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Corruption and Exploitation in America's Prison-Industrial Complex

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- Mon, 25 Nov 2019 05:38:11 EST rTr48MXc No.181119
File: 1574678291917.png -(1180354B / 1.13MB, 1167x910) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Corruption and Exploitation in America's Prison-Industrial Complex
https://reason.com/2019/11/22/west-virginia-inmates-will-be-charged-by-the-minute-to-read-e-books-on-tablets/
People who have been incarcerated in West Virginia prisons will soon be charged $3 an hour just to read books, and $15 an hour for video visitation with their families. For a bit of context, prisoners in West Virginia are paid anywhere between 4 and 58 CENTS an hour for their labor.

How is this possible? Well, the inmates have all been given free electronic tablets that ostensibly can be used to read books, send emails, and communicate with their families. But according to a 2019 contract between the West Virginia Division of Corrections and Rehabilitation (WVDCR) and Global Tel Link (GTL), the company that is providing electronic multimedia tablets to 10 West Virginia prisons, using the tablets to read books, listen to music, or play games will cost $3 per hour (or $0.05 per minute); using them to conduct video visitations will cost $15 per hour (or $0.25 per minute); and using them to send written messages will cost $0.25 per message, plus an additional $0.50 to send a photo with a message.

And dont forget, those books that inmates are being charged $3/hour to read? Every single one of them comes from Project Gutenberg, a free online library of more than 60,000 texts in the public domain. And according to the aforementioned contract, the WVDCR will receive a 5% commission on gross revenue from the tablets. A WVDCR spokesperson claims that no inmates are being forced to use the tablets and the 5% commission will go toward a fund at each of their prisons that inmates "use for such things as paying for cable TV and hosting open house visitation events for families."

At the moment, it seems the prisons are not restricting outright purchases or donations of regular print books. But from what I can tell, there is no library-esque system in place where inmates can borrow books and then return them either at a set time or once they have finished reading them. And here's the other thing: there's been a troubling trend in other parts of the country of prisons restricting book donations and forcing inmates to purchase books through pre-approved vendors or to use electronic tablets provided by private contractors like GTL and JPay. Earlier this year, Book Riot reported that numerous Ohio prisons were banning book donations by groups like Appalachian Prison Book Project. Amid media scrutiny, the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction (ODRC) announced it would lift the bans for third-party book donations, but family members are still banned from sending print material. In at least one Ohio prison, family members must put money into the inmate's account so they can order it themselves. JPay, which handles money transfers for the Ohio prison system, takes a cut on all deposits. Oh yeah, and the director of the ODRC just happens to be the former general manager of JPay.

Meanwhile, Pennsylvania, Washington, and three prisons in New York all attempted similar bans on donations of used books to inmates, then relented under citizen pressure. The prisons cited security concerns over contraband, but news investigations showed there was little actual evidence of smuggling via donated dictionaries. And last year, after Florida inked a new contract with JPay to provide multimedia tablets to inmates, inmates were forced to return MP3 players they had purchased through the state's previous provider, losing all the tracks they had purchased as well. I think there's a word for that, what is it again....uhhhh oh yeah, THEFT!

But wait, theres more! Pennsylvania also pays a private contractor $4 million a year for digitized mail services, where letters to inmates are scanned and sent to inmates as black and white photocopies while the original letters are destroyed and in 2017, the WVDCR also instituted a policy barring inmates from receiving their original mail. Isnt opening other peoples' mail a felony offense? I guess it's okay when the Prison-Industrial Complex does it!

And of course, with all this in mind, I dont think I need to remind you all of the...interesting statistics regarding the incarceration rate of poorer, nonwhite people in the USA versus that of richer, white people....
>>
Simon Sommledale - Mon, 25 Nov 2019 05:47:51 EST MvRoQ1jI No.181120 Reply
Aren't American prisons suppose to be really vindictive and harshly punitive by design? I think thats the entire point so fucking the prisoner over even more is seen as a good thing.
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Albert Seddlestock - Mon, 25 Nov 2019 08:39:44 EST oP69mx7Q No.181125 Reply
>>181120
>Aren't American prisons suppose to be really vindictive and harshly punitive by design?
No, not really. This is the end product of running your justice system like a capitalist corporation owned by racists instead of actually running it like a government though.

