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420chan is Getting Overhauled - Changelog/Bug Report/Request Thread (Updated July 26)

Histories biggest Chad

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- Fri, 30 Mar 2018 21:26:22 EST 2kVQJUZ4 No.57414
File: 1522459582323.png -(71555B / 69.88KB, 220x166) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Histories biggest Chad
My vote goes to Mark Antony
3 posts omitted. Click View Thread to read.
>>
Ebenezer Sillerhock - Tue, 03 Apr 2018 01:03:53 EST zPMk1XQv No.57425 Reply
1522731833942.jpg -(105324B / 102.86KB, 488x640) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>57424
Yeah, I got really sad when I tried to pick up a picture of him for my post and all duckduckgo gave me was excerpts from the manga. I imagine Medieval poetic epic fans feel the same when they look up Astolfo and drown in lewd femboi goodness.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astolfo
>>
Hedda Dreddlewag - Tue, 03 Apr 2018 12:21:56 EST 2kVQJUZ4 No.57426 Reply
1522772516232.png -(683658B / 667.63KB, 1080x791) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>57425
Oh my god I'm so fucking sick of Astolfo
>>
Angus Boblingridge - Wed, 04 Apr 2018 07:30:10 EST zPMk1XQv No.57429 Reply
1522841410296.jpg -(38212B / 37.32KB, 600x466) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>57426
Yeah he kind of has become the meme husbando of choice for fashionable bisexuals and other irritants. I like him, he's so very cute and bubbly, but not unlike with Heath Ledger's Joker back in the day, I have to keep a wide berth so I don't get swallowed up by the cancer.

Back on topic, though, I'd also like to nominate Ted Bundy.
>grows up in a home with an abusive, racist grandfather and a grandmother that gets shock treatment monthly or so for depression
>is told that his mother is his sister, figures out that this is bullshit on his own
>ends up rich and successful anyways
>some girl breaks his heart
>he gets a new girlfriend, cheats on her with the old one, winning back the old gf's love just so he can then break her heart and laugh about it
>can get any woman he wants
>abducts, rapes, tortures, and murders them anyways
>in jail as a murder suspect
>fucking escapes, could have laid low and gone free, just goes around murdering people anyways
>final murder trial is going well, he might just get off scot-free somehow
>shithouses the whole deal anyways
>about to get executed
>blames it all on true crime comics and porn just to piss everyone off one last time

Truly an inspirational underdog story for the modern age.

ISIS Status Update

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- Thu, 14 May 2015 09:42:52 EST q6QF5w+I No.55391
File: 1431610972442.png -(687368B / 671.26KB, 763x512) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. ISIS Status Update
Even as a pacifist I hope ISIS gets wiped off the earth.
Let all Bullets and Bombs rain down on these deranged religiots.

What's the status actually?
Are they still in control of large areas?
How much is left of them?
When will they be defeated?
154 posts and 34 images omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Edwin Doggleridge - Tue, 30 Jan 2018 19:07:04 EST dUHNnmI0 No.57356 Reply
>>57353

I just had a realization that the Kurds are basically the new Poles. Turkey:Syria:US::UK:Russia:Germany
>>
Priscilla Murdbanks - Sat, 17 Mar 2018 10:49:36 EST sYpKvVF0 No.57404 Reply
Looks like its gone South for the Kurds in Afrin with the Turkish army offensive. Meanwhile ISIS have re-emerged in Iraq and have been in conflict with the Kurds in recent weeks.
>>
Phyllis Brookville - Tue, 20 Mar 2018 19:30:47 EST /mZfItc6 No.57405 Reply
>>57404

yeah, poor kurd-bros got fucked in afrin by erdoganistan

The Oil Industry

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- Sun, 19 Nov 2017 15:40:04 EST 8P+TfceH No.57305
File: 1511124004231.jpg -(93473B / 91.28KB, 912x513) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. The Oil Industry
Easily one of the most influential shadow histories in global economics.

