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What is the cheapest way to add co-op support to my video game?

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- Sun, 20 Aug 2017 23:17:46 EST 9venZ0d6 No.37160
File: 1503285466870.jpg -(633274B / 618.43KB, 1745x1229) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. What is the cheapest way to add co-op support to my video game?
I want my players to be able to play co-op but portforwarding and explicitly hosting a server would kill off a lot of potential players. Aside from hosting servers myself, is there a way to let people play co-op without anyone allowing incoming traffic from the internet?
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Ernest Waddledale - Mon, 21 Aug 2017 13:23:00 EST bkh8m0qR No.37161 Reply
You can use a server to mediate the network transversal of two clients and then let them talk to each other. That's how WebRTC works and it's dirt cheap to run the server.
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Charles Gallylat - Thu, 24 Aug 2017 11:55:42 EST 9QSfnS0r No.37163 Reply
The steam framework has a multiplayer network api that is sort of "free" to use, with the exception that your game will now be locked into their platform.
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Polly Choffinggold - Sat, 26 Aug 2017 15:49:38 EST P6PS9CBz No.37167 Reply
You can try NAT traversal techniques like hole-punching, but there's still going to be some routers that won't let people host game sessions without explicit port-forwarding.

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