hedgechedging - Tue, 22 Oct 2013 23:47:11 EST ID:NnEniNuW No.5975 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1382500031818.jpg -(34912B / 34.09KB, 550x550) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>5670
>The device itself is very simple, just 2 CDS cells acting as a voltage divider

Why two CDS cells? Are you trying to compare the brightness in two different areas? I think you would be better off putting them in a wheatstone bridge either way.

As far as logging the data, your best bet would be something like an Arduino Uno paired with the ethernet shield. If you've programmed things before, I'm sure you can figure it out in 4 months.

http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Arduino/A000072/?qs=sGAEpiMZZMum3JrLekXmB3jotOOpRCjKI6jHaaTwcfk%3d


Shipping container build by Charlotte Tootlock - Sun, 01 Sep 2013 01:32:22 EST ID:mSiCExQ8 No.5864 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1378013542604.jpg -(83882B / 81.92KB, 640x475) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 83882
Shipping containers are stackable, waterproof (for rain, not for dropping them in a river), and strong. They also cost around $15,000 new. I heard about a guy who built a small underground shelter using a shipping container that he buried in his backyard, and I was thinking about trying this myself.

I can get 6 carbon-steel sheets, half-inch thick, and weld them together myself for around $6,000 (before shipping, ironically). Would this plan work, or am I missing something crucial?
19 posts and 2 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
William Lighthood - Fri, 04 Oct 2013 13:02:44 EST ID:sQAOunmf No.5936 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>5935
http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/conductive-heat-transfer-d_428.html
>>
Nigel Brabblespear - Sat, 05 Oct 2013 07:37:18 EST ID:aF+amxZx No.5937 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>5936 there is a reason im not a engineer... i dont even know where to start researching.

i was looking at rigid 2 inch foam insulation, specifically http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pdfImages/4d/4d258498-d60f-412a-bfe5-f3ad7e813c00.pdf. now i see r value of 10.8. then i tried to figure out exactly what that means. i got to this formula " hr•ft^2 •°F/Btu (RSI, °C•m^2/W). i know what everything up to the parentheses stands for.... but tbh.... even if i figure all that out i probably wont understand it.


basically im trying to figure out if my house is at 68 inside and its 10 out side how long before i have to turn the heater back on if i got 2 inch insulation. and this would help avoid the tin oven effect some what right?
>>
M - Sat, 05 Oct 2013 16:14:02 EST ID:Jr33UkvF No.5938 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>5937
according to my knowledge of thermodynamics, it is not possible to be calculated with the data you are giving us. we would have to know the area of the container (not the width*height for all faces, but the actual area of the bended panels), this means it is going to matter if you put your insulation on the inside or outside. I would also have to know the thickness of the steel plating.
And assuming you want to keep the temperature at 68F, we would have to know how much heat your heater can produce.
if you want me to calculate your shit, give me the area in m2, the plate thickness in mm your temperatures in K and your heat production in Watts.
>>
Nigel Brabblespear - Sat, 05 Oct 2013 16:36:39 EST ID:aF+amxZx No.5939 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>5938
ummm give me a few days to do the research and ill try and do it.

thank you for explaining what i need to find.
>>
George Bonnerchid - Wed, 06 Nov 2013 17:09:24 EST ID:bexY1i7u No.5986 Ignore Report Quick Reply
%test%


Linear displacement by John - Tue, 01 Oct 2013 06:52:34 EST ID:fy15wSYi No.5929 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1380624754594.jpg -(16629B / 16.24KB, 360x200) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 16629
I'm doing a little project of mine and I have encountered a problem..

The project is basically a motion platform that moves in three directions at very low forces (few mN). I got the first two direction done (X,Y), but the third is giving me trouble due to the gravitational force.

Basically I use some very thin beams (flexures) that allow deflection in one direction and none in all others. In X and Y I have no issues with gravity, but in the Z direction the beams own weight and as the force is not applied directly at the centre of the flexures, my whole thing starts to rotate which I don't want.

So I was thinking of maybe using a linear spring that doesn't allow bending.. Do such springs exist at such a stiffness (20 N/m)?
>>
Frederick Wanningdudge - Sun, 06 Oct 2013 16:12:31 EST ID:D8N1xh14 No.5944 Ignore Report Quick Reply
A spring that does't bend? House a spring in a piston or something. Is that what you're asking for?


