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- Mon, 31 Aug 2015 21:30:52 EST L/We2WuN No.34527
File: 1441071052066.jpg -(51758B / 50.54KB, 960x774) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. software engineers
is anyone hear a software engineer or studying it? im starting collage and am think about studying it because of the high pay. an i have some questions.

>what skills do you need
>what was the biggest surprise about your work, something you did not expect.
>how are bonuses earned
>whats the shittest part about your job.
>what do you do day by day, like whats your day at work look like.
>>
Faggy Blackfield - Mon, 31 Aug 2015 23:51:58 EST ALghvMIf No.34528 Reply
>high pay
Depends where you live, depends what you know, depends on your experience.

>bonuses
Depends if you are offered stock options, and of course depends entirely on the company you work for being bought (and your options not ending up worthless due to shenanigans by the CEO/incoming company to fuck you).

>biggest surprise
Most 'developers' cannot program themselves out of a wet paper bag. you will continually meet people who are great at passing whiteboard code interviews, but can't write quality software worth shit. they magically keep their jobs and end up just pushing paper around and are clever enough to never get involved in any actual development so they aren't exposed.

>day to day
Entirely depends where you work and what kind of job you have. Jr software engineer at big corp, you probably spend all day fighting fires from legacy code rot. If you're a "A team, 10x rockstar devops' at a startup you probably will work a 16hr day for no overtime doing literally everything under the sun. Remote developer you'll be at home and spend a lot of time on skype talking to idiots who constantly change the architecture of what they asked you to build, or you could be mailing it in running automatic scripts and spending all your time creating billing invoices in org-mode.

You could also work for one of those shitty cult startups that just waste time all day. The founder is somebody who really doesn't give a shit and is just there to milk money from VCs, and all you end up doing is jacking it totally off all day with stupid hula hoop hipster bullshit or cringey team building activities.

>skills needed
Be able to program, obviously. Having a background in compsci theory will help you immensely. http://spin.atomicobject.com/2015/05/15/obtaining-thorough-cs-background-online/
>>
Charlotte Grimfuck - Mon, 31 Aug 2015 23:52:36 EST SFwGSzW3 No.34529 Reply
>what skills do you need
Surprisingly little
>what was the biggest surprise about your work, something you did not expect.
How easily people burn out and become alarmingly apathetic about it
>how are bonuses earned
How are what earned?
>whats the shittest part about your job.
Getting up out of bed every day and realizing that I'm using my thirties to accomplish absolutely nothing that's meaningful to me
>what do you do day by day, like whats your day at work look like.
Evading my half-dozen different and contradictory bosses, the three airhead project leads who are obsessed with their jobs to an unhealthy degree, and my socially inept cube mate who won't stop fucking talking about baseball all fucking day. We fucking get it, you like baseball! Nobody gives a flying fuck!
>>
Simon Niggerbury - Tue, 01 Sep 2015 15:28:18 EST YdgNXsy3 No.34534 Reply
1441135698690.png -(37682B / 36.80KB, 715x596) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>34528
>>34529

Exactly what these people said, except for this:

>skills needed
>Be able to program

Doesn't that contradict the earlier part of your post?
>>
Ian Fonningfield - Tue, 01 Sep 2015 17:03:57 EST L/We2WuN No.34538 Reply
>>34528
dude are the classes on that link you posted free?
are there any other sites like that?
>>
Reuben Hecklestot - Wed, 02 Sep 2015 00:25:05 EST 2rtIJJ0k No.34541 Reply
>>34538
Yes and yes.

Besides MIT Open Course ware (http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/), coursera, edx and udacity you can just pick almost any university and look at the current course page and you'll get lecture notes, often recorded lectures, often sample tests and once in a while you'll get the reading assigned as pdf instead of having to find the book. Some universities put these behind paywalls/student logins but many don't bother.

Speaking of books, use library gensis to pirate any overpriced textbook http://libgen.io/
>>
Simon Cimmernere - Fri, 04 Sep 2015 03:23:05 EST UI0/NQ/a No.34548 Reply
>Skills
I have no formal training in CS, did a STEM degree and some programming on the side and was lucky enough to find a junior position that trained me up from scratch. Surprisingly most people in this industry don't have CS degrees, it's usually physics/engineering.

