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420chan is Getting Overhauled - Changelog/Bug Report/Request Thread (Updated July 26)

They don't wanna Talk about this very simple unsolved math: https://tinyurl.com/yd7okrue

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- Thu, 16 Nov 2017 11:42:57 EST 9RLAtG0r No.15585
File: 1510850577128.png -(478143B / 466.94KB, 1280x720) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. They don't wanna Talk about this very simple unsolved math: https://tinyurl.com/yd7okrue
Here is the link to these secret problems: https://tinyurl.com/yd7okrue
>>
Rebecca Gendlelock - Wed, 22 Nov 2017 05:19:31 EST m52FE4m4 No.15587 Reply
I'm not clicking that link. What do you take me for, some sort of fool?
>>
Isabella Sugglenetch - Sun, 26 Nov 2017 07:31:40 EST d8q0ZW2Y No.15588 Reply
i bet your so-called link doesnt even relate to mathematics, you dirty bastard

Visually Understanding Math

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- Tue, 17 Jun 2014 06:57:11 EST RLkenDTl No.14091
File: 1403002631911.jpg -(499955B / 488.24KB, 1200x780) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Visually Understanding Math
Hi guys,

Wondering if anyone could point me to an introductory level book on Math that teaches primarily by showing how to visualise the math so that I can understand HOW it works (as opposed to just memorising the equations/procedures and accepting that they work).

I'm thinking of going Feynman's Lectures atm, but am wondering if there's something better you guys might recommend.

Again, would like it to start at the very basics if possible.

Thanks and Jesus.
5 posts omitted. Click View Thread to read.


I'm an enthusiastic

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- Sun, 05 Nov 2017 03:47:19 EST aO21Ekyq No.15577
File: 1509871639668.png -(1048491B / 1023.92KB, 651x618) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. I'm an enthusiastic
I am taking a class in abstract algebra and was getting ready for a test and noticed a pattern that has popped up when shows how to represent all polynomial functions in a ring that map from Zmodn to Zmodn. What I (think) I found is pretty much why when you have some value x^n it can be replaced with x etc. Pretty much showing why there is only one way to represent all the functions withing the ring due to not being able to have any x raised to something larger than n-1

Oh fuck.

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- Sun, 10 Sep 2017 05:38:52 EST 8UKf4f6U No.15559
File: 1505036332760.jpg -(1849091B / 1.76MB, 3264x2448) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Oh fuck.
Just entered college and put my major down as math.
I haven't fucking done math in years. I dropped out! I fucking dropped out because I thought fuck high school, college is where its at. Now I'm fucking here and i have no clue what I'm doing.
Tips?
Picture is a latern I stole from a meth-head while he was in jail. Its my finest decoration in my dorm.
3 posts and 1 images omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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James Fuckingspear - Sun, 24 Sep 2017 16:33:03 EST lYjTKStM No.15570 Reply
As somebody who dropped out of studying math after 3 months, don't sweat it.

That said high school math is very different to academic math. You won't be learning calculus or algebra, at least not at the uni.
However you learn about proofs, what you need them for different kinds of proofs and how they are done. You'll need some algebra to follow the exercises and examples, but nothing really substantial.
But you might discover that Math in it's academic form is an ivory tower and if you want to do anything but being a researcher you'd have to find your own interests to do something financially worthwhile in life, which will be if you really like math seem stale in comparison.

If you want to learn something exciting that relates to the real world get out asap.
>>
James Fuckingspear - Sun, 24 Sep 2017 16:37:19 EST lYjTKStM No.15571 Reply
Not that math isn't exciting, it's the most powerful science in existence. But you need to be pretty smart to archive something in it. (By that I mean coming up with a new conjecture or proving a theorem)
>>
Jack Soddleson - Mon, 25 Sep 2017 03:37:41 EST +lsSrhgb No.15572 Reply
>>15570

An undergraduate degree in math almost always requires taking a sequence of calculus classes that lead in to proof based math. There are many people that get undergraduate degrees in mathematics that go on to work in the private sector successfully. It is inaccurate to say it's in ivory tower field, that is only accurate if you want to become a professional math researcher, which even a large portion of those with math doctorates don't pursue after their thesis.

