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Sandwich


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How to get the most flavor

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- Sat, 07 Sep 2019 03:34:36 EST nHV4947b No.159753
File: 1567841676145.jpg -(14244B / 13.91KB, 198x255) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. How to get the most flavor
How do you get the best flavor when cooking food. I heard by using a cap on the stove/pot you dont let the flavors come out so they stay locked in.

Also the longer you let it sit the more flavor will develop (on low heat), but how long is too long, and why do the flavors get better ?

Any Hot Neat Tips You have for Maximizing Flavor when cooking ??
>>
Masaharu Morimoto - Sat, 07 Sep 2019 10:03:45 EST rLqUYCDx No.159760 Reply
>>159753
Some ingredients release flavours slowly. Others release them quickly and they will disappear or turn bitter if you keep cooking (e.g. lemon/lime).
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Madame Mérigot - Sat, 07 Sep 2019 17:33:10 EST 5WdELw/2 No.159763 Reply
Maillard reaction into a deglaze everytime
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James Martin - Sat, 07 Sep 2019 18:26:37 EST dDOcS6GA No.159764 Reply
generally don't cook vegetables with the lid on. sulfur needs to escape
sometimes you want to cook things fast and barely, rather than all the way through
toast your spices, or get them hot in a fat

maillard and caramelizing, try to minimize added water during braising, use finished products to add a lot of depth(like wine, or chocolate or coffee/beer)
>>
Marcus Samuelsson - Sat, 07 Sep 2019 19:45:35 EST 1q/EdQ5u No.159765 Reply
Depends what flavors you're going for, yaknow? Take the lid off if you're trying to get rid of moisture, and don't want too much heat. . Leave it on if you're trying to retain moisture.

IN GENERAL:

deeper, darker flavors get better with more heat and more time. Think of chilli. It's best when you toast your spices, and let everything meld for a loooong time.

for lighter, fresher flavors, you don't want much heat, and you add the flavors right at the end. Think of chopped herbs on top of pasta, or lemon zest.

Learn how to use aromatics. Here's a list of aromatics: Onions (and similar), ginger, carrots, peppers, celery, garlic. That's like the base of the flavors youre making.
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Duff Goldman - Sat, 07 Sep 2019 20:31:57 EST uVf8BUQx No.159766 Reply
Use salt

There is a proverb about an ancient king who asked his daughter how much she loved him. She said she koved him like salt. He was greatly offended and banished her. Someone then contrived to remove all the salt from his food for some days. Afterwards, he recalled her back into the kingdom, as he realized salt is what makes all food flavorful
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Chef Wan - Sat, 07 Sep 2019 20:39:05 EST A6+25qa3 No.159768 Reply
>>159767
Not true because my ex girlfriend isnt take me to court over missing salt payments
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Johann-Carl Leuchs - Sat, 07 Sep 2019 21:47:03 EST dDOcS6GA No.159769 Reply
>>159768
we can never choose to not eat salt

we could have been anything but we chose to need salty.
>>
KrepsUntBurgdorf - Mon, 09 Sep 2019 22:50:00 EST lsB3GoRu No.159789 Reply
How much is too much spice? say you're making a lentil curry. maybe 5 tablespoons curry powder, 8-10 would just be too much .. or am i wrong?
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Madame Mérigot - Mon, 09 Sep 2019 23:56:46 EST 1x7jkH+X No.159790 Reply
>>159789
depends on the ratio, but use all the curry spice you like

curry doesn't actually exist in real life, it only exists in your heart
>>
Rick Moonen - Tue, 10 Sep 2019 17:43:36 EST +Pn+aTRd No.159800 Reply
>>159789
Depends on the size of the dish, the flavor of the curry, and how you like it. Curry powder is kinda hard to overdo. It's mostly tumeric, usually. But any dish with curry powder is best supplemented with other spices - black pepper, garlic, chili or cayane, fanicer spices if you got em (cardomom, cloves, etc.).


