Leave these fields empty (spam trap):
Name
You can leave this blank to post anonymously, or you can create a Tripcode by using the format Name#Password
Comment
[i]Italic Text[/i]
[b]Bold Text[/b]
[spoiler]Spoiler Text[/spoiler]
>Highlight/Quote Text
[pre]Preformatted & Monospace Text[/pre]
[super]Superset Text[/super]
[sub]Subset Text[/sub]
1. Numbered lists become ordered lists
* Bulleted lists become unordered lists
File

Sandwich


420chan is Getting Overhauled - Changelog/Bug Report/Request Thread (Updated July 26)

The Story of the World in Pictures, 1934

Reply
- Sat, 10 May 2014 13:18:16 EST XyVGo1SW No.52472
File: 1399742296962.jpg -(724456B / 707.48KB, 1536x2048) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. The Story of the World in Pictures, 1934
Hello /his/. When I was a teenager my grandfather gave me one of his books, 'The Story of the World in Pictures', published in 1934. It's full of photographs and covers the many natural wonders and cultures of the world, while also illustrating the technological progress and arts of the time. With the intent of preserving it I photographed every single page a few years ago (I don't own a scanner, I'm afraid). I stumbled upon the pictures recently and thought you guys might be interested in them, all 303 of them.

It's an interesting little piece of history - images of native cultures and natural wonders long since lost, and some of that optimism that pervaded in the interwar period, that after the Great War we could grasp science and our natural abilities to build a better tomorrow for all mankind - anything was truly possible.
And then 5 years later we began a war that killed 60 million people and culminated in the nuclear destruction of multiple cities...so it goes.

I'm currently uploading them into 3 RARs on Mediafire, and will also post a few of them here.

Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls - the Story of the World in Pictures.
>>
Nell Mivingdock - Sat, 10 May 2014 13:19:55 EST XyVGo1SW No.52473 Reply
1399742395962.jpg -(1480758B / 1.41MB, 2048x1536) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
DICKS EVERYWHERE
>>
Nell Mivingdock - Sat, 10 May 2014 13:20:41 EST XyVGo1SW No.52474 Reply
1399742441962.jpg -(1097743B / 1.05MB, 2048x1536) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
HISTORY EVERYWHERE
>>
Nell Mivingdock - Sat, 10 May 2014 13:23:13 EST XyVGo1SW No.52475 Reply
1399742593962.jpg -(1125700B / 1.07MB, 2048x1536) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
The Mediafire upload will probably be ready in an hour or so. I'd also like to note that if anyone has any problems with the quality of any individual image, or would like a better copy of a specific photo from the book, then please ask and state the page number and I shall be happy to do so.
>>
Whitey Fezzlechune - Sat, 10 May 2014 13:33:52 EST /+tLisk/ No.52485 Reply
They just don't make books like that anymore
>>
Nell Crozzlespear - Sat, 10 May 2014 13:50:07 EST 9AXSwIu/ No.52494 Reply
This is wonderful, can't wait for the link to the whole thing.
>some of that optimism that pervaded in the interwar period
The optimism is so palpable and refreshing. The PRIDE in being human which radiates from the preface and contents is particularly inspiring, we don't get that feeling anymore unfortunately. Such intense wonder and awe over nature is also something that's fading.
>>
Nell Mivingdock - Sat, 10 May 2014 13:54:08 EST XyVGo1SW No.52496 Reply
1399744448962.jpg -(1574931B / 1.50MB, 2048x1536) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>52494
Indeed. A more innocent time, where you could turn countless elephants into piano keys but not have to worry about them running out. There just weren't enough people to inflict the environmental pressures on them that are so prevalent today.
>>52495
>>
Nell Mivingdock - Sat, 10 May 2014 14:05:19 EST XyVGo1SW No.52504 Reply
1399745119962.jpg -(1579778B / 1.51MB, 2048x1536) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
Ultimately I think I find this book beautiful because it represents those final couple of decades in time before the world became one great monoculture. A time when the world was still full of mystery and awe. A time that won't come back.
>>
Wesley Bruggleshaw - Sat, 10 May 2014 15:35:24 EST oPP+bHoq No.52564 Reply
1399750524888.jpg -(1404160B / 1.34MB, 2048x1536) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
The upload is complete. All three parts can be found here:

Part 1, containing images #1 to #129 (I reached #88 in this thread): http://www.mediafire.com/download/cnadkrxvsk7ahwr/Story_of_the_World_in_Pictures_Part_1.rar

Part 2, containing images #130 to #265: http://www.mediafire.com/download/vqlbo9bxm3x5r2v/Story_of_the_World_in_Pictures_Part_2.rar

Part 3, containing #266 to #303: http://www.mediafire.com/download/mognqz2xt2fxpza/Story_of_the_World_in_Pictures_Part_3.rar

