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functionalCS/learnAIfromscratch cringe 3.0 as old thread died

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- Tue, 17 Aug 2021 23:25:07 EST x6K3CZQk No.39739
File: 1629257107033.jpg -(357377B / 349.00KB, 1280x720) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. functionalCS/learnAIfromscratch cringe 3.0 as old thread died
lying drones over Sweden https://youtu.be/qKDcBK_B-bw though the sound is trash https://youtu.be/Bdywzwu4a-ki if you fan video, fix the sound because you now know how to do so, with the meme curriculum.

I will make drone workshop maybe in learndronesfromscratch sometime as I'm writing drone software now, mainly because it's so terrifying https://youtu.be/ZiO2dq78mZI but all anons should get invovled in this kind of work, what is going on in x field? it's worse than you thought.

FunctionalCS is 1.0 alpha. Learnaifromscratch.github.io is beta. The final version I make my own curriculum on youtube and build an anon army. If I get into X tech, I will shill to them that I can train the next generation of employees to be here. Not that I want anons to be wagies or slaves to Bezos or Minsky, but we can manipulate the game and just get in to see 'what goes on here?' https://functionalcs.github.io/curriculum/ is alpha, there we learn with no help at all, it's the first attempt.

https://learnaifromscratch.github.io/ is the second attempt, an AI specific 'workshop' there we learn roughly most of functionalCS in efficient courses I've found that are the same curriculum as functionalcs, this is a deliberate attempt to bypass the credentials of 'ML engineer' so anons can work for places like Algorithmia AI marketplace or get into MBZAI, but it's also an attempt to get into various bigtech/wallstreet tech, because if you haven't noticed many of the profs I've chosen speak at certain companies so I decided to roll with them and it was rewarding, I've never learned so much from these profs and now I kind of 'get it', the concept I took for granted earlier is a much bigger subject about computational theory and that's what we're doing if it's not obvious.

There is way too many workshops for learnai because the subject is AI with a huge prereq list of annoying stats (do we need stats? another goal of learnAI is all of this is this needed?, you decide), but some random anon who just wants to destroy their way into bigtech, if you do CS19 you're good, despite what everyone has told you, plus I made algorithms.html but you are even better than all those uni internships because none of them want to work there, whereas we would like to parachute in there and see what goes on in these kinds of companies. No really they want to work for Google and get some kind of L8 salary or Facebook so we're poaching what they have left on the table to chase a non-existent comfortable positions (until your performance review, tip they fire everyone, but not us).

Anyway my promise is to infiltrate and teach you what you need to know to get in there too. I have a background of doing this, writing for 'Infiltration Zine' since I was a teenager. I have articles in 2600 magazine where they sent me clothing and I replied 'hey I'm supposed to be anonymous'. There's a few cringe articles I wrote there and for infiltration I won't post here, one is where I climbed a suspension bridge and kicked open the door to get to the top of the cables and broadcast a pirate radio signal, and then filmed a very cringe video that ended up on crimestoppers but thankfully nobody snitched me out, so I'm returning the favor, no snitching you aren't ivy league grads but it doesn't matter, you will know (well, most of what they know, they are the best schools with personalized assistance) what they (well, mostly) know but you have taught yourself, and it worked for me to excell in HK finance. Literally not a single person I met in HK that I worked with, including highly talented frenchmen who knew OCaml, could finish a single CS19 assigment. It's a hard course, but can you figure it out? You're already better than everybody I hired in HK.

>You
Every other anon should copy what I'm doing and make their own workshop for whatever they are interested in so I can also take their courses, I'd like to speak Latin or ancient Greek, I'd like to understand the cutting edge of modern philosophy whatever that is, I'd like to speak another language besides Mandarin, English and Russian, I'd like to understand how agriculture works so I can get the fuck out of where I am and live in a remote farm when I quit JS and get out of Tribeca. I'd like to build a house there too if you can teach me. I'd like to make games, etc.

I write my meme curriculum purposely in the most basic html format because I've been around the world and nobody has functioning internet anywhere, I designed it so if you're on a phone you can complete it, the entire meme curriculm on a phone. Have you guys been to middle of nowhere Indonesia and have seen kids with phones and nobody owns a laptop? That's what you should strive for, make your own repl if you have to like code.pyret.org that's something I will try after memeAI is done.

Anyway there is no 'high iq' needed or 'early programing knowlege' like being 13yo and writing algorithms needed. Just put in the work, you'll be fine and crush everybody else..... hint: nobody puts in the work like you do. Good luck anons.
>>
Caroline Gabblecocke - Wed, 18 Aug 2021 00:53:49 EST x6K3CZQk No.39742 Reply
>>39739
Btw, I highly recommend you do the material yourself, entirely by yourself, and THEN contact the profs we all know about directly, they will help you. Never, ever mention that 'oh hey check out this site where this guy does all your assignments and posts lectures'. Even the lectures that are public on YouTube, I'm still getting sued by certain schools for doing the assignments and posting solutions even if they are also public, it doesn't matter. Currently being sued by two universities actually for literally just writing a walkthrough, kind of hilarious.

Anyway don't mention anything except 'i found you online and did you shit, can you help me' and they will but don't step to them with 'how can I make money' or ask to be spoonfed, and more importantly, don't mention the meme curriculum because then even more lawyers I can only handle the 4 law firms currently suing me. Any more and I need to move back to HK
>>
Archie Cissledock - Wed, 18 Aug 2021 22:20:23 EST gG7d++dT No.39744 Reply
Excellent to see a new thread OP.
Can you say more about your job in hong kong? I think it'd be very useful to know what goes on inside of a company like that.
What to expect in terms of workload and how good your colleagues actually are.
If those guys really can't do CS19 problems then it should be really easy to get in there if one is just CS19 tier good.
Lets say I can do CS19 and high school math is that enough? What kind of software do those companies use? This is all super interesting stuff so I'd love to hear what you have to say.

>I'd like to understand the cutting edge of modern philosophy
Western ("analytic") philosophy is heavily epistemology focused these days. If you go to a philosophy department in an english speaking country you will mostly find analytic philosophers.
This "epistemic turn" is very stem friendly because you can use theorem proving software to prove the logical validity and logical entailments of arguments.
This is cool because you can btfo people with formal logic and derive crazy conclusions from arguments.
Example: there exist attempts to prove that Kurt Godels ontological argument for God is logically valid. That means if it's valid and the premises are true then God exists.
There has also been a lot of specialisation so noone builds a giant Kant or Hegel tier system that addresses all areas of philosophy.
In philosophy of mind there has been a return of non-materialist approaches of consciousness. Check out David Chalmers or Bernardo Kastrup.
The real cutting edge in philosophy of mind these days is with the Integrated Information Theorists (Christoph Koch et al) and the Qualia Research Institute guys. Both groups try to mathematically model consciousness. QRI also does research on psychedelics which users of this forum would probably enjoy.
There that's my contribution and I hope other anons can contribute something similar. Let a thousand meme curriculae bloom.
I finish this post with a song:
https://goreshit.bandcamp.com/track/alleau
>>
Edward Wushtadge - Thu, 19 Aug 2021 06:47:25 EST juxEsbh+ No.39747 Reply
Brainstorming ideas to prevent censorship:
How can we prevent the meme curriculae from censorship?
>clone learnai git repo
>set up alternate sites witht same html
>maybe deliver text content over dns for the meme: https://jacobkiers.net/hod/
>shill torrents on torrent sites
>sneak torrents into torrent trackers
>compile meme curriculae into pdf and uoad to libgen
>get xah lee to mirror meme curriculae on personal website
>print meme curriculae onto t shirt, hat
>upload meme curriculum audiobook to youtube voiced by man with comical accent
>have xah lee do meme curriculum audiobook

How can we get new courseware?
>recruit elite college students academics and college staff to leak courseware
>encourage them to recruit others
>encourage elite tech company employees to “describe their work” itt
>encourage them to recruit others
>>
George Gonnerchod - Fri, 20 Aug 2021 16:39:21 EST mA1iEkzD No.39749 Reply
because this is a new thread and the thread needs more intrusion I will recommend a few ideas for software project.
  1. cardano app any random shit
  2. boru but for more than images. Also pdfs social networking link aggregation all with the same booru style tag model. Then build a content recommender based on some new arxiv meme ai paper.
  3. scientific calculator with obscure functions not found in mainstream calculators. functions domain specific. Go on arxiv find paper “a new algorithm to calculate x”
implent in julia ocaml haskell python?
4. Custom database again you want to implement some brand new feature from a new arxiv paper that noone else has implemented yet.
5. auto code obfucator (like a compilator compilates language to same language but unreadable can do this in functional languages comm on for compilators)
6. Any random program BUT you have contacts into academia you know someone is working on a paper to feature X with a new algoirthm you talk to them and let them tell you their idea before piblication. Boom you are first person on planet to implement algorithm in a real progrem.
>>
Walter Blackwater - Fri, 20 Aug 2021 21:23:47 EST R+Xj7YSN No.39750 Reply
Op, if you dont mind and have some free time, can you make an anonymous github where you upload your code for the various courses(which im hoping you still have) you did on functional cs curriculum and learnaifromscratch tripos? it would help me compare my code to yours. Thanks!
>>
Clara Brerrynore - Fri, 20 Aug 2021 22:12:23 EST b/9PF5hs No.39751 Reply
>>39750
He already has accounts for functionalcs and learnai static sites which he uses to update them. Would probably be more efficient to use one of those accounts unless he’s worried about the account hypothetically being deleted and hypothetically the github.io pages also being deleted.
I’m not sure what degree of opsec he needs (wether he could get sued for posting that code) and it’s probably not wise to discuss such matters on a public forum like this.
>>
Clara Brerrynore - Fri, 20 Aug 2021 23:04:51 EST b/9PF5hs No.39752 Reply
Another idea: do machine learning algorithms targeted towards crypto users (like ai fraud detection) and rent access to them out on singukaritynet. It’s like algorithmia that ai marketplace but with crypto.
>>
Ernest Bommlebanks - Sat, 21 Aug 2021 09:35:27 EST eG+9L7bN No.39753 Reply
>>39742
OP what is your opinion of Google Summer of Code?
>>
Graham Demmlewon - Sat, 21 Aug 2021 13:56:17 EST cVF1KCkH No.39754 Reply
>>39749 Here are new ideas:
>tooling for small languages (ocaml) yaron minsky says they need better tooling.
>niche software for small industries
>TUTORIALS: intermediate tutorials that go beyond python for retards and teach you data structures/algortihms/advanced languages
>niche educational content for small languages. why isnt there a youtube channel with tutorials for something like ATS or F*?
>why isnt there just a big channel that teaches you haskell or ocaml?
>encrypted messaging app for niche demographics. built in market place where you can pay in crypto. can be marketed at whatever niche you want where people need messaging functionality and payments in one app.
>local business directory
>onboarding tool where you help businesses set up crypto payment infrastructure. market to people who want to learn about crypto.
>torrent tracker and recommendation algorithm.
>>
Graham Demmlewon - Sat, 21 Aug 2021 14:06:04 EST cVF1KCkH No.39755 Reply
op where the fuck are you? do you like my ideas? love you man
>>
Samuel Pegglewag - Sun, 22 Aug 2021 04:01:46 EST x6K3CZQk No.39760 Reply
>>39758
I saw that, it's basically most of PAPL but for kids in grade 6, and that's the reality of what we are doing now. Kids in Grade 6 do everything we're doing. You could prob easily do it back then too, and that's really the whole point of the meme curriculum that anybody can do this it's just a bunch of recipes you follow and logic you deduce that a grade 6 kid could follow too, except the Putnam which we'll see is crazy hard and crazy rewarding, you learn how they substitute and move shit around there as tricks to solve problems.

I started the meme crypto (post-quantum) curriculum today, there's a lot of vids to watch because she goes into way more detail than the slides but since I'm workout now, I just ride a bike and cast it to a TV since I have to ride a bike anyway. These are great lectures because they are European perspective, she actually shows the NSA database in Utah that harvests all our data. I laughed out loud when she showed that, you'd never see it in other crypto courses. No ECC, no number theory, it's all changed. We're doing graphs now so if you know CS19, you know crypto. The entire CP4 book is on graphs too we'll eventually see. tl;dr we will know everything there is to know about programming graphs at current snapshot in time.

>>39749
>auto code obfucator (like a compilator compilates language to same language but unreadable can do this in functional languages comm on for compilators)
Already exists and they hire common lisp developers apply to grammatech, they produce codesurfer/x86 which when it has access to source code using a scheme API you can modify the control flow graph of each procedure directly, relinking everything even the stuff you don't have source for. It's the ultimate malware hackers tool and they hire all the time. You want to do this then do the algorithms meme workshop in common lisp or the crypto workshop in scheme/lisp. Sussman's new book is also one of the best books out there for advanced programming, rewriting matching algorithms from scratch and his insane propogating system that can update itself in Scheme.

If nobody has ever programming in Lisp/Scheme I recommend you try sometime, there is no hardcoded tests because you just cut + paste some algorithm you wrote and test it in memory immediately hitting it with any property-based tests you can think of, and this is run live in an interpreter there is no compiling until you later decide. The compiler itself is lisp all the way down so you can intuitively understand the whole thing without needing documentation, OCaml is (sometimes) like this too, or rather Standard ML, you can intuitively understand the whole toolchain just looking at the signatures. That's why I shill these langs because it's so easy. Reminder you can do the entire meme curriculum in mit-scheme if you wanted and you would not have a problem finding employment, by doing all these concepts in a very easy language that req you to rewrite everything yourself, you're good to go for any other languages so long as you pass those awful coderpad or hackerrank interviews.

>>39753
You get money to work on some open source project, so it's just 2.5m of work, OpenBSD also does a similar thing every year (before coronachan) where you spend a few weeks in Europe paid for and write a large amount of whatever software they are working on. If you qualify to get in it would be great to do

>>39750
I have all the answers for 15-210 assignments posted on functionalCS git and iirc 15-150 as well, but they will delete stuff so I don't do it often. LearnAI we either have the prof answers or I post enough of them anons can figure out the rest in CS19. You can get them yourself, search github for the filename of the assignment every semester but they get deleted quickly.

>>39744
HK there are recruiters everywhere and they even negotiate your salary if you want, they are full service employment consultants that appear out of everywhere when you arrive in my case. The way they do business there is nothing like here, they absolutely hate anybody who self promotes or is not modest about everything they do, or who doesn't defer 100% to whatever manager. They believe all of us westerners are highly arrogant and naive, they will test you as well giving you every opportunity to sell out your boss when the big boss shows up from Singapore or whatever, their prejudice is that we will jump at the chance to throw that useless tit under the bus so they try it on you believing you will throw them under the bus too when it comes down to it, they think we have no duty to loyalty which personally I don't, my manager there was a goof and constantly fucked up everything I could have done his job in my sleep but because I didn't sell him out the first chance I got they ended up showering me in rewards indirectly, very odd culture totally alien from the west. The people you hire, you will get 2nd rate devs because the first rate devs are all snatched up by enormous engineering companies and paid $1m a year. You will get guys like us, who just want to work and are working class plebs. These guys all easily passed CS19 when I was there and became great developers and none of them jumped to a higher salary, because they saw the worth in staying because I was constantly teaching them and recommending them for promotions. Whenever the founder asked me a trick question to see if I would promote myself, I always promoted them instead and some of those guys are now in Shanghai making stupid money because hilariously, covid made a ton of finance tech corps obscene money. JS had their best year ever and the place I worked at also had their best year last I heard. Stupid, stupid money liek 50% increase in a single year https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-06-18/jane-street-and-drw-traders-made-billions-in-pandemic-markets

Everything has changed though anon post Wuhan flu and HK handover to Beijing so who knows what it's like now, lot's of foreigners left if not all of them, primarily not just because of the peking coof but because during that time there were guys paid by Beijing swinging metal rods in the streets and around MTR stations and police refused to intervene. It's all a guessing game now, but anybody can still get into it if they want they just magically adjusted my visa when I was there to claim I was now fine to work and live, but now the entire globe has changed, I can't even leave my country legally right now still after 1.5 yrs of wuhan flu so can't exactly shill HK as a place to go anymore. If you do go avoid the MTR, it's where the communist dudes swinging metal rods were and don't get caught slipping in popular bar districts at night, they patrolled around there too trying to find some foreigner or guy dressed in all protester black to jump. Get a taxi/uber everywhere.
>>
Betsy Senninglock - Sun, 22 Aug 2021 09:43:48 EST ZUMV0LHr No.39761 Reply
>>39739
I've made an onion mirror hnbtncheqbkjjwal6snysw5pdwnlwjlynfdovnaxkihvbpz3zfklnqid dot onion
>>
Jenny Bardshit - Sun, 22 Aug 2021 15:50:27 EST QH59vrHc No.39764 Reply
>>39760
Thanks for that advice about hong kong. I would like to speak to hkers at some point. I don’t have enough experience with them to say anything about their culture.
Maybe I’ll work remotely for a HK or Singaporean business for a while to see what the culture there is like.

Do you think the demand for cryptographers is similar to that for security or ML professionals? A priori I would expect that to be true since Cryptography is highly security relevant and requires math skills likeML.
Since the math skills require a high barrier to entry you would expect to see a low supply of qualified cryptographers.
>>
Jenny Fommerkag - Mon, 23 Aug 2021 08:57:52 EST mtPPT+lG No.39766 Reply
By the way OP if you want I can teach you philosophy and I have a friend who is studying latin and might be willing to help you learn it when he gets good enough.
>>
Hedda Himmerdadge - Mon, 23 Aug 2021 12:10:58 EST DygZ0k8s No.39767 Reply
>>39739
Hey OP, you inspired me to go crazy hard on this stuff. 10+ hours a day. Also full-time school and making trading bots on the side. After a few days I'm on the Data Scripting assignment. Anyways I wanted to tell you about a few errors / clarifications I have encountered in software.html.

In the Sortacle section, "Next is a sort validation function that consumes two sorted lists of type person." In the assignment - "Write a function that determines whether the second input is a sorted version of the first." So the first list doesn't necessarily have to be sorted.

Question 5 Big-O lab. we know that the length function of 1 list is O([k -> k]) then we can simply call length function twice, one after another and add. O([k + m -> k + m]) which is in O([k -> k]). Maybe we are not allowed to call another function inside, but the question didn't specify that we cannot. Also I don't understand dbl-count call in cases list2. There is only 1 argument when dbl-count has 2 parameters.

Question 6 Big-O lab. k calls with k operations on each. O(k) = k^2. It is a little ambiguous, but I think the next function call is still in the outer function because they said "the program also calls" implying we are not inside the initial k^2 calls. Then k elements with k^2 operations on each = k^3. k^3 + k^2 = O([k -> k^3])
>>
Jack Chamblemene - Mon, 23 Aug 2021 22:47:19 EST RZqZTmhk No.39768 Reply
>study graph theory 16 hour day
>machine learning to parse massive databases
>work for palantir or quant finance
>$$$
>>
Hamilton Busslestark - Tue, 24 Aug 2021 02:58:29 EST Yiinumeg No.39770 Reply
>>39760
OP this might be a dumb question. I have been following software.html but I do not know how to submit assignments or access labs.
>>
Matilda Turveyway - Fri, 27 Aug 2021 20:17:06 EST IV7uJsDf No.39776 Reply
have just finished the lex fridman podcast with charles Hoskinson.
hoskinson has mentioned that he wants to support a center for researching automatic theorem provers with 20 million dollars.
hoskinson and the Cardano community seem cool.
Maybe some anons should contact him maybe he’ll teach you something cool or hire you. Or you meet someone cool to collaborate with.
>>
Jenny Breggleford - Mon, 30 Aug 2021 20:56:09 EST 1vQXaxO/ No.39779 Reply
>>39739
Hey OP, I really want to thank you for everything you have done for us random anons.
>>
Barnaby Deddlecocke - Mon, 30 Aug 2021 22:12:06 EST bbGV0mXK No.39780 Reply
>>39779
Same. It is rare that I run into people that are smart, skilled and kind at the same time.
We love you OP!
>>
Phoebe Ninnernone - Wed, 01 Sep 2021 03:02:37 EST a2HqXmJH No.39782 Reply
>>39781
There aren’t multiple people in this thread and the threads before it?
>>
Hedda Simbleville - Wed, 01 Sep 2021 12:30:24 EST PwOEyh9C No.39784 Reply
OP do you think it's too late/waste of time to go to uni at 23+? I already make money and support myself working remotely but I want to go to a different country to study something unrelated and experience new things. My only concern is it turns out to be shit and I find myself quitting halfway through. What do you think?
>>
Shit Pirringhick - Wed, 01 Sep 2021 22:47:00 EST p1aZAjbw No.39786 Reply
>>39782
no its one schitzophrenic computer programmer, speak for yourself, phoebe
>>
Sidney Sonnerwill - Fri, 03 Sep 2021 22:56:02 EST x6K3CZQk No.39793 Reply
>>39784
The older you are the easier it is actually
When I was early 20s I was obsessed with all kinds of unimportant bullshit and could not finish university either, now it's simple. I think it's just you build confidence as you get older or maybe you care less about stupid things like obsessing over your girl, obsessing over shit that in 3 years you wonder why you obsessed over it, if you go back to uni you will meet people in their 50s and older in your clases there was a guy in my course before I dropped out who was 62 and absolutely killed the material like a machine.

>>39770
In CS19 you don't submit anything, you figure it out yourself, the AI courses we do actually have tests you can run to grade your own assignment, and in algorithms.html of course there's competitive programming servers that will test your submissions but otherwise we have to wing it ourselves.

>>39776
I always liked Cardano as a meme token, but honestly I haven't kept up with it at all mainly because so many people IRL come up to me wanting to speculate and gamble on shit tokens and I don't think it's what cryptocurrency is really about, it's not a get rich quick scheme it's a way to move money around so fucking Paypal or Bank of America doesn't freeze your account. No middle men

>>39768
There's a stigma to Planatir but I highly recommend getting in there anyway to infiltrate and see what happens yourself, since there's a stigma about Peter Thiel they may get less applicants than others, but if you want to learn from the best, that's where you go. If it turns out to be CIA 2.0 then leak your face off before quitting and then writing your own meme curriculum

>>39779
I absolutely hate the present state of education with some exceptions, it's all paywalled and what they teach you is so bad that you have to STILL do a 3 day interview at google or facebook in order to get in, nobody trusts your degree even from the most so-called prestigious insitutions. Since it's entirely broken we may as well manipulate it to our advantage with no investment or debt

>>39769
Crypto workshop will honestly be the most fun, and Robert Harper's type theory. That stuff is awesome and always interesting because your mind can think up a hundred ways to use it. Algorithms will also be fun because personally I like to compete and solve things in the most unusual ways possible like when Poh-Shen Loh said fuck it and decided to spend his last year in the IMO camp coming up with the most unusual proofs he could think of and made it in anyway.

>>39767
Yes CS19 is filled with mistakes I have to go through, thanks anon.
If you go crazy with this material make your own CS19 youtube videos and teach it yourself, it truly is the best intro course esp now that I've been doing Kattis problems all of them are typical CS19 assignments. There's some things I'm going do once LAIFS is out of beta, like rewriting CS19 completely and including real open source project PRs to prove to anons it's all they need really as a foundation, that's why I haven't really gone back and edited all the junk I wrote that is often incorrect because I think random anons will know themselves anyway, it's such a good course.

