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HOW DO YOU DECIDE ON A LANGUAGE

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- Sat, 06 Dec 2014 20:19:31 EST 6S+wMTU7 No.11891
File: 1417915171279.png -(283218B / 276.58KB, 600x360) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. HOW DO YOU DECIDE ON A LANGUAGE
And how do you keep up with it?
There are seriously probably a half dozen or more languages I am very interested in, yet can't settle on one enough to put any effort into it. There are pros and cons to all of them.

As part of my self-improvement routine I'm really hoping to settle on 2 and alternate, doing an hour of study every other day. (For example, Latin on MWF, Arabic on TThS). But seriously, how do you even pick one?

Next post I will write about which ones I'm interested in, even if just to get it all out of my head and on paper.
>>
David Brookman - Sun, 07 Dec 2014 01:28:16 EST h3lr3kpz No.11894 Reply
FYI, American. Good Spanish after 8 years of schooling and using it on the job and to read books.

>High interest:
-Hebrew (modern)
Pro: Dad was Israeli. Learning an non-European language will be good for the brain, make me think differently. Also a challenge to learn a new alphabet. Abundance of Hebrew language media is available because Israel is a developed nation.
Con: relatively few speakers, especially in the US. Most Israelis know English and would probably rather practice English with me.
Won't be able to read the Bible with Modern Hebrew, not that that's very important to me but whatever.

-Scots Gaelic
Pro: Mom's side of the family is almost entirely Scots and their culture is important to me. Considered moving there for some time. Celtic languages sound beautiful.
Con: No one speaks it. 60,000 in Scotland, basically zero in America. Intermediate and high level materials are hard to find.

-Latin
Pro: Classical literature, foundation of the west. Should be somewhat easy with a strong Spanish base.
Con: No use other than reading. Difficult grammar, time could be arguably better spent with a living language.

>medium interest
-Romanian
Pro: It's a Romance language, but it's used by eastern Europeans. Could be a sort of easy way into familiarizing myself with slavland without having to learn Cyrillic or something complicated like Russian or Ukrainian. Even though it's not in my blood there's a lot of Eastern Europeans where I live, and I am kind of a slavaboo lately.
Con: Sounds stupid, very toothy like Italian. Probably the least widely spoken of the "big 5" Romance languages. By taking the easy way out and not familiarizing myself with much slavic vocab or Cyrillic I might be shooting myself in the foot as far as becoming a slavmaster goes.

-Russian
Pro: One of the most widely used languages in the world. Lingua franca of eastern Europe. Could use this in daily live in certain neighborhoods of my city. Enormous amount of media and huge internet presence assures I'll never get rusty.
Con: Extremely complicated, and I don't have that great of an interest in Russia specifically. Worried people will think I'm just another 18yo communist.

-Ancient Greek
Pro: Again, classical literature. But I have a hard time with this stuff because all the classics have been translated to English for seriously a fucking millennium, so I'm not sure I can swallow that there's so much "lost in translation".
Con: Used only for reading. A lot more people know Latin than ancient Greek, so using it in an artificial way on the internet would be much harder.

-French
Pro: French is a huge worldwide language. My area (Maine) has a ton of French speakers of all colors - the cousins of the Quebecois and recent immigrants from Africa. I could use it daily. Huge abundance of self-teaching material and media to practice with.
Con: Awful, non-phonetic spelling. Don't like the way it sounds. I hear it's very difficult to master, despite being widely taught and a Romance lang, it has as many irregularities and rule-breakings as English

>low interest
>”I totally want to” but doubt I could keep up with it

-Danish
Pro: Greenland is a huge fascination to me. Danish is used in Greenland's cities and a lot of their media is in Danish. It's also taught in Icelandic schools and used to be the official langauge of Iceland and Norway until the 40s... so there's a lot of media from all over Scandinavia in Danish. And of course there's Denmark itself, a great, super developed awesome place. No shortage of Danes on the internet to practice with. Scandinavian languages are supposed to be very easy for English speakers.
Con: Everyone in Denmark and Iceland already know English. Aside from interest in Greenland which comes and goes I don't really have a big huge reason to study this, and I doubt I'd ever use it IRL, just on the internet/books/movies.

-Japanese
Pro: Well I did a semester of this in college, just as busywork to fill in elective credits. There's no shortage of moonspeak on the internet, it's probably one of the most-pursued among English speakers, and I really like the writing style. It's not hard for me to follow switching between kanji and kana, I thing their combined scripts look beautiful. There's the intellectual benefit of something so totally foreign, and a rich history and culture. no i do not like anime, I do like j-horror movies though
Con: Doubt I'd ever get the chance to speak it IRL and I hear that the Japanese really look down on whites interested in their culture. Would be an extremely heavy investment requiring years of study to even watch a movie, and the cost-benefit of that statement compared to likely never getting to speak it face-to-face with a native kinda sucks.
>>
Hugh Pengerbanks - Sun, 07 Dec 2014 12:54:19 EST H0C+olUa No.11895 Reply
>>11894
>>11894
> and I hear that the Japanese really look down on whites interested in their culture

Could be worse.

you could be Korean

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