>I think thats the entire point so fucking the prisoner over even more is seen as a good thing.
Fucking over people, at the cost of taxpayers, for the benefit of private business is not a good thing.
>>
Doris Brorrybad - Mon, 25 Nov 2019 08:49:59 EST hCAKuWBQ No.181126 Reply
>>181125
Not to mention "American" prisons are very few. Prisons, schools, transportation, basic services like that are all handled by the states at that level.
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John Drimbleridge - Mon, 25 Nov 2019 10:02:02 EST eW7lNgCN No.181127 Reply
>>181126

It's kinda of ludicrous the difference between school systems from state to state. The prison system is a complete racket though.
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Doris Brorrybad - Mon, 25 Nov 2019 10:09:59 EST hCAKuWBQ No.181128 Reply
>>181127
For sure the US justice system needs to do some soul searching. Not sure what the other dickhead is trying to say tho.
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Fucking Tootford - Mon, 25 Nov 2019 14:04:31 EST +8irr0Qf No.181129 Reply
>>181128
Soul searching is useless as sending thoughts and prayers. They need being legally compelled to chnage ways and jailed for bribery from profiting.
>>
David Sesslestock - Mon, 25 Nov 2019 16:36:17 EST DnQ32w8b No.181130 Reply
>>181129
All Fox needs to do is flash a picture of some prisoners to their racist viewers and this whole prison racket will continue to be ignored. Nobody is compelled to to help anyone they're prejudiced against. Prisoner = Minority
>>
Graham Wemmlebotch - Mon, 25 Nov 2019 19:04:04 EST vGHmMf9D No.181131 Reply
The Nazis and the Commies are the ones that support wars, debt, the nanny police state, security cameras, license plate readers, checkpoints, redlight cameras, speed cameras, FBI facial and voice recognition, curfews, gun bans, NSA wiretapping, the end to the right to silence, free speech bans, searches without warrants, private prisons, mandatory minimums, 3 strikes laws, DNA databases, CISPA, SOPA, NDAA, IMBRA, private prison quotas, no knock raids, take down notices, no fly lists, terror watch lists, Constitution free zones, stop and frisk, 3 strikes laws, kill switches, National Security Letters, DNA databases, kill lists, FBAR, FATCA, Operation Chokepoint, TSA groping, civil forfeiture, CIA torture, NDAA indefinite detention, secret FISA courts, FEMA camps, laws requiring passports for domestic travel, IRS laws denying passports for tax debts, gun and ammo stockpiles, laws outlawing protesting, police militarization, Jade Helm, and banning religion.
>>
Augustus Duckville - Sun, 01 Dec 2019 07:35:33 EST rTr48MXc No.181206 Reply
>>181131
I've never met any Communist or leftists who actually support any of that.

But then, I dont think you actually know what that word means anyway...
>>
Charles Morrymatch - Sun, 01 Dec 2019 11:24:32 EST tlilhxRg No.181213 Reply
1575217472956.gif -(1768307B / 1.69MB, 360x360) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>181208
>Americans scream that the Soviet Union opposed wars and tyranny

I dunno what timeline you're on, but I want in on that.
>>
Rebecca Blepperfig - Mon, 02 Dec 2019 13:20:07 EST 4iOFpMwy No.181229 Reply
>>181214
Chinabot is apparently welcome here. Why pretend it doesn't exist?
>>
>>
Reuben Seckledock - Wed, 04 Dec 2019 09:27:44 EST qPbFZDTy No.181258 Reply
When you have a government contract you're goal is never to deliver a good product, it's to grease the wheels of the right people to get that contract renewed.

That's why America has military equipment that kills it's own soldiers, schools that don't educate and prisons that don't rehabilitate.

Turning prisoners to slaves is the direct result of making imprisonment a capitalistic structure.
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Samuel Lightworth - Wed, 04 Dec 2019 19:52:02 EST eW7lNgCN No.181260 Reply
>>181256

Sure seemed like you were replying with utter sincerity, what with the whole you replying to it at all thing going on there. nb shit poster shit thread shit bot shit board
>>
Phyllis Gettingham - Mon, 30 Dec 2019 12:32:52 EST GW1axdWk No.181725 Reply
1577727172886.jpg -(16806B / 16.41KB, 640x335) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>181119
Mike Bloomberg Exploited Prison Labor to Make 2020 Presidential Campaign Phone Calls
https://theintercept.com/2019/12/24/mike-bloomberg-2020-prison-labor/
>Former New York City mayor and multibillionaire Democratic presidential candidate Mike Bloomberg used prison labor to make campaign calls. Through a third-party vendor, the Mike Bloomberg 2020 campaign contracted New Jersey-based call center company ProCom, which runs calls centers in New Jersey and Oklahoma. Two of the call centers in Oklahoma are operated out of state prisons. In at least one of the two prisons, incarcerated people were contracted to make calls on behalf of the Bloomberg campaign.