"Too much" spice is just when it overpowers something else you want to taste. Like, if you're making a very nice steak, then you'd only want minimal seasoning (salt, pepper, maybe a bit of herbs). But something like a lentil soup has most of the flavor from the spices, so it's hard to overdo.
>>
Guillaume Tirel - Tue, 10 Sep 2019 17:59:27 EST uTzrZDEX No.159801 Reply
Cook things long enough so that cells break down, but not long enough so that they lose flavor.

alium family with starches

fatty foods with starches
>>
SomaGuru - Wed, 11 Sep 2019 02:04:02 EST kybj8RuG No.159807 Reply
>>159801
once stuff is done cooking, is there any point to let it sit at 60-90c to build more flavor or is that not the Case
>>
Pierre Wynants - Wed, 11 Sep 2019 07:49:59 EST uTzrZDEX No.159808 Reply
>>159807
Depends on what you are cooking. In most cases more flavor comes from more broken down cell structures. One thing may be best cooked in PC another in 100C yet another at 60C one for 3 minutes optimally another for 6 hours... It all depends.
>>
Wolfgang Puck - Sun, 15 Sep 2019 15:22:58 EST e/aFcqya No.159864 Reply
>>159753
Never use frozen or canned anything. Always as fresh as possible.
Your food needs to have a good balance of flavors. Usually fat, sweet, salt, spice, herb, earth, pungent, and tang. Those are the tastes basically all ingredients fall into, if you balance them, no matter what ingredients you used it should be good, but know that you dont always need something from every group.
Salt is flavor, sweet balances salt, spice balances sweet, fat is richness

The wisest words ive ever hear (from gordon ramsey no less): Food should taste of what it is. Alot of over ambitious chefs use too many ingredients in their food and the flavors of what they are cooking with get lost in the medley. Everything isnt a curry, sometimes just 3-5 ingredients is plenty.
>>
Michael Chiarello - Sun, 15 Sep 2019 15:33:21 EST Z0KJkHwG No.159865 Reply
>>159864
Canned tomatoes are fine, and often preferable to fresh, because the fresh tomatoes that you buy at the grocery store are often picked under-ripe and gassed with ethylene to make them red. Canned tomatoes are often canned at peak ripeness.

There's nothing wrong with frozen vegetables. Frozen fish may also be preferable to fresh, unless you live close to the ocean and have access to a nice fish market.
>>
Troisgros family - Sun, 15 Sep 2019 19:07:26 EST EZXaKJiF No.159866 Reply
>>159865
This. Canned tomatoes are lovely.

Canned beans/chickpeas are wicked convenient. Sure, I prefer the dried stuff, but you gotta soak them overnight or pre-cook for a couple hours. That's not convenient.

Canned greenbeans/corn are great for when they're out of season. Same with frozen. Is it better to have fresh veggies? Hell yeah. But if it's winter in new england and I want green beans, Frozen > Canned > beans shipped from 3000 miles away (when cost is considered a factor).
>>
Marco Pierre White - Mon, 16 Sep 2019 02:08:43 EST e/aFcqya No.159868 Reply
1568614123935.jpg -(57658B / 56.31KB, 600x360) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>159865
No no no no no
Canned tomatoes have a different taste from being in the tin. It is not the same
>Theres nothing wrong with frozen vegetables.
Yeah maybe if youre just a cook making some 2nd rate meal for your kids, but Gordon Ramsey would have your ass for that statement.
>>
Alain Senderens - Mon, 16 Sep 2019 04:18:26 EST 7smKBVuw No.159869 Reply
>>159868
Gordon Ramsay is wrong. He's from the UK and has a simple flavor palate. Ignore the TV chef and use lots of spices and don't shy away from using frozen or canned just because of memes. Gordon Ramsay also is confused by pineapple on pizza, so let that sink in.
>>
Paul Thalamas - Mon, 16 Sep 2019 04:38:21 EST It3C0mHQ No.159871 Reply
>>159868
Unless you can somehow get me some fresh San Marzano tomatoes from Italy I'm going to use the canned ones.
>>
Tyler Florence - Mon, 16 Sep 2019 06:57:08 EST 5J5ZvcVT No.159872 Reply
1568631428670.jpg -(114143B / 111.47KB, 1600x1071) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>159868
Eskimos absolutely do use frozen berries to make a cultural delicacy called Akutuq.