OP if you're interested in math stick with it. There are jobs out there for people with math aptitude. You will probably have to learn how to program.

Math related jobs are high satisfaction because they generally pay decently and the process of learning various fields of mathematics can be really mentally rewarding depending on your personality.

On the other hand, if you want a more streamlined career progression that follows a pipeline you may want to choose a more professional style of program. If you study math and don't want to become the ivory tower researcher, at some point there is a transition you have to make in to doing real world things that causes even the most intelligent people to "fall off the wagon" sometimes.

Pleb Contemplates Curvature

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- Mon, 23 May 2016 14:22:48 EST BB0KLoxX No.15128
File: 1464027768468.png -(150891B / 147.35KB, 769x595) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Pleb Contemplates Curvature
I am certain i am missing information so i appeal to you brainy smarties to educate me However this also may be a physics questions. I dunno.

Do curves actually exist? Meaning at the smallest point possible (I would assume planck length) would it not be a straight line from point A to point B then a second straight line from point B to point C etc etc? Only upon pulling back far enough to no longer see the individual points does the curve appear?
36 posts and 4 images omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Graham Bennernotch - Fri, 22 Sep 2017 18:49:55 EST F95jr/F4 No.15565 Reply
>>15505
Any model of reality discussed in language is "sort of" discrete because language is a discrete medium. However, to the extent that language can describe the idea of continuity at all, it can also encode it in a model of reality, so there is no comprehensible sort of continuousness which cannot also be a property of the Universe. As such it makes no sense to argue that the Universe is discrete because the models are discrete, because "the models are discrete" is not a meaningful statement: all possible models are discrete because the means of communicating them is discrete. Effectively the argument becomes that no continuous universe could contain beings which communicate about said universe in a discrete language, which is clearly silly.
>>
Graham Bennernotch - Fri, 22 Sep 2017 18:53:45 EST F95jr/F4 No.15566 Reply
>>15565
But the setting for qft is R^n (and also C^n) and uses the axioms of real fields which are the "best" mathematical expression of continuity known. If that's not a continuous universe then it isn't possible to talk rigorously about what is
>>
Hannah Bardshaw - Sat, 23 Sep 2017 08:29:57 EST lYjTKStM No.15567 Reply
>>15565
Calculus is an excellent "language" to describe a continuous real world property.

Getting into Physics ---> Quantum stuff

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- Thu, 21 Aug 2014 13:14:21 EST t/8wjLF3 No.14296
File: 1408641261077.jpg -(125896B / 122.95KB, 1200x930) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Getting into Physics ---> Quantum stuff
Where should I start? Should I learn a bunch of calculus first? I was recommended University Physics With Modern Physics (Young & Freedman) to start with and then to move to Quantum Mechanics (Bransden & Joachain). At least to start off with.

Any other recommendations or whatever? Besides college and stuff, just on maybe the order you began learning it or w/e? thanks.
7 posts omitted. Click View Thread to read.
>>
Barnaby Brellyhick - Sat, 20 May 2017 21:48:22 EST EJeHrwkJ No.15507 Reply
>>14296
Write a paper suggesting a link between chemistry and physics
>>
Martin Murdman - Mon, 19 Jun 2017 22:10:21 EST q/daWEW+ No.15522 Reply
>>14296
Learn calculus, differential equations, linear algebra, and abstract algebra/group theory. Read Quantum Mechanics by Shankar. When they start about euler lagrange equations as a way of doing classical mechanics problems check out Give Taylor's Classical Mechanics.

