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Sandwich


Discord Now Fully Linked With 420chan IRC

what does it mean?

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- Mon, 31 Oct 2016 04:13:39 EST nKlONaKn No.12698
File: 1477901619447.png -(63957B / 62.46KB, 263x201) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. what does it mean?
pic related
language enthusiasts?
bwh_bw-errytime
>>
Hamilton Sillertitch - Tue, 08 Nov 2016 17:39:55 EST tBCLFBlr No.12705 Reply
大仏。。。本当に奈良だった。
Daibutsu.... It was really Nara.
(daibutsu are giant statues of Buddha and Nara is famous for them)

TEACHING ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE HORROR STORIES ETC

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- Tue, 26 Aug 2014 08:13:29 EST mPRdrUeT No.11631
File: 1409055209501.jpg -(55297B / 54.00KB, 352x480) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. TEACHING ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE HORROR STORIES ETC
I've just finished my Cambridge ELT qualification, got a job offer (signed, sealed, delivered, I'm yours) and I'm now about to move away to a Eurasian metropolis where I will be undertaking my first English teaching job.

tell me about how snotty the kids are going to be
any horror stories (to tell camp-fire style)?
been figuratively fucked in the arse by a language school?
18 posts and 2 images omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Clara Worthinggold - Fri, 16 Sep 2016 00:29:59 EST mVf2/T6i No.12670 Reply
>>12645
Can't speak for other regions, but our English teachers in Scandinavia are usually (read: Never heard of this not being the case) locals with a BA in teaching (specializing in English) or an MA in English (for high school-equivalents).
You might have better luck in the PIIGS (sans Ireland), but even then it's likely they've got locals who know more about English grammar than you ever want to, even if they have a weird accent.

tl;dr: Speak the local language fluently and have an MA in English as a foreign language, and you'll get to compete with the thousands of other candidates who can do the job and know the local culture better than you are likely to ever know it.

Not that it's impossible, it's just not Asia-tier levels of easy to get a job just by being white and anglo, and you're more likely to have to do some private classes with annoying business-types who speak shit English if you go do it.

Tbh, I'd recommend just getting a job in a major Russian town instead (got a couple Chechen friends who say it's easy if you speak good English) and flying to the EU for whatever you can't easily/legally do in Russia,
>>
Doris Fuggleville - Wed, 28 Sep 2016 20:23:52 EST EyvlnHM8 No.12672 Reply
>>12644

I think you need a bachelor's degree from a university. My sister used her degree and has been teaching English to kids in Japan for four years.
>>
Betsy Crunnerville - Fri, 11 Nov 2016 19:27:16 EST NZmMur/5 No.12713 Reply
>>12644
You need a CELTA course. In Europe it pays between €5 and €25 an hour, depending on the country. You have to start in the countries that pay fuck all and build experience. No one will hire you with an Online Cactus course or any of those websites that offer weekend courses.

>>12645
Getting a job is not hard if you have a CELTA qualification and if you get the visa and do all the paper work yourself. Schools will hire British and Irish people before you, and only hire Americans when they are desperate, because they hate doing the paperwork. Soon though British and Americans will be equally undesirable, so there will be more demand for you, the population of Ireland is only 4 million after all, they can't exactly teach all of of Europe English.

(I am an ELT teacher who has worked in 3 EU countries)

German

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- Tue, 13 Sep 2016 05:11:03 EST 6cVh3/6V No.12664
File: 1473757863741.jpg -(7669B / 7.49KB, 200x202) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. German
is it possible to find Germans here that can do some sort of exchange language learning prior to my arrival to Germany in 3 weeks?

can anyone here translate heiroglyphs?

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- Sun, 14 Aug 2016 11:56:21 EST +vg/lECh No.12627
File: 1471190181099.jpg -(248498B / 242.67KB, 767x1363) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. can anyone here translate heiroglyphs?
i've been trying myself and it is complete fail
got these two items at the store for 11 dollars /brag
4 posts and 2 images omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Esther Hommerpore - Fri, 02 Sep 2016 18:56:14 EST yesq+7fO No.12656 Reply
It say's "OP is a fag".
>>
Phyllis Hodgewot - Mon, 12 Sep 2016 11:48:46 EST RQ9rHzrc No.12661 Reply
8.jpg -(80085B / 78.21KB, 666x69) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>12660
tits for translation

