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What do you guys think about this equation?? by equation - Thu, 16 Feb 2017 21:56:31 EST ID:3CQShUbt No.15337 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1487300191718.jpg -(376323B / 367.50KB, 2048x1536) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 376323
DICKS EVERYWHERE
>>
Esther Dribbleforth - Fri, 17 Feb 2017 23:12:09 EST ID:A2j/BW/W No.15338 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>x = 0.0777...
>jk, x is infinity

Anyway, you fucked up the very first line. Should be 0.777... = 10x. From there, you can break up the lhs to get 0.7 + x = 10x. Subtract x from both sides: .7 = 9x. Divide by 9: x = 0.7/9 = 7/90. So 0.0777... = 7/90.
>>
Beatrice Crenningmock - Sun, 19 Feb 2017 01:54:24 EST ID:A2j/BW/W No.15339 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15338
And by "you" I mean whoever wrote that troll proof. I was under the impression it was your doing at first, but now I see you're just asking about it.

In that case, and looking at this with fresh eyes, I see that whoever wrote this is confusing (purposefully?) things like 0.7x with 0.7 + x.

0.7x = (7/10)(7/90) = (7*7)/(10*90) = 48/900 =

Whereas, 0.7 + x = 0.7 + 0.0777... = 0.777...

Or, 0.7 + x = 7/10 + 7/90 = 63/90 + 7/90 = 70/90 = 7/9

This confusing of addition with multiplication is the main theme of the "proof". The only things done correctly here are multiplying or dividing equations through by ten and the realization that a number subtracted from itself is zero (the number doesn't need to be infinity for this to work as is stated in the "proof").
>>
Sidney Hummerwedge - Tue, 21 Feb 2017 00:04:06 EST ID:vrOFV9fT No.15340 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15337

If you want to deal with things like 0.777 repeating it's best to use a symbol like a, rather than those fucking dots. Everything went wrong after the part in the rectangle in the attached image.
>>
Fucking Grandville - Wed, 22 Feb 2017 00:08:02 EST ID:A2j/BW/W No.15343 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15340
English use those dots instead of the vinculum. Chinese do too.


Maths is cool n shit by Straid Of Coolaphis - Fri, 28 Oct 2016 20:21:44 EST ID:g2pPf6fA No.15254 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1477700504974.jpg -(265201B / 258.99KB, 1403x1600) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 265201
Can we have a maths party thread moderators? Because maths is cool and shit.
2 posts and 2 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Nell Murdway - Fri, 30 Dec 2016 20:28:55 EST ID:i+CEI2Ll No.15303 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I am math. Its a long story but I got there with some hard work and a bit of dedication.
>>
Shitting Buzzville - Thu, 09 Feb 2017 13:15:17 EST ID:TNhK97cO No.15331 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1486664117724.png -(20997B / 20.50KB, 334x255) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
I heard you guys like to party

I am a party animal myself
>>
Hannah Surringbit - Thu, 09 Feb 2017 18:34:07 EST ID:u4xffs6y No.15333 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15331
Easy, you just multiply the average he has calculated by the amount of guests +1 (for himself), then you subtract the weights of the guests.
>>
Sidney Hummerwedge - Tue, 21 Feb 2017 00:13:27 EST ID:vrOFV9fT No.15341 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1487654007539.png -(24941B / 24.36KB, 851x523) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>15254

I like math and man am I drunk, category can go fuck itself it's just a handicap for topologists that can't handle homology
>>
Fuck Tillingway - Tue, 21 Feb 2017 11:32:41 EST ID:j58znr37 No.15342 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15341
Are you trying to start shit m8?

Category theory is the new set theory, it's fucking foundational.


hex calc by CVF - Sun, 12 Feb 2017 00:53:25 EST ID:zOfzUnva No.15334 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1486878805691.jpg -(83985B / 82.02KB, 1280x720) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 83985
good calculator that does hexadecimal? for school?
binary is a plus +
>>
Basil Sinnerdedging - Mon, 13 Feb 2017 19:38:14 EST ID:A2j/BW/W No.15335 Ignore Report Quick Reply
https://www.amazon.com/Texas-Instruments-Engineering-Scientific-Calculator/dp/B004NBZB2Y
>>
Sophie Nennerstet - Mon, 13 Feb 2017 22:35:57 EST ID:ogPDtdlS No.15336 Ignore Report Quick Reply
If it's for a class use what they tell you. Otherwise use a smartphone, laptop, etc. It is what computers were originally made for, after all.


