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Why did America even give a shit by Phineas Fuckingstone - Wed, 20 Apr 2016 00:46:22 EST ID:NN93ashj No.56644 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Like what was the point of the cold war? Why was someone else following a different economic system... a threat?
28 posts and 8 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Martha Menkinwell - Mon, 02 Apr 2018 14:42:39 EST ID:8cb/Ihsi No.57422 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57370

Proof of this, please.
>>
Sophie Migglechire - Mon, 02 Apr 2018 18:40:52 EST ID:rbK+gS1r No.57423 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57407
YOU FUCKING MONGOLOID CUNT!

THE AMERICANS BOMBED BY DAY BECAUSE THEY HAD A FUCKHUGE POPULATION AND A HUGE AIRFORCE!

THE BRITISH HAD A MUCH SMALLER POPULATION AND A SMALL AIRFORCE SO THEY CHOSE TO BOMB BY NIGHT!

YOU KNOW WHAT A FACTORY FROM A MILE HIGH LOOKS LIKE AT NIGHT?

THE SAME AS A FUCKING CITY BLOCK!

FUCKING KILL YOURSELF YOU RETARDED AMERICAN CUNT!
>>
Edwin Cligglededging - Tue, 03 Apr 2018 17:21:20 EST ID:/mZfItc6 No.57427 Ignore Report Quick Reply
friendly reminder that germany never bombed london until the britbongs bombed berlin first
>>
Samuel Forringwere - Tue, 03 Apr 2018 21:01:13 EST ID:rbK+gS1r No.57428 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57427
Friendly reminder that the UK never bombed Germany until the huns bombed Poland first.
>>
Lydia Gommertug - Wed, 18 Apr 2018 14:59:30 EST ID:wty78VYY No.57443 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57427

Except when they did during WWI.


Musketmen by Graham Mavingridge - Sun, 02 Oct 2016 19:47:46 EST ID:KCDGi4tU No.56914 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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So in the 17th and 16th century muskets used a matchlock or wheellock mechanism to fire and therefore took a long time to reload, leaving the musketeers vulnerable, so they needed Pikemen to protect them. My question is- why didn't they just attach the pike underneath the musket and turn them into Piketeers?

I mean if you attached it underneath the musket with hoops, you could move the pike along so the musket was at the centre of gravity when you fired it. And obviously if it got to close quarters you could just us the pike like a pike.
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Jack Blonkinhock - Sat, 08 Oct 2016 21:51:26 EST ID:bw6ZNCus No.56931 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>56925
Well the first bayonets were plug bayonets that sat in the barrel of the musket. It still amazes me they didn't work out that was a bad idea right from the very start.
>>
Cornelius Shakebury - Wed, 12 Oct 2016 08:33:24 EST ID:FqRGTRMQ No.56940 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56931
It does make sense from their perspective.

One of the main reasons why bayonets make for such shitty weapons, is that they're misaligned.

The thrusting blade doesn't line up with the general line of the weapon, making it imbalanced and a liability in melee combat. That unbalance will result in slower attacks and bad accuracy, and someone with an actual spear, or a sword can capitalize on that immediately, since they have much better balanced weapons.
>>
Augustus Sudgepet - Tue, 15 Nov 2016 01:38:58 EST ID:BBViIOJc No.56976 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56916

yeah your strength or adaptability are irrelevant when it comes to timing, whenever a threat is advancing, a defense/counter must be executed simultaneously. with mixed arms you may have less of each weapon available but there is a greater time range of group readiness and less openings of vulnerability
>>
Charles Hiddlefone - Mon, 16 Apr 2018 22:13:50 EST ID:pYW/9DNs No.57437 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56940
In modern times the better trained soldier has such an overwhelming advantage I'm not sure it matters anymore. Bayonets seem like a silly affixment to a firearm, what few bayonetings that have happened could have just been done with the disattached blade.
>>
Lydia Gommertug - Wed, 18 Apr 2018 14:55:59 EST ID:wty78VYY No.57442 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Pikes came first and used to be the most common weapon on the battlefield while muskets were meant for support and holding off attacking troops while a giant pile of pikemen were supposed to just trample down enemy formations.