how do you keep it all straight

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- Wed, 17 Aug 2016 21:11:20 EST +vg/lECh No.12637
File: 1471482680442.png -(558768B / 545.67KB, 641x616) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. how do you keep it all straight
so i have to wonder how you people that know multiple languages
3+
keep it all straight.. do they ever bleed together?
1 posts omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Basil Punnerback - Sun, 28 Aug 2016 15:56:17 EST mVf2/T6i No.12652 Reply
It's fairly normal for people here know English as a foreign language (to varying degrees of success) and either French or German at a reasonable conversational level.
Sometimes, if you're at a reasonable level of fluency, you might prefer some languages for certain things (English, for instance, is terrible at explaining medical things to the layman because everything has a crazy name like 'Cirrhosis' that tells you nothing about the condition, while other languages might have names meaning 'Shrinking Liver' or something that gives you a decent hint). I know some language majors on their 4th or 5th language who make a game of using as many foreign languages in a sentence as possible while still having it make sort-of sense to someone who knows all of them.

Best explanation I can come with is
>>12638
Think running vs swimming. They're all forms of locomotion, but you'd never just collapse in the middle of the street and start doing the magikarp because you got the two mixed up.
>>
Sophie Gasslebury - Mon, 29 Aug 2016 14:40:34 EST RQ9rHzrc No.12653 Reply
>>12652
that is impressive.. 4 or 5 languages.. i'd started to learn dutch but moved to russian unfortnutaly i got side tracked and haven't used rosetta stone for a while
>>
Fuck Ninnerbanks - Fri, 02 Sep 2016 20:48:12 EST XwCU7Rol No.12657 Reply
>>12653
4 or 5 is impressive, but not crazy. Look up some of those youtube polyglots like Luca Lampariello or Richard Simcott, that's where shit gets really crazy

Deitsch

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!owU3wSU682 - Mon, 21 Dec 2015 21:36:44 EST 3VyXICsi No.12515
File: 1450751804638.png -(205376B / 200.56KB, 437x437) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Deitsch
Does anyone here speak Pennsylvania German or have an interest in the language?

Pennsilfaanisch Deitsch is:
  • only a native language to certain groups of Americans and Canadians whose ancestors came from a specific region of Germany.
  • similar to some High / West German dialects, but also borrows lots of words from North American English.
  • almost completely a spoken language; Deitsch music and literature exist but even spelling can change from one author/artist to the next.

I find this language interesting even though it's only useful in highly specific situations and regions. I used to live in an area with a sizable Amish population and always thought the language sounded relaxing. Almost all the Amish past a certain age know English too, and even when talking with each other they sometimes use Deitsch and English interchangeably.

I'm using internet resources to learn some basic Deitsch. Maybe I'll be able to have a conversation with some Amish folks in their native language someday. Or at least I'll be able to tell what they're saying when they talk to each other.
5 posts and 2 images omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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CrazyFolksTribe !owU3wSU682 - Tue, 10 May 2016 01:46:34 EST ASCbueoR No.12584 Reply
>>12582
I believe so. I've barely done any learning on this language since creating the thread though.

Random observation: Last week I was with a couple Amish guys and noticed that they preferred the English words for prices and numbers, even when the rest of the conversation was in Deitsch.
>>
Cyril Sushville - Fri, 26 Aug 2016 16:43:03 EST pcMWDhvA No.12651 Reply
>>12552
Funfact: if you're fluent in german you probably have no problem with Deitsch either. it's sounds pretty similiar to swabian german, (they speak it in like less than 200km from where i live)
deitsch sounds less retarded tho.

it's also better understanable than some of the weirder german accents, like everything outta the mountains down south, or the extreme platt from the north coast.
people up north speak a pretty good common german beseides their accent tho, people south are mostly ignorant enough to not even realise it's not even remotely german whatever they're talking lol

Learning Japanese, tips on remembering Kanji besides radicals

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- Thu, 28 Jan 2016 15:42:43 EST 6f3V80M0 No.12536
File: 1454013763736.jpg -(8935B / 8.73KB, 320x354) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Learning Japanese, tips on remembering Kanji besides radicals
Ayy everyone. I'm in the process of learning Japanese. Just recently finished up with learning how to read Hiragana on textfugu and I'm starting on Kanji soon, and also Katakana shortly thereafter. Textfugu does a great job of helping me memerize radicals and stuff, but are there any more ways I can improve my long term memory of Kanji, Hiragana, and Katakana? I found a PDF file of over 1000 Kanji in it so that's definitely going to help out a ton. If nothing else, I'm sure textfugu will help out sufficiently. It's a pretty great website. I highly recommend it for people learning on their own.