Top 10 favourite Integers by Colonel Badtouch - Fri, 04 Nov 2016 15:38:05 EST ID:9bYxsT36 No.15261 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1478288285194.jpg -(104652B / 102.20KB, 640x427) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 104652
Hey guys what are some of your favourite integers? Here's my top 10:
10. 34,236
9. 8
8. 457,893 ( I bet some of you thought this would be higher!)
7. 43.
6. 6 (Imagine that!)
5. 240
4. 9000
3. 7,777,777
2. 7, 777,771
  1. 108
5 posts and 1 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Jenny Gabberworth - Sat, 12 Nov 2016 08:43:59 EST ID:hLKFmGX4 No.15270 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15269
You have good taste
>>
Tom Waits - Sat, 12 Nov 2016 10:13:29 EST ID:jsJM/H7S No.15271 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1478963609990.jpg -(13347B / 13.03KB, 236x188) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>15269
4+8+15+16+23+42=108
>>
Cornelius Brorrypick - Tue, 15 Nov 2016 19:41:50 EST ID:zOfzUnva No.15272 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1024 512 256 128 64 32 16 8 4 2 1
binary maths are fun
>>
Sophie Clishville - Thu, 17 Nov 2016 23:18:33 EST ID:IoPw+j1r No.15274 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1479442713222.jpg -(25393B / 24.80KB, 220x295) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>15269
>>15271

4*8*15*16*23*42=7418880

Every post in this thread starts with 15
>>
Nigel Dartwater - Thu, 09 Feb 2017 18:17:46 EST ID:txB+9pVv No.15332 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1486682266851.jpg -(34208B / 33.41KB, 289x420) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>15261
10. 15625
9. 11
8. 222
7. 6
6. 50
5. 7
4. 800
3. 22222222222
2. 2919
  1. -7776


how i relearned erry mathsz by Lydia Lightshit - Fri, 05 Feb 2016 02:37:19 EST ID:mVsq12K/ No.15040 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1454657839252.png -(56956B / 55.62KB, 722x768) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 56956
Everyday before work, I woke up 2 hours early and forced myself to read/do exercises of the following books. (this later became 3 hours). I averaged 3 books per month if they were survey books, and about 1-3 months for a rigorous book. This became an easy routine after the first week, and I'm still doing this.

>1) Daily Rituals by Mason Currey
https://books.google.ca/books/about/Daily_Rituals.html?id=hA-MoAEACAAJ
This is where I got the idea of making a routine from, it's a survey of historical artists, philosophers, scientists ect who all had a routine in order to get work done consistently. Franz Kafka would split his sleep up into 2 section in order to fit in work beside his regular office job.

>2) Basic College Mathematics by M. Lial et all
https://books.google.ca/books?id=ucUDMAEACAAJ&dq=basic+college+mathematics
As mentioned before in here this covers elementary school and Jr. High math basically. You can just survey this for the most part (not do any exercises) unless you don't understand something, then do the exercises. Took 3 days to survey this. When I later took Harvard's CS50 computer science course, the first lecture about Binary numbers directly was related to this book's first chapter on whole numbers. I torrented this book.

>3)Basic Mathematics by Serge Lang
https://books.google.ca/books?id=gBtvo480ng4C&dq=basic+mathematics
I got out the notepaper and did most of the exercises by hand. This was all focused on reasoning, why is this true, how do we prove this is true, ect. This book teaches you so well that applied calculus is your bitch afterwards. I torrented this book too since author dead, copies are like $80 on amazon.

>4)Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning by Eccles
Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.
18 posts and 4 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Eugene Worthinggold - Wed, 09 Nov 2016 20:34:35 EST ID:Kybqo6e7 No.15267 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1478741675258.jpg -(410053B / 400.44KB, 716x522) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>15264
they thanks for teaching me a new word there!
>>
Cyril Fuckingham - Thu, 10 Nov 2016 07:44:26 EST ID:A03XOBvv No.15268 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15267
Which one of those words did you not know?
>>
George Honningham - Sat, 14 Jan 2017 20:50:27 EST ID:pPw7QUKx No.15324 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1484445027021.jpg -(94698B / 92.48KB, 736x1104) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>3 books per month
How do you do that? I've been reading A book of set theory by Charles C. Pinter for about six months and have only read the first 70 pages. Some of the excerces took me days to solve them, and after two months i could finally understand the resolution of the Russell's paradox. However, I've reading it over and over again until being pretty sure my proofs of every single problem are indeed proofs.
>>
Frederick Wicklesadging - Wed, 18 Jan 2017 12:25:37 EST ID:bkgMqk62 No.15326 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15324