>Surprise
Code quality is pretty much always awful for most projects. Limited time & money mean 90% of the time a lot of corners get cut in order to get features out of the door

>Bonuses
No bonuses for me, this depends on what company you're working for. Startups typically share some form of equity (which is worthless) and you might get performance-related pay at MegaCorp. It's possible to negotiate benefits like flexible working hours & being allowed to work on other projects in your free time.

>Shittest
As others said, a lot of the projects you'll do are fucking terrible CRUD apps that aren't at all meaningful. About every month a potential client will ask for something retarded like "Tinder for Furniture" (unfortunately, that example isn't made up)

>Daily Work
I work at a really small shop with one other dev, at the minute it's really quiet so the whole day is going to be spent on open-source (which is awesome). At regular places you'd probably have 1-2 hours taken up by meetings/coordinating with clients, and the rest of the time either working on specifications or getting distracted by coworkers in a shitty open-plan office.

If you're planning on studying this just for the high pay, you have to be really good at what you do, and there are probably faster ways to make money like finance. There are not many old programmers in the industry, they either burn out, quit, or go and consult.
>>
Shitting Nusslewill - Fri, 04 Sep 2015 13:35:39 EST YdgNXsy3 No.34553 Reply
>>34548
>the whole day is going to be spent on open-source

How does the money work where you're at, if you don't mind me asking?
>>
George Debberdock - Fri, 04 Sep 2015 21:12:00 EST wunF7/Z3 No.34561 Reply
>>34548
Most of the best programmers don't have CS specific degrees, like Charlie Miller of NSA/hacking iOS/hacking cars fame who has a math degree. Don Knuth also has a Math degree and to my knowledge never took any programming courses in University and just taught himself. RMS/Stallman didn't take any computer science courses and took Physics and random Chinese history courses. Sussman is a mathematician too, Dj Bernstein is a mathematician, same with Colin Percival, list goes on and on.
>>
William Smallstone - Fri, 04 Sep 2015 21:19:17 EST UI0/NQ/a No.34562 Reply
>>34553
It's more of a contractor setup than an actual company, but I'm a salaried employee. Pay is a bit below the market rate, but I get a whole lot of freedom and responsibility that would be impossible to get as a junior dev most other places, so it balances out. Work-life balance is far more important than having a few extra thousand in the bank IMO.

>>34561
Depends how you define the best programmers really. I guess one thing they all have in common is that they thoroughly enjoy the field and are willing to spend a lot of time practicing. Education/certification seems to be pretty independent of that.
>>
William Shakeville - Sun, 06 Sep 2015 14:35:02 EST 1jgH3qxE No.34572 Reply
>>34538
Found another course site, this one by Stanford
https://see.stanford.edu/Course#Introduction to Computer Science

Programming Methodology - entirely Java intro to CS course to learn OOP
Programming Abstractions - entirely C++
Programming Paradigms - Lisp, Scheme and C++
>>
Ernest Dovingpeck - Sun, 06 Sep 2015 15:26:04 EST KmxmS4eT No.34573 Reply
>skills
Written and in-person communication skills, conscientiousness and attention to detail, strong Google reflex and Googling skills and patience for reading through search results, writing clean and maintainable code, CS theory (primarily for interviews but it does come up sometimes). Approximately in that order.

>surprise
The huge variance in company cultures. It's very, very worth figuring out what your coworkers and manager and day-to-day at a specific company will be like before signing anything.

>bonuses
Stock options and signing bonuses. Regular cash bonuses only if you work in fintech or if you're good at negotiating.

>negotiating (you didn't ask but I'm telling you)
Never take an initial offer, always try to get a counteroffer. You should get a substantial raise every six months or (at most) year. The salaries reported on sites like glassdoor will skew low if you're any good at your job and any good at negotiation--I have two years of experience and make the supposed "median" salary of a *senior* software engineer in my city. I'm not a wizard, and certainly not the highest-paid person with my level of experience that I know.

>shittiest
I hear it can get boring, if you're not willing/able to move into management or develop your skills enough to become valuable enough to work on the really, really interesting stuff. Dealing with bad legacy code and infrastructure choices can sometimes be a pain.

>day to day
Come in whenever between 9:30 and 11, get breakfast from the kitchen, read and respond to emails, fix bugs and release the bugfixes, develop infrastructure and features, analyze data and answer questions about our data/the product/infrastructure, occasional devops making sure that all our data pipelines are running smoothly, eat snacks and drink coffee, two or three one-hour meetings per week, get lunch and shoot the shit in the lunchroom for half an hour, more of the above until 7 or so. It's very cushy.