>>39761
Nice I may do this too, like make a blatant pirate course with all the solutions for some famous courses that I have Zoom passwords for and have harvested all the lectures. I'll host the lectures on torrent in overseas and the Tor site has all the solutions. You could do this too anon, make the site "Tor University"
>>
Sidney Sonnerwill - Fri, 03 Sep 2021 23:23:36 EST x6K3CZQk No.39794 Reply
>>39739
Took 3 weeks off vacation

Experimental https://learnaifromscratch.github.io/algorithms.html I noticed CSE 101 is totally open, every lecture: https://cseweb.ucsd.edu/~dakane/CSE101/ it follows DPV book. There is a huge amount of old exams and solutions here, all the homework is open, lectures, etc. I would like to throw in some proofs with competitive programming but on the other hand, most of the algorithm texts are straight up wrong. CLRS has an entire chapter on Fibonacci heaps and the 2nd edition also had one on binomial heaps which seem great on paper, but an absolute complete waste of time to implement and in TAOCP Knuth doesn't even bother with them for good reason. in TAOCP algorithm analysis is a tool you use and programming is the #1 focus, in algorithm texts it's all just a math exercise in theory that doesn't translate to real hardware. Linked lists have O(1) operations right? Watch this starting at 0:29 https://youtu.be/M2i7sSRcSIw it doesn't translate to real hardware, though we will learn in algorithms.html how even stacks are linked lists but it's not something you want to use in 2021. Honestly CLRS is an awful book you should never read, so I have tried to avoid it in the meme curriculum. I don't even like DPV that much but it's so much better than CLRS and if we have to read a concise algorithm book then that will be it but I'm going to throw in some TAOCP chapters to prove it's not that hard to do yourself.

All the 'higher level math' is just calculus with vectors, with except of Vol 2 there's some insane math there otherwise any anon can figure it out themselves from learnai, esp the calculus workshop, all those totally insane e parameters? Easy
>>
William Haffingford - Fri, 03 Sep 2021 23:40:27 EST kvE2K0ct No.39795 Reply
>>39793
OP why don't you write a intro to cs and prog workshop using SICP as the vehicle? It will be long no doubt. But SICP is the master book from which HtDP, CS19, etc borrow their materials. It's all in there. Just an idea.
>>
Sidney Sonnerwill - Sat, 04 Sep 2021 00:22:32 EST x6K3CZQk No.39796 Reply
>>39739
Other anons that wish to unseat 3blue1brown from this throne, there's many libraries floating around https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=28405675 or write your own using Wildberger math, I did a bit of this with his geometric linalg class because there's tons of stuff you can easily animate. I like about 80% of 3blue1brown and 20% is kind of cringe, like the whole 'math is beautiful' cringe, please never do this, people can recognize beauty without you telling them.

The only one I may do is a visual proofs, not the geometric proofs but how induction and substitution works because I think people learn visually more than anything. We are upright beings that wander the earth in 3D and have the most insanely advanced optical interface that can calculate distances immediately so you don't fall over, that kind of advanced interface can be exploited with visual learning which is why I always try and include some kind of lecture, some kind of visualization, but there isn't enough. Wildberger certainly excels at this the visualization doesn't have to be animated it can be static but of course we are programmers and can animate it if we want. The mistake I believe most creators make is recreating a 2D cartesian kind of universe, throw that away, we are 3D by nature.

When we go through DPV in algorithm.html, think to yourself how can I make a YouTube video visualizing this, including the proofs. If I had time that's something I would do, and that book isn't going away anytime soon. Going through the Nature of Computation and 'The Computational Beauty of Nature' will help you here to type cast the visualization to something concrete in nature that anybody can understand. All anons should do this. Take the algorithms.html course and make an animation in unity, then record it and step to 3blue1brown or even Khan academy and sell yourself to them as a superior instructor, you never know. I'm on a different trajectory but that's what I would be doing otherwise.

It's getting crazy out there anons, I'm literally doing pirate concerts in my spare time now like back in the old days where you had to run from the cops because your warehouse show wasn't licensed but now it's like they send the entire police force after you for even going out in public. https://youtu.be/aMOBazjoBXI use this time to build skills. See you on the other side
>>
Sidney Sonnerwill - Sat, 04 Sep 2021 00:26:00 EST x6K3CZQk No.39797 Reply
>>39795
Sussman has a Javascript SICP coming out next year I believe, check MIT Press
Forget SICP, if you want to read the best programming book in years check Sussman's new book about AI programming, writing code that can expand itself or handle any situation like a human body cell does. It's a great book, I may do that after CS19 but of course time is the fire in which we burn
>>
Shitting Pendlederk - Sat, 04 Sep 2021 06:21:30 EST 1BRpsedH No.39799 Reply
How does DPV compare to kleinberg?
>>
Hedda Fuckletetch - Sat, 04 Sep 2021 06:31:37 EST vQq8Xw5C No.39801 Reply
OP what do you think of digital design and its prospects? I noticed you're not rly into this subject but I liked your anecdotes about FPGA use in HFT, it sounds interesting.
>>
Cyril Donkinwit - Sat, 04 Sep 2021 07:17:40 EST tdqZ6p5x No.39802 Reply
>>39793
Good to see you again!
I don't own any Cardano myself but I've heard it has better tech than Ethereum.
Crucial about Cardano is their smart contract language being a dialect of Haskell.
A functional programmer would be equipped to use that language and might be able to carve out a niche for themselves where other programmers won't be able to follow.
If you can formally prove your contracts works you are already ahead of your competitors who can't do that and then have their contracts hacked with all their money stolen.
I also like how crypto kills off middlemen but I've gotten greedy investing in it.

If you ever post those torrents or fix the functionalcs torrents you could post them on 4chins /t/ board where someone (probably me) will pick them up and seed them even if a seedbox goes down.
Once torrents end in those communities it's hard to censor them because there are hundreds of people willing to seed.
That board has old anime torrents probably 2 or 3 years old by now.

I'll be pursing that strategy >>39747 had uploading meme curriculae onto other websites.
Academic publishers and the entire system of distributing academic learning materials is trash, should be illegal, publishers should be nationalised or replaced by crypto based DAOs.
They are equally as evil as the decaying nation state system that enforces their claims to copyright and gatekeeper status. Hack the planet, but start with Elsivier.
>>
Angus Snodlock - Sun, 05 Sep 2021 01:19:08 EST 6XDxxER9 No.39805 Reply
>>39796
>unity
Blender is also good.
It’s a FOSS 3d modelling tool which you can optionally control with Python scripts.
>>
Sophie Greenford - Mon, 06 Sep 2021 19:52:43 EST nA81pW3/ No.39810 Reply
>>39808
Have you redpilled them in that thread on climate science yet?
>>
Shit Sonnerfare - Tue, 07 Sep 2021 10:21:39 EST RTMuLrHX No.39812 Reply
>>39808
These people don't seem to understand that OP is learning on the go just like us. The only difference is OP is a ahead of the curve compared to the average user on this board because of his experience and previous resources he completed. OP does not claim to be a math prof/AI grad, but trying to build a road to these advanced topics without getting caught up in traditional cs schooling, for a lot of people that is not possible/accessible

I mean look at other recs, how often do other curators recommend CS19? go to circlejerk learnprogramming, go anywhere, no one recommends CS19, even though it is a gem of a course. People recommend Harvards CS50, they recommend MiTs phthon course and these kinds of things. If a serious student invested like 200-300 hours in CS19, they would, with a little bit of effort, learn much more than someone doing other introductory courses. This is how you know OP is curating quality.

Another thing is me mostly recommends Uni level courses, which he somehow gains access to. These courses I have never seem or even thought of taking or even having access to without having inroads in a formal education, having a CS masters etc. This is already levels above much of the MOOC based online education self learners go through.

The most intersting thing about OP for me is the unorthodox courses and resources he posts, I simply would not have found it without his help in these areas.

Last thing, this curriculum is obviously not perfect and everyone can do whatever resources they want in addition to it. For example, I had completely forgotten highschool math, so I started Khan academy in tandem with the math workshops
because IMO you need a little bit of that high school level knowledge before you commit and get into these abstract courses, that's just me though, maybe for a newcomer going over OPs resources would be more efficient than following my path. People should use OP material as a guide, not word of god where they have to follow everything to the letter.
>>
Edwin Drungerhick - Wed, 08 Sep 2021 15:29:12 EST TD6a4th1 No.39813 Reply
Recent hackernews comment quote:

Writing a thesis subject in Elixir/Phoenix was perhaps the highest gain spontaneous decision in my life to date. Nobody ever learn Elixir in uni as a part of a course, so your adversary candidates pool is tiny, comparing to the vast masses of java/python/js/c++ graduates. Perhaps this was the main reason of me being hired fresh outta college with less than a 3 months of experience :)
But the job itself is meh:
  • fully remote, no spying, can spread 8h how I want (4 in the morning and 4 in the evening, doing whatever during the day)
  • pay is higher than I would ever get at junior position in mainstream languages
  • team is nice
  • but ridiculously low-quality legacy code
  • previous devs had left with close to no documentation, so codebase ownership is low
  • long time lags in processes, mostly due to the management

Does anyone have experience in roles like this?
Do entry level functional jobs pay better than jobs in mainstream languages?
Sounds like evidence the meme curriculum is a good idea.
>>
Basil Hopperspear - Fri, 10 Sep 2021 12:15:17 EST cbYlch9z No.39818 Reply
For the philosophy meme curriculum I’m thinking I start out with logic and then we go right into Kant for an advanced introduction.
Then we can go full meme into the rest of german idealism or analytic philosophy.
Maybe we read a few dialogues by Plato first because Platonism is so foundational for western philosophy and this is where all the big questions are first formulated in the style we know today.
Once we have analytic philosophy and german idealism we are free to explore the cutting edge of philosophy today with elite thinkers like Markus Gabriel, Graham Harman, Nick Land (for memes, dude is insane).
Which topics do you want to learn about? Just make a suggestion and I’ll see if it’s worth putting into the curriculum.
>>
Ebenezer Wonkinket - Fri, 10 Sep 2021 13:30:17 EST B5JWuzNE No.39819 Reply
>>39818
I'm not familiar with philosphy but i'd do aristoletiean logic -> probilisitic logic theory
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Hamilton Backlelotch - Fri, 10 Sep 2021 19:08:09 EST 0JEENUhn No.39821 Reply
>>39818
Don't take this the wrong way, but stop hijacking Op's thread. You can make your own curriculum on /lit/ or /his/. This is /prog/. I'm sure there will be more people who're interested in this, over there than here. You can also make it on a more popular chan too.
>>
Esther Beffingdock - Fri, 10 Sep 2021 20:02:57 EST TUsFmg2H No.39822 Reply
>>39821
I’m posting itt because op expressed interest in my curriculum.
If noone else does then yeah i’ll go somewhere else.
>>
Hugh Puddlepore - Fri, 10 Sep 2021 22:25:45 EST RTMuLrHX No.39823 Reply
>>39822
Philosohpy is very interesting, and I'd love to an OP style treatment, but build it first then they will come, just make website OP style, then start spamming it everywhere, not these niche forums.
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Sophie Cobberhall - Tue, 14 Sep 2021 00:06:00 EST L5YRhRv0 No.39829 Reply
>>39793
Palantir question: How hard is Palantir to get into compared to Jane Street?
>>
George Cicklehad - Thu, 16 Sep 2021 20:08:09 EST vRhHH3zM No.39834 Reply
>>39739
my man . I can teach you Arabic , teach you about religions and why you should follow the latest one. and then if you want to come to our place and mess with the western tyranny and skrew it up then welcome. you're doing a big favor to me and to billions of people . i want us to fight along each other. if you can make a hiding your ass from murica that would be pretty great . with love from arabistan.
>>
Clara Sishkere - Thu, 16 Sep 2021 22:56:12 EST HBM0JOW5 No.39835 Reply
>>39834 Not Op.
“Hide your ass from US Govt” Opsec workshop sounds like a good idea.
You’ll need protection against ip based tracking and browser fingerprinting.
Get a trustworthy vpn and fire fox with anti fingerprinting settings.
Tor browser is immune to fingerprinting many tor nodes are honeypots.
>>
John Turveyford - Fri, 17 Sep 2021 02:50:54 EST Wj3RfSIk No.39836 Reply
>>39813
You can pickup Elixir yourself, no need to go for ADHD retard mishmash curriculum.
>>
George Cicklehad - Fri, 17 Sep 2021 12:55:25 EST vRhHH3zM No.39838 Reply
>>39835
thanks, m playing with i2p now what you think of it? . tor skrewed alot of guys, not that they're stupid but they want them more than cp guys , telegram pretty secure if you now what you're doing but they ban so much. now matrix and rocketchat is the platforms of choice for a lot. but i think that's not enough. something practical and doesn't prevent you from doing activities because its pretty important.
an opsec workshop would be very helpful.
privacy without freedom to do anything in any site doesn't mean anything. you can just shut off your computer.
we have alot of work to do my man to achive that.
>>
Isabella Bushshit - Fri, 17 Sep 2021 13:58:55 EST n43y1xkH No.39839 Reply
>>39838 I don’t know anything about i2p. A full opsec workshop is probably not necessary because of how much opsec content is already out there.
>>
Cornelius Goodspear - Fri, 17 Sep 2021 17:06:01 EST RsT4ny13 No.39840 Reply
>>39839
dunno i feel like tor and a vpn and browser fingerprints and all of the eco system that we know and is out there is not enough. there's a difference between wanting privacy and being chased down and wanted more than anything
some guys might have something better,
but for most of people common sense is fairly enough probably
>>
Priscilla Bibberwill - Fri, 17 Sep 2021 20:54:17 EST UKwKm4Mb No.39841 Reply
>>39840
the thing about opsec is if you dont need it, you wont have it

so nerds writing computer codes are the people who love to think, but dont have to get safe

also your making the classic mistake of https://opsec101.org/#dont-start-with-countermeasures-countermeasures-come-last you need to know who your fighting against, if youre trying to just stay off 5-Eyes Drag net, it heavily relies on UNENCRYPTED COMMUNICATIONS, so you can do quite a lot by not working with any companies in those jurisdictions and not sending clear texts. Granted, no computer software will prevent goons from kidnapping you, so if you don't need it, you probably wont have it
>>
Barnaby Shittingwell - Sun, 19 Sep 2021 11:42:17 EST s3DNKQLc No.39843 Reply
>>39836
so you're that anon from the /sci/ thread
>>
Rebecca Blythehood - Mon, 20 Sep 2021 02:15:40 EST UKwKm4Mb No.39844 Reply
>>39843
that advice isnt even inconsistent with software.html or Prof K! Build software! You need no idolize some platform, they all can be conformed to your needs. I dont know ocaml, but as a huge lisp shill, its hardly magic (SHH!, it is) but if you just go build products and study the gaps as they occur you should be useful enough to be employed. if you arent already employed as a dev though, it may be harder to transition to an elixir role, lots of places looking for senior devs that they can onboard to elixir.
>>
Phineas Blunkinworth - Tue, 21 Sep 2021 15:12:02 EST izDwhiHd No.39847 Reply
>>39844 yeah anon i am think most of ops critiques are not understand his goals or ideas fully
>>
Sophie Perringford - Tue, 21 Sep 2021 22:26:13 EST x6K3CZQk No.39848 Reply
>>39847
The goal of the meme curriculum, is to find one that is proven to work because as per both prof K and Robert Harper, everyone is just winging it. For example the strange reason that prof K makes students in CS19 rewrite map/filter/fold about 4x over for trees, streams, lists, mapreduce etc. It's because he has done research and written papers that show that understanding of higher order functions leads to understanding of modern APIs or how he and Harper refer to it as 'understanding the program behavior'. On the internet everyone shills for their specific 'paradigm' but in reality there is no such thing as a paradigm if you read Robert Harper's book, or prof K's papers. People get politically obsessed with languages and paradigms for whatever reason, I don't have any ideological bias to push 'functional paradigm' or anything, I just push what works for a single developer who doesn't have an entire team they can hire and wants to deploy a non trivial project by themselves.

The reason why the meme curriculum jumps back in time and into ridiculous tangents that end abruptly is because that's how I learned from The Art of Computer Programming, it's written in the same style, Knuth has you reading some obscure papers on medieval Indian forms of visual poetry (citrakāvya) and medieval European forms of carmina figurata then these turn out to be algorithms, then you patch the algorithms so they are programs. He has you digging around into pieces of calculus to understand how to generate a function, it's always just what you need and then you return, there is no linear way to learn all these topics they require knowing all the topics but we are human and can't know everything so we can at least carve out a Eulerian path where we visit everything just for a second to see the big picture, then you as anons can figure out what you want to specialize in and can do so having followed the path and touched enough things that something may spark your interest like it did for me.

For example Robert Harper's book pfpl, is completely non-mainstream. Dynamic types are a subset of static types (wait what), concurrency and dispatch are never, ever properly taught and confused with other things like parallelism, with a single exception (prof k's plai.org). Exceptions themselves are cryptography, they are a shared secret (also why I have a crypto meme curriculum). All these things, are the same thing. Like when Voedvodsky went and got an entire undergrad in CS just to use a proof assistant and he realized it was the same thing too. Everything we do, it's all just one thing, and with the exception of pfpl and complexity theory, it's usually embarassing in how non-rigorous it all is. That's why CS is a meme, because most of it is just winging it, and why Harper wrote that book to change it to a real science, and why prof K is always redoing his cs19 course to find better ways at explaining all this. He has a good talk I should post about how it's all the same, and he's the only person doing statistics to prove his teaching methods actually work. Like that statement in one of the CS19 lectures 'Programming is going to eat everything, and then math is going to suck too'.
>>
Sophie Perringford - Wed, 22 Sep 2021 00:04:14 EST x6K3CZQk No.39849 Reply
>>39739
I took a few weeks off to read through 'Theories of Programming Languages' by Reynolds which Robert Harper wrote me and told me to try. Now I get why he wrote pfpl

I also watched about 16 hours of Gennady Korotkevich solving problems on livestream. A few patterns: he writes examples exactly like CS19. He solves problems, exactly like how Prof Loh teaches where you just investigate something and poke at it (he is a math olympiad winner so not surprising). He started writing code in Pascal, which is essentially pseudocode'if you've ever read one of those awful algorithm books like CLRS (reminder that clrs is terrible, they deleted fully from the second version many algorithms that in theory run in O(1) but that Knuth doesn't even mention because they're useless IRL). Anyway when Gennady writes c++, it's the same pseudocode, he rarely takes advantage of c++ specifically like some compiler option to allow big integer, most of it is just the exactly same thing you learn in CS19. Anyway this will all be in algorithms.html sometime, the workshop where we get employed to whatever shitty bigtech corp.

Anon asking about opsec workshop
We kind of are doing this in the crypto workshop though I don't advertise this, but I'm going to dump everything I know there. My advice is first do not target any 5 Eyes Alliance country with whatever shady things you are doing. Of course the bulk of the profits is catering to the US domestic market (or UK, AUS) but you never want to do this, ever. You will run probability on this like actually writing out a tree and see all branches lead to jail. Trust me risk is not worth reward unless you live in some Ukraine warzone like Donetsk or Crimea and even then, it's not what you read about because the Russians I used to talk to back in my retard days told me they were never scared of FBI/DEA, they were scared of local cops being alerted to what they doing by the FBI and then coming round to extract taxes violently. So 'living in Russia or China' will not automatically get you a get out of misery free card either. tl;dr don't even target the 5 Eyes Alliance, ever. Not even once.

This means the EU is free for you to pilfer and profit and many of them don't trust each other, you being the foreigner they will likely trust you depending how you set up your 'service' whatever it is. Reminder there is a very old silkroad clone that has never been busted run out of Israel by expat Russians that targets the eastern EU and Russian market. I think even Wired interviewed them once and they said the secret to their survival was banning all politics and anybody who claimed they were 5 Eyes so UK guy coming on 'oh hey can I get drugs' instant ban. Learn from what works, move to Namibia or something if you want to start screwing with the 5 Eyes nations and taunting them daring their highly competent agents to come and mess up your shit.

Otherwise it depends what you are doing. Telegram is not at all 'safe' if what you are doing is political, Moxy, whatever you think about him, has a lot of material written how shit telegram really is and that it's likely just a honeypot where some kind of spies are claiming to be extremists and roping in rubes to their chatrooms and can easily find them. I mean cmon major terrorist groups running telegram let's be real here. If you are organizing locally there are other ways to do this you can find yourself, follow what the HK protesters did because Google was handing over their info, they did some clever things and still do to resist the communist takeover.

Anyway for example's sake, let's say you're an anon who wants to make money "illegally" i write in quotes because, hey it's not in your country, is it still 'illegal'?. So you would target the EU market or possibly asian market (meaning you could never go there, or any country that may extradite you but your own western country likely won't). The server you run would need to run 'secret protocols' which I have written about before, you should need a customized protocol in order to communicate with it (which is why we take crypto.html in the new meme workshop). This means changing the rounds of some ssh cipher and essentially hiding it's existence from all modern tech by being unique. There should be no way to access the outside world from your tor hidden service, there's articles how to do this but it's just basic networking and openbsd makes it really, really easy to do. That pf firewall you can deny all network connections except another server that just routes traffic back and forth from your hidden server. I've met one of the guys who wrote the openbsd firewall back when I was 'infiltration zine' guy, he is a ninja of writing software and designed the whole thing with a guy from Germany who's running massive server networks. Anyways it works, and is trivial to configure. This is what you want, low maint, easy to configure as a non-expert, but that's only 30% of the problem the real problem is how do you get the money and then cash it out yourself, and not get caught. This is the part I never really figured out instead I did my technically 'illegal' things so I could give the money away, because I had this idiotic idea that they would never catch me if I never kept the money, but I would distribute it around my community and the idea was that I could like a rising tide boost my own fortunes by empowering everyone in my area and to be honest it did work but of course it failed in the end because real life has all these corner cases you don't consider.

For example here's an idea. Why is there no cannabis auction site for the EU (remember no UK)? Trivial to implement with Elixir, there is literally instructions how to do this on google scholar if you search. If you are like me you want to streamline the taking of cash to the site and then go and create clearnet sites that simply buy off your users and you then transform the money they spend into crypto that the buyers can accept. Anyway, it's been 8 years and that's exactly what I did once upon a time, take money you can print out in some corner store like Ukash back then and then cash it to 'slightly difficult to trace' crypto and pay my vendors then ship this shit on clearnet. Purely a middle man position you never touch drugs, you don't even touch money if you're careful you just enable others to touch the money and move it around because they will always be better than you at this, you just need to start it off and then advertise you want cashiers and they flock to you and you can stop. You should approach any kind of EU board like Elon Musk and make it as easy as possible. That's what I did and it worked but I never trusted the last mile, where the middle man money went to me living in western country. I gave that all away but it was really fun, you have a ton of money that you can't use but you can use it for everyone around you to boost yourself. Anyway it worked for me because I'm still not convinced, that any kind of scheme online that is not halal won't result in you going to jail because they always follow the money, but if you give this money away, how would they find you? EHhhh, for me it was a competition to see who could be the best, I didn't care about the profits because I was doing my phone thing at the time, so I have no advice for you how to get the last mile out but I suspect that's how they have got everybody before you who was likely more savvy and more organized so be careful. Nothing is worth going to jail trust me. Esp if you violate 5 eyes alliance, guess you picks you up? USA and then you're in D Ray federal prison which I cannot explain how nightmarish it all is, you have to experience it. Imagine you and 3 guys from Iran and Haiti and you have to brawl with a few hundred hondurans and guatemalans because the idiot Brit in your pod complained about the spanish TV. That's what life in US BOP is like if you get caught, it's never worth it. The reality is ... there is no fast money. Your family hates you too, they won't respect getting money illegally even if it's in Europe or w/e so I abandoned that whole idea thankfully.