That's a slow pace, but good. I think if you are reading three math books in a month you are missing a lot of details. It took me a year to read Shoenield's mathematical logic and I have been reading Kunen's set theory for a year nearly and I'm only half way through. Shit takes time.
>>
Emma Drundlestock - Mon, 06 Feb 2017 13:38:21 EST ID:0v0QG0m/ No.15330 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1486406301032.gif -(1998868B / 1.91MB, 268x453) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>15326
>That's a slow pace,
Yes, I know it. That's because I got my bachelor degree in maths but never studied it seriously until now, that I have noticed my lack of foundations; and it's because of that that I don't go on unless I'm pretty sure I have solved and understood every single part of the text and the problems, specially set theory and logic, wich are basic for all mathematics. Solving all the doubts arising when studying mathematics is a very important part of our study routine if one really wants to understand them... and it's probably the most tedious part.

>Shoenield's mathematical logic
I'd swear it was a model theory book. I remember I didn't buy it due to that, and bought Richard E. Hodel's An Introduction to Mathematical Logic instead.


Calc by Hugh Jass - Tue, 31 Jan 2017 08:38:40 EST ID:Rhgh4/nK No.15328 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1485869920510.jpg -(10870B / 10.62KB, 489x93) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 10870
  1. How do I set this problem up?
  2. Do I square the radical term to get rid of it?

The way my prof. writes these problems in a straight line is confusing. Thanks
>>
Basil Gubberway - Tue, 31 Jan 2017 11:54:02 EST ID:A2j/BW/W No.15329 Ignore Report Quick Reply
This is simplification using order of operations, not calculus.

[1/sqrt{1/(9x)}/(2[x^0.5]y)^-1]^-4

[1/(sqrt{1}/sqrt{9x})/(2sqrt{x}y)^-1]^-4

[1/(1/[3sqrt{x}])/(2sqrt{x}y)^-1]^-4

[3sqrt{x}/(2sqrt{x}y)^-1]^-4

[3sqrt{x}*2sqrt{x}y]^-4

[6xy]^-4

1/(1296x^4y^4)
Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.


Can someone help me? by Samuel Gagglechick - Sun, 08 Jan 2017 06:01:19 EST ID:QDezsc5/ No.15313 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1483873279651.png -(36685B / 35.83KB, 1320x300) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 36685
Anyone?
>>
Jenny Tootbury - Sun, 08 Jan 2017 13:11:54 EST ID:a1cMDxo8 No.15314 Ignore Report Quick Reply
In general, you should make a sketch of the situation with all line segments and angles included, write those down and think about which of them you can calculate directly from what you're given, as well as your intermediate results.

In the present case, you know the lengths of all sides of the triangles PQR and PQX., and you want to calculate XR. What are some angles you can calculate? Is XR part of any interesting triangles, and is it possible to calculate some of the sides and angles in those triangles?
>>
Cornelius Nittingpidge - Mon, 09 Jan 2017 06:00:40 EST ID:TYRFlDNG No.15317 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1483959640448.jpg -(18924B / 18.48KB, 320x320) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
it's far bro
stay home
>>
Charlotte Ficklepen - Wed, 11 Jan 2017 15:34:25 EST ID:A2j/BW/W No.15320 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Call angle QPX a and angle XPR b. Then you can use the law of cosines (LOC) to determine both a and a+b. Then subtract to get b. Then use LOC to find the length of XR using b. Sorry for the late reply.
>>
Shitting Drussleford - Tue, 17 Jan 2017 19:32:16 EST ID:cHNY4zfv No.15325 Ignore Report Quick Reply
i know this shit seems retarded when you just doin geometry but try to really grasp the concepts cuz advanced math takes this triangle shit and makes some whole other crazy shit happen with circles till you got calc and beyond, all based on triangles, thats why pythagoras was a real OG nigga


Watch my set please by Basil Fussletut - Fri, 18 Nov 2016 11:24:03 EST ID:FFd5rNZG No.15275 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1479486243372.png -(17046B / 16.65KB, 800x600) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 17046
Hey /math/, can you guys watch my set for me? I'll be right back.
10 posts and 6 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Phineas Hinnerwill - Mon, 09 Jan 2017 22:47:18 EST ID:TdtLbn0v No.15318 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15315
Are you certain of this
>>
Barnaby Chindlestadging - Tue, 10 Jan 2017 16:28:23 EST ID:2HEwuEDh No.15319 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15318
Yes, a set of all sets would contain itself. The set of all sets which do not contain themselves is paradoxical and we call this Russell's Paradox. The set of all sets cannot exist in naive set theory due to Cantor's Theorem, which says that you can't have a surjection from a set onto its power set. Since the set of all sets is its own power set and the identity map from that set to itself is a surjection, we have a genuine contradiction. Cue: type theory or wrangling with the category of all categories instead.
>>
Polly Crazzlestodge - Thu, 12 Jan 2017 13:12:19 EST ID:zauFrAWR No.15321 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15319