US = Rome 2.0 by Samuel Clombledale - Sun, 29 Oct 2017 22:32:47 EST ID:6GEx+/2g No.57289 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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If you don't think the US is the cultural and philosophical continuation of Rome get the fuck out of my face.
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Oliver Grimhood - Mon, 16 Apr 2018 12:41:54 EST ID:/mZfItc6 No.57436 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57435

they are making a game about it called death stranding
>>
David Pockwill - Tue, 17 Apr 2018 04:40:07 EST ID:IlyKIasb No.57438 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57435
Rome died over three centuries.
>brainlet thinks 476 was a date that mattered
>>
Oliver Furrystone - Wed, 18 Apr 2018 00:18:30 EST ID:Ln/8BqTP No.57439 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>57433
And what's wrong with that logic? By all indications, Rome was pretty singular as far as imperial hegemonies go, right?

>>57438
Or it never died, and instead re-branded itself as a religious hegemony which eventually diversified and splintered into multiple independent empires which each had equivalent claim on being the legitimate continuation of Rome, which was a semi-mythological distinction even in the time of classical Rome. The Holy Roman Empire only dissolved in the nineteenth century, only to re-emerge as the Third Reich a century later, in a war which saw the final end of the Ottomans, the direction continuation of the Byzantine empire. And the entire English empire drew its legitimacy from the founding of the Anglican church which schismed as a direct result of the same Roman bullshit which birthed all these other negros.

Now you can claim that all of this is so general to the context of greater Europa that it should be treated as distinct from Rome despite that hegemonic phenomenon being the direct genesis of all this shit, and that's fine as long as you keep an overall perspective on what went down, but it's not fine to pretend that all these parties didn't CONSIDER THEMSELVES to be the legitimate continuation of Rome right up until WW2 made it unfashionable, and deliberately reflected this in their national devices and traditions.
>>
Phoebe Trotforth - Wed, 18 Apr 2018 02:16:54 EST ID:EMkKTYeq No.57440 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57439
This. Rome is alive and well friends.
>>
Wesley Sarringforth - Wed, 18 Apr 2018 08:15:11 EST ID:XVAFJun6 No.57441 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57439
>By all indications, Rome was pretty singular as far as imperial hegemonies go, right?
Not really, no.

The most singular thing about Rome is that non-historian normies have actually heard of it.


Histories biggest Chad by Isabella Blunnergold - Fri, 30 Mar 2018 21:26:22 EST ID:2kVQJUZ4 No.57414 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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My vote goes to Mark Antony
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Archie Gongerstock - Mon, 02 Apr 2018 04:32:29 EST ID:zPMk1XQv No.57420 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Gaiseric, King of the Vandals and Alans in the 5th century
>gets passed over for the crown cause he's a bastard, kills his baby halfbrother and gets away with it
>get crippled and can't ride horses anymore, acquires boats
>gets fucked with in Hispania, conquers everything from Mauretania to Carthage with the most ragass army of the Germans in Europe
>the Byzantines kiss his ass already, kicks the shit out of them anyways
>fucks with the entire empire out of Carthage of all places, when it gets attacked he defends his capital with a couple broken boats and wins
>the Byzantines kiss his ass again and name him foederatus like a bunch of kcmods
>scares the shit out of Flavius Aetius, the guy who broke Attila the Fucking Hun at Locus Mauriacus
>mutilates his daughter in law to try and get his son some Imperial kitty
>oh, did I forget to mention that he sacked fucking Rome? Gaiseric sacked fucking Rome
>has stinky whiskey poop gas all over the treasures of the Republic, Principate, and Dominate
>respect for cultural acheivements is for virgins like Alaric, who couldn't even land on Africa without dying of the sniffles
>dies peacefully in his own bed, unlike virtually everyone else around him, who he outlived
>>
Sophie Migglechire - Mon, 02 Apr 2018 18:43:03 EST ID:rbK+gS1r No.57424 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57420
I was like "Dude, Gaiseric is a fictional character from the manga Berzerk", but then I looked it up and this guy was a real barbarian king.
>>
Ebenezer Sillerhock - Tue, 03 Apr 2018 01:03:53 EST ID:zPMk1XQv No.57425 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>57424
Yeah, I got really sad when I tried to pick up a picture of him for my post and all duckduckgo gave me was excerpts from the manga. I imagine Medieval poetic epic fans feel the same when they look up Astolfo and drown in lewd femboi goodness.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astolfo
>>
Hedda Dreddlewag - Tue, 03 Apr 2018 12:21:56 EST ID:2kVQJUZ4 No.57426 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>57425
Oh my god I'm so fucking sick of Astolfo
>>
Angus Boblingridge - Wed, 04 Apr 2018 07:30:10 EST ID:zPMk1XQv No.57429 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>57426
Yeah he kind of has become the meme husbando of choice for fashionable bisexuals and other irritants. I like him, he's so very cute and bubbly, but not unlike with Heath Ledger's Joker back in the day, I have to keep a wide berth so I don't get swallowed up by the cancer.