Also frozen berries are a great simple healthy snack on a hot summer day.

Also Gordon Ramsay's own website has recipes using frozen berries.

Whoever made that image is retarded.
>>
Raymond Blanc - Mon, 16 Sep 2019 10:26:46 EST Z0KJkHwG No.159875 Reply
>>159868
Nah, that's a bunch of pretentious, self-deluded bullshit. Turn your TV off
>>
Marco Pierre White - Mon, 16 Sep 2019 15:52:19 EST e/aFcqya No.159880 Reply
>>159875
Ok I challenge you.
Go get a fresh black berry and a frozen one. Eat both and then shut the fuck up when you realize one is clearly inferior.
Whats pretentious is your ridiculous defense of shit tier consumer goods over fresh farm to table produce.
It tells me that you dont know how to cook, that or youre just very average.
I took culinary arts for years, I have experience. Who are you?
>>
Alain Senderens - Mon, 16 Sep 2019 15:55:24 EST 7smKBVuw No.159882 Reply
>>159880
No one is buying your delusions, jackass. You are most likely a "chef" that works at mcdonalds.
>>
Anthony Bourdain - Mon, 16 Sep 2019 16:09:10 EST +a8qsbXt No.159883 Reply
>>159880
>REEEEEE I WATCH KITCHEN NIGHTMARES I KNOW MORE THAN YOU
Lol, you're such an uppity fag. I gave you good reasons why certain canned or frozen products can be better than fresh, and all you have in response is "Gordon Ramsey said so."
>>
Alain Senderens - Mon, 16 Sep 2019 16:22:58 EST 7smKBVuw No.159884 Reply
Gordon Ramsay is entertaining and is a legit roast lord. I'm a fan of his shows. But the thing is, on Kitchen Nightmares for example, a lot of the restaurant owners using frozen food are lying about their food being fresh on the menu, which is a legitimate problem. Frozen food isn't the problem, it's lying to the customers that the food is fresh when it isn't that is the issue. Funny how so many wanna be internet chefs miss the whole point.
>>
Michael Symon - Mon, 16 Sep 2019 17:47:06 EST 5WdELw/2 No.159885 Reply
>>159880
>I have experience, who are you?

lmfao it's like something out of a poorly written anime for 13 year olds
>>
Marco Pierre White - Mon, 16 Sep 2019 19:32:26 EST e/aFcqya No.159886 Reply
>>159885
>like something out of a poorly written anime for 13 year olds
What, your life?
>>
>>
Marcelo Zana - Tue, 17 Sep 2019 14:44:07 EST e/aFcqya No.159903 Reply
>>159888
No, I remember being 13 some 10 years ago and noone was even that intelligent at that age (ignoring that it wasnt a strong comeback anyway)

But hey you must be at a pretty low intelligence to think of that even shittier comeback so all is well
>>
Giada De Laurentils - Tue, 17 Sep 2019 14:55:25 EST Z0KJkHwG No.159904 Reply
1568746525261.jpg -(6804B / 6.64KB, 242x208) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>159903
You're not helping your case at all. It's pretty clear at this point you're just an angry child with a severe case of butthurt, pretending to be a master chef and flexing your utter lack of knowledge. The wise thing to do would be to realize and accept that you don't actually know what you're actually talking about, shut your mouth, and move on with your life.
>>
Alain Ducasse - Tue, 17 Sep 2019 20:49:15 EST Gkn23z6r No.159910 Reply
>>159868
>Yeah maybe if youre just a cook making some 2nd rate meal for your kids,
Bruh. Don't denigrate home cooking. That's where all great cuisines originate. That's where most great chefs got their passion.

When freezing berries (and most other foods), the texture gets destroyed. But the flavor is more or less intact. So if you're making a suace, frozen shit is great.