You don't absolutely have to use category theory or type theory to talk about that kind of collection. There are extensions of ZFC in which you can discuss proper classes like the collection of all objects that don't contain themselves, like Neumann-Bernays-Godel set theory. In New Foundations set theory there is powerful comprehension so the collection of all sets is indeed a set. It dodges Russel's paradox by specifying what kind of predicates are allowed to define sets.
>>
Ebenezer Genkinnadge - Thu, 12 Jan 2017 14:29:49 EST ID:jD/Lrc1O No.15322 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15321
Both of those systems you mention seem to be exploiting the idea of different "levels" of sets, which sounds like a type-theoretic way of dealing with the problem to me.
>>
Augustus Bambleson - Thu, 12 Jan 2017 19:13:32 EST ID:zauFrAWR No.15323 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15322

Yeah, there are different "types" of objects, but often times it's not apparent what a given object is. From this perspective you could make an argument that every set theory is a type theory, with just one type in consideration, which seems to obfuscate what distinguishes what is considered type theory as opposed to something else. In type theory you know exactly what sort of element you are dealing with, while this might not be the case in set theory.


Combine Data Sets Values Something by Doris Bemmlebanks - Mon, 02 Jan 2017 13:27:30 EST ID:RbgW2Zpy No.15304 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1483381650547.jpg -(51347B / 50.14KB, 156x518) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 51347
Suppose youve got 2 data sets but they're in completely different units and not on the same scale. What operation could you apply to each row in order to get an idea of their combined result.
Sum? Average? Multiply?
2 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Nigel Hibblefutch - Fri, 06 Jan 2017 13:41:45 EST ID:tgwdoW8d No.15310 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15309
Nah I just want to build a "score" from a bunch of different columns like this.

Maybe if you looked at the percentile of each row and averaged that.
>>
Reuben Bunford - Sat, 07 Jan 2017 04:28:59 EST ID:tgwdoW8d No.15311 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I figured it out!
Calculated the percentile rank of each row relative to its column, then averaged all the ranks across! Fuck yeah!
>>
break-a-bond !!D0XjIgKF - Sat, 07 Jan 2017 23:56:11 EST ID:tgwdoW8d No.15312 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15311
However!
This does not take into account weighting of each item if that matters at all.
So the forumula would become tedious
0.2*percentile1 + 0.8*percentile2
Then if you change that weighting from 20% -> 30% you're going to have to change every other weighting to add up to 1.
>>
Eugene Gubberfuck - Sun, 08 Jan 2017 18:08:26 EST ID:/4S1D94J No.15316 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15310
You cant build a score without context to what the data represents
>>
Edwin Semmlebury - Sun, 22 Jan 2017 22:28:09 EST ID:C8IBIGCT No.15327 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15316
Well he just did!
deal wit it


math for CS. by Fanny Gommerlirk - Sun, 07 Jun 2015 03:58:35 EST ID:8MLIP4Q3 No.14780 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1433663915621.jpg -(114090B / 111.42KB, 1021x682) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 114090
I want to polish up some skills, specifically proof by induction, solving relations, and some calc. i think i know where to go for the calc (i learned it from the khan academy like 2 years ago and got a B+ in Calc II) but I can't find anything good for proof by induction or solving relations. i have some old lectures on my HDD but they aren't enough.

should I give in and hire a tutor? there is a top 10 stem school where I live and could get a tutor from physics, math, maybe CS, maybe another field's list but it's expensive.

pic unrelated
5 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>>
Rebecca Bludgehene - Wed, 10 Jun 2015 20:50:36 EST ID:wkzayL5P No.14786 Ignore Report Quick Reply
MIT has math courses online free
http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-042j-mathematics-for-computer-science-fall-2010/
>>
Edwin Pittdale - Sat, 04 Jul 2015 04:12:10 EST ID:VtQDzEaN No.14811 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I appreciate the advice guys. Thank you!
>>
Jack Wunderfuck - Sat, 15 Aug 2015 01:52:48 EST ID:PrRFulRY No.14859 Ignore Report Quick Reply
OP here again. I'll be studying calc (I have taken calc before and did fine) and discrete math this fall. im worried about the discrete math. my plan so far is to write down all proofs covered and make sure i learn each one and master it. i want to get close to 100% in this class. what tips to you guys have, beyond keeping at it and seeing prof/TAs regularly with questions?
>>
Fuck Worthingway - Wed, 26 Aug 2015 23:04:36 EST ID:Dk8yywxc No.14867 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>14859

Make sure you do all of the assigned exercises. Try to do your own proof first on exercises, then look for a result on the internet. Hopefully you will be able to find many of the things you're asked to prove if you can't solve it yourself, but if you look at the result without trying it defeats the exercise of looking for a solution, which might screw you on the exam.