Why isn't it talked about more in schools?

Wars have been decided and aimed at the acquiring this black gold.

/his/ Discord for General History - Just started back up again, join if interested
https://discord.gg/KNzz9Wk
>>
Nicholas Tillingford - Sun, 18 Feb 2018 07:55:30 EST QXkOojeI No.57382 Reply
most people are under the illusion of nationalism, with a hint of tribemind us vs. them, good guys vs. bad guys thinking
>>
Caroline Murdson - Thu, 15 Mar 2018 16:49:12 EST gGfsSn/q No.57402 Reply
>>57305
It's not taught in schools because then there's a whole other list of things that should be talked about, like the way the middle East was mapped and forced to comply to those borders, and how THAT was based on the division of Africa and the ability to exploit other resources. And how THAT was allowable because of the leadership that was in charge of WWI and WWII, our deified governmental leaders who were, at best, period socially liberal and radically so but today were still astoundingly openly racist. And THEN you have to talk about...
See how this is going? This doesn't happen because, no snit, there's a school that no limits historybeing truly taught in public schools, and showing people for their entire persons and not just the neat stuff you can talk about at the soda shop with B&V. I mean, it makes for boring discourse ALLL. THROUGH. LIFE. But it also means others can... feel better? I dunno.

Was Jesus an Iron Age cult leader?

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- Thu, 13 Jul 2017 16:42:44 EST 6FQAmMFX No.57218
File: 1499978564344.jpg -(239294B / 233.69KB, 1280x720) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Was Jesus an Iron Age cult leader?
Hi all (Before I start quick disclosure: I am an atheist but I am here to have an honest discussion and am not here to troll and offend anyone.)

When i read the account of Christ and I read it as a myth that was meant to be examined as testimony I imagine that instead of reading a book Luke, John, or Matthew are at the bar just telling me a story about some guy they knew. This is what a testimony is after all: a story someone tells you. If a book is written in the format of a testimony thus you must not necessarily believe the narrator at all times. Sometimes you can assume that he is lying or exaggerating things just like a stranger telling you a story at a bar would. (Sorry for the long intro but it will help the rest of this make sense... hopefully) So following this logic and using its lens to examine the bible I make 3 assumptions as I read the accounts of Christs life.

1 - Jesus is not divine and has no special powers. (ex. I've never seen a dude walk on water why would I believe a testimony that says someone saw someone do it somewhere.)

2 - No one else has special powers everyone is a human limited by the knowledge and culture of Iron Age Middle East.

3 - Jesus is corruptible just like every other person.

Now with all this in play as I go through the bible I hear a story about a Iron age Rabbi that ran an organization with lots of hall marks of a cult like abandoning families to follow a holy teacher, giving up wealth, and dedicating one entire life soul, body, and mind to the holy teacher. Further this holy teacher showed them a bunch of cheap parlor tricks. The holy teacher was so narcissistic and egocentric that anytime anything other then him comes up he tells you how unimportant it is compared to him and tells you to give up everything just to worship him and serve him.

Further he is reckless and his delusions of grandeur like thinking he is himself a god as well as his corrupt nature like soaking himself in a years wages worth of perfume in one sitting in front of a bunch of people who gave everything up to obey and follow him. The picture is clear. I do not see a wise and loving guy. I see Charles Manson or Marshall Applewhite.

Again, I am not here trying to offend anyone, I am just trying to honestly explain my thought process. Now that I explained my thoughts, what I really want to ask is what are yours? How do you read the bible? How do you see Jesus? What do you think were his motivations and aspirations? And most importantly why do you believe these things.