>also I'm not a spokesperson for the website, just saying it's really really helpful

Anyone care to share their experiences with learning Japanese? Tips and/or advice are always welcome!
7 posts and 1 images omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Angus Pockson - Fri, 17 Jun 2016 10:26:19 EST JaVU4zbp No.12599 Reply
learn chinese first, the mother language

then laugh at the strange island-folk usage of the characters
>>
Molly Chongerpock - Fri, 05 Aug 2016 16:45:59 EST 2RPCMfTI No.12621 Reply
Jisho is a really good all around japaneseto English dictionary. They even translate romaji. I would learn hiragana and katakana at the same time, since its like upper and lowercase. That way you hve pronunciations down. You can spell and japanese word with those scripts. Also some smartphone/tablet apps i found are tae kims japanese learning and kanji script. I dont speak a lick of japanese but i strarted trying to learn last year. Got lazy and gave up. Be better then me man i gave you the powa
>>
Martin Gunnerridge - Wed, 24 Aug 2016 02:55:00 EST RIIf5LgT No.12649 Reply
Hey so since I'm going to Japan soon does anyone know the best way to speak simple conversational Japanese? There has to be some good guide I can memorize basic phrases in within like a month. I'm not gonna be able to read jack shit but I just want to know how to ask for a bathroom and some ham.

It'd be nice if it didn't try to make me speak fucking weeaboonese either I have a feeling 'konichiwa' is viewed at as idiotic by now

Deutsch

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- Fri, 12 Aug 2016 09:50:47 EST yxHWHWww No.12625
File: 1471009847002.jpg -(493291B / 481.73KB, 1280x960) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Deutsch
How do you say "guns" in German? I'm getting mixed answers. Some say Feuerwaffen, others say Schusswaffen, others say Scheißeisen, and others just say be specific if it's a pistol or rifle - Pistole or Gewehr.
>>
Matilda Brookhood - Fri, 12 Aug 2016 11:21:03 EST 0MqpVuSe No.12626 Reply
Gun in English is defined differently depending on context and some people have particular preferences. Feuerwaffen is the closest to the common English usage as in: there are too many guns in this country.

spanish translation help

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- Sun, 31 Jul 2016 17:07:12 EST GuQbZI5Q No.12615
File: 1469999232380.jpg -(95553B / 93.31KB, 720x960) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. spanish translation help
Al verte las flores lloran
cuando entras en tu jardín,
porque las flores quisieran
toítas parecerse a ti.

not sure what the word toitas is supposed to mean here.

"too see you the flowers cry,
when you enter your garden.
because the flowers wanted
??????"
>>
Shit Ferringway - Thu, 04 Aug 2016 19:37:02 EST mfZltbc+ No.12620 Reply
>12615
because the flowers wanted
to absolutely look like you.


Spanish poems only make sense is spanish, especially within the culture. Doesn't always translate well.

Bulgarian

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- Sat, 08 Feb 2014 16:03:40 EST 1AksULXm No.11057
File: 1391893420762.gif -(1047096B / 1022.55KB, 292x363) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Bulgarian
I've started being intimate with a girl from Bulgaria and I like surprising her by speaking bulgarian words. But while it's pretty easy to find the phrases "hello, how are you?" Or "I really like you" there's not a lot of books with phrases like "I want to make you scream with pleasure" or "Put my dick so far up your mouth I can't see it anymore"

Anyone here know enough Bulgarian to help me with my dirty phrases?
>>
Nell Bankinson - Sat, 23 Jul 2016 11:48:49 EST uauZvyAb No.12610 Reply
>>11057

"Put my dick so far up your mouth I can't see it anymore" > SHE TI GO VKARAM DO SLIVICITE.

"I want to make you scream with pleasure" Iskam da te eba do poshturyavane

English

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- Sun, 20 Oct 2013 18:16:28 EST vr2z1SkJ No.10092
File: 1382307388462.jpg -(31264B / 30.53KB, 468x289) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. English
This is a question for non-Anglophones:

Is your English pronunciation more like British English or American English?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multicultural_London_English
32 posts and 7 images omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Doris Chunnerfare - Sat, 09 Jul 2016 09:53:57 EST kOl4SikP No.12603 Reply
>this bs attitude that Brita think our English is proper or better somehow

England doesn't have ANA accent or one voice the only people that speak RP English ate bbc employees and posh years. The accents are vastly different and these days a lot of American slang has slipped in most people here now say dude
>>
James Turveyford - Mon, 11 Jul 2016 18:15:23 EST QwF64Y6H No.12605 Reply
1468275323563.gif -(16439B / 16.05KB, 444x284) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>12576
As far as I know, the whole Anglophone/Francophone thing is originally a Canadian invention. Pre-1960s, we'd refer to each another as English Canadian/French Canadian, but when bilingualism was institutionalized and we became a country separate from Britain, Francophone/Anglophone started to be widely used to refer to one's mother tongue (without implying that we are differently Canadian).In Canadian French at least, there is no doubt that it commonly refers to first languages as opposed to learned ones (that's the terminology the government uses as well). We would tend to use "francophile" for an Anglophone who speaks French, although it does imply that this person loves the culture/language which isn't always the case. On the other hand, when we say to someone from France that they are Francophones, they often say "No, I'm French". If I'm not mistaken, though, people from Belgium who speak French do call themselves Francophones. But I agree that "non-native speakers" in OP's context avoids the confusion.