That's why we do the meme curriculum to manipulate bigtech and just invade their offices and work our way through internal structures to get paid the same amount of money, enough anyway so you can go and be a contractor or write your own software comfortably after a few months without needing an income.
>>
Eliza Drammerdock - Wed, 22 Sep 2021 01:24:14 EST e76FJU7M No.39850 Reply
>>39848
OP, you are quite right. I have talked with CMU students. Those who have taken PFPL with Bob Harper, say that they don't obsess about paradigm shit after taking the class. They know everything is interwoven and everything has a use. In real projects you never use one paradigm. You change your style according to your needs. When you need state you code imperatively otherwise you can get away with functional.

This was what SICP is trying to teach us for so many years. Don't stick to one paradigm. There is nothing called the best paradigm. Mix and match according to your needs. SICP teaches us when the time is right to use a certain style. Those who get that shill SICP. Others whine that it is a book about recursion.

OP, I hope you will create a separate workshop where you go through SICP commentary style and then maybe Norvig's old AI in Lisp book.
>>
Devin Vandroff - Wed, 22 Sep 2021 01:55:58 EST htooB2So No.39851 Reply
>>39849
Wow. Seriously OP how do you do it? how are you so productive? I am a college student, and i am struggling to study for my linear algebra and calculus class. I wish i could focus on topics like you are able to.
>>
Devin Vandroff - Wed, 22 Sep 2021 02:00:19 EST htooB2So No.39852 Reply
>>39849
Thoughts on DCIC? apparently it is a better version of PAPL according to Prof K. Have you done it?
>>
Eugene Blevingfuck - Sat, 25 Sep 2021 00:23:03 EST x6K3CZQk No.39855 Reply
>>39853
Two ways right now, one is figuring out their swarm search strategy, another way is fooling the deep learning which is trivial to do so and we will learn this in the AI workshop eventually when we do DNNs, however they are already overcoming this by having drones train themselves, they go out in the world and write their own code as they come across things. Nothing is truly autonomous yet we still have operators who do things like get an overview of the search space and then choose where the target is, because you have a hundred+ drones all with 4K cameras and heat sensors, but the flying itself is all autonomous you are like a conductor not actually controlling the drones every move. Elon Musk's idea of reducing bandwidth between machine and man is the key here, the grand idea for where I am anyway is to have the drones move like the operators hand, hence my conductor analogy because it's literally like that. Drop 20k drones over target space and then realtime control at an abstract level without having to manually fly.

The drones now can guess your next move with probability, like you running through a forest trying to get away from them. The swarm can predict where you're doing to run, of course non of them have weapons right now but that will definitely change, in fact I think this is the future of cops. Instead of Robocop we will have drone swarm cop, 911 call comes in, a thousand drones converge within seconds and subdue target (because they are already circling on idle, and filming everything), real cops take their time showing up to do investigations but everything has already been recorded by a few thousand 4k cameras their job is simple. This is speculation on my part because I'm only programming pursuit algorithms to follow other drones, for warfare scenario purposes, but everyday it gets more frightening, I'm glad I got this job to see what is really going on and encourage all other anons to do the same, go program drones, literally every civilians/corporate drone outfit is also a military contractor right now like Skydio https://boards.greenhouse.io/skydio/jobs/4255866003


>>39852
I'll replace all of software.html with DCIC eventually but it's largely the same as PAPL right now from what I can tell, though some things I find are explained better. Did you notice everything is 'data centric' now? The world is now wall street, if you have 'information supremacy' like Gen. Alexander of the NSA used to put it, you will prevail. Even the calculus book I shill is a 'data centric' calculus book.


>>39851
tbh I am completely shit right now, I was far more productive 5 years ago but to show it's possible I'd like to finish everything in the meme curriculum as fast as possible to move on to other things, for example today I wrote half of 'OCaml in a day' workshop based on Jane Street's NYC workshop that is 6 hours and teaches the same thing, doing the entire CS3110 gitbook, but then I ran out of time which is my own fault for not allocating 6 hours. I'd like to allocate way more time and make it a live workshop, next week I will try and do this and move everything to be closer to how I finish it every morning then later in the evening. I can do it just I slacked with work overload, half out dev team quit because that's what all devs do these days, they work for 6 months then parachute into a new job.

If you want to focus anon, even though Cal Newport is a meme, try some of his advice how he blitzed through MIT and his undergrad. After class go to the most empty public library on campus and redo every proof given in class, do all the homework, then get out of there and drink beer https://youtu.be/nEqhOfG1lwg
Experiencing the alternative will also motivate you. Imagine you have no education what are you going to do? Be like me, doing almost slave labor landscaping because nobody in my country would hire me, one reason why I fled to go to HK.

Btw China is hiring like mad right now esp Shanghai, Intel is hiring there, everybody. Visas starting to be handed out again to anyone to applies. China is so different from here, do you speak English? Do you understand an if statement? You're in. Not a single competent chinese dev would work there because they can make millions working for some other engineering outfit or get US visa. I exp this in HK while doing hiring, nobody wanted to work in finance. They already had familiy members promising them millions for other things, so I hired literally anybody who applied with no interview. Every single one of my manager's claimed the 'new education system' did not teach them the skills needed, so I convinced them that I could teach them myself, and would go into interviews with some nervous local kid and just tell him there really is no interview, I'm hiring you right now but you have to take CS19 (paid) first, if you can do that you're in. All of them passed, I could only do that because I hung out with the founder guys and convinced them to do so, that would likley never happen here in the western world, nobody wants to invest. In China they will invest in you.

That said, this is my scheme for the meme curriculum of course I will weasel my way into likely Amazon because it is everywhere on earth, and then manipulate it all internally to see how they hire and write a curriculum specifcally for that, which I suspect is still just CS19 and some algorithms.html practice, but we'll see that's in the near future. I'll apply to Jane Street too, and do their interviews with the explicit motivation of getting other anons in. How hard can it be, in fact how hard can the trading desk interview be? I went through glassdoor and team blind with some 'trading ops' interview questions in probability and most of it is things we've already done. Esp when we start doing 10-701 homework that's all entirely trading desk interview ques and easy, you think about the distribution 'oh this coin question is bernoulli distro' and then remember wildberger drawing that picture to link outcomes to some real line, and anybody can do this. obv the IRL job is much harder than this but who cares, the interview isn't.

>>39850
Sussman has a SICP sequel using Javascript coming out next year too. The Toronto CS Cabal actually did both https://github.com/CompSciCabal/reading-material but it's hard to find all the blog posts, but they're doing exactly what I'm doing if you can dig around and find it.

Sussman's new book req you to go back and take some SICP topics and I'd like to do that, because his new book is absolutely crazy like his biological systems he programs
>>
Eugene Blevingfuck - Sat, 25 Sep 2021 00:33:51 EST x6K3CZQk No.39856 Reply
>>39739
University of the People is now seeking US regional accreditation status https://www.uopeople.edu/student-experience/quality/accreditation/
If that happens I will get a degree there and write a (much better) guide to completing it as I finish the degree.
I already have taken 2 years of UaP, you do easy courses, for example calculus is Gilbert Strang's book, programing intro is Python 'how to think like a computer scientist' free book, you get access to NYU professors in each course unless that's changed, but when I did it they were all NYU. I learned some complexity theory from one of them. Each course IIRC were about $100 USD (but large discounts if you live in non western country), and then you had to pay for 'invigilators' which in my case was a local community college who I paid $50 to watch me take an exam online, they are all multiple choice. In "developing countries" you can have almost anybody watch you take the exam, like a librarian. The school so-called social area was complete and utter cancer of course, you will want to avoid . Think twitter but even worse and more terminal cancer. The assignments are all peer review which is kind of great actually, except I almost flunked the first class because I used an algorithm they had never seen before and even though I commented the hell out of it they still claimed I did it incorrectly and failed me, so you may have to appeal to the NYU prof like I did who then asked me to be TA offering free tuition for the operating system course I was supposed to do next before I dropped out.

Anyway I'm always interested in cheap, real certs for anons and regional US accreditation means instant green card and for me, easy to get into grad school again.
>>
Eugene Blevingfuck - Sat, 25 Sep 2021 02:26:25 EST x6K3CZQk No.39857 Reply
>>39856
Reminder to all anons, the meme curriculum is not just a curriculum, it's a choose your own adventure gonzo journalist scheme to infiltrate bigtech you too can do fun and profit.

Algorithms.html is now the jobs workshop of functionalcs, the mostly cringe sub curriculum I've been working on where I do most of this, probably Amazon at first only because they exist in every country hiring devs from pakistan to turkey to india. Look at this https://www.amazon.jobs/en/jobs/1681405/software-development-engineer-relocation-to-eu they pay Mexicans to relocate to Gdansk and none of that is harder than what we're already doing in ai.org or https://ckaestne.github.io/seai/

This is the real competitive programming isn't it. It's what I wanted to do for the web dev workshop thing that failed because all the international contracting places I infiltrated were just 1984 to the max even filming you or just way too exploitative. Now it's our turn to exploit
>>
Eliza Himblecocke - Sun, 26 Sep 2021 10:01:35 EST wJMwCaZr No.39859 Reply
>>39858
can confirm, Early op vibes. Similiar to his old post on 8chan. The course material is similiar too. The post contains a few different books he didn't mention in the 8chan post, that's all.
>>
Ebenezer Fanhall - Tue, 28 Sep 2021 16:15:58 EST xzfNbOp5 No.39863 Reply
>>39739
hey op give us your take about whats going to happen in a few months? it seems like everything is ending
>>
Cornelius Hicklewutch - Wed, 29 Sep 2021 23:57:42 EST 2kL6YK2T No.39869 Reply
>>39849
>most of it is just the exactly same thing you learn in CS19
I never knew CS19 could be so useful. Would you recommend a newcomer to this curriculum to start with PAPL or DCIC?
>>
Hugh Blytheway - Fri, 01 Oct 2021 07:09:39 EST IG8IpNIi No.39871 Reply
I'm a little lost, not sure what this thread is all about. I think it's about self-learning AI programming, and also collecting online courses and material to further the existing material? In any case, I love Lustre.
>>39860
This is an amazing thread. I tried to do this when I was a freshman. I completed the Khan academy course on mathematics, but had to stop because I had limited time. In hindsight I was just bored and a little depressed. I will definitely try again using OP's resources and advice.
>>
Priscilla Sepperwill - Fri, 01 Oct 2021 17:15:51 EST 5ihDvUeO No.39872 Reply
>>39739
I'm gigapoor with a fucked up wrist, can anyone help me? marklov@protonmail.com I rather go to jail a decade than being like this.
>>
Isabella Tootman - Sat, 02 Oct 2021 00:16:48 EST x6K3CZQk No.39873 Reply
>>39872
Trust me you never want to go to jail. ever. period.
It is a nightmare on cruise control. Having a single fucked up wrist is nothing, matt might if you read his blog fucked up both his wrists, and then switched his keyboard to Dvorak, and even wrote a lot of his own NLP in order to program. Hal from bitcoin fame did the same thing, he was paralyzed in a chair.

>>39871
Take the math you enjoy and nothing else. Try the Poh-Shen Loh linear algebra/discrete math lectures he does, maybe they will be interesting. Try his Putnam seminar though it will be very hard working through the book, but crazy at the same time 'wait I can actually do that.. why did nobody teach me this'.

>>39869
For now they are largely the same, though there is some better and clearer documentation in DCIC for some parts of the book and DCIC is the only maintained book, so up to you I'd recommend to just do DCIC. The only thing left we have to do in PAPL is the graph and dynamic programming lectures really, which I purposely stopped doing in order to sync it with the competitive algorithms course but w/e you can go ahead of course. Pay attention how Prof K explains things, that's exactly what they want in an interview and I've emulated him to great success.

>>39860
The daily rituals book back then I used to send to convicts in jail en masse, texas tribune newspaper used to have a listing of every prisoner w/open API to scrape the data, I programmed it to feed me a new convict daily and then send them that book from amazon, almost everybody thinks they can't do something, then they see how famous artists kept it together through a forced sched, like Kafka who used to work F/T in some insurance office and complained his job left him no time to write so he would break up his sleep to get a window of time to write yet still get 8hrs per day. Of course back then I had money I couldn't use so I randomly gave it away.

Speaking of artists you can use the meme curirculum for music, I always follow whatever new music is being played at university radio stations worldwide, all the vocals are being programmed you can say anything into a mic then go into Lisp and manipulate that data like any other data.
>>
Isabella Tootman - Sat, 02 Oct 2021 00:49:51 EST x6K3CZQk No.39874 Reply
>>39863
I spent all week doing the CS 3110 curriculum to shove into algorithms.html and the crypto workshop thing just because it's easy to do esp if you've done CS19, I modelled it after Jane Street's 6hr OCaml workshop just I spread mine over 8 days or 8 hours.

The meme curriculum continues slowly, the AI homework why not write the algorithm so it works in all the frameworks, typetheory.html lambda calculus cornell web IDE and standard ml hw from 15-150 while reading harper's sml book as prereq to programming logic in 15-317.... cs19 I don't do to match it when we take the same subjects in algorithms.html but will do it all. linear.html finish tao's notes I spent a bunch of time trying to get back the deleted new MIT lectures which are excellent, the hax0r workshop continues, calculus.html most of wildberger's integration from scratch videos are good enough and at the end of calculus.html I'll do this https://www.openbookpublishers.com/product/1050 to prove we know integration, as auto-differentiation is essentially a compiler trick now.

crypto.html is the quantum software workshop because she teaches 'post-quantum crypto' as well as regular crypto, so we can play in there with Ryan Odonnell's algorithms course like how to write these ciphers for a quantum architecture and run them on a simulator like IBM's or Rigetti's which has some limited free tier options, anyway time is the fire in which we burn, I can only do it incrementally because that's all I've ever done to get things finished but any anon can surge ahead. CS19 when it's done in the same page would be interesting to prove that yes you can write a feature for some open source project and get PRs accepted with only CS19 as a background, that's prob how it'll finish just because anybody can do it and maybe they need proof to believe it.

Math.html finish all the material, including Tao's book which comes up in putnam lectures by poh-shen loh. Math is probably the easiest workshop actually, The algorithms class I do for algorithms.html is a guy who was a two time gold medal olympiad and putnam fellow 4 years in a row https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Kane_(mathematician)
>>
Jenny Duckwill - Sat, 02 Oct 2021 10:04:21 EST u387a6Om No.39876 Reply
>>39874
OP, I hope you have looked at this sem's 15-150 lecture notes. They are very detailed and far far better than previous semesters'.

You always say CS19 is the only fundamental base you need to learn anything. After CS19 what would be a good course to follow? Is it FDS or 213 or something else?
>>
Phoebe Harrysark - Sat, 02 Oct 2021 15:34:15 EST 7D3uJkoU No.39878 Reply
>>39877
not to be mean, but are you retarded? that video is two loops, one watching for file changes and compiling and the other firefox (or some other pdf view) that reloads on file changes. maybe emacs has warped my mind of "vague problem" but this is latex-preview-pane.
>>
Nigel Weshkodging - Sun, 03 Oct 2021 02:42:58 EST u387a6Om No.39879 Reply
>>39878
It may be simple. But no body did it. She felt the need and built it. That is the motto. You should be able enough to build tools you need. Knowing which function calls to use to build that particular tool is also a skill in itself.
>>
Charles Boffingshaw - Sun, 03 Oct 2021 07:50:51 EST 5ihDvUeO No.39880 Reply
>>39873
I broke a bone and I got fired of my wageslaving job, I'm looking to fix it but I don't have cash, if you help me I'll give you as collateral two of my family assets one house and a terrain.
>>
Charles Boffingshaw - Sun, 03 Oct 2021 08:02:04 EST 5ihDvUeO No.39881 Reply
>>39880
It's traumatic and not a result of ergonomics, an accident happened and I got fucked up.
>>
Frederick Clishdale - Mon, 04 Oct 2021 17:30:46 EST /Y1EGS6X No.39883 Reply
>>39879
i didnt say to just call the function, i also, before that, described vaguely what the program would do. i have written that 'program' before, but its like a single screen of code, a makefile...
>>
Doris Charrysig - Tue, 05 Oct 2021 15:17:15 EST qotx5/Tw No.39886 Reply
also do i need to read PAPL and watch those lectures and learn Pyret do everything in Pyret, or is PLAI book and Racket enough?
>>
Rebecca Sacklechun - Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:09:31 EST x6K3CZQk No.39887 Reply
>>39886
take whatever you are interested in
learnai is kind of a proof that you can learn all this on a phone while in your spare time, that's the real goal
that's why I'm doing the CMU ai assignments on a phone using Pyret, because you can, just like I used to use Lisp to go through books like 15-213's computer hardware book, you can model it all with Lisp/Scheme/Racket if you wanted

it doesn't matter at all you're not using the language of the day, they're all the same derived from Algol 60. When you read Robert Harper's book he calls this modernized Algol and shows you how easy it is to bolt on dynamic dispatch or concurrency. Gennady the current competitive programming champion of almost everything used to only use Pascal to write algorithms. The real goal is to understand the problem solving method that Poh-Shen Loh or Prof K teach that's what you walk away with from an undergrad not some specific language feature you can teach yourself from just knowing the lambda calculus and computation by substitution which really is all computation, you write a function and what happens it returns a value in other words substitutes all that out for a value. Then Algol 60 comes a long and has side effects, what else is there to know, nothing has changed even dependent types are decades old. Anybody from anywhere can take this too, it's the one thing that is accessible to us without having a formal set of credentials. You can't teach yourself to be a lawyer or doctor but you can learn CS theory of the wild and crazy arts of computation and even get paid to do so. Anyway that's what learnai does which is seperate from the other site, a proof that yes you can learn all this on a handheld device treating it like some kind of daily puzzle to figure out, then when you get bored put it away and live your life.
>>
Ebenezer Sollerwell - Wed, 06 Oct 2021 14:04:43 EST qotx5/Tw No.39889 Reply
>>39887
but i have Nokia Lumia. Is there pyret interpreter available for Lumia?
>>
Molly Dindledidging - Wed, 06 Oct 2021 20:12:34 EST ibgnbFGl No.39890 Reply
>>39889 Stealing is pretty easy if your nokia isn’t good enough.
You look for a little old lady and steal her purse with her phone in it. Ez.
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Curious Georgia - Fri, 08 Oct 2021 21:10:06 EST 1EHUcqjZ No.39894 Reply
>>39887
Did you take notes when you did papl? or did you just memorize it, or have the information in your mind? you mentioned that you used a phone for papl, and i can't imagine one will take notes if they are reading the book from their phone. when you did the math textbooks , did you take notes while reading the textbooks? Also, how long did it take you to finish papl? i am currently in college, and i plan to do the book for at least 30 min - 1 hour every evening if i have time. I feel like papl is more important for my goals than the java class that i am doing for my computer science class.
>>
Augustus Shittinggold - Wed, 13 Oct 2021 00:03:15 EST Ota9fexp No.39904 Reply
>>39739
When I look at people who took CS19 in uBrown they say it's just an introduction to CS32 which itself is an introduction to Software Engineering.

What does it mean to get good? Are the people who take (and pass) those classes at some kind of stellar level? I guess I'm just confused at what "introductory" conveys...
>>
Nigel Muckledod - Wed, 13 Oct 2021 13:56:23 EST G/p94VvH No.39906 Reply
>>39877
it's default behaviour, what the hell (s)he wrote an extension for?
>>
James Geddlewater - Wed, 13 Oct 2021 17:06:56 EST qotx5/Tw No.39908 Reply
>>39905
new ones use some obscure programming language and "template" (interface probably) to download is behind some paywall
>>
Nicholas Siblingbit - Wed, 13 Oct 2021 17:33:03 EST fXQjFEc7 No.39909 Reply
>>39739
Nothing ever gets better. I am now a 25 year old jobless and soon to be homeless man, I have learnt nothing with my time and even baseline normalcy is far too hard to catch up with. Everyone has jobs already and can put food on the table while I wither away and NEET with my ailing single mother. I am not some genius programmer, I don't even know how to write some basic programs, all I can do is waste time gathering resources and never committing to them. Doing CS19 will not somehow magically make he a 'hacker' or put me ahead of others, its debatable if it is even possible to do it for someone who has no math background. To get a math background and understand even basic calculus you need months of time and that I do not have. I think friends my time is coming. It was good coping thinking I could attempt these resources to catch up, but man as some strong delusions.
>>
Esther Sessledale - Wed, 13 Oct 2021 17:37:04 EST 8rSDidJz No.39910 Reply
>>39909
hey dude i think you have unhealthily high expectations. FANG is the top of a power distribution, but the 80% else that consumes the world, as software has, is fine employing shit, mediocre and modestly good engineers for white collar wages. Im a high school drop out and was homeless for my late teens and twenties but 70k a year is like min wage for someone who can craft a trivial (non-joined) SQL statement, for every small business believes they need some web presence, and some actually have presence of mind to automated vital business tasks. i dropped out before trig, before calc. never learned calc, had to re learn alg1, but really, i dont need it. most math i've ever needed for SMB CRUD apps is to imagine venn diagrams with 2 circles at a time. No shit. Make 3 shitty crud apps, host them and get your entry level gig, grind for 2 years and get a slightly less shitty gig, rinse and repeat.
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James Ponderwill - Thu, 14 Oct 2021 09:36:29 EST TtgLh8zQ No.39911 Reply
>>39909
You are better than me, I'm disabled and can't use both hands, I hope anyone can help me I left my email above.
>>
Devin Vandroff - Thu, 14 Oct 2021 18:42:48 EST hQ9jonBJ No.39912 Reply
>>39909
Listen, just set a time, go to a quiet place (library, or coffee shop) and stay there and commit to cs19, or whatever course. You say you are a neet, right? well since you don't have a job, you should be able to find a place where you can focus and stay there till you can do whatever it is you are learning. Use the pomodoro technique, study for 40 minutes, then take a 10 minute break. Don't do anything besides studying during the study session. If you are really serious about what you want to do, and if you think you have gotten to the point where "your time is coming" I believe you should be able to do whatever it is that will make you successful out of sheer will. Follow this guys guide on how to pass the coding interview. He was a neet like you, and he studied 8-12 hours for 8 months, and he got hired as a software engineer for amazon:
https://github.com/jwasham/coding-interview-university. or you can do this mooc.fi: https://www.mooc.fi/, complete the java course, then grind leetcode. All this is up to you. Your mom is ill? then you will definitely do what is necessary, and use those resources I just provided, and do it like that guy who had no experience and 8 months later, he is a software engineer for amazon after 8-12 hours of daily study. If you ignore what I posted, and you don't commit to it, then don't blame anybody but yourself for giving up. This is probably your last chance. I said it before, and i will say it again, find a quiet spot. Go to a library, coffee shop, any place that isn't your room where you can focus. Take your laptop outside if you have to, or if it isn't possible clear out your room, remove all distracting things, and study there. It's up to you, anon....
>>
Phineas Clenkindodge - Fri, 15 Oct 2021 08:16:32 EST U+qoSyQz No.39913 Reply
>>39904
I was confused about this too. OP could you answer this?
>>
John Nannerridge - Fri, 15 Oct 2021 08:37:43 EST HQb+JBcw No.39914 Reply
Is it possible to teach Chris Chan functional programming and AI skills?
Think of it as a test for the minimal sanity needed to complete the meme curriculum.
>>
Phoebe Pickshaw - Fri, 15 Oct 2021 18:52:52 EST fXQjFEc7 No.39915 Reply
>>39912
Thanks for this. I was frustrated at how little I could control my impulses and I thought about how to do it a lot. I'm not exactly NEET, I'm perusing a masters in a Stem-Eng major, but not having work or personal money was just getting to me at the time. You are right, I do have some free time, and I don't know what happened but I see the bullshit now. Time to get to work.
>>
Polly Pickwill - Sun, 17 Oct 2021 00:50:06 EST x6K3CZQk No.39916 Reply
>>39904
Introductory means you've never seen it before
CS19 you can do with no background at all, it's specifically designed this way in Prof K papers
He includes reading of HtDP Chapter 3 and some exercises you can look at if you want I've linked the placement tests many times, but you don't need them because CS19 goes at crazy speed dropping assignments every few days but we don't have to do that because we are not actually brown students.

