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False memories within dreams

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- Sun, 19 Feb 2017 07:09:07 EST nFOx3zLb No.45499
File: 1487506147623.gif -(630648B / 615.87KB, 269x202) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. False memories within dreams
For years I've been randomly experiencing false memories within my dreams. For instance I will be in the middle of a dream and then straight up 100% remember something funny a friend said the day before, and then I'll wake up and realize that shit never happened. I get all types of memories, sometimes even about people I've never met that I made up within my dream on the spot. The crazy thing is that these "false memories" are coming straight from my memory center in my brain, they feel completely real until I wake up. Memories are imprinted in your mind. You can shine a light on a dark wall and see something you did years ago, and the proof is the impression left in your mind. But how can your mind just fabricate impressions like that on the spot?

I've always been a semi-lucid dreamer, like I know it's a dream but I don't yet realize that dream reality isn't real reality, so I don't have complete control but I'm usually pretty clear headed. This makes these instances even more trippy. I also experience deja-vu in waking life relatively often. While the fake memory in the dream feels straight up like an actual memory, deja-vu feels more like a foggy memory is being channeled to you somehow for 5-10 seconds and you get the crazy feeling like this has happened before, and then it's gone. Maybe they are related?

Similar experiences?
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Snoozer !3I4SJbCh8M - Sun, 19 Feb 2017 10:33:28 EST zzQurSQx No.45500 Reply
Hey there, this happens to me a lot so I thought I'd share some thoughts. For starters I'm not always myself when I dream, and a lot of the people who are regulars and friends in my dreams aren't people that I know IRL either. I even have an apartment that I find myself in frequently that I consider my home and know like the back of my hand, but I have never actually lived there. I don't think it's beyond our minds to construct it's own characters and environments from scraps of memory, and even articulate another lifetime for you to immerse yourself in. Your mind can cook up plenty weirder stuff than that, so it's not really reaching to guess that your brain can store subconscious memory as well.
Though, if you are looking for speculation, maybe you are walking into other's dreams, and pulling faces and locations from their experiences. You say you experience deja vu frequently, this is perhaps due to a similar phenomenon where your own conscious version of reality is being read or accessed by another person, or alternate version of yourself from another timeline via subconscious retrieval.
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Beatrice Pundlepark - Sat, 18 Mar 2017 08:21:22 EST zxIIkkaa No.45550 Reply
>>45499
I'm pretty sure that's a fairly common occurrence.
A lot of the time when I'm drifting to sleep I hear music play, either a mix of several different songs or something 100% brand new that my brain is conjuring up. In a dream I can have an entire universe with set rules and things I have to do, with friends and family that don't exist IRL, and sometimes I would even have memories of previous dreams while dreaming if there's enough similarity to it.

It usually takes a good hour or so after I wake up to separate the dream experiences from the real world, so I try to avoid speaking to people before then because everything gets kinda muddled.
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Caroline Hendlespear - Thu, 16 Jun 2022 20:47:10 EST qcwqrlqM No.46866 Reply
>>45500
>>45550
>>45499
Dream-reality confusion is a trait of borderline personality disorder and dementia. Neither of those are good things, with one having a much worse prognosis.

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