My analysis lead me to make this documentary about the life of Christ where I go into detail and develop my thesis from birth to crucifixion. If you care for such a thing here is a link.
https://www.youtube.com...
(I will warn because it is based on the biblical account of the life of Jesus there is explicit content that is violent and sexual in nature in some parts of his life's account.)
15 posts omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Hannah Hecklewell - Tue, 27 Feb 2018 08:15:23 EST tzC97MoX No.57391 Reply
>>57218

i think OP you're being slightly harsh on jesus here, not way off, just reading some sinister intentions in to what may have been genuine philosophy, misguided or not.

first of all Jesus may not have ever claimed to be capable of miracles. For instance take the fish and bread that fed too many people, maybe in real life, Jesus convinced a large number of very hungry people to share a relatively small amount of food and everybody ended up with some. That might constitute a "miracle" in some sense, it would be the kind of thing that would make you respect the charisma and authority of somebody, without it being actually supernatural. And then 5-8 generations and 100-200 years later when the gospels were written (just ball parking here) the story had morphed into full miracles

pretty much all of the miracles i could find in the gospels could be explained in similar ways, turning the water to wine could be done in a similar way to the fish and bread, maybe he was just good at planning parties in an era where most parties ended up with physical altercations over the wine. as for raising people from the dead i dont recall him ever raising anybody who wasnt recently deceased and ancient medical knowledge wasnt that good, maybe some poor souls werent really dead and had a brief bit of awareness when jesus happened to come through and bless them

so i dont think the miracles thing is necessarily evidence that Jesus was deceiving his disciples.

as far as asking that his followers abandon family and possessions, there's no doubt this is a hallmark of cult behavior, however, i think there's a difference between deceptive narcisissitic cults and genuinely deluded cults, like the difference between charles manson's cult and mormonism

maybe jesus really truly believed his followers would achieve the highest truth, morality, etc by giving up everything and following him, he would not be even remotely alone in thinking this way, its basically the story of like every ancient buddhist/eastern spiritual leader

this applies to the fact that he focuses everything on himself too, if he really thought he had discovered the secrets of the universe, then it would only be right for everybody to drop everything and listen to him, and maybe he really thought there was no better use for a ton of expensive perfume than to make some cryptic philophical point (i actually dont remember what the perfume thing was about)

so to summarize, i definitely agree he was a cult leader, but im not so sure he was a manipulative guy, when his story is not so different from tons of other earnest spiritual leaders throughout history
>>
Edwin Tootbury - Sat, 24 Mar 2018 12:34:56 EST PmmRJlWL No.57411 Reply
>>57388
If true, it'd be pointless to keep them so secret. Nobody cares about dualism in 2018. There's plenty enough Gnostic texts out there to piece together what they believed. All they'd be doing is hindering the progress of archaeology. Would you not want to provide evidence of the success of your past conquests?

No, I suspect the texts in that library are far more 'foundational' than heretical.
>>
Walter Hillerhood - Wed, 04 Apr 2018 17:05:55 EST IlyKIasb No.57430 Reply
OP's observation is neither new nor particularly unique btw.

>>57250
As Simon bar Kokhba, but he is not remembered like Jesus was because his followers blew their load fast.

It is better to say that Hellenistic age Judaism fostered both messianic and proselytic tendencies that manifested in a diverse set of cultic beliefs based on individual spiritual leaders, of which Christianity was one and the birth of Gnosticism is likely tied into this process where regional communities could have significant sway over scriptural interpretation.

In other words, Judaism by the 1st century AD was rapidly diversifying as a congregation far away from Herod's Temple. This was the beginning of the diaspora, and in the beginning, it was fueled by converts. Modern Judaism discourages converts, but the Maccabees readily encouraged the conversion of gentiles to ward off centuries of depopulation in Judea proper. There were dense populations in Alexandria and Cyprus, Greece, Syria, and Rome itself. They were not active in banking, which was predominately dominated by established Latin or Greek banking charters that had evolved from the temple lending system of Archaic times.

In this context, much like you can trace evolutionary ancestors back by comparing structural similarities, the birth of Christianity becomes quite clear.