>"collage"
Good luck.
>>
Nigger Lightwill - Mon, 14 Sep 2015 16:11:19 EST L/We2WuN No.34623 Reply
QUESTION ABOUT PROGRAMMING

i had a friend who washed out of a physics Ph.D because the math was too fucking hard.

so how hard is the math in programming? not code breaking type shit just normal everyday software engineer level programming.

also can i use my skills to build my own software on the side? how common is that? do people ever make any money from it that you know?
>>
Reuben Wingerfare - Mon, 14 Sep 2015 16:51:08 EST tFPja/JK No.34624 Reply
>>34623
You don't need any math to program, as professional development is about solving problems with computation so if you can solve said problems without needing linear algebra then fine. If you wanted you could just learn full-stack javascript and literally use it for everything from web development to iOS gaming as they keep making more and more abstractions for js (backbone, angular, node, coffeescript, ect).

If you did take math, and analysis of custom algorithms then you can make some pretty awesome things but if your goal is python-django webdev this won't matter
>>
Nell Chillyway - Mon, 14 Sep 2015 18:19:10 EST TN+TsOtU No.34625 Reply
>>34624
It should be stated that while math isn't necessary for programming it may be necessary in order to graduate from a programming program at a school. Make sure to check requisites if that's the direction you're looking at.
>>
Reuben Wingerfare - Mon, 14 Sep 2015 18:35:31 EST tFPja/JK No.34626 Reply
>>34624
Speaking of abstractions, today facebook unveiled React Native for mobile and Relay for backends, so you can literally use React javascript abstraction to program almost anything networked now. http://facebook.github.io/react-native/ it uses the Chromium Developer Tools for debugging as well. nb
>>
Augustus Trotridge - Tue, 15 Sep 2015 07:55:14 EST rbOz0RJG No.34628 Reply
>Skills
I have a degree in CS, plus i'm self-taught in most things hardware and network-related stuff.

>Surprise
How well a database can be made (my company's website DB). It's literally a dream of foreign keys.
How much to shit everything can go when management pushes for a new web store without having the ability to interface with the financial systems. Until I came, a lady sat and copy/pasted orders from webstore to ERP system manually for up to 3-4 hours a day. I'm her hero after I automated that shit...
How little school actually teaches you...
The feel i'm making stuff efficient.

>Bonuses
what is a "bonus"? A town in School?

>Shittiest
How shitty a database design can be (Our financial system)
When shit dun werk because of the aforementioned shitty DB.
The lack of code discipline in the dept. Now I just have to properly teach the CIO good etiquette with git -_-

>Daily Work
I work in a smaller department with 2 other dudes, one does the main website stuff and generic IT support, the other is the CIO. I do not only programming but most of the sysop and security stuff as well.
I always start off with getting a cup of Hacker Brew (aka. coffee)
Then it's off to open VS and hammer the keyboard. If there's emergencies, I take care of them as they come, or pass them on to the proper buddy...

>"collage"
You do know that programming relies heavily on correct spelling don't you?
>>
Fuck Fobberdock - Tue, 15 Sep 2015 08:15:15 EST eweWjeNi No.34631 Reply
>what skills do you need
text editing
>what was the biggest surprise about your work, something you did not expect.
>how are bonuses earned
a bonus! hah.
>whats the shittest part about your job.
testing IE browsers
>what do you do day by day, like whats your day at work look like.
edit text and view web applications
>>
Archie Crapperhall - Tue, 15 Sep 2015 19:21:39 EST ye2oh+to No.34632 Reply
>what skills do you need
Enjoy technology, understand enough about every level of the stack your company works with to be useful or at least have an opinion on things. You can't learn enthusiasm for tech.
>what was the biggest surprise about your work, something you did not expect.
Most people don't have enthusiasm and are lazy as fuck.
>how are bonuses earned
I get 10% of my salary bonus each year. 25% of that is dependent on the company as a whole meeting certain financial targets in the year, the other 75% are my successes and reviews, referrals etc. Pretty much guaranteed.
>whats the shittest part about your job.
Agile. Fuck agile, just let me work.
>what do you do day by day, like whats your day at work look like.
Meet with business analysts, they tell me what new features the business need to do their jobs, improve productivity, etc. I give them an idea of what is definitely possible, what is probably possible and what is definitely not possible, with timescales.