Back on topic, though, I'd also like to nominate Ted Bundy.
>grows up in a home with an abusive, racist grandfather and a grandmother that gets shock treatment monthly or so for depression
>is told that his mother is his sister, figures out that this is bullshit on his own
>ends up rich and successful anyways
>some girl breaks his heart
>he gets a new girlfriend, cheats on her with the old one, winning back the old gf's love just so he can then break her heart and laugh about it
>can get any woman he wants
>abducts, rapes, tortures, and murders them anyways
>in jail as a murder suspect
>fucking escapes, could have laid low and gone free, just goes around murdering people anyways
>final murder trial is going well, he might just get off scot-free somehow
>shithouses the whole deal anyways
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ISIS Status Update by Vulvarin Trembling - Thu, 14 May 2015 09:42:52 EST ID:q6QF5w+I No.55391 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Even as a pacifist I hope ISIS gets wiped off the earth.
Let all Bullets and Bombs rain down on these deranged religiots.

What's the status actually?
Are they still in control of large areas?
How much is left of them?
When will they be defeated?
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Polly Pittwell - Tue, 07 Nov 2017 10:09:33 EST ID:IPTSCini No.57295 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56677
They was some exmilitary christian crusader folks who went to fight with the PKK but left when they found out they were socialists.

Did Isis ever find a new source of income? Last I heard they basically ran out of banks to rob, but this was years ago.
>>
Shitting Henningshaw - Mon, 22 Jan 2018 23:17:29 EST ID:bYbZAxnz No.57353 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>57282
>Kurds kicked Daeshs ass
>Germany sells tanks to the turks
>Turks shooting the Kurds now
>>
Edwin Doggleridge - Tue, 30 Jan 2018 19:07:04 EST ID:dUHNnmI0 No.57356 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57353

I just had a realization that the Kurds are basically the new Poles. Turkey:Syria:US::UK:Russia:Germany
>>
Priscilla Murdbanks - Sat, 17 Mar 2018 10:49:36 EST ID:sYpKvVF0 No.57404 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Looks like its gone South for the Kurds in Afrin with the Turkish army offensive. Meanwhile ISIS have re-emerged in Iraq and have been in conflict with the Kurds in recent weeks.
>>
Phyllis Brookville - Tue, 20 Mar 2018 19:30:47 EST ID:/mZfItc6 No.57405 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57404

yeah, poor kurd-bros got fucked in afrin by erdoganistan


Civilization of the Month by Charlemagne !PXhMv3keyc - Tue, 09 Jan 2018 16:21:24 EST ID:7moSACzs No.57339 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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In preparation for going back to school (and to hopefully bolster some discussion on this nice but very slow board) I'm gonna try this thread format. Each month, assuming I don't get lazy and drop this, I'm gonna post a big thing about a civilization, culture, or political entity. I'm gonna try to avoid obvious topics like Egypt or Rome, and focus on stuff people may not have heard of as much. In an ideal world you guys will join in and discuss the peoples and cultures herein, suggest new topics, or correct me if and when I mess up.