Medieval Japan

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- Tue, 28 Oct 2014 02:55:10 EST GZTV3220 No.54171
File: 1414479310402.png -(74468B / 72.72KB, 273x240) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Medieval Japan
Japan's history has always interested me, in fact feudal Japan or Sengoku Japan is what got me into history in the first place. I know it's over played and anime and weaboos have kinda ruined Japan's reputation. But, aside from all that, japan in the Sengoku era was extremely bloody and treacherous. Wars were constantly being fought, enemy armies just a few miles away from you being on such a small island. It was quite war torn. It was much like medieval Europe, just more violent compared to how small the country is and how many battles and wars were fought in such a short time. Their culture and warrior class was extremely sophisticated and unique. It might not be the most powerful or most influential in the world, but the civilizations before the western ideology conquered wer extremely unique and quute different than the rest of the world. You could say that before the west spread Iit's influence, Japan was a pretty mysterious place. It's quite fun to study if you ask me.

Inb4: I'm not some weaboo
10 posts omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Matilda Goodhood - Sat, 05 Sep 2015 00:17:29 EST b0Z6XbnQ No.56091 Reply
>>56082

Should really place the european comparison a good 200years back though. The 1400s were the end of that age of europe and the hailing of the renaissance. Japan (and east asia in general) fell a bit behind in this period, due to political incompetence.

Suicide mode d emploi 1982 (Claude Guillon - Yves Le Bonniec)

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- Thu, 01 Feb 2018 17:56:31 EST jTO7vV4p No.57358
File: 1517525791877.jpg -(58697B / 57.32KB, 960x726) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Suicide mode d emploi 1982 (Claude Guillon - Yves Le Bonniec)
Does any1 know where to find this? Book in subject... It's a history book.
>>
Suicide mode d emploi 1982 (Claude Guillon - Yves Le Bonniec) request - Sat, 03 Feb 2018 16:11:00 EST jTO7vV4p No.57360 Reply
>>57359
Thnx

Cults of St. George

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- Mon, 20 Nov 2017 22:42:40 EST 6GEx+/2g No.57307
File: 1511235760178.jpg -(240601B / 234.96KB, 1600x1200) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Cults of St. George
Does anyone have any resources or material on the history or doctrine of any of the cults of St. George that supposedly existed in the medieval times?

I've recently gotten into esoteric Christianity and the Legend of St. George and his martyrdom has great significance to me. I can't really find much on google.
2 posts omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Walter Worthingbury - Fri, 05 Jan 2018 04:32:37 EST 60BLApn7 No.57337 Reply
>>57321
homeboy wasn't asking about the life of St. George, he was asking about cults of St. George in the Middle Ages. Chill out.
>>
Sidney Mablingfat - Sat, 13 Jan 2018 22:08:05 EST TOP9kWlt No.57343 Reply
>>57307
Do you have a general work on saints?
Something like: A Brief History of Saints (BLACKWELL BRIEF HISTORIES OF RELIGION), Lawrence S. Cunningham

Footnotes in there could be helpful for something specific on St. George.
>>
Oliver Bardwell - Wed, 17 Jan 2018 08:36:07 EST dUHNnmI0 No.57344 Reply
>>57314

kneejerk tribalist reactionary faggot with a superiority complex and poor reading comprehension detected. nb.

Abyssinia General

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- Mon, 13 Nov 2017 18:32:46 EST MffvHEZt No.57300
File: 1510615966986.jpg -(2205284B / 2.10MB, 2372x3057) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Abyssinia General
It's obvious that most of African history is either lumped into one generalized plot line of "primitive city-states" pre colonialism, or overshadowed by Egypt or mostly ignored all together. I want to talk about the most overlooked empire/empires in Africa, and possibly the world.
As far back as D'mt, Axum and then Abyssinia, the nation-state that is now Ethiopia is a deeply ancient culture and history that has played major roles in world history, dating back thousands of years. Before we get bogged down into "starving Ethiopian" meme's, lets take a second to discuss Ethiopian history, and maybe share some ideas about why it might not ever be talked about in our "post-colonial" society.

