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Glasswork repair?

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- Thu, 08 Oct 2015 05:08:44 EST v03Jz29y No.37695
File: 1444295324547.jpg -(16615B / 16.23KB, 425x319) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Glasswork repair?
I have a lowball glass that developed a crack along the side earlier this year that I've continued to use since the crack was so small that nothing leaked out. However, after months of continued use and dishwashing cycles the crack now goes from the lip of the glass down about three-quarters and then curves around to another side. It's still sealed, though, and does not leak liquid. I'm getting kind of worried about the crack getting worse, to the point that it'll either shatter in my dishwasher or in my hand. I'll probably just throw it away, but I was wondering if there's a way to fix it since I get bored from time to time and DIY stuff helps pass the time if it's interesting. Is there a home method of repairing glasses that have these hairline fractures?
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Isabella Cloblingham - Thu, 08 Oct 2015 13:52:35 EST mDbgbdG9 No.37697 Reply
essentially, you won't be able to add much heat without cracking the glass more, so you're going to need to apply some kind of cement or epoxy if you want to save the glass.
also wash it by hand.
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Lillian Claywater - Thu, 08 Oct 2015 19:21:16 EST v03Jz29y No.37699 Reply
>>37697

Yeah I was thinking about applying heat but was worried about it just hurting the integrity of the glass before it managed to seal the crack. Running my fingernail over it it seems the crack is on the inside of the glass and doesn't go through to the outer side at any point. As such, applying cement/epoxy to the inside where liquids will be kind of worries me. I'll look up if there's non-toxic options available, but I'm thinking I should just take my lowball out back and put it out of its misery.
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Priscilla Nuvingtad - Thu, 29 Oct 2015 01:01:26 EST Cy4p435G No.37713 Reply
>>37712
I wouldn't use epoxy for a drinking glass. too many nasty chemicals leeched by most 2 part epoxies, plus it can't withstand much heat. I've seen glass repaired with UV curing glue.

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