That said, it seems fair to me to start with the beginning. This month's Civilization of the Month is Sumer.

"Sumer" as a name comes to us from their Akkadian neighbors/occasional rulers, who called them Shumer. The Sumerians called themselves "ùĝ saĝ gíg ga", meaning "The black-headed people", a name we learned from the cuneiform tablets they wrote on. Unfortunately, we do not actually know what "Shumer" means; when looking (or, more appropriately, glancing) into it, I pretty much just found academic flamewars.

The Sumerian people seem to have been in the area of modern day Iraq since at least 6500 BC, and continued to do their thing until the second millennium BC. Then they were conquered by the Amorites, who in turn were conquered by the Assyrians. However, their cultural impression was lasting, and Assyrian kings would continue to refer to themselves as "King of Sumer and Akkad" for centuries.

The earliest archaeological site we have for the area is called Tell el-'Oueli. A tell, from Arabic tal, meaning hill or mound, is a giant pile of trash from generations of people living on the same spot. This site consists of two thousand years of the Ubaid period (6500-4000 BC), and is characterized by the style of clay painted pottery, unwalled villages of mud brick houses, and tools (mainly sickles) made of clay usually, though occasionally stone or metal. During this time irrigated agriculture, use of the plow, and sailing were developed, and an egalitarian society became more stratified as a noble chieftain class developed as communities became much bigger than your standard village.

Eventually, pottery became produced more efficiently and trade flourished along the rivers of the Fertile Crescent, which led to the rise of the first cities. This period, named Uruk for the biggest one of the time, lasted from 4100 BC to 2900 BC. Uruk was created when two Ubaid villages grew into each other, and during this period became the most populated city in the world, surpassing 50k inhabitants. Cities during this period were centered around a large temple (two in Uruk's case, at the centers of the towns it grew from) and were ruled theocratically by priest-kings (called ensi). Slavery begins to see heavy use.

In 2900 BC we enter the early dynastic period (2900-2270 BC). Around the beginning of this time the wall around Uruk was built, spanning 9km. We see a split from the priest-king system to a relatively secular ruler (still claiming divine right to rule, as kings will), and a council of elder priests. In 2700 writing began to form out of pictographs, and things like clay tokens were used in accounting. At first, cities were separate entities that can't really project force terribly far. However, any towns around a big city were obviously going to have a hard time, and we actually see towns outright disappear as the cities absorb their populations. Around 2500 BC a king from the city of Lagash named Eannatum conquered the area we now think of as Sumer, creating one of the first empires. However, it fell apart after his death. Two centuries later a king named Lugal-zage-si did something similar, and reigned for fifteen years or so until the Akkadians conquered Sumer.

In 2270, the son of a cup-bearer for a Sumerian king (a social position of high standing and trust, I'll note) named Sargon rose to power, conquered Lugal-zage-di's realm, and led him to his hometown of Akkad in stocks. He went on to carve out an empire stretching nearly from the Red Sea to the Mediterranean. His empire would last until 2147, when a nomadic tribe called the Guti overran the place to a degree that the infrastructure couldn't handle. The empire collapsed, and minor city-states made their return.
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Charlemagne !PXhMv3keyc - Sat, 03 Mar 2018 13:39:45 EST ID:SDfSRyX/ No.57398 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57397
>>57341
Ancient Iraq by George Roux seems to be the standard text on the subject. It was written in like the 60's though so it may be getting a bit dated.
>>
Polly Gippertodge - Mon, 05 Mar 2018 22:53:04 EST ID:yKb3KU3b No.57399 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>57390

that was a very educational read. i know little of history. RIP Phoenicia. thank you OP for this excellent thread and please continue in your work i will remain a reader for sure
>>
Jack Clayhood - Wed, 14 Mar 2018 20:25:20 EST ID:Q7nozEwK No.57400 Ignore Report Quick Reply
OP is a god-king
>>
Hannah Fanway - Fri, 16 Mar 2018 01:33:18 EST ID:zPMk1XQv No.57403 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57400
Charlemagne-lugal
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Fucking Buzzville - Sat, 31 Mar 2018 23:14:33 EST ID:H9z/rL/N No.57418 Ignore Report Quick Reply
It's okay Chuck. I know how much work goes into this. nb.