Let's have at it!
4 posts and 2 images omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Charlemagne - Mon, 01 Jan 2018 13:26:17 EST 7moSACzs No.57334 Reply
1514831177246.jpg -(1484013B / 1.42MB, 2542x1524) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
Ethiopian art is pretty interesting. It's got this almost anime style to it and of course you get Ethiopian Jesus. And their script is some fantasy shit, having been around since at least the first century AD, being descended from a Bronze Age Arabic script.
>>
Charlemagne - Mon, 01 Jan 2018 13:28:27 EST 7moSACzs No.57335 Reply
1514831307607.jpg -(157806B / 154.11KB, 490x328) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
Here's a pic of Ge'ez. Would have shared an alphabet table but then you don't really get a feel for what it looks like.


History repeating itself.

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- Tue, 25 Aug 2015 20:46:20 EST mwxNDmgT No.56026
File: 1440549980871.jpg -(647807B / 632.62KB, 1920x1200) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. History repeating itself.
What can we see from past events in history, that can help us piece together the major events of tomorrow?
20 posts and 1 images omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Sophie Gammlesore - Sat, 28 Oct 2017 01:41:33 EST 1oNFPI90 No.57286 Reply
1509169293941.jpg -(36046B / 35.20KB, 590x350) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
Mummys, bitches.
>>
Ebenezer Wugglebig - Wed, 01 Nov 2017 16:31:44 EST /EK+cIBP No.57293 Reply
>>56026
I got one OP. Those new declassified military docs from the CIA that suggest planting bombs in urban centers and staging shootings to frame Cuba as hostile terrorists might give us some insight into modern terrorism and its ultimate motivations and sources.

If you haven't seen the docs, they're covered here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eRdHKn8lULk
>>
John Wuffingnet - Thu, 09 Nov 2017 08:42:06 EST rbK+gS1r No.57296 Reply
>>57293
I doubt that the CIA was directly involved in the creation of modern islamic terrorism, but it's important to remember that Osama bin Laden was trained by the CIA to fight communists using guerilla tactics, so Osama probably just took those plans and lessons and simply applied them to killing American citizens after the Soviet Union fell.

Prechristian germany

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- Sat, 07 Oct 2017 13:17:05 EST BrfXiFVX No.57269
File: 1507396625056.jpg -(363165B / 354.65KB, 1024x961) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Prechristian germany
I'd like to learn more about the Germanic regions before christianism. Any suggestions? Cool facts?
3 posts omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Albert Brenkinridge - Sat, 14 Oct 2017 20:54:02 EST G431o8lC No.57278 Reply
>Did the greek have a lot of influence on the more north-eastern parts of europe?

No. A few Greco-Roman dieties show up in inscriptions around the Rhine. Heracles perhaps more than any other figure shows up all over the place. Consider this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hercules%27_Club_(amulet)

As influence goes it's trivial. Germans migrating into Roman territory are another story. They were Romanized to varying degrees with some of the nobility learning Greek.
>>
Basil Tootham - Tue, 17 Oct 2017 10:44:01 EST lE3doHR2 No.57280 Reply
>>57277
It's more that the Roman's, in their histories, identified foreign deities with their own Roman figured. Mercury, or Hermes, the psychopomp was equated with Odin, iirc. Hercules would probably have been equated with Thor or a Baldr type figure.