If you are ever lost with anything, work from the definitions and theorems you've used. Often you can solve a difficult problem by breaking something seemingly complicated into its parts, and then using the tools you have on the smaller pieces. The vast majority of professors will only ask you problems that they have previously exposed to you in class, homework, exercises, or at worst from the assigned textbook. If you feel you are struggling and have done all of the exercises and asked for correction from the professor, start doing the rest of the problems from the textbook and look for solutions.

Before you take any exam, at the very least read all of the exercises and questions in the textbook that you have been given. Oftentimes after being initially exposed to an idea without a solution and some time passes, we will be able to find a solution much more quickly than encountering problem without having seen it before.
>>
Sidney Pittbury - Mon, 02 Jan 2017 17:51:19 EST ID:bM58eX3O No.15306 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>14780
fuk that, pick up a discrete math textbook. Then keep a copy of Advanced Calculus by Patrick Fitzpatrick around. Then whenever something troubles you about calc, look it up in that bby. It has a lot of goodies. In terms of CS numerical recipes contains most of the algorithms a person could ever want to use, code of them in C, and mathematical explanation of why they work.
Cheers and don't use it to build missiles u dingus,
-anon


Crazy Super Golden! by Barnaby Nicklewill - Wed, 28 Dec 2016 02:20:12 EST ID:RbgW2Zpy No.15300 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1482909612562.png -(8830B / 8.62KB, 254x223) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 8830
How does it do it! Nobody knows!
>>
Barnaby Nicklewill - Wed, 28 Dec 2016 02:21:59 EST ID:RbgW2Zpy No.15301 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Also has anyone worked with python's wolframalpha API thing?
>>
Nell Murdway - Fri, 30 Dec 2016 20:27:46 EST ID:i+CEI2Ll No.15302 Ignore Report Quick Reply
See what I wonder is how does that mouth not just munch up the numbers? I mean it looks like their gonna fall right in.
>>
Doris Bemmlebanks - Mon, 02 Jan 2017 13:28:20 EST ID:RbgW2Zpy No.15305 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15302
These are the questions that keep mathematicians up at night.


What's your power level? by William Drenkingold - Thu, 01 Dec 2016 01:21:19 EST ID:I4oaqfW8 No.15281 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
File: 1480573279507.jpg -(72258B / 70.56KB, 300x567) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. 72258
I'm new to this site and it struck me as pleasantly surprising that there's a whole set of science&math boards. I am however rather skeptical about the average level of education here, so let's make a little survery:

  1. Age
  2. Degree
  3. Specialty
  4. Dream job/profession
  5. Plans for the near future and long term strategy
7 posts and 3 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Henry Nankinfield - Thu, 08 Dec 2016 12:20:53 EST ID:u3+2K/XR No.15293 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15286
I am looking to join the air force or the navy either as enlisted or as an officer to do the same thing as well.
>>
Hugh Nezzlesene - Mon, 12 Dec 2016 18:11:04 EST ID:rJukANYt No.15294 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15284
Learn to code, theoretical chemistry is neat.
>>
Emma Brubberhud - Fri, 16 Dec 2016 14:39:15 EST ID:tLe4/amM No.15295 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>15281
1) 22
2) About to finish masters in maths
3) Teichmuller spaces/Topology/Geometry/Dynamical Systems
4) Something that allows me to work very little (managing a website or something) and pays just enough for me to travel and do research
5) Take a year out and travel while applying for PhDs
>>
Albert Minningpune - Tue, 20 Dec 2016 23:20:25 EST ID:21QMX3Lp No.15296 Ignore Report Quick Reply
  1. 27
  2. electrical engineering
  3. embedded systems/FPGA shit/PCB design
  4. R&D aka building shit and testing it
  5. already living it my dude
>>
Betsy Fuckinggold - Wed, 21 Dec 2016 19:21:14 EST ID:GmQCz3Ds No.15298 Ignore Report Quick Reply
1482366074266.png -(78534B / 76.69KB, 479x359) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>15285

not if you don't know anybody

;_;


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