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Any philosophy bros?

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- Thu, 07 May 2020 08:10:03 EST 70J/aQdF No.71397
File: 1588853403863.jpg -(48845B / 47.70KB, 388x600) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Any philosophy bros?
how well do you guys understand absuridism and 'the stranger/outsider' by albert camus.

Won't lie, I felt pretty empty and devoid after reading it.
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Nell Gezzleville - Thu, 07 May 2020 08:29:04 EST 70J/aQdF No.71398 Reply
>>71397
also if anyone could explain absuridism in tldr thanks.
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Cornelius Singerhare - Thu, 07 May 2020 23:26:07 EST MWZzTWKr No.71399 Reply
>>71397
I remember pretending to read this in junior high as my english teacher wanted to expose me to new things, but I don't remember it much. A man goes to a funeral and doesn't feel sad then he smokes a cigarette, that's about all I remember.

Why should I want to reread this?
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Jack Ceblingbodge - Fri, 08 May 2020 01:25:01 EST OiRqaAIu No.71405 Reply
>>71398
tl;dr life is inherently meaningless and rife with suffering but you are probably capable of tricking yourself into having a good time
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Isabella Panningbury - Sun, 10 May 2020 20:01:44 EST zFhc+Pa/ No.71408 Reply
>>71407
Was he being edgy, or just explaining an edgy writing movement?
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Simon Dagglefun - Tue, 12 May 2020 03:57:39 EST v61EgacG No.71412 Reply
I've heard that the The Myth of Syphilis was like the stranger but on steroids
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Jack Sommleville - Tue, 12 May 2020 12:55:06 EST 70J/aQdF No.71414 Reply
>>71412

Joking aside, camus argued that when you accept life has no meaning and just live as you are then you will be happy.

it's like chasing a ghost. You're never going to find it, just live and when Sisyphus accepted it he became happy rolling the rock.

Its a metaphor, no one is going to be happy pushing a fucking rock all day. The point was just accept your life doesn't have meaning and set goals to enjoy it more.

Like a roller coaster, its not about reaching the end of the ride it's about enjoying it before it does end.
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GreekGodMode - Thu, 14 May 2020 15:02:46 EST GBdyzaRu No.71418 Reply
>>71397

The stranger is my favorite book. It empowers me because of my life choices
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Esther Checklesatch - Thu, 14 May 2020 16:31:50 EST sO2oGt81 No.71419 Reply
>>71418
i prefer Nietzsche reductionist good and evil to albert camus pessimism. Suicide for the pussy.
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James Smalldale - Tue, 23 Jun 2020 23:21:55 EST njH6nPfX No.71449 Reply
>>71399
yeah I remember picking The Age of Reason in 9th grade English for some paper and I chose it just because I recall my dad hating Sartre, not knowing anything about philosophy at the time my take away was that some dude keeps trying to get money to pay for his girls abortion but when i finally makes enough she dumps him to be a gay guy's beard, did not pick up any of the actual themes and just reported on it like it was The Giver it flew completely over might head until i actually got into Sartre like 5 years later
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Isabella Brankinwell - Wed, 24 Jun 2020 22:13:54 EST nSaiI/CM No.71451 Reply
absurdism is great to delve into when your life is feeling especially meaningless and rife with trivial roadblocks. it's like hitting epistemological rock bottom
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Hugh Brimmleman - Wed, 29 Jul 2020 06:40:44 EST UH4wPmbB No.71484 Reply
Man, a muthafucka just cant deal when the suns hot like that. Imagine if you will a stranger of the night, however, who sees not the sun but a star and gets all murderous up on idk where they'd be... maybe a mountain top rather than a beach, to shake things up.
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Eugene Nickleshit - Thu, 30 Jul 2020 07:25:34 EST Pd/F8LZw No.71489 Reply
It's been a while since I read the stranger but
I'll give this a shot. Absurdism isn't really clear if you read just 'The Stranger'. You should read 'The Myth of Sisyphus' and the rest of the novels as well. For absurdism the key concept is the Absurd. The Absurd is people wanting meaning in their lives but there not being any. Like in the greek myth when Sisyphus is eternally condemned to rolling a boulder up a mountain only to watch it roll back down once he reaches the top, our lives are equally charactarized by meaningless struggles. Our lives are Sisyhean, Absurd. Now Camus asks us to imagine Sisuphus. He must be miserable with such a horrible and pointless task, right? Well Camus doesn't think so, for Camus Sisyphus is happy. He must be thought of as happy. Well then Sisyphus must be out of his mind, completely deluded and not realizing his situation, right? No again. Camus thinks the happiness is completely lucid. In those moments when the boulder is rolling down the mountain, he takes it all in. The mountain air, the view and so on all the while knowing that he's stuck there, forever repeating his pointless task. Knowing that at the base of the mountain, the boulder awaits him. That's absurdism. You're lucid about the Absurd, never slipping into comforting lies or distractions but you still enjoy life when you're not struggling. You rebel against the Absurd even though you know you cannot overcome it. One who can do this is an Absurd Hero.

Mersault in 'The Stranger' is indifferent towards everything. He's not really living, just barely existing. Language like 'the trigger gave' is used instead of 'he pulled the trigger' for his actions. He's not an absurd hero except iirc at the end when his execution is near and he's happy. He's not bitter about the wasted life or angry about the fact that he will die soon. He's living now, he's awake and the boulder is rolling down the hill.

It's been a while since I read 'The Stranger' though, I can't clearly remember the ending. Anyway, I like Camus' metaphor for life. We do pointlessly struggle. I just can't accept his command to "imagine Sisuphus happy". There's no way someone who's lucid at all times of the human condition can be happy. This is a dark road that I can't recommend for anyone but if you're interested, read 'The Last Messiah' by Zapffe and go from there.>>71397

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