This syncretic identification was by no means unique to the Romans, at any rate.
>>
Edwin Tootbury - Sat, 24 Mar 2018 05:31:44 EST PmmRJlWL No.57410 Reply
>>57277
Well for starters, "Germania" was a concept invented by the Romans. It was used to categorize. Most of these peoples never considered themselves a unified "German" ethnicity much less a nation. That would come later, much later. In ancient Germania, the carrying capacity was much lower than modern times because the forest sod was too thick to cut by the ard plow which was common in such times. Most communities were semi-permanent, and migration constantly according to the seasons. They stuck to morrane valleys, circular areas surrounded by a high wall of rock and debris that were formed by the massive ice shelves of the last glacial period. These areas were treeless and their loose soil easily be cut by the ard, but they lacked in nutrient-rich topsoil. Thus, they were not good for consistent pasturage, and they could only support temporary communities. The thick old growth of the European Plain, now long gone, preempted efficient communications between tribal leaders.

Altogether, and it's not hard to see how radically life could differ from one village to the next based on all sorts of factors but primarily resource availability. Due to the constant migratory pattern, tribes blended into each other and became other tribes. It's the reason we see so many shifting names in the Roman record. Many tribes rose, competed with one another, and collapsed during the span of Rome. And it's hard to make generalizations over such a diverse people over centuries of time. Much of the ancient Germans was built to be temporary, and much of what constituted their cultures is now lost. Many tribes only adopted written languages for purposes beyond symbolism after the fall of Rome. This makes piecing together the intricacies of their culture beyond a limited set of runes not really designed to convey significant information difficult, to say the least. Most of what we know was written by Roman sources, or written after the Fall of Rome. Never do we see a first hand account of living amongst a Germanic tribe in any of this, only third-party accounts relayed to people like Tacitus, who has spawned a great deal of oft-repeated myths as a result of this.

Significant foreign excursions into Germania could trigger mass migrations that threatened the boundaries of the Empire. Scandinavian and Gothic migrations triggered the Marcomannic wars, the Hunnic wars lead to the collapse of the Western Empire itself in time. This belays how precarious life was for the peoples of ancient Germania. Displacement from the best sites was fatal. Food surpluses were thin. This made excursions into Rome for the purposes of securing resources and better land advantageous. Simple excursions for livestock or supplies turned into mass migrations very quickly. In the Marcomannic wars and during the Crisis, Roman willpower was still sufficient enough to halt them. In the later 4th and early 5th century, it was not.

Late medieval thread

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- Mon, 24 Apr 2017 17:01:04 EST aLFu7iIl No.57163
File: 1493067664811.jpg -(302917B / 295.82KB, 1000x485) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Late medieval thread
Does anyone have any good lectures, essays etc on the decline of knights as a class and the decline of feudalism in general?
Also, general late-medieval, renaissance thread.
13 posts and 1 images omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Charlemagne - Mon, 21 Aug 2017 13:58:25 EST 6zd51tsO No.57258 Reply
>>57254
The impact the plague had on medieval society is pretty crazy when you start looking into it. Entire noble estates are abandoned/wiped out and then claimed by whoever happens across it, art becomes morbid and twisted, population scarcity causes peasant strikes and revolts because labor is suddenly in major demand, and you get crazy stories like how a pope at the time spent years wrapped in layers of blankets between two fires because they thought heat dissuaded disease.

>>57257
>The crossbow is portrayed as a hunting weapon on fourPictish stonesfromearly medieval Scotland(6th to 9th centuries):St. Vigeans no. 1,Glenferness,Shandwick, andMeigle.[49]The use of crossbows in European warfare is again evident from theBattle of Hastingsuntil about the year 1500. They almost completely superseded hand bows in many European armies in the 12th century for a number of reasons.

From Hastings to the 12th century we're predominantly seeing chain and padding for armor. It was in regular use before the rise of plate armor in the late Middle Ages.
>>
Charlemagne - Mon, 21 Aug 2017 14:22:12 EST 6zd51tsO No.57259 Reply
>>57258
Disregard the crossbow bit, I'm an idiot and forgot what your original point was.
>>
Nigel Fanham - Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:51:06 EST bo3asBrW No.57265 Reply
>>57258

It showed me the one positive example about humanity. Towns became more independent and dirty farmers proved to be able to understand and create great works of culture, philosophy and politics within a few generations and without church support. Literally people who spend most of their time knee deep in mud evolved into great painters, architects and writers. We think humanity is constantly devolving but there are regrowing ressources that clearly don't rely on a genetic advance.