No other course covers the advanced material in CS19 he does at the end of the year, which I will mix into algorithms.html, like that Tweesearch assignment in CS19. I can't remember if I've updated git yet but the second part he has you understanding exactly how a DAG works, it's ascending not descending like a tree.
You guys will be surprised when you do competitive programming and dynamic programming is easy for you because you learned it from Prof K, assuming you went ahead and did those lectures. Complete search, Knuth's 4th book on combinatorics, all of that is in CS19 at a broad level he's trying to give you intuition for.

>>39902
It's only an MVP so far. Reminder I only use OCaml because it's the closest thing to SML I can find with libraries. In my day to day drone job I use an imperative DSL, it's a big library, exactly like the higher order functions you learn in CS19 'the behavior of APis' paper. Succesor ML is an interesting project too, Robert Harper has a ton of practical comments in there like how djb comments on crypto primitives in that cfrg mailing list I posted on functionalcs.

But if you want to develop something BY YOURSELF it's a great language and easy to use, exactly like Pyret you simply declare data types and then do matching on them for your whole program. Watch the 'effective ML' youtube video, like slicing up a connection into different states you can exhaust with the compiler to be sure you've covered all of them.... yourself.

>>39894
PAPL and your Java class will collide eventually and you'll understand both better. Reminder the Brown curriculum is largely Java, prof K covers all this with mutable state and even objects later in the course.

>>39889
It's a simple webpage IDE or you install it yourself using the 3-tier compiler method, which is easy to follow. You can run Pyret totally offline and in your browser still if you have node installed.
>>
Polly Pickwill - Sun, 17 Oct 2021 01:04:00 EST x6K3CZQk No.39917 Reply
>>39914
Sure, but prob he's in a jail where you can't get books until after his conviction where he certainly won't get out for a long time.

However I will use opportunity to talk about prison education which I've already done, a good book is The Schemers Guide paperback by Iain Ferguson if you can find it, can be done entirely with pencil/paper. Tao's book is good too, or print off the STEP exams from Cambridge, this is a free book: https://www.openbookpublishers.com/product/1050 we will go through it in calculus.html, go on jpay or jmail.cc and send him printouts of the problems and work through each one, you'll often find the prisoner is faster than you and will keep you on your toes finishing the material but I wouldn't recommend doing this with any sexual offender, they're already crazy find a non crazy prisoner. Hell send them Tao's book and work through it with them, anything where you have to explain the material to an audience you will learn like I learn.
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Polly Pickwill - Sun, 17 Oct 2021 01:57:37 EST x6K3CZQk No.39918 Reply
1634450257657.jpg -(205986B / 201.16KB, 799x547) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>39739
The new meme curriculum is changing from alpha to beta now it's all daily challenges, no more linear work
Rest of CS19 will be done in algorithms.html whenever I upload it
math is all problems and poh-shen loh seminars
calclulus.html is Cambridge STEP proiblems which are largely hairy integrals to solve
linear algebra I still want to finish Tao's notes, then it's using linear algebra in algorithms.html
AI will continue as normal though, and whenever I go back to the haxxxoring curriculum because that's not even a linear course, dicking around hacking software is fun only so you can reprogram your friends Alexa to play Despacito or other cringe song at maximum volume whenever you want, we'll learn this.

functionalcs I will crush all the crypto course to show anons it can be done with no background, and finish Harper's book and lectures, plus some Favonia lectures on cubical type theory
however in the meantime:
>You did it, you're done.
There's nothing left you can't do if you made it this far, and proof will be in solving a simple problem or two everyday like I do, get up, load problem into brain, go work doing something and come back and likely solved, repeat. All these concepts will come to you much faster because you put in the foundation. Now is the time to build whatever software you want, it's what I do on the side because there is now time to do so.

The content we take is exactly what a Quant developer interview is as well, the calculus book we do about optimization, parameters to e and understanding symbolic differentiation which a compiler does now with auto diff, and AI content is what they interview for (just developer, not 'researcher') except we haven't done a lot of dice rolling predictions, making bets and expected value which we will do, like Sheldon Ross' books. Bot making too, you guys want to challenge gunbot and their insane prices, why not try.
Wildberger 'rational probability' is also a thing if you've done his algebraic calc course, why not it's just measuring a model from 0 to 1 interval, doesn't have to be real numbers and limits, try it out.

All the 'AI engineer' positions I've been infiltrating are just basic things learned in 10-701/601, stapling your decision tree to some framework and there is 5 of them right now from microsoft to python to apache. All of it, is entirely deep learning that's why Pytorch is the most popular software right now. Reminder it's a framework so you can program papers in deep learning with anything and just integrate it manually into the framework for MXnet or Pytorch of w/e. Reminder you can cast the data into Wildberger's wacky hyperbolic geometry for fun to see what happens, it works. Not to get a job of course but for w/e you're doing on the side. We don't have to do gradients and all that shit, we'll do it anyway but it doesn't mean that's the only way. Anyway, sometime ai.html will do this

tl;dr you're done, honestly. I'll prove it eventually in software.html making a meme service for free using all free hosting, of course there is a lifetime of material to know but manipulating the internet for fun and profit? you're done
>>
Polly Pickwill - Sun, 17 Oct 2021 03:11:33 EST x6K3CZQk No.39919 Reply
>>39894
No notes, the assignments is how you remember
If you write map/filter/fold yourself, you know how they work forever, same with MapReduce, every other assignment
That's how you learn anything, you figure it out yourself and 10 years from now you remember that time you had to make a functional updater that gives you constant time access to a tree, or how to traverse a graph, or what a vector dot product is, you'll always remember multiplying two lists elementwise and combining the products into a single returned value

CS19 compliments any java class, it's the exact same thing in the end. Andy Pavlo's CMU course on dbms is also good learning window functions and other sql. Modern sql queries can be up to 10mb in length just the string itself, imagine doing joins on thousands of tables that's the kind of queries that are still being handwritten for optimization. We're talking like 2k LOC program of all nested queries you have to write a separate program just to test, and who teaches you how to do that... cs19
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Jack Dartdock - Thu, 21 Oct 2021 18:12:23 EST Ota9fexp No.39922 Reply
>>39739

I'll be going full into the curriculum and seek the knowledge I lack for myself. I do have some fears about balancing mathematics and computer science learning in a 12-hour day.

It's all blurry since I truly know nothing else than rudimentary kindergarten addition, but I'm sure it'll clear up once I start learning and practicing the material.

I guess I'm taking the bet on myself. Although I feel a bit guilty just following a template I'll make up for it by leaving no stone unturned, thanks anon your guidance is precious.
>>
Jenny Chillyfoot - Mon, 25 Oct 2021 11:38:58 EST 0Mx4dnAk No.39926 Reply
Hey OP are you aware of https://immunefi.com/?
Do you have any resources for smart contract security to look for bugs in these tokens?
>>
Betsy Clavingworth - Tue, 26 Oct 2021 05:33:33 EST CPFZMk2U No.39928 Reply
>>39793

ty op i lived my life poor and depressed only dreaming abt learning shit because im so curious of computers n shit but i never done anything just got 20 and i fucking know nothing im throwing the dice on myself and gonna learn all this stuff change my life im the sole responsible for all this shit and im gonna see it thru
>>
Clara Nicklelock - Tue, 26 Oct 2021 16:51:26 EST 5hQrVKnL No.39929 Reply
If you struggle to remember how to use unix shell and it's utilities because books are boring and you can't come up with interesting practical tasks yourself checkout this: https://overthewire.org/wargames/

In a few hours of playing Bandit i have learned how to use tools far better than in last 4 years working as engineer. Trust me in a matter of few hours you will be able to:
  • understand and manipulate unix permissions
  • read hexdumps, encode/decode/compress data, figure how data is compressed just by looking at hexdump
  • connect to machine via telnet/opennsl s_client and send/receive data, also use nc
  • understand cron jobs and basic bash scriptiong
  • scan netwok ports
  • background/foreground jobs, screen/tmux
  • git
  • and a lot more tools, and all of that in practice(meaning you will not forget immediately)

If you are interested in practical reverse engineering and exploiting C programs checkout https://overthewire.org/wargames/vortex , it's fucking amazing. OP, I encourage you to at least skim through it, I think it's a must have practice for https://learnaifromscratch.github.io/theabsolutestateofsoftware.html

Also recommend this talk by CMU prof on hacking/reversing/learning through CTF practice https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vj96QetfTg
>>
David Berringmut - Tue, 26 Oct 2021 23:34:43 EST x6K3CZQk No.39930 Reply
>>39739
All of learnai leads to this: https://learnaifromscratch.github.io/algorithms.html
It's part curriculum part gonzo journalist attempt to infiltrate Palantir and Amazon for fun and profit.
Algorithms.html is the """premiere""" workshop where i spend most time but I'll still do everything else, you should too there's great content there.
All the math workshop, linear algebra esp, type theory and crypto in fact I want to do Ryan O'Donnell's quantum class with the crypto workshop because it's post-quantum crypto we should know how Shor's algo works and the quantum architecture to write our own algos for all the simulators that are out now by Rigetti computing and IBM and now Google. Quantum computing is a sleeper everyone wrote off as impossible and they are getting there.... except djb and Tanja Lange who knew it could happen.

Quantum computing is simple, it's normal computing but you add a single element of randomness like what if we flipped a coin and added that to x86.

>>39929
That is good, I like things that aren't just static linear progressions. I learned shell programming from the ancient Pike/kernighan book 'The Unix Programming Environment'. It's a tiny book absolutely filled with info that still is relevant to this day, even their crazy 'here's how you program a large program in UNIX' chapter.

Hacking workshop I slacked on for inexcusable reasons, it's actually my primary interest. Many of those Brown U papers are very good doing variations of moving existing program assembly around like it's a Jenga block, just rip it out and move it over here, bang you have full root. Still works all the time, ROP was used for some recent CPU exploit, it will never end.


>>39928
This is made to make money https://learnaifromscratch.github.io/algorithms.html
Like specifically a workshop for anons to get a job, maybe they hate it or they love it.
But it's better than what I used to make landscaping after prison for $10/hr cash daily.

You can easily do this, anybody can. Nothing we are doing is difficult honestly, if you did the entire meme AI workshop you agree with me, it's a lot of work but it's not impossible to know, it's not impossible to do. ANYBODY CAN DO THIS

>>39926
Not at all aware and now I'm interested though honestly those bounties are low, I can break your contract just using up too much gas you should pay me much more. You want to spend time breaking those contracts anon just use up gas, think endless loops. You don't have to 'hack' anything

>>39922
The meme curriculum is actually geared towards kindergarten addition because it starts at the very beginning with Tao and Wildberger teaching natural numbers, or counting sticks.
Off topic but I have making crazy gains with Wilberger's linear algebra too, combining with Tao's notes on polynomials being vector spaces. I will make a writeup soon but again this is simple math anybody can do, there is no prodigy involved and competive programming is the same, you guy's start doing it and you will no longer revere the top programmers, it's SIMPLE the same things prof K taught us in CS19, just you need practice to keep up. Nobody practices because they give up thinking this is some kind of birth given ability, I'll never know why, but the meme curriculum tries to show you that no, you aren't born to do this, you learn it, and it's the same as being an auto mechanic. A learned skill.
>>
William Tillingworth - Wed, 27 Oct 2021 05:01:15 EST CPFZMk2U No.39931 Reply
>>39930
What should I do to ensure that shit stays in my head? Do you have any information on rigor, discipline, proper study methods? Thanks
>>
Molly Cibblekon - Wed, 27 Oct 2021 06:57:07 EST iVN1Zl1t No.39932 Reply
>>39931
Gwern article on spaced repetition. His “death note and anonymity” also probides a good mathematical approach to open source gathering of intelligence I can only reocmmend to cyber security afficionados here. Off topic but it’s a resource I wanted to share.

OP how likely do you think it is that quantum computing can crack all the copies intelligence agencies have of old encrypted communications? Sounds like you could crack all that encrypted data and use ML to mass parse it fòr surveillance. Could also be used to red all those rich people’s signal messages and blackmail them over messages they sent “in private”.
Can quantum computing crack the cryptographic algorithms used by https traffic and messaging apps?
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Polly Blizzleson - Wed, 27 Oct 2021 11:15:42 EST 713UPRy5 No.39933 Reply
Torrents are down and the algorithms.html resource links are behind a login :(
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James Worthinghall - Wed, 27 Oct 2021 15:46:09 EST J3S2yFrS No.39934 Reply
OP do you have any suggestions for making money independently? I had a "corporate" dev job two times and I don't think I can ever do that again. I just ended up hating my coworkers, my job, and myself until I finally quit, both times. But I don't know what I can even do. I just don't want to interact with other people that much. The only thing I've found that seems perfect is doing bug bounties on Hackerone or Bugcrowd but I don't know how feasible that is and I would rather be doing something with programming anyway. Do you have any suggestions?
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Beatrice Werrycocke - Thu, 28 Oct 2021 18:34:39 EST YGowt8Oj No.39935 Reply
Anna Kramer says Facebook is having a very hard time hiring. Bad PR.
Should be infiltratable like Amazon now that they can’t afford to be as selective.
>>
Edward Turveydock - Thu, 28 Oct 2021 19:09:30 EST /JzTxcjP No.39936 Reply
>>39916
Prof. Reiss is probably the most butthurt person about the current state of Java mindshare I have ever met. He is a true OOP believer and will made that square hole into a circle even if it kills his career (which it kinda has).
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Thomas Broddlewater - Fri, 29 Oct 2021 20:12:28 EST x6K3CZQk No.39938 Reply
>>39933
Try this, there is a 24/7 seed box http://btcache.me/torrent/D3B621E29F1C4647E37E5111A1B28FDB790BB056
I checked and no logins https://cseweb.ucsd.edu//~dakane/CSE101/Lec1.html for example, ucsd has most of their lectures open but you never know, things disappear
It could be your are trying to connect from some blacklisted country, tell me a video service used there and I'll upload all the lectures so you don't have to d/l a 4.65g torrent
I picked that course because the guy teaching it is an olympiad and putnam wizard, almost nobody is a 4 time putnam fellow
He also uploaded years and years of exams and their solution, perfect for practicing algorithm analysis (on paper) and in competitive programming we implement the same algorithms but if you watched any of those Gennady twitch streams where he effortlessly knows the exact complexity of everything he is doing, this is how you learn

>>39932
>how likely do you think it is that quantum computing can crack all the copies intelligence agencies have of old encrypted communications?
100% likely, Tanja Lange says so in the very first lecture of the crypto workshop then shows the student a picture of one of the NSA super database compounds that just vaccuum data and stores it forever for the sole purposes of cracking it when technology allows to do so. Signal is different, it generates a new key for every conversation so going back in time and retrieving all the conversations is somewhat more difficult but to be honest I know nothing about the Signal axolotl or w/e it is protocol, only that they do something similar to PFS (perfect forward security meaning change the keys for every new convo) but any kind of elliptical crypto is done for but things like SHA-1 through SHA-3 are not done for, we will learn all this as the course goes on, and we will learn real quantum computing from a 'programmer's perspective' so writing algorithms and cracking them ourselves using whatever simulators are avail, I know IBM and Google are both working on (I don't keep up to date yet) quantum as a cloud service and IBM has one that actually works for low amounts of qubits. Lot's of cryptocurrencies are fucked too, tons of things we will see that's why they are now doing 'post-quantum' crypto ciphers in Europe because nobody trusts the NSA anymore and why should they. Not that I'm anti-NSA though, I expect every country has their regional agency that can gain 'information dominance' as per Gen Alexander put it, that's just how the world works maybe you want to work for them yourself, see what they're up to.

>>39931
Spaced repition works, we kind of already do it in the meme curriculum you see the same things numerous times. Prof K has papers about this I littered all of software.html but the #1 way is to figure it out yourself, once you do, you never forget. If you do forget the details they rapidly come back after you sit there and think for a few minutes in my experience I've forgotten tons of books but just thinking about something I remember or recognize the pattern from somewhere, think I've made an original solution and then remember oh wait I read about this in.. robert harper's SML book in 2014. In the math meme workshop I also post the professor's reasons for not including solutions, because again he claims if you firgure it out yourself you will never forget bu8t we aren't tuition paying students in a top school who get office hours and TA help, we have to look at the solutions, hopefully after thinking about the problem long enough that it will stick. Gennady/tourist of competitive programming fame says the same thing at the end of all his twitch broadcasts when he looks at the solutions, he tells people to figure it out themselves too then compare yours to their almost always better solution.

A lot of the CS19 assignments I've never forgotten because I had to figure them out myself, that's one example. To quote prof K in one of the lectures, if somebody were to wake me up in the middle of the night and demand I program a vector space and it's operations I could do it (he uses the example of counting the length of a list, but same thing).
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Thomas Broddlewater - Fri, 29 Oct 2021 20:54:05 EST x6K3CZQk No.39939 Reply
>>39937
Yes, all those Oregon Programming Language Summer Schools workshops cover Idris anon, check them out. In one of the lectures a large cabal of Idris devs try and troll Robert Harper after he makes a typically provocative comment that Haskell and all it's derivatives 'are only approximations, there is no such thing as a data structure in haskell' and other hilarious shit. I don't know enough about Idris but it's a general purpose programming language with dependent types, this means all those things like contracts they teach you in CMU, not needed just use dependent types. IIRC it's the only general purpose lang with dependent types.

>>39935
Jstreet too
There's a recruiter blog for JS where one guy there claims bigtech is bribing schools to keep out JS and other companies with access to students
So everyone is having problems right now, hence the meme curriculum not that I think you should work there and be their slave but you should treat it like school, except it's paid school. This is why I chose Amazon and Palantir out of the blue, they are DESPERATE like hundreds of unfilled jobs worldwide because of (likely) their insane internal policies but who cares. I am specifically interested in joining one of the big tech outfits and manipulating them interally to rise in the ranks for fun and profit, as a hobby. I literally don't care about income so long as I have power and food to eat, and I think other anons can get in there too no problem just we have to step to them on their terms, that's why we are doing ivy league courses, that's why we are doing competitive programming, we are learning to speak their syntax and game their system as hard as possible, because everyone else is too. You get in an interview room with these guys like I did in HK with highly arrogant France OCaml devs but I was able to signal with them and relate, they hired me, and literally anyone else can do it who is interested, anyone, anywhere.

>>39936
Although I unironically subscribe to the Robert Harper statement that functional programming SUBSUMES imperative programming except in specific special cases, to begin we have to dance and play the awful game of 'design patterns' and other cringe OOP dogma. I kind of understand Alan Kay's original idea that there is like this massive server farm, and you throw something into it and each server has it's own independent algebra and processes your req, and this style of programming is superior to all others but on the other hand I realize Sussman/Harper are everyday producing absolutely amazing shit that is easier and easier to do, that's why I primarily shill functional programming: it's easy. They use a lot of category theory terms and confusing abstractions but honestly it's easy, there's no massive complexity to hold in your head and try and figure out what state at which time is causing this obscure bug.

This is also why I don't have any 'integration tests' or other nonsense in the meme curriculum, you will never need them if you write a module and abstract over it with some functor, it's already guaranteed to work. I never had to 'integration test' my shitty chinese phone store app with my Elixir box, it just worked because the types in the specification said they would. I could rant about this endlessly but Robert Harper is a better source, watch his OPLSS lectures (we will in the type theory workshop)
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Barnaby Bimmersedging - Fri, 29 Oct 2021 21:01:30 EST jFgqq+Wr No.39940 Reply
>>39939
>and all it's derivatives

Fixed:
>and all its derivative

It really bothers me when I see clearly very intelligent people make this grammar mistake. The possessive form of "it" is "its." No apostrophe. The only time to use "it's" is when you're abbreviating "it is."
User is currently banned from all boards
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Thomas Broddlewater - Fri, 29 Oct 2021 21:16:30 EST x6K3CZQk No.39941 Reply
>>39934
>How to make money independently
Sure, watch every single Peter Thiel lecture on youtube https://youtu.be/-oKjLVECMKA
His advice: start as small as possible, and build a monopoly on that market
Like how ebay began by selling pez, the monopolized the pez 'market' then grew into what they are today

This is what I did with my Chinese app, I chose to dominant a very, very small market I knew Chinese were into manly home based cooking and delivery, then I expanded to home based restaurants who took reservations and hosted people in their house, then I expanded to real restaurants in China (in a tiny city too, in a tiny app marketplace nobody has ever heard of)

Of course, you could also do something shady. Many countries like say, Canada have legalized marijuana but is there a site where you can just go and bid on clones? or even buy clones? No. Will they extradite you if you get caught running the clone ebay? Probably not. If you decide to go shady then do not target your own country pref target the EU, or Canada. btw never target Australia, UK or NZ ever ever. There's a famous darkweb site run out of Israel by expat Russians who target only the Russian market. They are still operating. Of course what does shady really mean because companies like Uber decided to break laws creating their monopoly, they ignored taxi regulations and just went ahead and did it.