The Oil Industry by Frederick Blaggleham - Sun, 19 Nov 2017 15:40:04 EST ID:8P+TfceH No.57305 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Easily one of the most influential shadow histories in global economics.

Why isn't it talked about more in schools?

Wars have been decided and aimed at the acquiring this black gold.

/his/ Discord for General History - Just started back up again, join if interested
https://discord.gg/sf9tYGd
>>
Ernest Sublingchork - Sun, 18 Feb 2018 07:33:50 EST ID:ZDNGCe0G No.57381 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Daniel Yergin, The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money, and Power
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n1stQW6i1Ko

Perhaps a good starting point? I enjoyed the documentary series.
>>
Nicholas Tillingford - Sun, 18 Feb 2018 07:55:30 EST ID:QXkOojeI No.57382 Ignore Report Quick Reply
most people are under the illusion of nationalism, with a hint of tribemind us vs. them, good guys vs. bad guys thinking
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Caroline Murdson - Thu, 15 Mar 2018 16:49:12 EST ID:gGfsSn/q No.57402 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57305
It's not taught in schools because then there's a whole other list of things that should be talked about, like the way the middle East was mapped and forced to comply to those borders, and how THAT was based on the division of Africa and the ability to exploit other resources. And how THAT was allowable because of the leadership that was in charge of WWI and WWII, our deified governmental leaders who were, at best, period socially liberal and radically so but today were still astoundingly openly racist. And THEN you have to talk about...
See how this is going? This doesn't happen because, no snit, there's a school that no limits historybeing truly taught in public schools, and showing people for their entire persons and not just the neat stuff you can talk about at the soda shop with B&V. I mean, it makes for boring discourse ALLL. THROUGH. LIFE. But it also means others can... feel better? I dunno.


Was Jesus an Iron Age cult leader? by Doris Fuckingson - Thu, 13 Jul 2017 16:42:44 EST ID:6FQAmMFX No.57218 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Hi all (Before I start quick disclosure: I am an atheist but I am here to have an honest discussion and am not here to troll and offend anyone.)

When i read the account of Christ and I read it as a myth that was meant to be examined as testimony I imagine that instead of reading a book Luke, John, or Matthew are at the bar just telling me a story about some guy they knew. This is what a testimony is after all: a story someone tells you. If a book is written in the format of a testimony thus you must not necessarily believe the narrator at all times. Sometimes you can assume that he is lying or exaggerating things just like a stranger telling you a story at a bar would. (Sorry for the long intro but it will help the rest of this make sense... hopefully) So following this logic and using its lens to examine the bible I make 3 assumptions as I read the accounts of Christs life.

1 - Jesus is not divine and has no special powers. (ex. I've never seen a dude walk on water why would I believe a testimony that says someone saw someone do it somewhere.)

2 - No one else has special powers everyone is a human limited by the knowledge and culture of Iron Age Middle East.

3 - Jesus is corruptible just like every other person.

Now with all this in play as I go through the bible I hear a story about a Iron age Rabbi that ran an organization with lots of hall marks of a cult like abandoning families to follow a holy teacher, giving up wealth, and dedicating one entire life soul, body, and mind to the holy teacher. Further this holy teacher showed them a bunch of cheap parlor tricks. The holy teacher was so narcissistic and egocentric that anytime anything other then him comes up he tells you how unimportant it is compared to him and tells you to give up everything just to worship him and serve him.