Microwave by Jarvis Haffingkock - Tue, 10 Sep 2013 17:51:34 EST ID:0fHJPk0Q No.5892 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1378849894585.jpg -(121997B / 119.14KB, 1175x1290) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 121997
Is it reasonable to be freightened by my old microwave? The latch sucks and sometimes the microwave just gives up from latch issues. I also feel a stream of warm air in specific areas.
7 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Phoebe Tootson - Thu, 26 Sep 2013 00:32:08 EST ID:vwBSL6/Z No.5908 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>5892

You're worried about that and you're eating the food out of it? lol...

Microwaves are deadly, stay away from them.
>>
Graham Crecklesidge - Fri, 27 Sep 2013 08:34:04 EST ID:A8jxg2uv No.5911 Ignore Report Quick Reply
For fuck's sake, OP, just get a new one cheap from factory seconds or something.
>>
Nicholas Boblingkad - Fri, 27 Sep 2013 09:46:53 EST ID:ZpOwOy+z No.5912 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>5907

you could say he didn't see it coming
>>
Samuel Niggerway - Fri, 27 Sep 2013 14:15:45 EST ID:WqMK7Yu4 No.5913 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>5912
>>
Fucking Blanderforth - Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:20:02 EST ID:wZ4RqE3j No.5926 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>5892
I got an old microwave for free and it didn't heat food at all and gave me and my brother a headache within 2 or 3 minutes. I'd be more worried about the magnetron being bad than it not latching properly.


medical grade silicone by Dopey Wang - Fri, 27 Sep 2013 20:40:10 EST ID:IeKJOxZ+ No.5915 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1380328810504.jpg -(21170B / 20.67KB, 320x277) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 21170
not sure if this is the right section but anyone know where i can buy medical grade silicone for making adult toys?
>>
Shitting Bunson - Fri, 27 Sep 2013 21:39:20 EST ID:23z3O8Uj No.5916 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>5915
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=medical+grade+silicon+mooulding
>>
Dopey Wang - Sat, 28 Sep 2013 16:31:02 EST ID:IeKJOxZ+ No.5919 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>5916 I dont need it for the mold, i need it for the finished product so it has to be body safe. I've already ran quite a few google searched and emailed a few site (but obviously they wont give out that info)


2 stroke chainsaw by Shitting Pablinglere - Tue, 10 Sep 2013 09:45:03 EST ID:SOVM0ZNF No.5891 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1378820703986.jpg -(35765B / 34.93KB, 500x364) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 35765
Hey guys

I'm currently in first year and for a chemistry based unit we have to figure out what
material 9 components are made from. Most metalic, some polymer.

Anyway i'm not entirely sure when it comes to moter mechanics, and was wondering what some of the components will experience, in-terms of stress, heat subjection, and basically any condition that would applied during use.

Things like the cylinder head, the crank sump case, the crankshaft, the piston and the muffler.

The polymer components, i'm assuming, won't come under much change in temperature but conditions more like stress.

TL;DR - What parts of a 2 stroke engine for a chainsaw would experience high temperature? What defines the properties of the materials used?
>>
Whitey Pullykire - Fri, 27 Sep 2013 14:19:20 EST ID:7p59x5Kr No.5914 Ignore Report Quick Reply
What parts of a 2 stroke engine would experience high temperature?

Spark plug, cylinder head, cylinder walls, piston head, exhaust port, exhaust pipe,reed valve, head gasket exhaust pipe gasket.

>components will experience, in-terms of stress,
shit will get red hot and experience extreme vibration of varied frequency including acoustic vibration and ultrasonic vibration. frictional stress, strain(elastic stress) and compaction. The part we're talking about depends on what stress it receives.
>>
Thomas Cindershaw - Fri, 27 Sep 2013 22:12:42 EST ID:1/RGVUTh No.5917 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>5914

You forgot the chain + blades. those get hella hot, so i'd imagine would the teeth on the stationary blade


Revit resources by Edwin Gopperlock - Fri, 20 Sep 2013 16:14:26 EST ID:0fHJPk0Q No.5904 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1379708066032.jpg -(302642B / 295.55KB, 1050x825) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 302642
I took a revit class a bit ago but I don't feel so fresh, having gotten used to several software since then.

Is there a great guide I can touch up on? I've already checked the first few pages of varied youtube searches, under the "long" category.