Of course you don't want to be shady though because you prob have family and community respect, so instead try to become a contractor. You already have experience, apply to places and straight tell them you want to be a contractor not an employee. No more 'team meetings' or mindless propaganda to endure, you clock in and clock out. You could also direclty apply to contractor outfits like https://www.moonlightwork.com/ or anon, do what I did, apply to your local university research labs. The pay is meh, but you are doing crazy shit in theoretical CS or biology on the cutting edge, there's no 'customer'. Try it, I recommend all anons apply to those places they aren't really "jobs" meaning it doesn't feel like work, you're doing research.
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Thomas Broddlewater - Fri, 29 Oct 2021 21:21:49 EST x6K3CZQk No.39942 Reply
>>39940
I type on a phone here between drinks at a bar usually on weekends, but yes, no excuse I have terrible English skills, one reason I shill for anons to learn Latin like I am currently doing because it is a framework for English to learn things like what cases of a noun are, that translate to tenses in English.
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Thomas Broddlewater - Fri, 29 Oct 2021 23:25:31 EST x6K3CZQk No.39943 Reply
>offtopic shilling
I have spent a ridiculous amount of time reinventing AI/statistics to be rational. This is what is fun about Wildberger math you are Galois and you are figuring out how to solve open problems in mathematics, but using the rational continuum Wildberger talks about in his FMP playlist here https://youtu.be/Nu-YPJSNFpE where he claims ancient greeks used to think about multiplication being 2D.

I'm not anti modern math or anything but reinventing statistics and probability yourself using only the rational continuum and his rational trig book is actually kind of fun, it consumes most of my time these days. It also helps you to learn the 'real' statistics and probability abstractions because you have to dig deep into their foundations in order to model them in rational math. You guys can make actual gains in real research math doing this yourself.. and it's just highschool math. For example 'deep learning' when we finally do it in 10-701 you can use Wildberger's universal hyperbolic geometry as a model which is DEAD SIMPLE to help you learn the advanced regular math. This is something I have always done, cast something complicated into Scheme and model it myself, try to reinvent it there, that's how I usually learn. So I started doing it with Wildberger math like how do you model the complex numbers in order to solve polynomials? You use dihedron algebra. It just works, they're all solved. Nothing there is complicated no weird infinite process like a sequence magically converges to a number and take it's limit. Has anyone finished Tao's book? How do you take a hardware defined integer and model it as an infinite limit, you don't, so we have all these stupid abstractions that don't really work. People bikeshed over big decimal and other types, but Wildberger kind of already solved this with his elementary school math abstraction.

Something else I do is dick around with Robert Harper's cubical type theory.... but for rational math. It just works, there's no genius here needed, you want to program proofs like Voedvodsky dreamed of, you can literally automate it with a python script and a cubical type theory assistant prototype. I spend a lot of time doing this, it's awesome you are the 16th century mathematician trying to figure out something and using all the techniques that poh-shen loh and competitive programming teach us in order to solve the problems in rational mathematics. Because you use a proof assistant, you know it's correct. Yes you anon are the next generation's math genius and all you did was contemplate how to inject say, a loss function into rational math and model it there, then prove it with basic types in a proof assistant. You can even do this in Lean or Coq with it's video game like 'tacticts', and even if it doesn't go anywhere you learn a ton just trying to figure this out yourself.

For example Wildberger's meme course in linear algebra, using the affine plane. You read Tao's notes about linear algebra foundations and all the abstractions that can be a vector space like polynomials... it's exactly what Wildberger teaches. It's the same thing. A polynomial vector space is just those simple ruler lines written on a whiteboard. Wait what, why am I then learning all this other bullshit. So anyways that's what I've been doing, as a hobby inventing rational statistics like that rational normal distribution, why do we have to measure the real line to model randomness? You don't, try casting it into the rational highschool math world and see what happens yourself.

Anyway so that's what I do in the AI curriculum, we learn all the official stats and then I spend a few days porting this over to rational mathematics or wild abstractions like universal hyperbolic geometry, then there's always this 'but how do we connect the abstraction to this other dimension' and I've already done it, but in meme math. tl;dr try meme math, it's fun, it's like Lisp you cast everything there and it just works. I don't claim to know more than Tao of course or even a student with a basic BSc in applied math, and I get why we have these real number or limits or complex number abstractions because they are convenient and work on paper, however it's way more interesting for me to replicate these concepts all in the rational continuum for fun and profit. You end up learning both. Good luck anons I'll include this sometime
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Thomas Broddlewater - Sat, 30 Oct 2021 00:29:40 EST x6K3CZQk No.39944 Reply
1635568180027.jpg -(1566401B / 1.49MB, 1134x2268) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>39739
Another reason why you should avoid book memes
I made this pic

If you ever see it, it's me
After I made it in I think 2015, I learned linear acquisition of knowledge doesn't work
I gained new respect for hard working anons
Anyone can do what I do all day every day
There is no linear process to do so, some things have a linear prereq like trying to figure out the C++ I/O library that uses streams and CS19 taught you streams but otherwise, no you can figure it out yourself
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Wesley Donnerfoot - Sat, 30 Oct 2021 04:46:32 EST 3SSq9fMk No.39945 Reply
>>39944
Hey OP. How do you manage time & knowledge in order to use time in an
efficient way and build robust knowledge for one thing before moving to the
next one?
Do you have a sort of roadmap?
Do you use any tools/methodology like Personal Kanban, Notion/Obsidian/Roam Research/Zettlr, or emacs org-mode?
I feel struggle both to organize and bind me to a sort of calendar of TODOs and to keep/preserve in an organized and searchable way the knowledge I acquire during the curriculum.
Do you have a method and supportive tools to help in this?
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Beatrice Pannerchitch - Sat, 30 Oct 2021 10:53:30 EST PRE0tiGl No.39946 Reply
>>39938 Any video service is ok but I would prefer one where I don’t need to register an account.
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Caroline Greenfoot - Sat, 30 Oct 2021 11:40:18 EST 9Ekv/PBD No.39947 Reply
OP are you still doing drone work? Do you have any plans to go back to China and get a management position again? I and probably many other anons would love to work with you, even if only in an entry position
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Wesley Sendertodging - Sat, 30 Oct 2021 19:47:16 EST QrrJbpU7 No.39948 Reply
>>39938
> if somebody were to wake me up in the middle of the night and demand I program a vector space and it's operations I could do it (he uses the example of counting the length of a list, but same thing).
Very motivating last example, because at least I can tell how to count a list :)
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Ian Clizzlehudging - Sun, 31 Oct 2021 21:00:40 EST NHeco2iV No.39963 Reply
Thank you, OP. I'm already in Computer Science but honestly, the quality of the education is pure garbage. All of the professors don't care about teaching the material properly or they let people pass easily and it feels the CS department is constantly under budget and out of touch. It feels I have to relearn everything just so I don't forget. I'll start on CS19 while also doing fullstackopen so I can have actual marketable skills.
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Matilda Waffingfen - Sun, 31 Oct 2021 23:59:07 EST RTMuLrHX No.39966 Reply
>>39944
OP both the torrents are not working for me
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Betsy Gellerfoot - Mon, 01 Nov 2021 00:52:41 EST u387a6Om No.39967 Reply
>>39944
OP, you say to disregard this book meme. But I see SICP there, which is the epitome of intro to prog (both functional and imperative). I also see Sipser's book and CS:APP. Also GEB. These are books you shill.
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Matilda Fuckingville - Mon, 01 Nov 2021 10:46:42 EST gbqgFeed No.39968 Reply
Two people who I asked both say torrents are fucked
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Oliver Clayforth - Tue, 02 Nov 2021 15:53:49 EST iGQhpSyE No.39970 Reply
Hey OP do you recommend learning Haskell or OCaml? Haskell is far more mainstream (for a functional PL) but you seem to shill OCaml a lot
>>
Emma Harringwill - Tue, 02 Nov 2021 17:02:03 EST QrrJbpU7 No.39971 Reply
>>39970
Do both, and stick with the one that disgusts you less, or sparks joy more often.
>>
Alice Pockdock - Thu, 04 Nov 2021 19:58:49 EST x6K3CZQk No.39976 Reply
>>39970
I guess I shill Kotlin now since algorithms.html will do competitive programming/interviews in Kotlin. The syntax is almost the same as Pyret you can transfer from CS19 directly to Kotlin with absolutely no need to even look at documentation actually, example code will intuitively make sense.
For jobs there are people actively hiring Haskell devs and it's a small pool so you can get in there but if you learn OCaml it's the same really, in fact if you learn Pyret in CS19 it's also the same. This is the secret: everything on learnai/functionalcs is describing the *exact same thing* but from different perspectives. You just need to learn the idioms and common practices of the language you choose

>>39963
Try https://learnaifromscratch.github.io/algorithms.html once you get to graphs in CS19, do both at the same time (I am doing so). That is specifically made to pass any tech interview anywhere and I'm going to go myself and prove it works using only whats in learnai. Like actually getting hired to Amazon, walking around for a few weeks to see what goes on there, or/and Palantir to see what 'forward deployed developer' does. I don't really want to work there but who cares it's my hobby just to get in and manipulate the internal structure for fun and profit. Competitive programming you recognize the pattern of the data, customize a data structure for it and repeat a few hundred times, that's why we're doing it, you won't forget if you figured it out yourself. All the spaced-repitition learning or flash cards or w/e, waste of time. Solve a hard problem using X method and you will never forget that method.

>>39948
Tao's book anon we do in linear.html https://learnaifromscratch.github.io/linear.html and the first CS19 assignment docdiff. Whenever some math structure is presented to you like say, polynomials, you'll immediately think 'wait, this is a vector space, to hell with polynomial operations I'll just manipulate this shit with vectors'.

>>39947
Yes, actually I would like to take one of the 100k jobs in Shanghai currently being offered so I have been practicing Shanghainese. They are desperate for developers right now, so is JS in hong kong. I'll try both but shit is hitting the fan anon: https://fortune.com/2021/11/04/energy-crisis-food-shortage-security-fertilizer-prices-yara-ceo-madagascar-cop26/ there is not going to be enough food because fertilizer prices are sky high. Literally everything to do with agriculture right now is insalely priced according to my new little bot that tracks stock prices. This is an artificial, mismanaged global crisis so China, India, Russia will be fine but the rest of us are going to experience food price inflation and be utterly fucked. That kind of hurried my desire to parachute into Shanghai and take other anons with me. This will all be covered in algorithms.html

>>39945
My new advice from exp is take everything at once, it's all the same thing described from different angles. That's why learnai is a clusterfuck of ever growing workshops, it's all the same. One perspective may be difficult but the other may be easy, in the end you learn the same 'thing' and the better you get at it, the better you get at that difficult perspective because you think in the back of your mind.. wait I've seen this before.

Solve hard problems you have to think about yourself without looking at answers and you will never forget the solution. That's how you remember, that's why, math olympiads and competitive programming are shilled so hard by everyone. Like the Russian algebra book we do I routinely use it in work and for other courses. It has to be the best book/resource I've found yet in terms of that material popping up everywhere. Btw you can solve hard problems just sitting down and deciding to code something impossible like 'I want a virtual OS that runs on my phone' and try and make it. Each step when you solve something impossible, you won't forget.
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Cyril Hucklestock - Thu, 04 Nov 2021 20:24:23 EST x6K3CZQk No.39977 Reply
>>39967
Here's the truth about SICP
It assumes you've done 2 semesters of continuous mathematics so you are familiar with that level of absraction and how to deduce things from definitions. That's why they are currently rewriting it for javascript https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/structure-and-interpretation-computer-programs-1 in Apr 2022

Any follower of the meme curriculum can easily do SICP, esp if you did some of that calculus modeling book because that's exactly what you do in SICP, model something with software then max abstract it. A beginner would be totally lost like I was when I first read it, when I went back later and re-read parts of it, I finally got it. So SICP is best as a 'cs 101' for somebody who's already been programming for a while or somebody who has already done a few semesters of university mathematics. It's absolutely terrible for somebody who has neither and they will lost most of the nuances Sussman/Abelson try and convey to the reader and they have articles and interviews about this.

PAPL (now DCIC) prof K wrote because he wanted to take the same ideas taught in SICP but for people who don't have the prereqs, prof k has papers about this that are worth reading manly trial and error with the best students in the US and watching them fail repeatedly and changing their materials until a majority passed, then until a majority of non Brown students passed. proven to work! try it first then try SICP

my archaic meme list which still exists and often makes rounds I did compsci out of self interest and for fun, so I was willing to dig into weird esoteric theoretical topics out of interest but most people aren't, and will be disappointed if they follow my own recommendations in that pic. Today I would totally skip Sipser's book and just do Ryan Odonnell's theory toolkit course, you can use Sipser's book to look up anything that isn't familiar. GEB, which I still have is one of the 'light the fire' kind of books but the first 300 pages are the most annoying thing you will ever read, it's purposely repeating itself to drill into you self reference. If you want to read it of course go ahead and even watch the OCW MIT lectures on GEB (I haven't seen them). Make a GEB workshop yourself.

There's lot's of stuff I don't shill anymore like Apostol's calc book, no anon will sit through that and I had to read it like Isaac Newton where you re-read the same chapter a dozen times in order to understand it. Many proofs in the book are also impossible to decipher, you have to look at somebody else's proofs... which is when I discovered Tao's books that are written in a much more efficient style. Anyway, you should take what you want to take, and make it a workshop. Do what I do make a (shitty) draft at first then polish it up for youtube vids and get paid.
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Shit Nicklewater - Thu, 04 Nov 2021 20:28:13 EST B0rcCZui No.39979 Reply
>>39976
>I guess I shill Kotlin now
Why Kotlin all of a sudden? It seems like you are switching languages every few weeks
Is Kotlin even good for competitive programming? Never seen anyone use it
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Cyril Hucklestock - Thu, 04 Nov 2021 21:27:40 EST x6K3CZQk No.39980 Reply
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>>39739
learnai/functionalcs update

everything has to be done by Jan 29 2022, I went back to old methods getting up at 4am to finish. I haven't updated the meme fitness workshop but there's some things I've discovered are pretty awesome I should have been doing before like riding a bike and watching lectures, because if you followed the meme curriculum you're now at that level, you no longer have to stop to figure out things it's almost too easy for us.

Speaking of easy, CSE101 is too easy for us after CS19. I chose to do it because of absolutely huge amounts of practice exams/hw and solutions so we can make Big-theta/O a napkin calculation or wake up in your sleep and figure out the complexity of 3 programs that call each other. The cp4 book and even many Katiis problems are too easy for us I find, we may just skip to ICPC problems soon after doing all the graphs and problem solving techniques like DP/combinatorial complete search.

I slacked on the math workshop because it's also too easy now, Prof Loh's discrete math course anyway is too easy and I'd like to jump into the Putnam problems and learn those techniques with u guys. So all of that will resume, I stopped doing it to not present anons with a gigantic dump of information 'you must learn all of this' I kind of stopped it exactly where you're just good to go and have the 'theoretical minimum' to do it all yourself at will.

Anons should pick something very impossible to build and try it using meme curriculum resources. Forget what everyone else says it may work, so far it's working for me!. That CS19 lecture and assignment we did of Guy L Steele talking about casting a hard problem into a richer space, solving it there then sending it back to the lower dimensional space, and writing everything so that it is associative I have achieved insane progress doing this, which is hilarious I've already done CS19 many times but I never saw that Guy L Steele lecture which is from a Prof K paper citation.

tl;dr this is now too easy for us, esp if you cast everything to Wilderberger meme math and back again like Guy L Steele told us to do. A simple affine or 'universal geometry' plane, do associative calculations there because it's just rational numbers, cast it back to your program and hardly any battery life is used because CPUs are optimized for associativity, ie my drone job. I'm doing wild shit I never thought possible and it's just highschool math, nothing more. I would liike to inject this into the type theory workshop dicking around with cubical type theory proofs but for the 'rational continuum' and see what happens, so I'm very interested in that workshop above all others and the quantum workshop which masquerades as the crypto workshop but really it's quantum crypto because that is the near future.

Anyway anons I'm back to the old ways and will update 2x a day when possible, all workshops. Watch that Guy L Steele workshop from CS19, holy shit I had no idea how it would boost everything I do
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Cyril Hucklestock - Thu, 04 Nov 2021 21:29:53 EST x6K3CZQk No.39981 Reply
>>39979
>why Kotlin
Because the ICPC accepts it officially now and it's syntax is a carbon copy of Pyret, you can program purely functional in Kotlin if you want

Trust me anon you do not want to use C++, take a look at the IO library sometime and attempt to decipher it.
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Barnaby Pullybury - Thu, 04 Nov 2021 23:49:24 EST /Rys2xQP No.39982 Reply
>>39980
Why Jan 29th?
Thank you for updating those torrents, too. I’ll post them in various places to ensure distribution.
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Thomas Crunnerpit - Fri, 05 Nov 2021 02:33:47 EST u387a6Om No.39983 Reply
>>39980
Some people in the discord server were saying that Pyret syntax in DCIC is quite different from the actual documentation. Is that an issue? Have you seen it?

Why Jan 29th?

Don't you think if someone had some previous experience in imperative programming through courses like MIT 6.00 or 15-112 and then move on to CS19 they will get more revelations through the functional style of teaching? I know Prof K says that these people face more difficulty in CS19 than total newbies. But doesn't that hardship make you really understand how great the FP style is and when to use or not to use both FP and imperative prog? You came from that style. You are still discovering hidden gems from rewatching lectures.

Btw Guy L Steele's lecture is no more available from the link you posted in learnAI.
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James Gogglemig - Fri, 05 Nov 2021 19:39:49 EST AniC9jmg No.39987 Reply
>>39980

I'll be back on that grind soon as well. Managed to get a corpo gig and I'm completely sucking ass - Was immediately thrown into production and haven't met any of the deadlines given. Mentally I'm already checked out of there and just collect the checks....I've gotta say its pretty sweet for a first gig. I think I'll see if I can BS my way into more gigs while studying theory - might not have made it here without your curriculum so want to say thanks OP!
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Augustus Bardridge - Fri, 05 Nov 2021 20:59:08 EST HuS+uZXf No.39988 Reply
>>39980
Check Sapien Medicine and MEF Dynamics in YT, It's cranky and sometimes cringe but it works, I don't know if it's harmful long term.
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Albert Drevingville - Fri, 05 Nov 2021 21:17:29 EST x6K3CZQk No.39989 Reply
>>39985
I just tried it from a phone
Downloaded bitcache torrent file
Loaded and then stalled in qtorrent, clicked on forced resume, 2MB/s download for CS19. I actually hate torrents they're a shitty protocol, I will just make an FTP server or even stream all the videos myself and link them from Russia, i don't care.

>>39987
always be committing shit
even if it's not your area, there is probably software in your company with an open bug/feature list I used to crush those getting up early in the morning in HK in my spare time when I was sitting around and waiting for some team to finish something, otherwise we would have been doing absolutely nothing for weeks on end. But if you want just coast around and see what you can get away with, up to you. I've had jobs where I literally was an infiltrator and just doing the bare minimum to see if anyone would notice but I was already getting income elsewhere so didn't care.

>>39983
>Guy L Steele
Are you sure? Works for me https://dl.acm.org/action/downloadSupplement?doi=10.1145%2F1631687.1596551&file=1596551.mp4 are ppl connecting from afghanistan or something? If so I'll just upload it to some German youtube clone.

tbh I haven't read a lot of DCIC, because what I've skimmed is exactly the same as PAPL with exception to the later chapters where they insert memory locations just for illustrative purposes.
REMINDER TO ALL ANONS: a gigantic amount of students literally are taking DCIC in JUNIOR HIGHSCHOOL now. You should follow Prof K's bootstrap work with public schools they are writing their own map/filter/fold in Grade 10. Keep this in mind, the next generation is going to just place out of CS 101/102 completely.

Anyway let's audit DCIC for different undocumented syntax:
This one is new https://dcic-world.org/2021-08-21/trees.html the datatype here has syntax I haven't seen using '____________' but it's just a reader placeholder not real syntax, it's for the book getting you to figure out what it should be. Skimming around I see '...' used that's just a template, nothing new here. The tree datatype uses 'NoInfo' but you declare that in the datatype as the base case so no difference.I'll audit the whole book right now:

There's a hilarious new rant here about keeping teacher's employed https://dcic-world.org/2021-08-21/Collections_of_Structured_Data.html#%28part._.Combining_.Structured_and_.Collective_.Data%29 which I think does not make it's case when it's only "encouragement" and feelings bullshit because if you're like me, most of your teachers told you straight to your face you would never pass and would fail. I even had adversarial professors,too long to get into but anyway fuck teachers. Pay a grad student to audit your work and skip the entire system school to me always felt like a prison. You go to a new one and the first thing you have to do is prove yourself and fight some douche in your face testing you, then you have to play by the institution rules and can't do it at your own pace, you can't talk to X guy because Y group doesn't like him, you can't date Z girl because Q group doesn't like her, it's literally prison for kids. If you do the entire math textbook in Grade 8 in a single weekend and are bored stiff tough luck, sit there another 6 months. The whole system is cancer and needs to be redesigned, at least Prof K recognizes this and is trying though there's only so much he can do, and he has to pander to greater forces than himself but whatever what can we plebs do. That's the end of my rant, I really, really hate school in all forms and the bs credentialing we have to go through just to make money that's why I made a radical alternative and I'm going to test it myself.

There's a bit of a different syntax here: https://dcic-world.org/2021-08-21/testing.html#%28part._test-oracle%29 but it's still just returning a function, something covered later in CS19 lectures.
Anyway anon I don't see the different syntax, but anyway I recommend anon's use PAPL and just take the 2018 snapshot course
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Albert Drevingville - Fri, 05 Nov 2021 23:32:21 EST x6K3CZQk No.39990 Reply
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>Why ending Jan 29th
The type theory, security (because like you I started as a hacker), quantum crypto and putnam seminar workshop I'm making won't end but everything else will just because it needs to end and be finished, and I plan on using algorithms.html and CS19 (and AI too) at that time to infiltrate a bunch of famous employers to see if my own curriculum works. I cease to be working class that day https://youtu.be/4ld74iqdlLw for various reasons too boring and political to get into but there will be a lot of free time, I don't plan on wasting it.

This is the difference between the meme curriculum and everyone else: I take my own medicine and try it out. Can you actually get employed knowing only X? I will see. If I'm in an interview and they ask me some question outside the meme curriculum I'll say I don't know even if I do. I won't apply with any of my background, total blank application with no job history except working class job I still do on the side to avoid covid lockdowns (which never seem to end here). This is a continuous experiement, what does it take to get into things that nobody says you can get into. Is this too hard for you to do? Probably not, in fact it may even be too easy for you but you don't have the formal credentials for whatever society reasons and that's why the meme curriculum exists. It's not a static curriculum that worships nostalgia and defers to whoever pillar of CS, we look to the future fuck the past it was a pile of gatekeeping shit then too.

>Meme curriculum manifesto
I actually have a fully worked out strategy.
First I take the most futuristic proof courses I can find where anons can actually get paying jobs, because I hate MOOCs, I hate school, I hate meme book lists that nobody has actually done themselves, I hate 1970s data structures and OOP garbage, I hate that all this information is limited to who can pass an arbitrary credential check in order to make money and get hired to bigtech. The whole system is a big cancer and I was a victim too but beat them at their own game so I'm trying to show anons that no, you don't have to do all that shit. You can make money despite the obstacles they throw up. There's a reason I shill RISC-V and functional programming which according to Robert Harper SUBSUMES all other programming except in special cases, because I know they will be the future, and not the bullshit we have to dance around today. Note that PAPL is now 'data centric', and literally everyting else is about 'data'. There's a reason, it's the future. Anybody can write an algorithm but can they do data analysis ie: Cozma Shalizi advanced data analysis? That is a highly demanded skil that can't be imitated with some algorithm, ie: you get paid.