Further he is reckless and his delusions of grandeur like thinking he is himself a god as well as his corrupt nature like soaking himself in a years wages worth of perfume in one sitting in front of a bunch of people who gave everything up to obey and follow him. The picture is clear. I do not see a wise and loving guy. I see Charles Manson or Marshall Applewhite.

Again, I am not here trying to offend anyone, I am just trying to honestly explain my thought process. Now that I explained my thoughts, what I really want to ask is what are yours? How do you read the bible? How do you see Jesus? What do you think were his motivations and aspirations? And most importantly why do you believe these things.
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Frederick Blobblewill - Mon, 19 Feb 2018 11:39:45 EST ID:vZXg7z/l No.57386 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57285
the vatican has a giant disclosed library full of books hidden from the public, perhaps that's where they keep those books
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Martin Funninghall - Tue, 20 Feb 2018 18:14:26 EST ID:rbK+gS1r No.57388 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57386
The Vatican's forbidden books are in my opinion probably books written by cult leaders throughout the ages (I imagine it holds Cathar books for example), and just gnostic or mystic christian books in general.
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Hannah Hecklewell - Tue, 27 Feb 2018 08:15:23 EST ID:tzC97MoX No.57391 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57218

i think OP you're being slightly harsh on jesus here, not way off, just reading some sinister intentions in to what may have been genuine philosophy, misguided or not.

first of all Jesus may not have ever claimed to be capable of miracles. For instance take the fish and bread that fed too many people, maybe in real life, Jesus convinced a large number of very hungry people to share a relatively small amount of food and everybody ended up with some. That might constitute a "miracle" in some sense, it would be the kind of thing that would make you respect the charisma and authority of somebody, without it being actually supernatural. And then 5-8 generations and 100-200 years later when the gospels were written (just ball parking here) the story had morphed into full miracles

pretty much all of the miracles i could find in the gospels could be explained in similar ways, turning the water to wine could be done in a similar way to the fish and bread, maybe he was just good at planning parties in an era where most parties ended up with physical altercations over the wine. as for raising people from the dead i dont recall him ever raising anybody who wasnt recently deceased and ancient medical knowledge wasnt that good, maybe some poor souls werent really dead and had a brief bit of awareness when jesus happened to come through and bless them

so i dont think the miracles thing is necessarily evidence that Jesus was deceiving his disciples.

as far as asking that his followers abandon family and possessions, there's no doubt this is a hallmark of cult behavior, however, i think there's a difference between deceptive narcisissitic cults and genuinely deluded cults, like the difference between charles manson's cult and mormonism

maybe jesus really truly believed his followers would achieve the highest truth, morality, etc by giving up everything and following him, he would not be even remotely alone in thinking this way, its basically the story of like every ancient buddhist/eastern spiritual leader

this applies to the fact that he focuses everything on himself too, if he really thought he had discovered the secrets of the universe, then it would only be right for everybody to drop everything and listen to him, and maybe he really thought there was no better use for a ton of expensive perfume than to make some cryptic philophical point (i actually dont remember what the perfume thing was about)
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Edwin Tootbury - Sat, 24 Mar 2018 12:34:56 EST ID:PmmRJlWL No.57411 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57388
If true, it'd be pointless to keep them so secret. Nobody cares about dualism in 2018. There's plenty enough Gnostic texts out there to piece together what they believed. All they'd be doing is hindering the progress of archaeology. Would you not want to provide evidence of the success of your past conquests?

No, I suspect the texts in that library are far more 'foundational' than heretical.
>>
Walter Hillerhood - Wed, 04 Apr 2018 17:05:55 EST ID:IlyKIasb No.57430 Ignore Report Quick Reply
OP's observation is neither new nor particularly unique btw.

>>57250
As Simon bar Kokhba, but he is not remembered like Jesus was because his followers blew their load fast.

It is better to say that Hellenistic age Judaism fostered both messianic and proselytic tendencies that manifested in a diverse set of cultic beliefs based on individual spiritual leaders, of which Christianity was one and the birth of Gnosticism is likely tied into this process where regional communities could have significant sway over scriptural interpretation.