UK btw.
>>
Hugh Worthingham - Wed, 11 Nov 2015 13:48:37 EST Htp4S49O No.34818 Reply
1447267717781.jpg -(67493B / 65.91KB, 500x479) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
I started to sign up for classes today. An I have some questions.


>why the fuck do I need to take every calculus class my college offers?
>why do I have to take three levels of college level physics?
>why am I doing more math then coding?

I feel like there wasting my time / trying to suck every last dollar out of me.

SO MY SOME OTHER QUESTIONS I HAVE.
>how much math do you use?
>are they trying to fuck me?
>general advice?

To me I think of those 15 year old nerds who are coding freaks and do amazing things with computer. Did they have to take 8000 credit hours of calculus to get these skills? I think not. So I'm just wondering how it's going to help me be good and get a job.
>>
Fuck Blythelock - Wed, 11 Nov 2015 15:22:29 EST 5q2tULje No.34819 Reply
>>34818
Computer Science isn't about writing code. It's about the theory of computing and research into algorithms. You need to have a good deal of math skills to rigorously define computing theory and describe and investigate algorithms.
Just download a few research papers on a topic that interests you, if you need motivation to learn the math, you'll notice you'll _really_ need it.
>>
Otis - Wed, 11 Nov 2015 23:21:08 EST GpLu/LtD No.34824 Reply
1447302068928.jpg -(128108B / 125.11KB, 537x720) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
Hey OP, I've been working as a software engineer for about 2.5 years now since I finished school.

>what skills do you need
A strong foundation in problem solving. Being able to think outside the box.
Also, The ability to learn something new, pick it up quick, and then apply it in a practical manner.

>what was the biggest surprise about your work, something you did not expect.
I am continuously surprised about how inefficient businesses are. I came to the realization a while back that businesses don't have to efficient to rake in the cash, they just have to be slightly better then the competition.

>how are bonuses earned
Uhhh... I got a gift card to a steak house for my last bonus... It was pretty weak, but I have gotten a number of raises which I'd prefer any day over a bonus.

>whats the shittest part about your job.
There are two shitty things about my job.
  1. I hate writing technical documentation, its incredibly boring and no one reads it anyway...
  2. Managing third party vendors. Currently, I'm stuck in this bi-weekly meeting where we have about 6 different vendors on the call. Since we are the customer we have to coral them into building the solution we need. Everyone's in different time zones and it becomes very difficult when you cant get these vendors to agree to one solution. Theres also a lot of miscommunication and overall dev time is about a tenth as fast then if we were to built the damn thing in house.

>what do you do day by day, like whats your day at work look like.
First thing I do when I get in is check my email, its a good way to wake up in the morning. Then i usually walk around the office and say hi and talk to coworkers for bit. After that I'll write down my to do list for the day and get to it. Sprinkle in around 2 hours of meetings and the occasional drive by feature request and thats about it.
>>
Polly Drabbergold - Mon, 16 Nov 2015 05:10:53 EST HkC6SEOq No.34834 Reply
1447668653587.png -(19544B / 19.09KB, 535x233) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>34527
all of these questions could be answered by a simple google, if you're going to program for the money you're going into the wrong profession. You can apply this to literally anything in life. Here is a screenshot of some "skills" an employer would look for, this varies by what you want to do, really depends on what the company is looking for, you should do your own research if you're actually interested
>>
Sidney Gemblehere - Mon, 16 Nov 2015 22:44:36 EST JUqZi273 No.34836 Reply
>>34834
I think OP was looking for something more than technical qualifications and resumespeak.
>>
David Gandlecheck - Tue, 15 Dec 2015 14:05:52 EST 5q2tULje No.34891 Reply
1450206352690.gif -(123239B / 120.35KB, 232x200) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>34834
> Experience with Agile software development methodologies.
> Experience with Graphic Design, Photoshop is desirable.