I feel I'm the only meme cringe master actually looking at the future and not the past, do you guy's want to 1800s mathematics or 21st century mathematics? Do you want to learn how to program in the 1970s or how it's done now? Do you want to dick around with some shit abstraction using piles of 1990s OOP or make your own modern abstraction? This is the meme curriculum. What is proven to work, what is 21st century. What is just opinion with no concrete proof that it works and a pile of 1980s shit... well everything else. Literally everyting else is just opinion, I present something that isn't opinion, and will become your challenge in a few years reminder Prof K is teaching this to jr highschool students. Imagine what CS101 will look like at Brown 3 years from now, very different as they've already done CS19 in grade 10 taking his material!

>pure rant, please disregard the folllowing opinions they won't show up in meme curriculum except as hints that I inject
3blue1brown is another guy who defers to the status quo. It makes for views and money because our universities are still teaching this shit but .. limits and approximations of every single number? really? You guy's can't do better? Try it. You don't need limits and some 'sequence' that 'converges' to a number, what a bunch of bullshit. Try writing approximation algorithms and trying to optimize them IRL like a drone that needs to do trig to do pursuit, it's hard as fuck and we will do still do it in algorithms.html but it's not necessary, math is an abstraction just abstract it differently. I haven't written this but has anyone tried to use cubical type theory for the rational continuum? it works! Like trivially works. They are off trying to get some sequence to converge to a 'limit' and I'm just rolling on cruise control using rational mathematics to do the exact same thing and it works like a kid trying to assemble lego blocks. Nothing brilliant here. it almost seems natural like you were born to do this and intuitively know and everything just works. Trust your own mind, if it just works.

I'm supposed to use some silly abstraction of a 'limit' that 'approximates' he next mountain top or skyscraper in our scan of the ground for my drone but I don't use infinite processes, I can calculate the exact height using associative wildberger rational trig, remember those CS19 lectures, anyway my focus is money, and getting some guy in Guyana or Tunisia with a shit education worse than my own paid what I get paid, so for now the meme curriculum defers to this nonsense but it won't forever because i have experience now not using it, this is 60% of the reason I took the drone job, can I use WIldberger trig to get an advantage over my coworkers? It worked and for the record 3blue1brown makes me cringe my face off so I want to redo it all from scratch but that is hard to explain to people that I'm not some nut fruitcake, so for now meme curriculum does everything the status quo way, but it won't be like that forever, perhaps after Jan 29 when I go full gonzo journo but I"ll see, I'm not interested in changing society and their preconceptions I'm just interested in getting anons paid money who are in the same situation I was. That's all.

tl;dr I'm doing radical shit but it's all about taking care of your family and avoiding the scam that is modern university which I dropped out of twice because it was unbearable, can we match them not in networking but in skills? Maybe we'll see that is the meme curriculum manifesto. CAN WE HAVE WORKING CLASS BACKGROUND AND CHECK THESE FOOLS AND GET PAID... we'll see.
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Albert Drevingville - Sat, 06 Nov 2021 00:35:36 EST x6K3CZQk No.39991 Reply
>>39990
As a further rant, anon's interested in doing competitive programming using Rust you will read a lot of testimony how "absolutely impossible" it is to overcome the owernship abstraction Rust uses and linked lists. Really? Reinvent linked lists, don't use the libraries or modify them for your benefit. I'm not a Rust shill but I read this warning many times and tried it myself... yeah it doesn't work with the libraries but you can model a linked list, this is the point of competitive programming, you invent these things yourself taking the 'axioms' of a linked list buit working around the actual library version and implementing a parallel yet equal version yourself that WILL work with the Rust ownership model. So if you're some Rust shill, you can competitive program stop reading the blog posts of idiots.

Same goes for any other language, make it work using your mind not the libraries
Good luck anons see you when we get paid after Jan
no bump
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Albert Drevingville - Sat, 06 Nov 2021 01:45:00 EST x6K3CZQk No.39992 Reply
>>39990
Expanding on this now that I'm not a phone on a train
You can take Robert Harper's cartesian cubical type theory and model the rational continuum for fun and profit.
In fact, you can generate this like an automated unit test after you save a program, imagine having your code run through a proof assistant and it's guaranteed to be correct, in that model. For example, with AI, why does probability have to be represented as measuring the real line? Why can't you just model it in something else where all the axioms are satisfied, for what you are specifically doing. Why does the model need to cover every case imaginable, cast it to something else simpler. Most of ai.org this is what I do, I unravel the normal definitions and then replace them with easier math for my specific purposes, it's fun and just works. Why do we have to use e to model exponential growth? Why do we have to take 3 triangles, scale them, down and use them with a periodic function to approximate the height of something? have you tried this on hardware with finite battery life that uses floating point and not real numbers? Why not use associative addition it's the same thing just modeled differently, and it's all just a model anyway. Who cares.

Deep learning for example why use the geometry they confine it to, it works like shit instead cast it to hyperbolic geometry which has a bigger capacity for data. Measuring balls and shit abstractions, 'neighbors' and whatever. This is why the libraries are shit for deep learning. Wildberger has lectures about universal hyperbolic geometry, I'm not saying it's a replacement just for what we do, it works. Like trivially works. Everything can be calculated in parallel because it's naturally associative being rational/highschool. One day I'll write all this in but I hope other anon's try this, it's exactly like when I used to use Lisp as a model to simulate things like Level-1 Cache. Model the CPU and all it's operations on cache just to learn as you flip through the official version like that Y86 chapter in CS:APP not covered in lectures, totally a pure model. Wildberger works the same way except it's highly optimized, because it's just highschool rational math, so your shitty model is lightspeed fast.

Anyway try the meme curriculum modeling everything yourself, like a tree look up TAOCP the mathematical properties of trees (which we will do in algorithms.html) and write your own implementation. Think about how to model it all differently than what we're being taught, for me that's how I learn cast it to another abstraction like how can I satisfy all these rules in affine geometry? Oh wait it just works. Then cast it back to the dimension your indusry programming language expects, just like that Guy L Steele Lecture. Anyway, this is what I've been doing to keep it interesting.

In other news did you see this? https://mobilejazz.com/careers/ P/T work, writing in basically Pyret lite, nothing difficult here. Want to work there then take algorithms.html with me
no bump
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Beatrice Wimblegold - Sat, 06 Nov 2021 08:26:34 EST u387a6Om No.39993 Reply
>>39992
OP, don't take it otherwise, but, when you rant you are all over the place. You make references that are very hard to keep track of. It would be better if you created a long list segregated by topic and add all the good books, talks etc under each category. And write a bit about why that resource is important. It will create a central place and will be easy to track.
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Nell Pillermitch - Sat, 06 Nov 2021 12:52:00 EST IbIQEa0D No.39996 Reply
>>39993
my impression is do an accelerated CS101 program, until you can do competitive programming problems, then you can learn as you go any prereqs as they appear.
pic ur own adventure
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Priscilla Hirringspear - Sat, 06 Nov 2021 16:09:44 EST KjiUZTrY No.39998 Reply
>>39989

>But if you want just coast around and see what you can get away with, up to you

Ideally I want to do good work however I'm inexperienced. Of course that doesn't mean I'm content with where I'm at now, I'm keeping track of what I need to work on and doing what I can until my contract ends. Wouldn't mind repeating this loop if I get money and feedback.
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Martha Bunman - Sat, 06 Nov 2021 19:27:51 EST L10D5dkn No.39999 Reply
OP what (if any) unconventional scripting language(s) do you recommend? Bash is awesome but the syntax sucks and you can't really do shit if there is no utility for what you want to do. Everyone recommends Python and JS but I hate both of them
Mostly I'm looking for something that has the ability to interact with the OS like bash but a proper language
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Wesley Breshfield - Sat, 06 Nov 2021 19:45:52 EST AOz322t0 No.40000 Reply
>>39999
Whats wrong with Python/Common Lisp/Scheme/Racket? Since you don't like Python, I'd recomment Babaska, Joker, Scheme, Racket or Common Lisp.
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Martha Bunman - Sat, 06 Nov 2021 19:55:06 EST L10D5dkn No.40001 Reply
>>40000
>Babaska
I was looking at Closure but ruled it out since it's compiled. This looks promising
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Sidney Sirryfield - Sat, 06 Nov 2021 20:01:28 EST AOz322t0 No.40002 Reply
>>40001
Another clojure-like is Janet, its kind of like the Nim of Clojure. And Chicken scheme complies to C if I remember correctly. The best thing about Clojure, is its such a nice, professional, helpful community.
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Sidney Sirryfield - Sat, 06 Nov 2021 20:16:00 EST AOz322t0 No.40003 Reply
>>40001
Also, I think you should try to see if Common Lisp suits your use case. Clojure it a bit of a "modernistic take" of functional lisp. But sometimes you just want to have mutable values, or better C-interop/CFFI. Scheme is very small, but Rackets ecosystem makes it less problematic. It's also more opiniated to functional style, and Language Oriented Programming. Common lisp is just more truly multi-paradigmatic, and some of the Lisp feature are not re-created in Scheme, or Racket, or have deficiencies. Common Lisp conditional restarts and CLOS are some specific examples.
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Matilda Werringhodge - Sun, 07 Nov 2021 01:11:21 EST r+5KxZbl No.40004 Reply
Guy who complained about defective torrents here. All torrents except 10701 are now working. Thank you op. I love the energy this thread has now.
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Decimus Seneca - Mon, 08 Nov 2021 03:40:07 EST n/HGm+g5 No.40005 Reply
>>39977
> Isaac Newton where you re-read the same chapter a dozen times in order to understand it.
I always feel like this will take me too much time. How long did it take you to read the book? while rereading chapters like Newton?
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Decimus Seneca - Mon, 08 Nov 2021 03:50:00 EST n/HGm+g5 No.40006 Reply
>>40005
Also, which other books did you use this technique for? and tell me more about it. It sounds intriguing.
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Hannah Senkinwodge - Mon, 08 Nov 2021 21:12:01 EST x6K3CZQk No.40007 Reply
>>39739
Stumbled upon the world's shadiest hacking competition and added it here: https://learnaifromscratch.github.io/theabsolutestateofsoftware.html#Shadiest%20of%20all%20hacking%20competitions

I found that on UFC fighter's pages who were paid to shill while I was looking up their conditioning routines, hilarious. Reminder the hacking workshop is way beyond what you would ever need to get hired to do this if you want by all le famous security outfits. I'm reading the papers and then trying to make my own software to mimic things like branch prediction randomization attacks there's no assignments.

>>40006
Math books I have done that method. Get hung up on chapter 4 or 5 well then I didn't understand chapter 1 through 3 and should go back and redo it all because everything in math is derived in a giant chain. Each iteration I learned something new as well that I missed before. Each iteration it got faster to do those chapters all over again too and I looked at other things besides the exercises like tearing apart the examples and inputting corner cases or trying to rewrite them myself. Newton did this for Descartes La Géométrie which written into a two volume work entirely in Latin filled with student worked out examples when he was 14 years old I believe, read and re-read it a hundred times but he was on a mission to be the world's most famous scientist so refused to not understand everything in the book with way more determination than me, I'm just a casual.

AI workshop however will do some of this, for example everything we are doing is primarily in 2 books: Wasserman's 'All of Statistics' and the 2021 Kevin Murphy draft book. Afterwards I'll prob redo everything going those book chapters which are very terse, filled with exercises for practice and won't take nearly as long as the first time around trying to figure it all out.

>>40004
There's a holiday here coming up, I'll fix all the torrents then in every workshop like 10-701. Some of them have been downloaded over 200k times my upload ratio is gigantic.

>>39999
There's lot's of options, like whoever this is went full advanced and replaced pipes with graphs https://ambrevar.xyz/lisp-repl-shell/

Everywhere I have worked they used golang because it's trivial to make a native binary and drop it on a remote server to do whatever service side scripting even if it's not a scripting language. This is why whenever you see a devops job add they always have golang in there, it's what they're all using.

Personally I use GNU Guile only because when I was using Guix System you use ganooo guile for everything, and I found that s-exp can be trivially parsed and automated. I also used emacs shell which is kind of awesome for some things but I'm not any kind of advanced emacs user, one day I'll write up a code review post in learnai how to use emacs to audit code it's absolutely awesome and probably why jane street uses emacs for code review (why they use hg/mercurial, who knows).

Anyway you don't have to use a scripting language if your language compiles immediately like golang does that's why industry uses it. I learn AWK from the unix programming environment book by Kernighan and Pike, you could try that too it's old school BEGIN code END type programming and that book teaches you sed too, so you can make ninja edits out of configuration files without needing to load up editor, manually change, close editor and save.

>>39993
Indeed all the incoherent rants here should be ignored, I always end up ranting after leaving a bar on the weekend on various offtopic things, learnai is where I actually create a begin to end curriculum and I will repeat that any anon, all they need is CS19 to both begin and finish. You do that course you can do any course after easily. Literally every other workshop I routinely run into things already covered in CS19 like other day I was digging around the C++ I/O streams, well there's a CS19 assignment, lab and lectures on streams. I found it trivial to understand except for the crazy optimizations that took digging into but conceptually it's things you already know. Competitive programming yet more natural numbers streams problems or approximation assignments, the same as CS19. This is also why in many of the workshops I annoyingly continue to write 'this was covered in CS19' as further proof it's all you need. I of course enjoy the content the functionalcs still but they all have prereqs, 15-150 assumes you have 2 semesters of CS already and that's exactly what CS19 is: 2 semesters in one.

Another thing I do on the side is write PRs for open source to make it part of the meme workshop and I solved two bugs using Prof K property-based testing in gigantic software I barely understood, but I could test the properties of that one feature like writing out examples. Found the bug, wrote the PR, got accepted because all the examples are comments and self explanatory.... just like we will do in algorithms.html soon.

>>39998
Give yourself a promotion take the initiative and make yourself team security https://krebsonsecurity.com/2012/06/how-to-break-into-security-ptacek-edition/ I took that advice when I was in HK, just deciding to takeover some role that wasn't being done and they then parachuted me into it. Start testing everything, break the software of other teams. Repeat until somebody notices and decides to make you head of the security department which probably doesn't exist where you are, it never really did anywhere I worked.
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Augustus Chillystock - Tue, 09 Nov 2021 01:36:17 EST vawLOrEA No.40008 Reply
>>39992
That “cartesian cubical type theory” cool idea but very abstract.
Can you post some example from your code of it on github? Kthxbai. <3
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Samuel Blackman - Tue, 09 Nov 2021 05:40:21 EST vrPN8Afd No.40009 Reply
>>40007
How do you have time to do everything you do? And how do you allocate it between projects/courses? Previously you mentioned several times that you work 6 hours doing physical work, also you work part time on drone job and possibly some other job(s), you have to support mobile apps on chineese appstore. I mean in order to do that much you must be a genious with insane reading speed and ability to comprehend information on first read, if you read material Newton style it will take months of free time in order to finish single math book. And considering the nature of technical texts you not only have to read it you also have to type-in-execute code/solve math and prog problems which take 2x-4x more time. Also consider context switching, you must have insane memory, because for me getting into the context of where I left event yesterday takes a lot of time, and you seem to switch between like 5-6 projects everyday. Yeah, and what about time for family/girlfriend/friends?

I couldn't do all that stuff even if I didn't have 8hrs dayjob. Also how do you have energy after 6hrs labour + part time drone job? You actually drain physical and mental energy, what do you eat in order to not feel like worned down shit and not have sort of mental fog?

Do you have any leisure time? If you do what do you dedicate it to?
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Samuel Blackman - Tue, 09 Nov 2021 06:44:45 EST vrPN8Afd No.40010 Reply
Given a little thought to what I've written above. Considering that you have done everything in functionalcs curriculum, maybe it's so easy to comprehend new information because you don't actually learn anything new at conceptual level, you only learn new syntax for stuff you already know? So more you do, easier it becomes?
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Lydia Mollerchedge - Wed, 10 Nov 2021 09:35:57 EST plToEYv5 No.40012 Reply
OP are you on Gun.io or Toptal or something similar? What kind of work can you get there?
I'm pretty sure I would pass the interviews easy because of CS019 but I'm not confident in doing actual work since they shill themselves as platforms for hiring elite talent and I don't know if I could live up to those expectations
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Archie Bluddlestark - Wed, 10 Nov 2021 12:20:34 EST xkKt544n No.40013 Reply
>>40012
Sounds like your a pussy, worst case is you waste some time, best case is you get a job. Always be interviewing
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Reuben Fumblekit - Fri, 12 Nov 2021 13:53:31 EST PF0aTs0S No.40017 Reply
I'm so tired of not getting interviews because of my lack of work experience that I'm about to invent a random company and put that on my resume. How likely is someone to find out?
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Martha Brimblehit - Fri, 12 Nov 2021 14:38:09 EST xJM4J0L7 No.40018 Reply
>>40017
> How likely is someone to find out?
Very unlikely, recruiters have no time to do background check, even if they had it would take a lot of time. Employers lie to candidates all the time about quality of the project(we dont have legacy, everything is greenfield!), about paid overtimes(they are unpaid it turns out), and much more. So don't be afraid to put 1-2 years of experience on resume. What do you lose if they figure out during interview process? Nothing, you will just go to next interview.
But if you put bs experience make it convenient, read how teams work in scrum process, or even better - ask some dev about their daily routines - daily stand ups, weekly standups, code review, pushing tickets around in jira, writing documentation in confluence, etc
>>
Samuel Nendermeg - Sun, 14 Nov 2021 13:21:19 EST F033L1tG No.40019 Reply
>>40013
Maybe you're right but I wouldn't want some company to hire me there and expect me to be some expert who will tell them what to do and how to fix their app or whatever
That's why I'm wondering if there are jobs on those platforms where you do work alone and have full control of the project as long as you get it done because I can bullshit my way through that but I can't bullshit my way through some company wanting me to train their team or something like that
>>
Rebecca Pickstone - Sun, 14 Nov 2021 15:00:05 EST MT3Y2Fkr No.40020 Reply
>>40019
This job market is super hot, if you have more than 1 previous job / 1 YoE you shouldnt be so nervous, and you should be interview for the whol glamut, from jobs you know you could get (interview rehersal) and jobs you know they wnt see your resume (resume review).
>>
Bon Jon Veep - Thu, 18 Nov 2021 12:01:58 EST DAK/fOpj No.40022 Reply
>>40007
OP, how do you figure out programming questions/exercises you are stuck on? is there some kind of process that you go through to figure out the question? I mean the kind of question that you are sure you have learned the required topic, but you just can't crack, or seem to solve, the question. I'm sure there have been multiple times you got stuck in whatever it is you work on.
>>
Walter Clayshit - Thu, 18 Nov 2021 14:00:37 EST RTMuLrHX No.40023 Reply
>>39739
OP, as a layman, How do I learn about investing, stocks, crypto etc. Are there any quality resources being offered from high level unis at the level of CS19 for these things? If anyone else knows please let me know.
>>
Molly Brucklesore - Thu, 18 Nov 2021 16:15:58 EST tiBrUhUo No.40024 Reply
>>40023 with crypto you can pretty much hang around crypto chat rooms till you get spam ads for pump n dump shitcoin groups. Not financial advice not op. If you are good at osint and can code you can do make python scrypts to monitor key wallets or discussion groups for activity.
>>
Beatrice Semmlewill - Fri, 19 Nov 2021 20:27:56 EST 3zGZizND No.40027 Reply
Well I'm convinced about AI after hacking together a model for recognizing Japanese characters to use in my app.
My question is:
How long would I need to study in order to actually make money with AI? Is it easier to jump on Upwork/Fiver/etc to look for some freelance work or look for a proper (junior) job?
>>
Graham Chezzlefuck - Sat, 20 Nov 2021 22:23:08 EST x6K3CZQk No.40028 Reply
>>40027
Algorithmia is now datarobot but every month or so they have a great position called AI engineer (remote btw) which is what I modelled ai.html after, the idea being you read new papers and translate them to algorithms, and sell them on the Algorithmia AI marketplace. I'm not entirely sure it still exists but the AI engineer role definitely does, and yes it's very easy to jump on those shitty platforms and do AI work esp if you use all the frameworks while we go through ai.html like ginni gain of a data set to discover how you should design your decision tree, this is all built into Python and other frameworks and simple to do but many people don't understand what's actually going on whereas we take exactly what's going on. If I were you I'd use AI framework of choice and take the graduate version of the AI course we are doing so long as you can read that Kevin Murphy book and get what is going on... which you can do with calculus.html because I picked a book exactly for modeling AI functions. Anyway I will finish that whole workshop you should take it, but at the same time be self-interested and try something esp when we get to neural networks which is like 90% of present time AI (this can all change tomorrow) but things like price expectation for real estate on Upwork or Fiver you can do that after the first few lectures.
There is no junior jobs, you fake it to get in, and then learn as you go that's what we're doing in algorithms.html learning how to pass the filter, then everything else is easy if you can pass the filter.

>>40023
This may sound heretical but I don't think you should ever 'invest' in crypto, despite me being involved with it since 2010. Instead you could take quarterly NYSE listed company profit reports and run an AI algorithm on them and make 100x what you'd ever make gambling with crypto 'investing'. If you must do crypto have a service where people give it to you, like gunbot. What does gun bot do, it charges a huge amount of money to basically abstract x amount of exchanges into a single exchange. Think how those restaurant delivery companies work, you have a single menu and abstract away the individual restaurants so you can have multiple cuisines delivered. That's what you want to do for your crypto bot have all the exchanges you can and now there's just 1 big exchange. Gunbot is just a server that runs and you html connect to it via localhost, and that's exactly what Jane Street's totally insane free and open incremental does. You can write an html page that does incremental computations as you scroll down all the various inputs, forget candle graphs and shit look at incremental. Anyone can use it, esp if they did CS19 which is identical to OCaml in many ways. anyway... that's what I would do, these bots cost a lot of money but nobody has a bot that anyone can run for free, but you take a percentage instead of up front money. Make it so it's easy to import some trading strategy that people can buy, in your marketplace, like how I abstracted my Chinese app. Get other people to write it up and just plug into your existing system. That's what I would do but I kind of abandoned crypto for other things for many reasons too long to get into. Look at the price of gunbot too, can you clone (most) of that and sell it for free where you just take a percentage of trades or some other scheme?

>>40022
Taught in CS19, write examples. Expand the examples like he does it's not just a final value, it's x * y * z final value. Expand on it again and keep expanding until you get the formula you need. PAPL covered this and of course those math olympiad resources/Polya how to solve it book helps. You compare it to something you've already solved after writing enough examples you kind of flesh out the problem. This is exactly what we will do in algorithms.html doing all those competitive programming problems where we learn specific techniques like brute force (complete search) or dynamic programming to flesh out the problem examples and then come up with a way to solve it.

>>40017
Do it, what's the worse that can happen, they don't hire you which is what would've happened anyway. Keep in mind they will test you to see if you are at this level you claim, so if you can fake it in the interview you're fine otherwise you're sunk. My strategy is leave out all experience and instead show enthusiasm and bravado/willing to do their tests, then they can't corner you on something you falsely claimed to have as experience. But of course, if you think you can do it then try but I always deal with recruiters so I don't have to lie. Let's say all you know is CS19. Go on linkedin make a profile and fill it with keywords from CS19 like streams, APIs, etc. Someone will find you through software and send you a recruiter letter. It's literally how I got my drone job even though I was not qualified either, I did that 'cyber physical systems' course at CMU and they found me.