If you want to go deep the Landau Lifshitz books are essential. Griffith has a good E&M book if you are only interested in learning enough E&M to do advanced quantum. Gordon Baymn's lectures on quantum are really dense, but really well summarize the most essential aspects of quantum, and teach you how to solve some really practical problems (spectroscopy/scatter/super conductivity class shit). Messiah's and Sakurai's textbooks are each good in their own ways.

take acid
>>
Jack Brookham - Sat, 26 Aug 2017 12:25:01 EST wgTUzquz No.15552 Reply
You need calc 1 and maybe calc 2 (techniques of integration) for undergrad level physics books (specifically Newtonian mechanics and Electromagnetism). I used University Physics which you mention and Fundementals of Physics by Halliday and Resnick, either will do (get an old edition for cheap) but I personally liked University Physics more.

As for QM you'll need linear algebra and differential equations, both of which you should study after calculus. I'd recommend getting an old edition of Calculus by Stewart, Spivak might be too much if you've never seen calculus or if your algebra and trig is weak. Undergrad math textbooks are generally shitty money grabs, and MIT has some of their's up for free.

For other book suggestions I'd recommend looking at a university's physics courses and their respective syllabi.

Physics. Forces. Springs.

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- Sun, 16 Jul 2017 10:24:40 EST tgwdoW8d No.15535
File: 1500215080231.png -(16883B / 16.49KB, 973x331) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Physics. Forces. Springs.
Does it matter what ordeer 2 springs are in, if youre stacking them and measuring the total force?

Math Problems you came up with

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- Thu, 22 Jun 2017 16:37:54 EST jadYTFeE No.15524
File: 1498163874635.gif -(2096042B / 2.00MB, 338x252) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Math Problems you came up with
A rectangular piece of cardboard has a length that is twice its width. Squares with sides that measure 1/10 of the length of the cardboard are cut from each corner and the resulting flaps of the cardboard are turned up to form an open box. A maximum of 24 cubes that measure 2 inches on the sides can fit perfectly inside the box. What are the dimensions of the box? What were the length and width of the rectangular cardboard before it was cut and made into a box?
4 posts omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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James Gembleford - Thu, 22 Jun 2017 23:49:39 EST j58znr37 No.15529 Reply
>>15528
Oh I was doing squares which are 1/10 the width of the cardboard, not the length.
>>
James Gembleford - Fri, 23 Jun 2017 10:43:03 EST j58znr37 No.15530 Reply
So I now realise that my other answer doesn't really make sense because the resulting box would be the right volume to contain the cubes but not the right height. With that in mind, the solution is easy. Let x be the width of the original cardboard. The length is then 2x and the side length of the squares removed is (1/10)2x=(1/5)x. But this number becomes the height of our box, which must be 2in if the cubes are to fit perfectly inside. Solving (1/5)x=2in we find the width can only be 10in and the length 20in.
>>
Betsy Cenderhall - Fri, 23 Jun 2017 10:54:59 EST jadYTFeE No.15531 Reply
>>15530
Congrats, you got it! I hope others here had fun with my little problem.

Star

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- Thu, 01 Jun 2017 18:14:15 EST Mfduv5of No.15517
File: 1496355255705.jpg -(92361B / 90.20KB, 960x918) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Star
How do you determine the quantity of a thing mixed up in other things to a point where the sum total gets blurred by the myriad factors of an æquation?
>>
John Cannerway - Fri, 02 Jun 2017 14:34:58 EST BI+jncva No.15520 Reply
Try stating your question more clearly, if possible. It sounds more like you're not able to determine the quality of that thing because your definition of what thing is lacks the enough specificity for you to even know where to start when trying to extract the appropriate information from where and in what ways to manipulate it to give you a quantity for the exact thing it is you are trying to determine the quantity of.

Best language for math

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- Wed, 22 Mar 2017 03:37:13 EST lwS34rUW No.15429
File: 1490168233477.jpg -(75572B / 73.80KB, 620x1014) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Best language for math
German?
5 posts omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Fucking Crocklemack - Thu, 13 Apr 2017 22:08:40 EST c0vo/Lfo No.15471 Reply
>>15460
It takes roughly as long to say Nullstellensatz as it does to say Zeros Places Theorem. All that German accomplishes is reducing the number of spaces you have to type.
>>
John Bliffingson - Wed, 24 May 2017 03:05:51 EST lub1zF0h No.15512 Reply
>>15471

Yes, but there are fewer "z" letters in Zero Places Theorem, and the space key is already one of the most used buttons. It is more economic and eco-friendly over the long run to use long and complicated words that have lots of "z" and 15+ characters.