Crap like this makes me so mad.
>>
Rebecca Gicklekork - Mon, 04 Apr 2016 13:20:37 EST usGwHvzg No.35439 Reply
>>34818
You need math to teach yourself how to reason and go through all the mind-fucks of algorithms
>>
Priscilla Drublingpotch - Thu, 07 Apr 2016 01:15:25 EST oZPR2pbJ No.35445 Reply
>>34818
>what skills do you need
  • be able to communicate well (especially with laymen who have no idea how a computer works, or what kind of things it can and can't do) in order to discern what the problem to solve is
  • be able to solve a problem, or decompose a large problem into a series of smaller ones (and then solve those)
  • be able to write a solution to a problem in a modern programming language
  • be able to quickly learn a new language, library, or tool (Languages, libraries, and tools come and go all the time, so you better get used to it!)

>how much math do you use?
Enough to do the first 75 problems of Project Euler with ease. ( https://projecteuler.net/archives ) The math is important so (a) you can write an algorithm that doesn't take eternity to finish, and (b) you can quickly recognize common patterns, so you don't waste time struggling to solve them. (For example, when you see a sequence of 0,1,3,6,10,..., you should know that these are the triangle numbers, and that the formula for generating them is n(n+1)/2 . oeis.org is a great site for looking stuff like this up.) Differential and Integral calculus isn't important, but they make you take it anyways. Don't feel too bad if you scrape by with a B or C. I took only 4 semesters of it. The classes you should take are Symbolic Logic and Discrete Math. (Your exact class names may be different.)
>are they trying to fuck me?
Maybe with the physics. I never had to take that much. I took 4 semesters of chemistry, 1 semester (intro) of biology, and 1 semester (intro) of geology. (If you want a BA instead of a BS you can probably do less hard science.)
>general advice?
Write code every day. (It'll take 3 years before you start producing code that doesn't disgust you a year later.) Start by writing **small** programs. (Don't expect to write a video game, even something "simple" like Pacman, after just a year of study. If/When you do get around to writing a game, don't bother with 3d graphics; You'd spend 9 hours tinkering and struggling with them for every 1 hour you'd spend improving something else about the game.)

Don't neglect your physical health. Your youthful vigor will not last forever. Your health peaks at 25 and slowly declines after that. Eating junk food all the time will make you sick and fat. Not exercising will sap your stamina and make your body ache. Never washing your clothes will make you ill and give you cold sweats. Never brushing your teeth will break your bank 5 years later when you need $4k worth of dental work done.

Most importantly: Don't fucking spend all your free time on 4chan, or playing video games, or watching anime, only to realize 4 years later that you didn't make any friends.
>>
Epok - Sun, 10 Apr 2016 19:55:38 EST 9IeR6FBG No.35460 Reply
>>35445 Thank you for this wake up call. I'm on my second semester of some comp-science ish bachelor, and I'm falling a bit behind on both my physical health and school. I realize I'm the weakest on algorithms and recognizing patterns, so I better start there. Thanks again, much appreciated.
>>
Eugene Tootshaw - Tue, 12 Apr 2016 04:45:38 EST hFDFtj8J No.35473 Reply
>>34534
It's something you probably noticed by now in college.

Some people just straight up can't.


>>34548
>Code quality is pretty much always awful for most projects. Limited time & money mean 90% of the time a lot of corners get cut in order to get features out of the door

That's the one that's starting to piss me off. Go through the interview. Hear them preach TDD like it's gods gift to man get there day one 0% test case coverage on a multi million line system. Don't even get me started on the 1 GB single deployment "micro architecture".

Or the other one that's been getting me. Do you know how much documentation survives in a state where it can even be found by the time I get to it. None of it. I have years experience on multiple legacy migration projects, I have never seen a single line of documentation on a system older than 5 years. But every greenfield project ooo we have to keep it all in the sharepoint, it's a deliverable, super serious. Every college class reinforces it too. You're precious project share point will be quietly deleted 3-4 years after the project ends when the servers roi has appreciated and no one will notice. I promise you with absolute certainty no one will ever read that ever again, make sure any important documentation always lives in the repository with the code.
>>
Shitting Hiffingson - Wed, 13 Apr 2016 19:24:25 EST oZPR2pbJ No.35486 Reply
>>35460
I'm glad that I could help.

>>35445
>Don't fucking spend all your free time on the future
>future
I meant to say "computer". I dunno what happened there.

>>35473
>That's the one that's starting to piss me off. Go through the interview. Hear them preach TDD like it's gods gift to man get there day one 0% test case coverage on a multi million line system. Don't even get me started on the 1 GB single deployment "micro architecture".
Also, most "programmers" can't program their way out of a paper bag. Then again, there's only so much you can do when you're using Java and similar languages; They just don't let you do things The Right Way.