>>40012
Yes I have 2 accounts on toptal and will get a 3rd for algorithms.html (long story, you basically incorporate yourself and get another crack at interviews) but I'm interested in taking every interview, and that's what I do. Every single interview I can everywhere for fun and profit just to see what happens and what they ask. The rule anon, if you know all the 'hard stuff' you an figure out the easy part which is daily development as a cog in a wheel in one of these freelancer factories but we will learn how.

>>40009
Hardest part is figuring out the math model, once you kind of understand it, everything is easier. You will pick up a book and skip the first 1/4 of it because cs19 or Tao already taught you it. It's the wild abstractions of the math model, they never properly teach it and assume this knowlege that's why algorithms.html starts with a book and grad course on asymptotics it's the hardest part to get once you do, downhill from there.

btw if no anon hasn't noticed the book we do Asymptopia and TAOCP math prelims are identical, and concerte math is of course identical because it's an expansion of TAOCP math prelims. Ryan Odonnell teaches it all in his theory toolkit youtube lectures too both aymptopia and TAOCP/concrete math. We skipped the hard parts and will learn the asymptotic way of doing everything which is easier and what they do in theoretical cs or algorithm papers. CS19 + Asymptopia = very easy MIT 6.006, very easy cp4 book, very easy future of algorithm papers or doing something like TAOCP prelims it teaches you the regular way, then tosses in the asymptotic way but we're doing that from the beginning instead and skipping it all.

No classical limits and analysis and all that shit, just estimate your way to glory as taught in Ryan Odonnell's TCS course which I'll prob finish like chernoff bounds and everything while we finish cp4 book.

ANYONE CAN DO THIS, but it takes work. I have less than 3 months so I dug out of all meme books, David Goggins book because he only had less than 3mos to pass the SEAL test that I remember and describes how he did it and I'm now doing the same,though I have 2 jobs and he didn't, I still think it can be done because of the topics I picked to avoid all the bullshit they normally make you take. I will throw in some PRs to mobile app githubs too see what happens in algorithms.html and finish everything like crypto/type theory/cs19/ai/math in the same time period because why not nobody else has. You can easily do it too, which is the end game of the meme curriculum: ANYONE CAN DO WHAT I DO literally anyone.
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Graham Chezzlefuck - Sun, 21 Nov 2021 00:47:20 EST x6K3CZQk No.40029 Reply
1637473640489.png -(16147B / 15.77KB, 550x191) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>39739
I'm going to do algorithms.html live, which means I'll update the github as I do it unlike the others where I usually do it in the morning, then later edit and post (and still fuck it up and have to re-edit) but I will try and update 2x a day once in the morning and once at night while still finishing of course the rest of the workshops. I may make an instagram for it or other shit social media so anons can have alerts when it's updated.

Anyone try methods to solve chapter 1? I abandoned the IDE and went back to emacs, I have a setup exactly like gennady but it's all in emacs where I use the dreaded eshell to feed inputs and see results, it works absolutely awesome. We don't need IDEs just keep the standard library docs open and remember CS19, that's all you need. When you get hired somewhere use an IDE. The satisfaction when you kill 50 problems in a single evening though of course, we are at the baby levels of this game.

There is a master plan for all this, the draft org-mode generated workshops are a survey of all material and I will distill it down to what's needed and then make my own youtube lectures and even put up a erlang server I want it interactive beyond Zuckerberg's cringe meta. Anyone doing AI right now the calculus workshop has everything needed to understand the entire Kevin Murphy AI book or Wasserman's stats book. It's actually easier than I thought, there's nothing difficult about these courses, what is hard is making real AI or automatically analyzing the data and not just having magically cleansed and ready to go data to insert to your model, something Sussman talks about I'll inject into ai.html and he wrote a whole book about it using symbolic computing.

>ranting
Since it's Sat and I have no time to post anymore except today, I will rant incoherently as usual about relevant topics I'm doing anons may be interested in as this is the last day before trial by fire begins.

I do the AI curriculum slowly because I translate everything to a rational Wildberger tier representation, I'm trying to figure out rational stats for fun and profit. To be honest, I'm trying to model all math I come across in the meme curriculum to rational representation and it... just works. It works! I never insert opinions into the early meme curriculum but try it yourself, take everything and model it on the rational continuum. Reminder Wildberger has a good video for this here: https://youtu.be/Nu-YPJSNFpE about the continuum. It reminds me when I modelled everthing in Lisp when I first started doing this just to understand it.

Neural networks esp works in 'hyperbolic universal geometry' his playlist, I've been doing crazy shit there abandoning all the definitions and making my own in rational highschool math. I've talked about this before but holy shit, it just works. In this model you are Newton, you are the 17th century mathematician making advances in math as they did at the time, in what was accessible to them. Rational math is accessible to us. It's fun, you get to reinvent everything that nobody else has tried. This is all amateur on my part but i make crazy advances everyday one day I'm like how do I represent the 'normal' distro but get rid of e. I do and it works, I just add a constant and e is modelled exactly. In the process I learn everything about e out of curiousity. For me this is entertaining, making new math nobody else is doing just like when I modelled cache and branch prediction in lisp. Any anon can do this, it's quite literally highschool math. This is another reason why I watch the MIT optimization classes and will inject into ai.html like how you should never use a linked list for anything, and that arrays are governed by the hardware and too slow.

it is my foolish and obsessive compulsion that I can write highly complex software (like I did in HK) into simple rational math models and gain optimization and it will just work. So far, it does. I recommend other anons try it, what if modern math is all bullshit ? Model it by reducing the complexity which is what we do in Ryan Odonnell's complexity class, always shrink the complexity to some easier model. Anyway that's the fool's errand I chase in my spare time and.. it just works despite my limited math background. it's too radical for now to insert into learnai but this is what consumes most of my time, screwing around in the rat continuum taking everything I learn in courses to a simpler modeland seeing what happens for fun and profit.

This is my primary interest in the type theory workshop, can I model with types in a proof assistant Wildberger math? So far, yes. I'm just a pleb, but I feel like univalence by Voedvosky and cartesian cubical type theory doesn't work because it can't, those abstractions are too impossible stapling an algorithm to the real line. But for rational modeling..... works! it just works! Have u anons tried it, it's hilarious how easy it works it's grade 9 math. I script their prototype to solve rational math universal hyperbolic problems and it's like wolfram's cloud it just works. Hyperbolic geometry is a larger space for neural networks, more data can be stored there. Anyway all of it just works.

Since we're off topic I have been making music for local bands using the same principal, a recursive melody. An example (I didn't do this, but similar) https://youtu.be/HAZ5oOR5xG4 the melody is basic CS19 it gets faster as you iterate and the complexity reduces. Anyway that's what I do for lelz and fun on the side you guys should try, my shitty, shitty song I being played on local charts right now now. Good luck

tl;dr everything is live soon
update in am and pm
anyone can do this, even you!
the hardest undergrad courses and even a grad compelxity course? you can do it
>>
Graham Cublingham - Sun, 21 Nov 2021 14:28:02 EST hzo1mNM0 No.40030 Reply
Do you use Kaggle at all OP? It seems like the AI/data science version of competitive programming
Would grinding Kaggle competitions be a good way to learn AI?
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Eliza Cogglehadge - Mon, 22 Nov 2021 08:16:26 EST LBP0pXVY No.40031 Reply
What is the difference between 10-701 and 10-301/601? They have the same name and the lectures seem very similar. Which one to choose if I don't have time to do both?
Also OP do you have a recommendation for a dedicated course on deep learning?
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Ernest Bollycocke - Mon, 22 Nov 2021 21:27:31 EST HHdzGaOT No.40032 Reply
OP I found this interesting hedge fund in Asia called Symmetry Investments.
Two things you notice upon finding their Hackernews posts are they shill the D programming language and they hire functional programmers.
Have you heard of this company before? Sounds like your kind of company to me.
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Reuben Honeystock - Tue, 23 Nov 2021 18:52:22 EST x6K3CZQk No.40034 Reply
>>40031
For me so far, the best course to watch is the Cornell course, it's the most practical, and 10-301 has the best homework. You can use the meme curriculum to quickly find where in 10-301 they define things like Gini Gain so you can implement it yourself instead of having to watch all of 10-301. That's the point of the workshop, you don't have to take all 3 courses, Ctrl-F and find the timestamp where I indicate (or page/chapter) where you can find for yourself. Of course you want the most recent Neural Networks lectures so would watch 10-301/701 for just those. When you're done, 10-701 is worth watching as it's a graduate level overview, the prof basically is just talking to you and saying what works now and what doesn't work. For example using a Bayes classifier, this is often covered in books/other courses and the prof here flat out tells you in practice it req too many assumptions and is therefore useless as a classifier.
>Deep learning
Try MIT's it starts in 7d http://introtodeeplearning.com/ anybody can join IIRC, or at least the materials are all open. Depth First learning is good too https://www.depthfirstlearning.com/ if you look at my github history I maintained a bunch of courses there and plan on doing them in the meme AI curriculum.

>>40030
Kggle (avoiding cat planet) is like entirely professors and their grad classes competing, if you look at the winning teams they're all from like Argentina or something, and 30 students worked on it together to split the money. Sometimes there is good competitions on there like 2sigma's game they run every year. I haven't yet found a good AI bounty/competition site, most of them appear to just be companies trying to get cheap labor 'win $10k for solving this impossible problem!' when it would cost them 200k otherwise to hire some people. I do like https://numer.ai/ though they pay you out in a meme token, you would do that for recognition to get into wall street anyway and not for the stank tokens they are offering. FunctionalCS and learnai contain all you need to know to compete on numer.ai this was/is still my plan for the AI workshop when it's done they give you real tick data just it's anonymized so they can hand it out for free. The competition always resets and many competitiors I would assume get poached from there by various funds, the co-founder of Rentech is the founder of memer ai

Of course AI goes with all the other learnai workshops like security, making your own firewall that learns, shit like that.

>>40032
Try Oxford Knight they are global recruiters and have plenty of singapore listings, this is obv a jane street listing: https://oxfordknight.co.uk/jobs/ocaml-hedge-fund
That's how you get in if they won't hire you directly.
If you want to get in then take algorithms.html workshop it literally is crafted to pass the hardest interviews, esp when we break out of Chapter 1 competitive programming and go further.
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David Dartford - Tue, 23 Nov 2021 22:07:43 EST u387a6Om No.40035 Reply
>>40034
OP, when will you finish the CS19 part of the workshop?
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George Decklematch - Wed, 24 Nov 2021 10:49:10 EST DVbtr2v8 No.40037 Reply
>>40034
These ML lectures seem overly theoretical unless you want to read papers because in practice everyone just uses Sklearn/Pytorch/Tensorflow and while you still need to know the tradeoffs of different algorithms and such it doesn't seem like you need to know all this math just to use a library and ship products
What would be a path to get practical knowledge to build cool apps that use ML for yourself and eventually get a job/freelance doing ML?
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Eliza Capperstock - Thu, 25 Nov 2021 00:11:40 EST u387a6Om No.40039 Reply
>>40034
I have a question for OP. You shill CS19 so much mostly because the lectures are available to us. IF that was not the case what would you recommend? DCIC is okay. But it is the lectures where all the real talk happen. Would you then choose a different path?
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Eliza Capperstock - Thu, 25 Nov 2021 01:29:47 EST u387a6Om No.40040 Reply
>>40039
I am saying this because I was working through DCIC (which is supposed to be a more complete and updated PAPL) and I noticed that it is still bad as a standalone book. Without the lectures it is still chunky.

  1. It discusses map and filter like functions while discussing lists. It talks about accumulators but never talks that they are basically fold like abstractions. Fold is mention directly in the Streams chapter.

2. It never discusses sorting in the book and generative recursion. It doesn't compare structural and generative recursion. HtDP has an entire section on it. Its merits and demerits.

3. The exercises of the book are not challenging enough. I think the focus of Prof K with the book is more towards high school CSforAll type of American education. All watered down. But not as watered down as the other Java bullshit that happens currently.

4. CMU's 15-112 has short videos and all hw's open for all. It is much more challenging, rigorous. It does much much less hand holding but teaches and drills you much more and throws you out into the ocean. People who have taken it in CMU say that it removed their fear of staring at a blank screen. Even if they wrote sphagetti code they wrote a working solution. Writing better and optimised code was learnt in later courses like 122, 150, 312 etc.

5. Yes Prof K has some nice studies, property testing etc. But almost everything you can find in SICP, Manber's Algorithm book, etc.
>>
Lillian Fozzleworth - Thu, 25 Nov 2021 05:41:23 EST leq4Jo/T No.40041 Reply
>>39739
OP I did it. I fucking did it. My mom's so proud of me. Thanks for everything. You made me believe I could do it. The only course I did linearly was PAPL, I did almost everything but the last two labs (Should go back and finish those, honestly.)

Went from mid twenties hs dropout/druggie to making more money than anyone in my circle. It's not really about the money, the work is interesting too. And also I'm just getting started. I don't want to hijack the post, but maybe someone can learn from my experiences doing tech interviews with no degree:

  1. If you have a decent github profile companies will call you back. post something everyday, they do look at the activity bar. do post all your toy projects, even if it's trash, like a shitty implementation of Osaki's red black trees in Ocaml. The interviewing panel won't carefully read the implementation, they'll just note you're going through challenging data-structure books in your free time. Also if you worked on any open source project, you should have or instantly would get a job if you searched. Your work has been reviewed by professionals.

2. At the interview, if you're a fuck up with no degree, don't tell them you're a fuck up with no degree. If they ask about your background, giving them a sob story is the worst possible response (Learned that the hard way). Nobody is gonna hire you out of sympathy. The way to navigate personal questions is to start your answer from the present. I.e. "Well, the last 3 months I've been working through this book, by this author, in order to learn X. Prior to that I've been working on app Y, it's more like a toy project, but the premise is (...)" This is so much better than "I tried college but it didn't work out, then I spent a few years soul searching, working construction (...)" and changes the tone of the interview. If you don't have a tech background, your background is uninteresting to the interviewer.

3. Learning niche technologies are not a waste of time. The goal isn't to just get a job, but to get a interesting job, and gain a foundational skill set. Niche technologies is key to getting interesting jobs with no background. A lot of interesting jobs are impossible to get, because the candidate pool is full of PhD's. You won't be considered. But modern day PhD's only really knows Python and PyTorch. But there's a shit ton of nice jobs in c++/c/go, erlang/elixir/haskell/ocaml/reason, aswell as in in SRE/infrastructure. I thought I was wasting my time when I was grokking monad transformers, but turns out a lot people in charge of hiring knows haskell, and absolutes loves when you write pseudo-types on the whiteboard.

4. Perhaps most importantly is to show your personality during the interview. Put on your Sunday best, crack jokes and relax. They're not gonna take a chance on you if you are a neurotic stuttering mess (also learned the hard way)

5. When you finish PAPL, you are ready to start applying. I regret I waited, I honestly over prepared. Just send a bunch of CV's. If you get invited for a javascript interview, spent a few days studying javascript. Rinse and repeat.
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Simon Penderfoot - Thu, 25 Nov 2021 16:53:57 EST r/hmMvRK No.40042 Reply
>>40040
>>40039
OP I feel the same way. I was working through DCIC and noticed a lot of subtle changes in syntax in pyret and what's there in the book. Additionally, I noticed that some of the assignments were just tedious and kinda boring and yes watered down.

I dunno if HtDP is a better book than PAPL even though Prof K says PAPL > HtDP.

What's your recommendation as an alternative (not better, just alternative) ?

Is functional programming the panacea?

Would 3110 / 15-150 serve better for people who already know for loops and basic programming?

I just get the feeling that CS19 would be great if we were actual students at Brown, but somehow as outsiders taking it, we are struggling more than necessary than what could be accomplished by reading some other book or taking some other course.
>>
Esther Dreffinggold - Thu, 25 Nov 2021 20:12:22 EST xF8Xn8M3 No.40043 Reply
>>40041
personality is everything once you get past the HR resume filter
>>
Christopher Handrew - Fri, 26 Nov 2021 01:06:13 EST 91iINb3i No.40044 Reply
>>40041
Nice success story! how long did it take you to finish PAPL? and what kind of projects did you do after? Did you just read PAPL? or did you watch the cs19 videos with PAPL the way op wrote it in the workshop?
>>
John Brankinspear - Fri, 26 Nov 2021 04:34:41 EST leq4Jo/T No.40045 Reply
>>40044
Thanks. It took me a long time to finish PAPL, I think around 4-5 months. I didn't do it full time. I read the book and watched the lectures in order to finish the labs. The most important thing is to do the labs no matter what. They were super challenging for me, I had to spent like a week on most labs. That's when you are learning optimally, when you continuously go to bed unsure of how to solve something, wake up and attempt new ideas. Forget flow, it doesn't matter if time moves painstakingly slow, if you struggling with solving something, you are learning.

After PAPL I didn't do much quality work to be honest. Covid lockdowns put me in zombie-mode for a year. I jumped from language to language, did some math, some kattis problems (I have like ~300 pts). Only did cringe projects, like small interpreters/compilers/web-apps. It's probably better to focus on ambitious projects, post them to hacker-news and farm stars. But that's out of reach in the beginning. If you wrote a shitty one pass compiler that only does arithmetic, put it on GitHub. Recruiters will be like "well atleast he knows how to parse things + a little assembly". Most people in the industry suck, so if you beginning to only kinda suck, then you are building an advantage.

Really hope all the NEET's posting here will stop being depressed and start working towards a better future. Everyone can do this if they apply themselves. You just gotta find some urgency. And work to your strengths. If you are shit at math, like me, don't spend all your time working on your shitty math skills. Work on it, sure, but you should probably find your edge elsewhere.

>>40041
That's exactly right. I told myself before my last interview "I don't give a shit about answering questions correctly, i just wanna show my personality".

---
Anyway i'm gonna stop posting here now, sorry for hijacking + shitty grammar. Please keep posting OP, you are seriously changing lives.
Good luck everyone! change your life if you are in a shitty situation. If you are smarter than me, change the world. (i'll try to change the world too).
>>
James Siblingdale - Fri, 26 Nov 2021 15:55:13 EST dCYn0047 No.40047 Reply
Is CS19 good only with the lectures and assignments? The book is not that useful comparatively?
>>
Phoebe Danderford - Sat, 27 Nov 2021 13:00:06 EST qotx5/Tw No.40049 Reply
>>40041
yea it all may be problem of mindset. I almost never use free time to learn new things. I work 5 days a week fixing shit and refactoring shit legacy codebase. I am still bad. 1 year experience doing crud works in outdated technology, but no good algorithm knowledge, certainly i cant finish any of courses recommened. Sometimes i have cool idea like writing frontend for all scripting languanges that have interpreter intemplated in pure Java, then connecting it with some API with programming problems, but i just started and never managed to continue work on it, i just waste every single hour of 2 days of weekend i have, i have guilty cause i really need to learn more efficient ways of testing JavaEE applications, which is pretty complex topic in general. I just always do bare minimum, i was always like that.
>>
Beatrice Hudgecocke - Mon, 29 Nov 2021 22:54:21 EST x6K3CZQk No.40050 Reply
>>40041
Awesome, prof k has a post on quora talking about what to do in interviews if you've done PAPL but cs19 I find is much, much harder. Did you use the prof K method in the interview of writing examples and talking through the problem? I did that for one interview and they reacted like I was some kind of genius. Apparently nobody else does this.

Other anons that have done cs19 they should know every other workshop is almost too easy for them, like algorithms.html I skipped all the first chapter questions because it was things we did in chapter 6 of PAPL

>>40040
technically cs19 you have to do 2 chapters from HtDP first, I skipped it because you just fill it in as you do the CS19 assignments, which I haven't seen anywhere in CMU courses I've done unless you take 3-4 courses. I don't remember any property based testing in SICP, but I read it a long time ago. I agree the book is not challenging enough compared to the Brown course that's why I still use PAPL really as a good enough explanation and DCIC if you need more. 15-112 is skipped by all CMU student's who have highschool python, they go straight to 15-122 which I find is useless without the lectures explaining very complicated proofs of imperative code using contracts because there's just so many edge cases.

>>40039
My personal recommendations are just do the lectures from CS19, and the assignments/labs, looking in the book briefly for anything you need further explanation for. After you're done, like actually done. You can do any other course you want and any algorithms book easily, you can understand any imperative language like the C++ streams library because you already intuitively know what a stream is from CS19, you can understand any typed language like typscript or ocaml easily after. You can look at an API for a gigantic piece of cloud software and intuitively know how to manipulate shit. You know all there is to know about basic testing like writing a program to test another, and thinking about the properties of that program that shouldn't change (invariants) so all the test suites will make sense, you won't be just testing nonsense like specific values or edge cases. You can take 15-150 and slay it no program writing specification proofs of modules or jump into an algorithms text and immediately know what dynamic programming is or a graph is.
Reminder I used to teach CS19 to all new hires in HK and many of them with degrees struggled through it but once they got it they were like the best programmers you could ever hire. That was the secret of my management techniques, just hire everyone and have them finish CS19 in a few months while getting paid.

>>40037
Up to you do whatever you want, but the cornell course is filled with practical information like how to break up your ML test data reserving some to run your hypothesis function on. CMU undergrad course didn't even cover it that I know of but we'll see 10-701 does. Meme AI curriculum is primarily modelled off 'AI engineer' from Algorithmia (before they got bought out by datarobot) and how you have to take a new paper from an AI journal, turn it to into a working algorithm, then you have to attach it to a framework like Apache Spark platform and some Python library, and optimize it. There's like 5 other frameworks currently in use or writing neural nets using some language with an autodiff compiler and manually manipulating the garbage collection like how OpenAI uses Swift for everything now. This is a straight up learned skill like building a tiled floor or any other trade, that pays an obscene amount of money that anybody can do if they're interested just it req a lot more work than other paths. That's why anons, I have that calculus book dumped in there, where you specifically model shit using e^cxh or logarithms or power function with a chapter on gradients. Literally anyone can do this but admittedly, it has a large hill to climb but once you climb it doing all the calc prereqs you're all downhill stats is super easy and a lot of ML is just figuring out with probability everything you should be doing like what attributes should you split on to learn something, all probability which is basic 0 to 1 interval rational math model for the most part, as continuous probability I still haven't really run into translating papers. Anyway, we'll learn all this and it won't take that long.

>>40038
I only had time to watch his 'why i left google' video and that's exactly what I do, you want to know 'hey what does this company do, what kind of insane internal tooling do they have' so you go there and work for a while, exactly same reason I got a job programming drones. He's also right that most people at Google and other bigtech quit, it's extremely hard to move up, most of the work is boring unless you're on some amazing 'team', and big corporate life is often insufferable like constant meetings over bullshit. Anyway that's probably a good channel he appears honest though he's shilling crypto, which is a red flag for any channel. Everyday I have somebody trying to shell me metaverse crypto or some real estate NFT and it's all so tiresome.

>>40042
students at brown are struggling just as much anon, the good thing about CS19 is when you finish one of the assignments, you never forget it because you had to figure it out yourself. At first it is of course hard because we have no experience doing this but then if you go into the competitive programming workshop you build up skills how to solve these problems and can go back to CS19 for review and kill every assignment in under 30 minutes.