Anyway, I'm from the Maritimes (a mostly English-speaking region), and my English is obviously American/Canadian although I have a noticeable French accent. We aren't exposed to much British English, but American culture is all around us. I did an online test that was circulating on this site a while ago (had to choose which pronunciation I would use for different words), and apparently I speak closer to the people in Maine, which makes sense but I didn't know they spoke differently than people from California, Colorado or whatever.
>>
CrazyFolksTribe !owU3wSU682 - Sun, 31 Jul 2016 23:03:23 EST 7+HbprNj No.12616 Reply
>>12603
If you're referring to my post, yes, it now appears I made some unfounded British vs. American assumptions. Blame daily 3-MeO-PCP abuse.

Learning Arabic in a year

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- Sun, 27 Jul 2014 06:35:43 EST 86jrGCuF No.11565
File: 1406457343026.jpg -(83787B / 81.82KB, 500x500) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Learning Arabic in a year
What's up guys, quick question, how do I learn Arabic at least passably in about a years time?
I'm graduating Uni in a year or so with a degree in journalism and polisci, and Palestine has been on my heart and mind for years. This current slaughter is really pushing me towards volunteering to teach English there when I graduate. The thing is that I'll probably want/need some understanding of Arabic before I head over. I can take classes, but I may also need to buckle down and get my required classes done this next year.

What are some tools that are available to learn Arabic? Primarily I'd want to be able to speak it with passable basic writing skills.
17 posts and 3 images omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Rubbing Doom - Sun, 05 Jun 2016 04:21:43 EST H0vxF0ow No.12594 Reply
1465114903363.jpg -(112600B / 109.96KB, 960x720) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>11769
>Jehovas Witnesses of Muslims

so they also molest their children?
>>
CrazyFolksTribe !owU3wSU682 - Mon, 06 Jun 2016 01:16:53 EST I9a8QXVg No.12595 Reply
/lang/: Where internet druggos and cultural enrichment collide.
>>
Nigel Fuckingstock - Thu, 28 Jul 2016 14:06:27 EST YCGVMi/T No.12612 Reply
>>12594
i think he meant in the sense of proselytising, rather than in the sense of being profoundly sad all the time and sexually deviant

Spanish Tools

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- Sat, 05 Dec 2015 11:52:01 EST 3uFkg8e9 No.12493
File: 1449334321502.png -(199060B / 194.39KB, 720x711) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Spanish Tools
I want to learn Esperanto, but my English is not good enough to complete the Duolingo course.
Can anyone recommend a good method to learn Esperanto that doesn't involve me typing in English?

Background: I speak Catalan and Spanish fluently.
13 posts and 1 images omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Clara Brallyhood - Fri, 15 Apr 2016 13:20:24 EST NQ5lHSFD No.12571 Reply
Esperantoland is like most places: everyone claims not to be transphobic, and whenever actual incidents of transphobia happen, everyone says "oh but we're totally not transphobic though!" Most people, including Esperantists, would rather claim not to be transphobic than actually address transphobia within their communities. However, in this particular case, it's not even something that actually matters. It's just a made-up language. So for most people who aren't bros, they get frustrated and leave eventually... unless they're one of the ridiculously naive people who actually thinks it will be an international language some day.
>>
Lydia Braffingderk - Thu, 19 May 2016 09:49:26 EST CDym3DV1 No.12588 Reply
>>12583
All those languages take years to learn fluently while esperanto takes months

Graffiti

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- Mon, 28 Mar 2016 08:22:23 EST TI81xLmg No.12567
File: 1459167743225.jpg -(89232B / 87.14KB, 800x450) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Graffiti
Can anybody read this moonspeak?

And who puts quotes on kanji, honestly.
>>
moxie !QvI1p9.OFY - Wed, 30 Mar 2016 02:39:35 EST QCU4ZF+7 No.12568 Reply
>>12567
jesus christ. this is so stylised i actually can't tell, and i know for sure if i saw it written normally i would be able to tell you.

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