Fire and shit by George Drenderway - Fri, 13 Sep 2013 19:10:54 EST ID:XiGeXXo1 No.5898 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1379113854699.jpg -(16014B / 15.64KB, 214x300) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 16014
I wasn't sure where to post this, but I figured you guys would be most suitable. I'm a pro wrestler and to make my appearance more interesting I'd like to wear a flamming jacket during my entrance. Something like pic related.

I'm no engineer (philosophy student pls), which is why I seek your advice to build such a thing. What I would need would be some sort of trigger that activates the fire on the back, be it on the wrists or even on the chest, and the fire would need to extinguish after ten seconds or so. Again, forgive my ignorance, but I imagine the jacket would need to be constructed in 3 layers, the first a protective material to prevent burning and pain, the second an absorbent material which could be dosed with a highly flammable liquid and the third would be a metal that wouldn't conduct heat yet would allow the fire to seep through, maybe in the form of chain-mail. It may be safer to just have the arms light on fire. I was thinking maybe just altering the arms on a greatcoat but with the same premise as above.

Any advice would be a great help.
>>
Ian Desslehire - Sat, 14 Sep 2013 11:45:06 EST ID:VLmiDLgV No.5900 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>5898
Maybe protect your head with a hoodie and some flame-retardant gel, like stuntmen use.
>>
Wesley Clockleworth - Sun, 15 Sep 2013 03:50:30 EST ID:v8qu+fWE No.5901 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1379231430916.jpg -(134346B / 131.20KB, 308x400) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>5900
And use a "stage flame", a low-temperature alcohol flame that's less likely to make you into a crispy critter.

And you should use some version of this as your entrance song.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vCTaxGhRC5M


/tesla/, meet my friend /dis/ by Nigel Beblingford - Thu, 12 Sep 2013 02:08:09 EST ID:tB60PQ7m No.5897 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1378966089236.png -(73597B / 71.87KB, 750x600) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 73597
ITT: general manufacturing.

So, I was watching some youtube vids on what to do with my new MOT when I hear that high voltage ionizes 'oxygen and nitrogen into ozone and nitric oxide gases'. Chemistry is not my strong suit, so I started thinking that I found an easy way to create N2O. A few internets later, I found that this wasn't the case... but I did find something else.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ozone
>Ozone does not react with ammonium salts, but it oxidizes ammonia to ammonium nitrate:
> 2 NH3 + 4 O 3 → NH4NO3 + 4 O2 + H2O

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitrous_oxide
>Nitrous oxide is most commonly prepared by careful heating of ammonium nitrate, which decomposes into nitrous oxide and water vapour.
> NH4NO3 (s) → 2 H2O (g) + N2O (g)

Therefore, Windex -> voltage -> laughing gas. Q.E.D.

/tesla/ chemists: is this a real thing? Moreso, is this ChemE territory safe enough for an EE?
>>
Thomas Claystock - Mon, 23 Sep 2013 17:02:28 EST ID:9FHP6N92 No.5906 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>5897
1) windex isn't ammonia, or at best is 5% ammonia
2) you would have to create the ozone, then pipe it through the ammonia
3) then you have to purify and carefully heat the ammonium nitrate

All in all, a lot safer, cheaper, and better to just buy your own N2O


Engineer board by Lillian Beblingdudging - Thu, 05 Sep 2013 06:32:19 EST ID:qcML6joZ No.5880 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1378377139066.jpg -(181269B / 177.02KB, 1131x470) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 181269
You have done well, my children.
We created you, that one day, there would be a board for Engineers.

Now...
Wait, why is that cat pushing a watermelon out of a lake?
>>
M - Thu, 05 Sep 2013 08:13:51 EST ID:X6IJO66p No.5881 Ignore Report Quick Reply
this is not /b/
nb
>>
Eugene Fammlespear - Fri, 06 Sep 2013 10:13:22 EST ID:+FYkgdda No.5883 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1378476802351.png -(391562B / 382.38KB, 1024x576) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
You make me sad, my children.

But never mind. Now, who wants a refreshing ice cold glass of black oil flavoured space jockey cola?
>>
David Hupperwell - Fri, 06 Sep 2013 11:48:05 EST ID:WqMK7Yu4 No.5884 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1378482485951.png -(68447B / 66.84KB, 482x331) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>5880
>>5883
>>
Hamilton Seddlemudge - Sat, 07 Sep 2013 13:40:31 EST ID:iYjHoSI2 No.5885 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>5880
>>5883


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