>Canned tomatoes have a different taste from being in the tin. It is not the same
Canned tomatoes are very different from non-canned tomatoes, but not necessarily worse. I would take canned san marzano toms over flavourless winter plum toms any day of the week.

I mean, this is such an ignorant point you're trying to make. In the northeast, there's only a couple months of the year where you can get tomatoes that good by themselves, or good enough for sauce. The rest of the year, the tomatoes taste like fucking styrofoam and are only good enough for sandwiches.

That's just common knowledge. If you're making a sauce past october (at least in the northeast), then canned whole tomatoes are the best option. The plum tomatoes shipped from 3000 miles away are gonna taste like shit.

I always grow a shitload of tomatoes every year, and when I'm overwhelmed with the amount, I freeze that shit at the end of the summer. And you know what? I can make the most delicious marinara in december. Freezing works, and sometimes is better than fresh.
>>
Paul Jullemier - Tue, 17 Sep 2019 23:28:18 EST 5WdELw/2 No.159912 Reply
>>159903
oh shit is this BREWSTERS(tm) Guy again?

are you still out there firing people for eating olives and cooking bar food pretending to be a chef?
>>
Marcus Samuelsson - Thu, 19 Sep 2019 21:14:48 EST qnHVQVsp No.159931 Reply
>>159912
those olives are for the customers ok

you can't just go around being so careless with them
>>
Yutaka Ishinabe - Fri, 20 Sep 2019 18:00:39 EST BbPAH7FB No.159942 Reply
>>159931
Olives are gross, you made the right decision firing those guys but the wrong decision for customer fare
>>
Michael Chiarello - Sat, 28 Sep 2019 18:55:13 EST 7smKBVuw No.159987 Reply
Olive haters need to take their children's palate back to their containment board.
>>
Wolfgang Puck - Sat, 28 Sep 2019 21:44:53 EST XleBvq32 No.159988 Reply
>>159987
it's just a racist dogwhistle don't pay it too much attention
>>
Chuck Hughes - Sun, 29 Sep 2019 10:34:06 EST RuTHJ2oF No.159993 Reply
>>159987
Olive lovers are actually inbred fish people.
>>159988
No, olives are just disgusting. Don't try to shove /pol/ shit into this, fuck off with your boogieman argument.
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Raymond Blanc - Sun, 29 Sep 2019 21:15:27 EST 7smKBVuw No.159997 Reply
Olive haters don't belong in any food discussion, period.
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James MacInnis - Sun, 29 Sep 2019 22:26:51 EST WPM63BV0 No.159998 Reply
>>159997
I wonder how they recompense the fact that it's a commonly used oil.
>>
Raymond Blanc - Sun, 29 Sep 2019 22:45:37 EST 7smKBVuw No.159999 Reply
>>159998
From what I've heard, they wrap themselves up in blankets and curl up in some dark corner while shivering and chanting "olives aren't real... olives aren't real..." all night.
>>
François Pierre de la Varenne - Mon, 30 Sep 2019 09:03:03 EST It3C0mHQ No.160001 Reply
>>159998
That's a dumb argument.
It's like saying someone is stupid for disliking raw tea leaves yet they enjoy a cup of tea.
>>
Toshiro Kandagawa - Mon, 30 Sep 2019 16:32:45 EST hQkkjzhK No.160004 Reply
>>160001
Who eats raw tea leaves? I see what you're saying but that is not a very good comparison.
>>
François Massialot - Mon, 30 Sep 2019 20:12:06 EST WPM63BV0 No.160006 Reply
>>160004
Making an analogy with some other oil would have made more sense but I'm not going to come up with a rebuttal to myself. That's one olive branch too far.
>>
Julia Child - Wed, 02 Oct 2019 07:45:56 EST yungr8fX No.160014 Reply
Op you show a general misunderstanding of how cooking works. The lid keeps water in and letting something sober simmer makes flavors meld generally.

The only universal tips for bringing out flavor are fat and salt.

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