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Harm Reduction Notes for the COVID-19 Pandemic

Deitsch

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!owU3wSU682 - Mon, 21 Dec 2015 21:36:44 EST 3VyXICsi No.12515
File: 1450751804638.png -(205376B / 200.56KB, 437x437) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Deitsch
Does anyone here speak Pennsylvania German or have an interest in the language?

Pennsilfaanisch Deitsch is:
  • only a native language to certain groups of Americans and Canadians whose ancestors came from a specific region of Germany.
  • similar to some High / West German dialects, but also borrows lots of words from North American English.
  • almost completely a spoken language; Deitsch music and literature exist but even spelling can change from one author/artist to the next.

I find this language interesting even though it's only useful in highly specific situations and regions. I used to live in an area with a sizable Amish population and always thought the language sounded relaxing. Almost all the Amish past a certain age know English too, and even when talking with each other they sometimes use Deitsch and English interchangeably.

I'm using internet resources to learn some basic Deitsch. Maybe I'll be able to have a conversation with some Amish folks in their native language someday. Or at least I'll be able to tell what they're saying when they talk to each other.
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Caroline Sibblewater - Tue, 02 Feb 2016 20:52:26 EST ukZ5P8qs No.12540 Reply
This is what the Amish use, right?
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Ghengis Dong - Sun, 07 Feb 2016 14:23:13 EST w8lQyzMl No.12541 Reply
1454872993890.jpg -(68771B / 67.16KB, 480x360) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>12540
Yes it is. I'm from central PA, and some of my older relatives used to speak it. It's ridiculously impractical and resources for learning it are likely super unreliable. If I were a linguistic anthropologist though, it would be an incredibly interesting thing to do a field-study on.

Pic-semi-related. Those Amish mutherfuckers and their damn "shoo-fly" pies
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Ghengis Dong - Sun, 07 Feb 2016 14:25:53 EST w8lQyzMl No.12542 Reply
>>12540
to clarify, it wasn't historically exclusive to the amish, but is for the most part nowadays. I had a classmate whose grandmother wasn't an immigrant, and barely spoke english because pennsylvania german was the standard in a lot of small communities
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John Pupperson - Sat, 20 Feb 2016 22:50:44 EST BaQMI3Pf No.12551 Reply
1456026644292.gif -(10320B / 10.08KB, 329x329) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>12515

yeah i live in central pa too. i never had much interest, but i've heard it a bunch. A lot of older country folk you hear with thick accents . my shitty racist father thinks he does a good impression. for real, though, some times you hear an old timer say something really dutchie and you just wanna be like "fuck dude you are trying too hard"

i think a lot of older pennsylvanias with pennsylvania dutch heritage idealize their ancestors way of life and are clinging to what are probably the last vestiges of the language

Hex signs are pretty dank, too.
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CrazyFolksTribe !owU3wSU682 - Sun, 21 Feb 2016 23:51:59 EST 3VyXICsi No.12552 Reply
>>12551
>some times you hear an old timer say something really dutchie and you just wanna be like "fuck dude you are trying too hard"
That's wonderful. It reminds me of when Southern rednecks really overdo the drawl to sound more patriotic to their homeland. I never lived near the main Pennsylvania Dutch area of PA so I never got the chance to hear a non-Amish person speak it.

I wouldn't be surprised if, after the middle of this century, most of the "progressive" Amish and similar groups have all but switched to English for both public and family matters. I have a powerful attraction to dying languages of the U.S. and wouldn't mind keeping it alive for no practical reason.

One last thought: Deitsch sounds much more subdued and "rounded" than standard German, and the inflection/accent seems to have more in common with American English than with standard German. I also love how calmly and quietly it's spoken compared to English.

Deitsch word of the day: gschriwwe
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CrazyFolksTribe !owU3wSU682 - Tue, 10 May 2016 01:46:34 EST ASCbueoR No.12584 Reply
>>12582
I believe so. I've barely done any learning on this language since creating the thread though.

Random observation: Last week I was with a couple Amish guys and noticed that they preferred the English words for prices and numbers, even when the rest of the conversation was in Deitsch.
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Cyril Sushville - Fri, 26 Aug 2016 16:43:03 EST pcMWDhvA No.12651 Reply
>>12552
Funfact: if you're fluent in german you probably have no problem with Deitsch either. it's sounds pretty similiar to swabian german, (they speak it in like less than 200km from where i live)
deitsch sounds less retarded tho.

it's also better understanable than some of the weirder german accents, like everything outta the mountains down south, or the extreme platt from the north coast.
people up north speak a pretty good common german beseides their accent tho, people south are mostly ignorant enough to not even realise it's not even remotely german whatever they're talking lol

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