Worst battles in human history

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- Fri, 12 Feb 2016 07:46:23 EST CwlDQeu1 No.56482
File: 1455281183872.jpg -(127399B / 124.41KB, 800x614) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Worst battles in human history
I'm in a pretty soul crushing mood today and I've been thinking about the battle of Passchendaele. All factors considered is there a worse battlefield in human history? Will the world ever see such horrors, like those witnessed by the men in the general vicinity of Ypres during the war? 24 hour shelling, machinegun lines, snipers, chemical attacks and corpses everywhere? By comparison the highly mobile combat led in WW2 seems like a dream to me. Am I missing something?
37 posts and 1 images omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Ernest Hizzleham - Sat, 26 Aug 2017 14:51:00 EST Rv8hXdtD No.57262 Reply
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>>57255
I really enjoyed the movie, mainly because I kept laughing my ass off at ridiculous scenes like that.

Not sure that was the filmmakers' intention, though.
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George Piddlestone - Sun, 27 Aug 2017 01:31:18 EST PMeC+LId No.57263 Reply
>>56496

In that one example, carthage held out for seven fucking years, which would have been enough to defeat almost any other invading enemy, except the romans. The romans first asked for 10,000 talents, and when this was paid, asked them to give 300 noble hostages, and when this was done asked them to give up their weapons and they did so to keep peace, at which point the romans asked them to abandon the city to live in the hills, and then the carthaginians realized they had been tricked, now having to defend the city without weapons. I'd say they did pretty well considering. The romans burned them out house by house, much like the crushing of the warsaw uprising, it saves men to simply destroy rather than take.
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Matilda Cickleforth - Sat, 02 Sep 2017 19:43:37 EST i2pzJk0z No.57264 Reply
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>>57263

the 3rd punic war was the stuff of legends unseen ever again in the ancient world

the carthaginians actually dug a canal under the nose of the romans to create a new harbor and avoid the blockade, men swam in the ocean carrying torches to set roman ships on fire, carthaginian women used their own hair to create bow strings etc

after carthage fell, the character of the romans never recovered they fought barbarians and civil wars and slowly faded away

What if...?

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- Tue, 18 Jul 2017 01:26:19 EST Redgi3D4 No.57230
File: 1500355579902.jpg -(216281B / 211.21KB, 965x772) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. What if...?
So what if all modern wars suddenly had to be fought with swords and other pre gunpowder weaponry?

What would the military tactics be like? Would small groups of armed men run around as they do in modern war with guns or would we have to revert back to lining up in a field?

At first i thought it's obvious that we would adopt modern strategies and tactics but if an enemy decided to go for the line up in a field approach and just started marching toward whatever their target was (a city for example) small pockets of men would seem kind of pointless.

If someone can be bothered to waste time giving me some speculations, i'd be very interested to read. Also would be pretty interested in any examples of ancient armies doing operations that closely resemble modern strategies.
6 posts and 2 images omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Barnaby Cuckletedge - Tue, 08 Aug 2017 07:23:37 EST rbK+gS1r No.57245 Reply
>>57244
Durrr, of course, they work fine on shit like gambesons and naked skin/normal clothes too.
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Cyril Gindleshit - Wed, 09 Aug 2017 11:50:28 EST Redgi3D4 No.57246 Reply
>>57241
>I have an essay to write now.
Do it, please cover tactic and strategy differences
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Cyril Hucklespear - Thu, 10 Aug 2017 10:36:41 EST Redgi3D4 No.57247 Reply
On the topic of crossbows, i'm not sure what my rules allow for but if kevlar was allowed to stay then i'm guessing we'd have to go back to plate anyway. Last time i checked most blades would be able to get through kevlar and I assume crossbow bolts would be able to penetrate too.

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