In other words, Judaism by the 1st century AD was rapidly diversifying as a congregation far away from Herod's Temple. This was the beginning of the diaspora, and in the beginning, it was fueled by converts. Modern Judaism discourages converts, but the Maccabees readily encouraged the conversion of gentiles to ward off centuries of depopulation in Judea proper. There were dense populations in Alexandria and Cyprus, Greece, Syria, and Rome itself. They were not active in banking, which was predominately dominated by established Latin or Greek banking charters that had evolved from the temple lending system of Archaic times.

In this context, much like you can trace evolutionary ancestors back by comparing structural similarities, the birth of Christianity becomes quite clear.


Medieval Japan by Alice Nangermure - Tue, 28 Oct 2014 02:55:10 EST ID:GZTV3220 No.54171 Locked Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Japan's history has always interested me, in fact feudal Japan or Sengoku Japan is what got me into history in the first place. I know it's over played and anime and weaboos have kinda ruined Japan's reputation. But, aside from all that, japan in the Sengoku era was extremely bloody and treacherous. Wars were constantly being fought, enemy armies just a few miles away from you being on such a small island. It was quite war torn. It was much like medieval Europe, just more violent compared to how small the country is and how many battles and wars were fought in such a short time. Their culture and warrior class was extremely sophisticated and unique. It might not be the most powerful or most influential in the world, but the civilizations before the western ideology conquered wer extremely unique and quute different than the rest of the world. You could say that before the west spread Iit's influence, Japan was a pretty mysterious place. It's quite fun to study if you ask me.

Inb4: I'm not some weaboo
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Cedric Lightway - Thu, 03 Sep 2015 12:33:21 EST ID:b0Z6XbnQ No.56078 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54171

How was it more violent than the islands of the UK?
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Cornelius Fillyfuck - Fri, 04 Sep 2015 08:15:45 EST ID:MRc/EBe+ No.56082 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54172
That's a fantastic In Our Time episode, one of the best.
The other ones related to Japan are "Samurai" "Zen" and "Shinto", they are all pretty good.
>>56078
Look what went on between Scotland and England from about the 1400 onwards. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_battles_between_Scotland_and_England
Some boarder disputes and a war that lead to Scotland being ruled by England.
Meanwhile, In Japan https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Japanese_battles#Muromachi_Period
Constant warfare between a shitload of clans all the time.
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Matilda Goodhood - Sat, 05 Sep 2015 00:17:29 EST ID:b0Z6XbnQ No.56091 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56082

Should really place the european comparison a good 200years back though. The 1400s were the end of that age of europe and the hailing of the renaissance. Japan (and east asia in general) fell a bit behind in this period, due to political incompetence.
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Alice Blondlechone - Sat, 05 Sep 2015 19:05:41 EST ID:MRc/EBe+ No.56094 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56091
Political competence or constant warfare?
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A Wizard - Mon, 07 Sep 2015 14:43:14 EST ID:b0Z6XbnQ No.56104 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56094


They do go hand in hand I find, lol.


Suicide mode d emploi 1982 (Claude Guillon - Yves Le Bonniec) by Suicide mode d emploi 1982 (Claude Guillon - Yves Le Bonniec) request - Thu, 01 Feb 2018 17:56:31 EST ID:jTO7vV4p No.57358 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Does any1 know where to find this? Book in subject... It's a history book.
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Archie Hockledut - Thu, 01 Feb 2018 22:07:23 EST ID:vxn5xcv4 No.57359 Ignore Report Quick Reply
http://gen.lib.rus.ec/book/index.php?md5=EDDF9AAE52DE886D01360AEC85661A1F
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Suicide mode d emploi 1982 (Claude Guillon - Yves Le Bonniec) request - Sat, 03 Feb 2018 16:11:00 EST ID:jTO7vV4p No.57360 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57359
Thnx


Cults of St. George by Shitting Blackforth - Mon, 20 Nov 2017 22:42:40 EST ID:6GEx+/2g No.57307 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Does anyone have any resources or material on the history or doctrine of any of the cults of St. George that supposedly existed in the medieval times?

