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Unity to learn C#?

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- Wed, 08 Jun 2016 18:41:54 EST OfxKUBs6 No.35720
File: 1465425714788.jpg -(71948B / 70.26KB, 1600x1200) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Unity to learn C#?
Is Unity any good for serious C# programming and learning?

I don't want to spend 20% of the time coding while the remaining 80% is fucking around with Unity's GUI. Coding a game sounds cool to me, but not if all the hard work's already been cut out. Then again, I don't feel like creating my own engine from scratch either. I hope there's a nice middle ground there.

I'd like to code in a fun environment and not one that could easily bore me, that's basically it.

Thanks!
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Ernest Dreffingsick - Thu, 09 Jun 2016 00:38:15 EST 4AC8OQBZ No.35721 Reply
>>35720
So use Visual Studio instead of the Unity C# editor. Problem solved. Also it's how all the Unity pros work.
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Esther Chebblepog - Thu, 09 Jun 2016 21:50:50 EST vIbiteGg No.35723 Reply
>>35720
monodevelop is the cleanest IDE I have ever seen.
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Molly Cibblemotch - Thu, 09 Jun 2016 23:58:17 EST vHCDual8 No.35725 Reply
If you mean you feel like you'll spend all your time in the unity editor instead of working in code, that's entirely dependent on what you do. Normally the problem is the opposite, is that kids think they can make a game entirely in the editor which leads to garbage and frustration.

But yeah. You'll have plenty of chance to work on code. I mean, it will be a lot of calls to unity libraries, but it'll be code. My wife went from some light scripting experience, to writing some decent code learning unity. It worked for her.
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Lillian Ginderson - Tue, 28 Jun 2016 21:30:00 EST 29+Ja+IX No.35780 Reply
>>35720
In case you come back;
yeah its fine to do it in the editor.
But maybe get yourself a professional IDE environment like Visual Studio.
This way you aren't just learning how to code but also learning the actual Layout of the IDE environments.
If you need to know how to code, Unity IDE is fine.
If you want to be professional about it, learn to code in the business standard IDE
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Beatrice Worthingwill - Sun, 10 Jul 2016 11:42:44 EST qg7gFP0K No.35835 Reply
1468165364720.jpg -(573223B / 559.79KB, 1000x1719) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
I was away for a while so sorry for that, but thanks a lot for your replies. It's all noted. I would use VS for sure.

I really love programming and using algorithms way more than focusing on graphics and such, that's for sure. Hence why Unity put (and kinda still puts) me off a bit. I have to say I prefer C++ to C# too, to be honest. But I'm willing to learn.

Sometimes I wish graphics weren't that advanced these days. That doesn't facilitate things for me; making it enjoyable to play all the while making it look good. Any idea what kind of game I should aim for to avoid spending too much time on graphics? E.g. Platformers (although some still can get damn fancy).

Thanks and if you have more advice on that, that'd be awesome!

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