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420chan's Canada Cannabis Legalization Logitech Giveaway

We're giving away Logitech hardware to lucky 420chan users to celebrate recreational legalization on October 17!
Round 1 Giveaway Entry     Discussion Thread
Insulated tent by Betsy Bleblingched - Mon, 15 Jan 2018 23:49:39 EST ID:h0iFf5LS No.35591 Ignore Report Quick Reply
File: 1516078179743.jpg -(2701735B / 2.58MB, 3264x2448) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 2701735
There's a half decent chance I might have to live out of my car in the upcoming future, and that's something I'm fine with except that it's a fucking tiny vehicle (scion iq). While I still have a modicum of disposable income I was thinking about investing in a tent that would at least allow me to lie down instead of having to sleep in the seats. This winter has me fucking worried about freezing to death doing so though.

Can anyone recommend a tent/brand with decent thermal insulation? I'm on the mason-dixon line so I'm not trying to survive the Canadian wilderness or anything crazy, just looking to sleep outside without freezing to death. The cheaper the better, but I understand quality costs some money. Thanks for any recs
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James Tootway - Tue, 16 Jan 2018 01:23:06 EST ID:GXrxok7b No.35592 Ignore Report Quick Reply
you lose the majority of your heat sleeping through the ground. an insulated layer to sleep on is the highest priority, even leaves is better than nothing. try to get a nice sleeping mat. also wear a beanie over your ears to conserve heat n keep out bugs
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Grover McWilliams - Tue, 16 Jan 2018 01:23:19 EST ID:4NGFOTkZ No.35593 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>35591

I'm no tent expert, but unless you're deep in the forest, I'd recommend skimping on the tent and getting yourself a solid sleeping bag. Exposure is a real thing almost year-round in most places, and a big, airy tent or cold metal car aren't going to help much.
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Charlotte Dezzletudge - Wed, 18 Apr 2018 05:27:25 EST ID:3nOWOExB No.35707 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>35591
The tent isn't really going to insulate. Don't pay too much for a tent but use that money to get a good sleepingbag and mat.
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Matilda Mammerstudging - Sat, 21 Apr 2018 23:57:35 EST ID:T8axXUv0 No.35714 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1524369455828.jpg -(1463589B / 1.40MB, 2592x1936) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>35591
In my experience, much of which was gained living in the tent in the left in your image (the one on the right is an embark 2man that my fiancé and I used as storage at that time), you’re going to want something in the 2-4man range, with a tarp underneath and another over the top. “Waterproof” doesn’t last long. You’re still going to need good ventilation, so don’t burrito the tent. Paracord and bowline knots help immensely. Dig a rain trench around the tent, and make sure you’re not in a flood plain.
A cot couldn’t hurt but that’s a longer term item. A tall airbed with a rug under it will save your back.
Get a two burner propane camp stove, fast food isn’t a good long-term solution.
As has been said itt: no insulated tents (hence tarps), don’t sleep directly on the ground (add layers or altitude), and get a good sleeping bag. My bag was rated for 0f and kept me toasty in the embark my first new year’s without walls. Pic related, this is that tent new year’s day on the pacific coast.


If you’re positive you can maintain your vehicle, trade for a van and stick your mattress in the back. Honestly, if you intend to unfuck your life in under the five years it took me, get a van, deck it out all cozy-like, and do your best to blend into the background. Moving a few hours away might help in that regard.
Don’t get an rv, they’re cop magnets and they generally get run out of town. A minivan blends in well, a full size van is more comfortable but blends slightly less.
Walmart, Home Depot, 24-hour grocery stores, and some shopping center parking lots are usually safe places to sleep in a vehicle. Keep yourself and your vehicle legal or kiss it goodbye. You might find an acquaintance’s METHod a bit more your style- move every several hours from one known safe spot to another from your list of many spots to kill time that you’re gonna want to mentally make in the first couple months.

If your vehicle looks scuzzy and/or lived-in at first glance, expect to have tweakers, crackheads, and/or junkies trying to sell to or buy from you regularly. Keep it clean or you might start losing things (including bits of yourself).

Good luck out there.
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Betsy Trothood - Wed, 25 Apr 2018 00:51:24 EST ID:QvfkDMXF No.35719 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>35591
Just get a cheap bivy, a mat, and then spend the bulk of the money on a good sleeping bag.
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Oliver Figglestock - Sun, 20 May 2018 11:13:41 EST ID:FVvEeN+k No.35755 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>35714
>van
Box Van. Though they can stand out more than a minivan, they get completely ignored as it's assumed to just be another random work vehicle. Rofl, I've had people try and wave me into loading bays when I just wanted to shop.


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