I've recently gotten into esoteric Christianity and the Legend of St. George and his martyrdom has great significance to me. I can't really find much on google.
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Edward Dartgold - Thu, 30 Nov 2017 20:41:12 EST ID:57IeChQg No.57314 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Neo-nationalist detected. Nothing is known about the actual historical figure. nb.
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David Bunman - Tue, 05 Dec 2017 17:54:09 EST ID:rbK+gS1r No.57321 Ignore Report Quick Reply
You mean there wasn't an actual historical figure. St. George is all fucking bogus bullshit. Probably just some retold Greek myth from the middle ages.
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Walter Worthingbury - Fri, 05 Jan 2018 04:32:37 EST ID:60BLApn7 No.57337 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57321
homeboy wasn't asking about the life of St. George, he was asking about cults of St. George in the Middle Ages. Chill out.
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Sidney Mablingfat - Sat, 13 Jan 2018 22:08:05 EST ID:TOP9kWlt No.57343 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57307
Do you have a general work on saints?
Something like: A Brief History of Saints (BLACKWELL BRIEF HISTORIES OF RELIGION), Lawrence S. Cunningham

Footnotes in there could be helpful for something specific on St. George.
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Oliver Bardwell - Wed, 17 Jan 2018 08:36:07 EST ID:dUHNnmI0 No.57344 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57314

kneejerk tribalist reactionary faggot with a superiority complex and poor reading comprehension detected. nb.


Abyssinia General by Lillian Briblingham - Mon, 13 Nov 2017 18:32:46 EST ID:MffvHEZt No.57300 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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It's obvious that most of African history is either lumped into one generalized plot line of "primitive city-states" pre colonialism, or overshadowed by Egypt or mostly ignored all together. I want to talk about the most overlooked empire/empires in Africa, and possibly the world.
As far back as D'mt, Axum and then Abyssinia, the nation-state that is now Ethiopia is a deeply ancient culture and history that has played major roles in world history, dating back thousands of years. Before we get bogged down into "starving Ethiopian" meme's, lets take a second to discuss Ethiopian history, and maybe share some ideas about why it might not ever be talked about in our "post-colonial" society.

Let's have at it!
1 posts and 1 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Hedda Wavingford - Tue, 14 Nov 2017 13:23:41 EST ID:MffvHEZt No.57303 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57302
I knew there has been ancient forms of Judaism practiced in Ethiopia for millenia, but I never knew it had it's own kingdom! super interesting

bump for more
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Shit Gengerridge - Mon, 27 Nov 2017 10:42:55 EST ID:kI8uAvwR No.57311 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>57302
>Black AND Jewish?
Ethiopia has a pretty unique history with all three Abrahamic religions from their earliest days. It's been home to Beta Israel since time immemorial, was one of the first official Christian states in the world, and provided shelter to Muhammad's persecuted early disciples during the First Hijarat. And this is after centuries of contact and cultural exchange with ancient Egypt, Felix Arabia, the Swahili Coast and the greater Indian Ocean trading network.

(((Abyssinia))) is one of the big unsung historical pillars of both the Western and Near Eastern traditions.
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Phineas Nabblepetch - Tue, 26 Dec 2017 20:04:39 EST ID:QMKnB+lX No.57331 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>57302
lol, I learned about these guys from EU IV.
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Charlemagne - Mon, 01 Jan 2018 13:26:17 EST ID:7moSACzs No.57334 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Ethiopian art is pretty interesting. It's got this almost anime style to it and of course you get Ethiopian Jesus. And their script is some fantasy shit, having been around since at least the first century AD, being descended from a Bronze Age Arabic script.
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Charlemagne - Mon, 01 Jan 2018 13:28:27 EST ID:7moSACzs No.57335 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Here's a pic of Ge'ez. Would have shared an alphabet table but then you don't really get a feel for what it looks like.


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