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- Mon, 11 Dec 2017 14:46:48 EST ikaHKFhY No.94551
File: 1513021608473.jpg -(18626B / 18.19KB, 364x300) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Fitness Database
Currently I work in a youth center for traumatized teenagers. Most of them do not speak English nor can read English script. I'm looking to find a website with visual exercise explanations, as well as diagrams showing what muscles are worked. The aim for us to create a small booklet that we can use to help the teenagers design their own workouts using simple workout templates, build up a fundamental knowledge of fitness while not relying on language based explanations. We mostly work with dumbbells, kettlebells and calisthenics. If anybody knew of any accessible websites that had content similar to this that would be great.

Happy deadlifting.
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Edwin Tootforth - Mon, 11 Dec 2017 16:49:01 EST 4+458rlZ No.94552 Reply
Visual only with no language explanation? Fuck, I work as a trainer - and I;ve trained deaf and blind people - and that sounds hard as fuck. If such a thing were to be made it could make millions in profits.
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Lillian Bimmlechutch - Mon, 11 Dec 2017 17:17:55 EST LZQUuWue No.94554 Reply
Read Mark Rippetoe's book Starting Strength. It was literally designed with situations like yours in mind. I don't think they should be creating their own routines though. That's for people who are already in good physical fitness and need to start focusing on muscle groups. The Starting Strength method is super easy and can be done in a 45 minute time span. Google for it and you'll find a free PDF. It's got good pictures in it as well.
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Lillian Bimmlechutch - Mon, 11 Dec 2017 17:24:47 EST LZQUuWue No.94555 Reply
>>94554
Keep in mind that it uses a number focused progression method. So, it's 3 sets of 5 squats, 3 sets of 5 benchpresses, and 3 sets of 5 deadlifts, 3 times a week, adding 5 pounds each workout session. A quick 5 minute running warm up and you've got an easy workout that anyone can understand. Focus on the 3s and 5s and they'll be showing progression each workout for months. Once they get past this "Weightlifting 101" then they can start customizing the workout for their specific needs. The book goes into much more detail and even offers different exercises to move into as you advance.

Anyways, report back with what you end up doing.

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