To take a little tangent, I think that the future of programming (partly) relies on creating (and using!!!) languages that prevent errors from ever happening at run-time. Instead, any possible error shows up at compile-time, and forces you to fix it before compiling. For example, Elm ( http://elm-lang.org/ ) has done just this.
(1) 'head' doesn't have a signature of 'List a -> a' like in Haskell, but 'List a -> Maybe a'. ( http://package.elm-lang.org/packages/elm-lang/core/3.0.0/List#head ), and 'maximum' has a signature of 'List comparable -> Maybe comparable' instead of 'List comparable -> comparable'. ( http://package.elm-lang.org/packages/elm-lang/core/3.0.0/List#maximum )
(2) It checks that a case-of statement covers *every* constructor; If it doesn't, then that's a compile-time error.
(3) Every function is pure unless it's wrapped in a 'Signal'.

A thing I'd like to see enshrined in a language construct is the ability to clone a new type from an existing type. That is, I'd like to quickly create a new type 'Feet' and 'Meter' from the existing type 'Int', be able to quickly do 'Feet + Feet' or 'Meter + Meter' the same way you can do 'Int + Int', but have the compiler catch and deny 'Feet + Meter' (and 'Feet + Int' !), because there you probably meant to convert Meters to Feet, or vice-versa, but forgot. It's 2016, we shouldn't still be haunted by the mistake that killed the 1999 Mars Probe.
>>
Esther Mollyham - Thu, 14 Apr 2016 22:20:00 EST gNOZKk39 No.35489 Reply
>I think that the future of programming (partly) relies on creating (and using!!!) languages that prevent errors from ever happening at run-time. Instead, any possible error shows up at compile-time, and forces you to fix it before compiling. For example, Elm ( http://elm-lang.org/ ) has done just this.

You mean type errors? Languages and paradigms are not silver bullets and never will be. I'm convinced that persistent programming problems are intractable.
>>
Shitting Gudgecocke - Fri, 15 Apr 2016 02:24:02 EST oZPR2pbJ No.35490 Reply
>>35489
>You mean type errors?
I'm not sure you understood what I said... but, basically, I mean I'd rather have a compile-time error (Type errors are (usually) one such error of this kind.) than a run-time error. I'm not saying that it's a silver bullet, but only that it's better than what it came before it.

>I'm convinced that persistent programming problems are intractable.
I hope that you don't think that confusing feet with meters is an intractable problem.
>>
Frederick Peblingbutch - Wed, 23 Nov 2016 15:12:27 EST QFj3NJQM No.36310 Reply
shittiest part is the fucking meetings

fun part is not finding a solution from stackoverflow or github and building it yourself
>>
Eugene Sickleridge - Mon, 28 Nov 2016 15:56:10 EST o7NpBz5X No.36336 Reply
>>35486
So I'm kind of surprised to see someone trying to sell functional programming on here. Maybe you just haven't been around much yet, but "software people" do not want to use a functional programming language. Yes it would make them better programmers for learning it and would solve (or allow the automated solution of) many of their problems, but there is not an ice cube's chance in hell that anything other than Java, Microsoft's languages, C++, and other related atrocities will be used in the vast majority of applications. The reasons for this are social and political. Is it terrible that formal program verification is not being used on vehicles and in implants where program failure could cost human lives? Yes, but you would be better off not wasting your own life in trying to save all those lives lost to memory leaks.

There are limited real-world uses of functional languages in finance and in academia they are much more prevalent. Mathematicians and computer scientists do that stuff all the time. I do use Python for a lot of things myself, so I'm not a total fanatic when it comes to functional programming, but even Python would be an improvement over the state of things in commercial software development right now.
>>
Samuel Dadgenine - Sun, 01 Jan 2017 16:56:09 EST e7bTcYy7 No.36437 Reply
>>36336
Idk man, Scala hits a nice sweet spot for a functional language in a production environment because its compatible with existing java libraries. My employer switched to it a long years ago.
>>
Matilda Hassleham - Sun, 01 Jan 2017 18:55:03 EST D7/rI9fU No.36438 Reply
>>36437
Yeah but you still have to touch Java and are therefore living in sin.

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