With that, I leave you with one of my favourite pictures from this collection - Capitol Hill in Washington D.C., with a zeppelin in the background.
>>
Nell Crozzlespear - Sat, 10 May 2014 15:41:31 EST 9AXSwIu/ No.52565 Reply
>>52564 Thank you! Downloading it now.
Awesome book, and easily the best thread on /his/ this year.
>>
Reuben Niffingdog - Sat, 17 May 2014 01:17:37 EST /+qwjQi1 No.52602 Reply
1400303857113.jpg -(65942B / 64.40KB, 500x498) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>52564
Seriously OP, much love. Mayhaps I should do the same with some of the dated tomes in my possession.
>>
Charles Cliffingkuck - Fri, 23 May 2014 09:12:51 EST wGyL98NX No.52668 Reply
Thanks for sharing OP, really fascinating. Rather depressing when you see the patronising and racist assumptions, but that's history for you.
>>
Phoebe Blatherlock - Fri, 30 May 2014 22:21:24 EST Bj4zO6Wc No.52703 Reply
>>52668 I don't find it depressing, I found it reassuring to see how much we've changed for the better in those aspects in a relatively short time. Gives me hope for those other things that have stagnated or changed for the worse since the book was published, that they can successfully be turned around in one's lifetime.
>>
Phoebe Dishshaw - Fri, 27 Jun 2014 02:30:06 EST wXVidM3Y No.52818 Reply
10/10 thread OP. This is the best thread on /his/ atm.
>>
Augustus Fanfield - Mon, 30 Jun 2014 21:20:05 EST XVRS61ik No.52854 Reply
Truly awesome OP. I wish I coudlve lived through a time with this much wonder and adventure in the world
>>
Betsy Crumbleham - Mon, 24 Nov 2014 06:06:04 EST IOGOV0nl No.54364 Reply
>>52668
Eh, even the light racism is pretty lighthearted in a 'but they'll get better, of course' sort of tone, and there is little time wasted picking on the 'uncivilized' races for their backwardsness. Instead, it seems to compliment them for what they have accomplished given their undeveloped state of life.
>>
Cyril Ganderstid - Mon, 24 Nov 2014 10:00:51 EST URNu6lSZ No.54366 Reply
>>54364

I don't get what the big deal is here.

Expecting a book published in the '30s to look at undeveloped civilisations in a totally non-racist way?

I get that in some ways its offensive to the people published in the book but the concepts of their lifestyle etc. were totally foreign and a sense of amazement to Westerners that were still coming to grips with theories of evolution and such.

tl;dr getting knickers in knots over something that is considered racist now but was not only progressive for its time but a behaviour/attitude I'd 100% expect for the context.
>>
Charles Damblepit - Tue, 25 Nov 2014 00:45:27 EST URNu6lSZ No.54372 Reply
>>54366

I'm actually wondering if its even possible for people from developed nations to study undeveloped communities without any sort of racism whatsoever. Even the concept seems like something that would stir up the PC-conscious.

nb
>>
Phineas Gepperford - Wed, 03 Dec 2014 04:44:26 EST kX5INWG7 No.54423 Reply
>>52668

Are you implying that they were not less evolved, intelligent, and organized than the Europeans?

>mfw brainwashed people who ignore the most basic concepts of evolution when they talk/think about racial differences and various human achievements and aptitudes.
>>
Frederick Pickville - Wed, 03 Dec 2014 21:02:46 EST DHCiatMN No.54431 Reply
>>54423
> less evolved
>people who ignore the most basic concepts of evolution
Yeah, no shit. There's no such thing as more or less "evolved". You don't know anything about natural selection, and you're just using what you think you know to justify racist behavior.

Dumping stupid racist shit on /his/ is against the rules, so I don't think you'll last long. nb.
>>
Barnaby Dopperdock - Thu, 04 Dec 2014 00:53:15 EST ztejNy6c No.54434 Reply
>>54423

If genetics are at play in the rise and fall of civilizations as you seem to imply, then that would mean that up until the late 1400's Europeans were genetically inferior to most of the Middle East. Then, like magic, our genetic quality suddenly skyrocketed for no apparent reason during the 1500's and granted us all the benefits superior genes can offer, including world dominance.

Doesn't that sound pretty god damn stupid?
>>
Clara Brannertot - Sun, 31 Jul 2016 02:16:49 EST QgzwB9CS No.56791 Reply
bumping this thread because it's one of the best threads on the site right now. thanks again to OP for taking the time to share all of this.
>>
Graham Gupperfield - Mon, 01 Aug 2016 11:24:14 EST FqRGTRMQ No.56792 Reply
1470065054038.jpg -(99743B / 97.41KB, 400x349) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>54434
It would imply some kind of medieval genetic engineering project...

...as if some outside agency engineered Europeans to become storm troopers in their quest for global domination.

Also, I was just about to join the sharing-old-books deal because I own three reproductions of medieval "biology" books filled with wood etchings, but that's a silly idea since you can just download those books of the Goethe project or whatever that's called.
>>
Barnaby Tootshaw - Mon, 01 Aug 2016 17:10:29 EST im/ZMsTa No.56794 Reply
>>54434
Black Death? Seems like there would have been a massive proliferation of genes suited for survival due to half the population of Europe dying horrible deaths.
>>
Cornelius Mannerforth - Tue, 02 Aug 2016 02:50:43 EST FqRGTRMQ No.56795 Reply
>>56794
Diseases don't make a species stronger. They just lower the genetic diversity. The only positive thing the Black Death caused was social and economic change.

Report Post
Reason
Note
Please be descriptive with report notes,
this helps staff resolve issues quicker.