Mandlebrot Set Via WEbcam Iteration Discoved By Me

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- Sun, 14 May 2017 03:01:43 EST Cv411eOF No.15498
File: 1494745303297.png -(157083B / 153.40KB, 1366x768) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Mandlebrot Set Via WEbcam Iteration Discoved By Me
<center>
<body bgcolor="black" onmousemove="drawe();">
<video id="video" autoplay hidden height="500" width="500"></video>
<canvas id="canvas" width="500" height="500" style="">
<script>
var ii=177;
var video = document.getElementById("video");
var c = document.getElementById("canvas");33
var ctx = c.getContext("2d");
var canvas = document.getElementById('canvas');
var context = canvas.getContext('2d');
var text = "";
var video = document.getElementById('video');
var mediaConfig = { video: true,audio:true};
function drawe(){
var possible = "FABCGDE0123456789";

var canvas = document.getElementById("canvas");
var ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");
for(var i=0; i!=6; i++)
text+=possible.charAt(Math.floor(Math.random()*possible.length))
ctx.fillStyle="#"+text;
text=""

ctx.arc(Math.random()*event.x,Math.random()*event.y,4,2,Math.PI*180);
ctx.fill();
text='';
}
navigator.mediaDevices.getUserMedia(mediaConfig).then(function(stream) {
video.src = this.window.URL.createObjectURL(stream);
Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.
1 posts omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Eric Alan Frazin - Sun, 14 May 2017 03:12:08 EST Cv411eOF No.15500 Reply
<style>

canvas{
filter:contrast(4038%);



}
</style>
<center>
<canvas id="canvas" width='1500' height='1500'></canvas>

<body bgcolor="black" onmousemove="drawe" onmousedown="drawe" onchange="drawe" ondoubleclick="drawe;">
<video id="video" autoplay hidden>
</video>
<canvas id="canvas" width="1500" height="1500"style="opacity:0.0;fillColor:none;">
<script>
var ii=10;

var video = document.getElementById("video");
var c = document.getElementById("canvas");
var ctx = c.getContext("2d");
var canvas = document.getElementById('canvas');
var context = canvas.getContext('2d');
var video = document.getElementById('video');
var mediaConfig = { video: true,audio:0};

navigator.mediaDevices.getUserMedia(mediaConfig).then(function(stream) {
video.src = this.window.URL.createObjectURL(stream);
video.play();
Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.
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Phoebe Tillingstone - Mon, 15 May 2017 00:40:31 EST AQ7xCSUt No.15501 Reply
it's a neat little app. can you explain the principals behind it?
>>
Archie Blimmerfuck - Thu, 18 May 2017 01:12:57 EST j58znr37 No.15502 Reply
>>15501
It's enthusiasm combined with a severe lack of moderation on the academic boards.

Linear Algebra Review

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- Mon, 27 Apr 2015 02:23:31 EST AOEV1QdK No.14706
File: 1430115811548.jpg -(75522B / 73.75KB, 600x763) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Linear Algebra Review
I took a linear algebra class years ago and want to review. I have Axler's Linear Algebra Done Right and really enjoy it, but I want something with more applications and exercises to go along with it.

Suggestions? Online or texts
3 posts omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Fuck Chorryford - Fri, 29 May 2015 10:00:06 EST /JY7Oqfv No.14761 Reply
Linear Algebra by Shilov
>>
Esther Binderford - Sat, 30 May 2015 12:40:05 EST V731xQnT No.14763 Reply
>>14707
Lax is the one I just used for my class this spring. Pretty good book, easy if you have a basic understanding and use it in cojucntion with internet tutorials to refresh. LOTS of practical uses for the material
>>
Hannah Blittinglit - Mon, 24 Apr 2017 21:48:51 EST jVVag+L0 No.15489 Reply
>>14706
work through every problem in linear algebra done
do some abstract algebra along the way
good luck


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