>According to a source, who asked for anonymity for fear of retribution, people incarcerated at the Dr. Eddie Warrior Correctional Center, a minimum-security women’s prison with a capacity of more than 900, were making calls to California on behalf of Bloomberg. The people were required to end their calls by disclosing that the calls were paid for by the Bloomberg campaign. They did not disclose, however, that they were calling from behind bars.

>The campaign said it did not know about the arrangement between ProCom and an undisclosed campaign vendor until The Intercept made its inquiry. The campaign then ended the relationship on Monday and said it has asked vendors to do a better job of vetting subcontractors in the future.

>“The use of prison labor is the continued exploitation of people who are locked up, who really have virtually no other opportunities to have employment or make money other than the opportunities given to them by prison officials,” said Alex Friedmann, managing editor of Prison Legal News and an advocate for incarcerated people’s rights.

>John Scallan, a ProCom co-founder, said his company pays the Oklahoma minimum wage of $7.25 an hour to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections, which then pays the incarcerated people working in the call centers. The Department of Corrections website lists the maximum monthly wage for the incarcerated at $20 dollars a month, but another policy document says there is a maximum pay of $27.09 per month.

>When asked if their total monthly earnings are capped at these levels, Scallan said incarcerated people who work for ProCom make far higher wages. “I can tell you unequivocally that is not us,” Scallan said. “Some of them are making that much every day.”

>The Oklahoma Department of Corrections did not respond to multiple requests for comment to clarify the discrepancy, nor to answer questions about ProCom’s arrangement with the Bloomberg campaign.
>>
Shitting Povinggold - Mon, 30 Dec 2019 19:33:03 EST Y3JsGsvI No.181733 Reply
>>181725

Procom's response cracks me up in a big way

"Hey, we heard you're using prison labour and the max wage for an inmate is $20 a month, is that true?"
"Nah nah nah you don't understaaaand thats not us bro thats not us. Some of these gals are clearing $20 a DAY!"

Hats off to them. With that $20 a day they just might be able to afford a meal or better yet put a roof over their head for a month after they get out. More than enough to get a new start with a criminal record. I know it sounds rough but it's the price you pay for lipping off at a cop when you got pulled over doing 5 above the limit.
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Hannah Padgedock - Mon, 30 Dec 2019 22:53:58 EST uJ1UMTRI No.181736 Reply
>>181119
In my country the prisoners go on strike if they're unhappy with conditions...
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Sidney Forrystock - Tue, 31 Dec 2019 04:08:01 EST wFK2Hm63 No.181739 Reply
>>181736
They do that in America too but that is usually met with force here.
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Charlotte Blarrymot - Tue, 31 Dec 2019 06:26:49 EST QDryv1bZ No.181740 Reply
>>181125
American prisons always had a bad image. I mean during the civil war they'd let prisoners starve to death in somewhat normal prisons and I'm not talking about the south here.
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Caroline Hendledun - Tue, 31 Dec 2019 15:36:37 EST xNkfvYZU No.181743 Reply
>>181741

prisons are bad and the people that profit from them are bad
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Polly Dedgeshit - Thu, 02 Jan 2020 19:37:12 EST H9CYrW5/ No.181789 Reply
>>181120
I think the point of it is to make them become lifelong criminals. They try to instill a lifelong hatred of authority figures and isolate people from the outside world and surround them with hardened criminals to be their only friends. This just encourages people to get into crime when they get out, as all their old connections are gone and replaced with criminal connections. This of course ensures that the prisons will have a steady stream of offenders to keep their coffers full.
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Charlotte Sallerville - Thu, 02 Jan 2020 22:52:00 EST +8irr0Qf No.181792 Reply
1578023520407.jpg -(40340B / 39.39KB, 850x478) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>181789
Authority figures deserve to be hated.

On mostly unrelated note first hottie criminal of new year by that calendar. Her wnd boyfriend shot some woman to death for some reason.
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Frederick Murringforth - Fri, 03 Jan 2020 00:25:45 EST WyvJJzGH No.181796 Reply
>>181792
The reason was the woman laughed at their face tattoos.

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