>>40035
When those topics come up in algorithms.html that's why I delayed, but really CS19 is also the AI workshop because I'm doing all the assignments there in Pyret too it's just way better than Python imo, for that specific course

>>40045
you're new but give it a while and you'll realize you know more than 90% of the people working there, because you did CS19. If I were to make a recommendation it would be to try a compiler course from the meme curriculum, many programmers I know including myself often will reinvent things that a compiler course teaches. Try competitive programming too if you have any time, you get so fast.

>>40046
There is a performance engineering course in the functionalcs curriculum from MIT, the lectures on OCW work still too for the modern 2021 course. You mainly program for specific architectures, turning on features for certain CPUs and taking advantage of them as they are off by default or no programmer targets them. Kotlin native is absolute trash, really only their JVM target is any good that my pleb experience can tell. Anyway try MIT's https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-172-performance-engineering-of-software-systems-fall-2018/ then go on Stellar and export.zip all the current 2021 materials, they're mostly the same.

>>40047
Use the book as needed, the lectures cover everything in the book except the last half which is PL related and in his other course.

>>40049
For me I read how to optimize the JVM https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=29309902 then besides MIT's https://web.mit.edu/6.031/www/fa21/classes/03-testing/ for testing I sometimes used contracts using the java module language only because I didn't know Java and was scared half to death that what I wrote would implode, so I used the skills from 15-122 contracts to specify my entire feature https://youtu.be/lNITrPhl2_A (this is the prof from 15-122 I took) but it turned out fine, and nobody had any idea what a contract was which was kind of hilarious when I finished. This was a major financial corp btw trading countless millions of dollars per second. I think anons forget that, not many people know half of the stuff we take for fun and profit.
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Phineas Dennerfuck - Mon, 29 Nov 2021 23:02:19 EST u387a6Om No.40051 Reply
>>40050
Have you seen this semester's 122 notes? They are so detailed. Maybe because of the hybrid mode of teaching. Same for 150.
>>
Beatrice Hudgecocke - Mon, 29 Nov 2021 23:44:31 EST x6K3CZQk No.40052 Reply
>>39739
Anons took a week off to read ahead in the Asymptopia book and the art of programming, and Ryan O'Donnell's TCS toolkit course to see how they fit together, and they're the same. It's hilarious how almost all the mathematical prelims chapter of TAOCP is the same thing as Prof O'Donnell's course and Asymptopia. This is of course way beyond what we need for algorithms.html and we won't do it but keep in it in mind if you want to do the whole TAOCP someday you can easily now. I wish I had these resources the first time I did TAOCP. We will however read a lot of TAOCP anyway because it's just so good and so much better than any other algorithms text anywhere at explaining what is really going on, just we won't dive into all the psets and prelims but if you want to, it's there. I'm interested in a Microsoft interview workshop where all we do is just vol 1 of TAOCP and then apply and see what happens. I bet you'd get hired, considering I have new papers/interviews released of the ceo there saying they will. Anyway..

I ended up extremly fast doing kattis problems, like so fast that I'm now writing code at least 3x the speed I used to. Weird how it just clicks and you start doing everything fast, I practice on typeracer for lelz and got up to 93WPM average. I'm replying to emails much faster, going into the shell and writing some program tool in seconds then coming back and it just works, I haven't looked at documentation since I started doing this because I'm going through 50 problems a day. That said I skipped much of the first chapter psets on 'methods to solve' because they're too easy for us but they were fun to absolutely slay on cruise control, which I think anyone can do after doing CS19 or 15-150.

Competitive programming if it's too easy you move up to another difficulty so I'm mainly interested in chapter 2 Kattis problems doing the standard library, this is what they interview you on. Easier than you think anons, glory awaits
>>
Beatrice Hudgecocke - Mon, 29 Nov 2021 23:50:31 EST x6K3CZQk No.40053 Reply
>>40051
No I haven't, but after checking right now you're correct they are extremely detailed, prob because of all the zoom remote students. Maybe that course is worth doing now, the lectures were so good though he went through the most obscure edge cases to prove a library

In other news, has anyone tried to take CMU's graphics course? Part of the course you have to finish their 3D modeling software framework, like you build your own Maya. https://cmu-graphics.github.io/Scotty3D/
I have interests to move the meme curriculum out of beta into YouTube showing how math proofs look visualized and some other things, and I needed to do so by writing my own gfx from scratch I can't just use some library like 3blue1brown that only shows 2/3d plane, anyway so far this is an excellent course.

We have to learn concurrency in the meme algorithms.html workshop as part of interviewing, and this is the perfect solution so far, as in motivation you write your own 3D framework to make animations and gfx for games or videos and at the same timey you learn concurrency, at the same time you have a github filled with software. I may throw it in primarily because my own city is filled with film studios hiring desperately for gfx programmers, and it's more interesting to learn concurrency while doing a specific thing than it is in a OS course
>>
James Fozzlekedge - Tue, 30 Nov 2021 01:15:52 EST dCYn0047 No.40055 Reply
>>40050
Thanks anon. I think I'll just watch the lectures and do the assignments. Doesn't make sense to go through the book much, just seems tedious and easy. I'm the anon from 40042. I'm hoping to finish cs19 sooner cos of previous programming exp. Then will move to algorithms and competitive programming. Hope that sounds good.
>>
Polly Pittingpodge - Thu, 02 Dec 2021 09:10:16 EST hgKobO4B No.40056 Reply
What courses to do to get a job at one of those security consultancies like NCC group or Bishop Fox?
OP I know you're busy with the algorithms workshop at the moment but can you give an outline of what the security workshop will be once it's finished i.e. what courses/books/etc you will go through?
>>
Albert Magglekere - Sat, 04 Dec 2021 00:28:07 EST iQqTSbMD No.40057 Reply
>>40038 techlead is a scammer who doxxed coffeezilla for reporting on his crypto pump and dump scheme.
>>
Archie Billingson - Sat, 04 Dec 2021 02:44:56 EST x6K3CZQk No.40058 Reply
>>40055
PAPL is a good book, I haven't read the new one that much except for some of the algoritihm chapters, you can join algorithms course when graphs come up I may include it because Prof K lectures are the best for graph theory I've found
>>40056
The haxx0ring course we do is way beyond anything you'd need to get employed at Bishop Fox of NCC Group, we will do this microcorruption https://microcorruption.com/login which you should try and you're honestly good to go. If you apply to NCC group they send you the tangled web browser book and the web apps hacker's guide which is simple and fun to do, you can do it easily anon. Microcorruption is simple if you've done CMU's 15-213 which covers return oriented programming and includes it in some labs which I planned to do. You take a program and then rearrange the returns like a jenga puzzle to make it do what you want. In that workshop I will also go through all of Brown's undergrad haxxoring course by the same prof but I've been distracted.

I've been distracted since the spicy coof because there's a girl I now can't be with because of federal mandate bullshit I have the Sinovax but not the N. American vax, so I'm essentially a second class citizen here I can't go to a restaurant, I can't go out anywhere in public in my country I'm back in prison and can't leave. This pleb predicament has distracted me to no end I started drinking heavily again because my working class job pleb friends were doing it in the park during the summer, then the winter hit and I kept drinking and decided I can't do this anymore, so I stopped everything. What a shit outcome. I worked my ass off only to go back to my original state. It was harder than I thought to stop all that shit but now I'm just angry being here so I update in anger for the most part and want to slay every workshop more than anyone would ever do so I'm doing all the workshops as much as possible but there's still days where I remember there's a girl I literally have already dated forever and I cannot be with her because of some absolute petty bullshit regarding vax mandates and peak clown world so like everyone else I will self destruct those days but the meme curriculum is a savior, it keeps you going when these horrible days are manifested, that's why I designed it to be like this. Try and block out reality, chase your fantasy because it's not a fantasy it's truly possible for anyone. Just don't live in my country.
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Archie Billingson - Sat, 04 Dec 2021 03:03:48 EST x6K3CZQk No.40059 Reply
>>39739
Math curriculum goes 2.0 draft
I'm going through all the Russian Skopenkov books because Geometry part II was just released on libgen anons
I swallowed the pill that highschool math is actually the highest levels of math. This on it's face sounds totally insane but trust me, it's all the same. The junk you learned in Grade 8 is research math after watching countless PohShen Loh lectures and reading Zeit's problem solving books. It's one big long chain you derive all the way to PhD. If only I knew math was this easy 20y ago
>>
Shit Greenfoot - Sat, 04 Dec 2021 19:56:18 EST gLIOyW/9 No.40060 Reply
What to learn to be able to get a job easily that isn't web/mobile dev?
I don't mean something easy or quick to learn, but something that will get you instant work if you know it. Any recommendations?
>>
Phineas Chudgestone - Sun, 05 Dec 2021 07:42:48 EST I2Fp/Gs7 No.40061 Reply
>>40060 OP once recommended to do the microcorruption ctf and apply for a cyber security role. The field is starved of talent.
Once you’re in you pivot to application security for $$$
>>
Charles Blankintut - Sun, 05 Dec 2021 10:44:03 EST up09TsRe No.40062 Reply
>>40061
I doubt it's that easy to do one CTF and get a job just for that
But actually there are loads of those like overthewire, cryptopals, pwnable.kr, etc so maybe doing all of them and putting the solutions on GitHub would actually let you land a job. I'm tempted to try it and report back in a few months if that's enough
The problem I had when I was researching security is that for some reason 90% of companies require you to be a US citizen so you're fucked if you aren't one
>>
Martin Grandfoot - Tue, 07 Dec 2021 10:30:55 EST x6K3CZQk No.40064 Reply
>>40063
excellent though looks like somebody had to oldschool scan it, no electronic version yet.
>>40062
NCC group is UK based I think, or at least hire mainly from there it seems
>>40060
>instant work if you know it
The Andy Pavlo dbms lectures probably, however you'd need to still do competitive programming just to bypass interviews
Try this: https://www.cs.columbia.edu/~amueller/comsw4995s20/schedule/ which I'm doing starting this week in ai.html that's the applied version where all the homework is public datasets. You could easily freelance on one of those shitty sites with this knowledge and prob fastest way otherwise if you have to just do customer service rep shit for software, ie: 'support engineer' or even writing technical documentation they are always hiring. Make some medium blogger posts describing some software you're interested in, use it as a portfolio. Avoid terrible memes everyone else uses and write decent documentation. Google has free books floating around on how they do technical documentation but it's pretty simple, if you read documentation and hate it then you'll know what to make better.

>>39739
I went ahead and finished most of the machine learning courses and some new ones, filtered for the best:
>supervised learning
By far the best intro theory course is the Cornell CS4780 course taught by Killian
It matches with this applied columbia course taught by the scikit-learn guy: https://www.cs.columbia.edu/~amueller/comsw4995s20/schedule/ (lectures on youtube) but you have to do both since the columbia course expects you're also taking a theory course. Only the cornell guy actually goes through the math notation in the now 7 machine learning courses I've audited. That columbia course is exactly what you would do to get paid doing ML. That's all you need really the scikit guy from columbia even has advice how to write PRs to the scikit-learn library https://youtu.be/5OL8XoMMOfA

For anyone still interested in ML I also am doing some of the last half of 10-701 learning theory/graphical models/neural nets, and the MIT 'scientific learning' course for fun because physics-informed learning is the craziest AI you'll ever do: drop in a partial diff eq to your neural network that represents the rules governing some physical model, feed it noisy uncleaned data and it magically all works. Think of the insane AR you could make with this. 10-715 the advanced course, and all the other advanced ML courses I could find still uses the same book from 2014 https://www.cs.huji.ac.il/~shais/UnderstandingMachineLearning/courses.html to teach learning theory and the author has lectures on youtube covering the first 20 chapters or so, which is exactly what the 2021 10-715 course does.

tl;dr
CS4780 and W4995 applied ML from columbia
you're done!
advanced I'll do if you like ML:
10-701 1/4 of the last lectures (hw solutions here for 2021: https://github.com/jiaqigeng/CMU-10701-Machine-Learning )
MIT's scientific machine learning
Learning theory from 10-715 which hasn't changed
>>
Hedda Pinderstack - Tue, 07 Dec 2021 12:11:23 EST 2sTHcFLS No.40065 Reply
>>40063
I think the authors announced an official ebook after some 2021 competitive programming contest. It should be out late this year or early next.


>>40064 >AR
I thought about that myself. I wanted to set up a 3d model sales business.
ML should make the modelling part much easier, which currently requires lots of theory knowledge and more man hours than coding does.
My idea was to use a language model to generate “programs” in a custom DSL for 3d model sybthesis.
In a few years there’ll be a DALL-E style model that spits out models from normal english descriptions.
I still think the DSL idea is cool. If someone wants to copy this idea be my guest.
>>
Nathaniel Blytheson - Tue, 07 Dec 2021 16:03:02 EST 0+PS1uHS No.40066 Reply
>>40064
>You could easily freelance on one of those shitty sites with this knowledge and prob fastest way
if you mean those shitholes like Upwork then no way
I needed 20+ proposals just to get one gig there because for some reason people are fine with working for $5 or $10/hour and then 99% of the gigs posted also end up being shit where people expect you to make their entire MVP for $50
but I was doing web dev, no idea about AI
>>
David Settingdure - Tue, 07 Dec 2021 20:00:00 EST Z7BwO4Qz No.40067 Reply
OP why did you get rid of Kotlin for competitive programming? It's a really nice language to use, especially compared to C++ and Java
>>
Rebecca Drivingshaw - Wed, 08 Dec 2021 07:33:54 EST 71wdAp2j No.40068 Reply
>>40041
Congrats man, reading this makes my situation feel less hopeless.
I'll start DCIC today and hope to stick with it, might even try to find a part-time job
but explaining to employers that I've been a depressed NEET for a couple of years feels terrifying.


>>40050
Do you know where i can find the 15-122 vids, or are the lecture notes on
the course site enough?
>>
Hugh Duckham - Wed, 08 Dec 2021 10:15:41 EST URXtAHUp No.40069 Reply
Is it possible to complete the AI workshop in a year if all I know is basic high school math?
>>
Cedric Wenderspear - Wed, 08 Dec 2021 14:01:11 EST aRVhZ4x5 No.40070 Reply
1638990071470.jpg -(284395B / 277.73KB, 1920x1170) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>40053
The cmu lectures are good, but
> finish their 3D modeling software framework,
gluing together "lego pieces" in their object oriented shit doesn't seem very fun tbh.

I recently "audited" http://www.cse.chalmers.se/edu/course/TDA362/ they have open lectures and some nice handholdy tutorials/labs to do as well as some bigger projects. It uses SDL2 and opengl. It's a nice starting point to get ideas about how to do things on your own. The physically based rendering stuff is really cool.

The course and graphics research group at Chalmers was started by Tomas Möller, one of the co-authors of https://www.realtimerendering.com/ . which is an insanely huge book with like 2k references to all sorts of research/books. The lecturer is Ulf Assarsson co-author of Real-Time Shadows. Pretty pleasant dude to listen to.

Möller and some other swede also made this site http://immersivemath.com/ila/index.html . It's an online linear algebra book that uses webgl for interactive diagrams. Seems likes something that could inspire you for the revision of the math workshop.
There is also a follow up course, but it's basically just a project and talking about research papers. Here is a good list resources for graphics research: http://kesen.realtimerendering.com/
>>
Simon Blabblechot - Wed, 08 Dec 2021 23:39:45 EST x6K3CZQk No.40071 Reply
>>40069
2 months anon not 1 year.
The applied ML course we do has no math
The theory courses you are only using a subset of all the larger subjects which are all explained in the Kevin Murphy 2021 ML book we'll go through.
The new math.html which show that what you learned in highschool is exactly what you do in so-called higher mathematics it's the same thing and the Skopenkov books we do explain this in the preface.

>>40070
Yes the object oriented shit was a calculated scheme for algorithms.html which is also a scheme to pass interviews. I'll look at those courses anon thanks, one thing that's hard to find is an open computer vision course I can only find MIT's neuroscience machine learning which in a way is the same thing.

>>40068
15-122 assumes you can already program and you placed directly into it from AP CSP which you can see here: https://academy.cs.cmu.edu/ or take 15-112 which does have lectures. Although I liked 15-122 (I had the lectures) I've never really used it except for some special cases thinking about pre/post conditions and loop invariants and it always felt to me that I missed something when doing it in practice, because I remember the lectures where he routinely found new problems even after "100% proving" a simple function in a library was correct, so I abandoned it for pure functions then there's nothing to reason about, it just returns what you want and simple testing.. done. Manipulating state safely is well taught in that Cornell CS3110 gitbook and videos using OCaml where they essentially recreate a monad and CS19 does this too just it's not as obvious. I still think if you do CS19 then you can look at the documentation for any language and immediately know it even Prolog.

>>40067
Because we can do the CMU 15-295 lectures which some are open: https://scs.hosted.panopto.com/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=11d43362-4993-448e-9f38-ac4100cb80b8 plus the cp4 book is filled with C++ advice and code so thought it'd just be easier. You can also then watch those Gennady live streams.

Also C++ is conceptually easy in terms of competitive programming, you only have a few built-ins you really use and plus I did it for interview reasons, so anons could go work at some vidjya gaming company which always, always hires jr devs. You can do both though anon, use Kattis w/Kotlin and onlinejudge/UVa with C++. I would personally prefer an assembly competitive programming competition, like TAOCP style if I'm going to write imperative style code. You would have much shorter LOC too if they built a simple simulator with 256 registers but alas, one day.
>>40065
Even better write a program that can recognize the 3D models and you solved protein folding anon https://youtu.be/1YHsSFWn5OA
>>
Phoebe Fancocke - Thu, 09 Dec 2021 00:52:59 EST rui/iHws No.40072 Reply
OP what do you recommend for learning networking (computer science and not in networking in general)?
>>
Jarvis Snodspear - Thu, 09 Dec 2021 01:28:47 EST 91FVCJ3I No.40073 Reply
>>40071
OP you are a godsend. I've been looking to level up my sport programming skills and I found this website today. The ML parts are very interesting too. May God bless you.
>>
Jenny Cinkindock - Thu, 09 Dec 2021 07:36:56 EST 23RVCH6d No.40074 Reply
>>40071
do I need to take cs19 before digging into algorithms.html and cp?
>>
Phineas Deggleshaw - Fri, 10 Dec 2021 01:59:49 EST u387a6Om No.40075 Reply
OP, Suppose someone who likes math has the knowledge equivalent to basic calculus and infinite desc book i.e. knows how to do proofs and logic and all. Would you recommend the same path to learn CS and programming? Or will you then recommend SICP?
>>
George Murdman - Fri, 10 Dec 2021 21:53:03 EST x6K3CZQk No.40076 Reply
>>40075
Take both at the same time, why not. Reminder the prof of CS19 specializes in proof based results in education and every lecture in CS19 has a specific reason for being there, often with a paper attached and I even link these papers in the meme curriculum for example the seemingly odd repetition of writing higher-order functions like map/filter/fold for every single topic like streams/trees/lists. They found doing this teaches you how to understand gigantic APIs and if you watch Sussman interviews about why SICP is no longer taught his response is 'because today you are just poking at a huge library' and that's exactly what we do in the ML workshop we aren't really programming Python, instead we are using a gigantic library scikit-learn/Pytorch and AutoML and Keras. We just happen to be using the library language Python because it has the easiest interface but we could just as easily use C/C++ wrappers or something else. Any programming you do in 2022 will be with some massive API/library/framework almost nothing can be programmed from scratch now because it's all just too complex, If I were you, I'd go through his papers https://cs.brown.edu/~sk/Publications/Papers/Published/ and then design your own curriculum for yourself based on what you find there. Everything you want to know is there.

>>40074
No but it will be much easier if you do or at least do it in parallel. Gennady if you watch his livestream he uses the exact same methods taught in CS19 like writing a ton of examples to figure out a problem I'll post it sometime one of his vids is almost taken direclty from PAPL when I read it where instead of just producing the answer he expects he works it out fully and makes it a test case even though he never writes tests, for that problem he did. The key is practice anon just program those kattis solutions and then seek every single resource you can to help you doesn't matter where it's from though CS19 is probably the most streamlined in terms of 'here's what you need to know to figure out very hard things'.

>>40072
Prof K has a lecture in CS19 actually about internet backbones/networks/exchanges https://youtu.be/vQyS4vfcjCA after you learn graphs, reminder you can make that 1080p and picture-in-picture expand as large as you want.

Nate Foster from Cornell goes through network theory here: https://www.cs.uoregon.edu/research/summerschool/summer16/curriculum.php those lectures are also on Youtube. Every school uses Computer Networks: A Systems Approach by Larry Peterson and Bruce Davie aka P&D and 'Beej's guide to network programming' http://beej.us/guide/bgnet/ which is cringe to read, it's updated every year but he kept the old style of 90s writing before blogging speak became tiresome. Many schools including CMU and MIT no longer even let you look at slides for their networking courses so you have to back to 2019 or so but nothing has changed. Networking is like a specific trade and they're scared you can learn it yourself and go work in a datacenter somewhere bypassing their credential wall. Remember this next time you come across a random post somewhere of somebody crying about hiring for developers where all you have to do is pass some test and you're in. Imagine if it required licenses and official recognized schooling/guilds we'd be fucked.

Networking is low key tons of money, you start out being a 'technician' for some google farm but you can easily move up ranks far faster than software and be making $140k a year as an operations manager, that's for a small data center I just looked up locally. Those google guys are likely making 5x that money. They always have weird 10 hr shifts 4 day on, 3 days off work and you start night shift which is pretty comfy just you and football field full of servers. Anyway that's all I know about networking try emailing Nate Foster at cornell and ask him for networking theory materials.

>>40073
Thanks guy
learnai moves to 2.0 after I did all the courses myself and filtered the junk
then it goes 3.0 when I dump the courses and just make my own free courses on youtube but in a completely different way than everyone else that teaches, economy is key reminder universities have to provide breadth for students doing all kinds of other degrees and fill the whole time slot when sometimes it doesn't need to and sometimes it should go way further but anyway. Good luck anon
>>
George Murdman - Fri, 10 Dec 2021 23:49:10 EST x6K3CZQk No.40077 Reply
>>39739
Reminder you can also get paid to learn https://hawk-research.com/
Despite their marketing, you're helping students cheat by doing their hw and exams for them and getting paid
If you can do the ML workshop, then well you can get paid P/T easy income to finish student's homework and learn yourself, it's like drill you do enough decision trees at search depth majority vote, one depth, two depth etc., and it's second nature.

This is also possible now: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x6gB1hKjDys&t=0s micro flyers that do surveillance dropped from a larger drone, If you're in New Zealand or Australia, you can literally do what I do remote from your couch if you take the ML meme curriuclum and some of the competitive c++ programming curriculum https://jobs.smartrecruiters.com/DroneShield/743999790652801-ml-ai-software-engineer-electronic-warfare
>>
John Seddlefoot - Sat, 11 Dec 2021 00:00:58 EST u387a6Om No.40078 Reply
>>40076
Is learnai 2.0 on a new website? I can't find it. Btw, CS19 is still unfinished?
>>
Walter Puvingfoot - Sat, 11 Dec 2021 05:36:15 EST 71wdAp2j No.40079 Reply
For anyone trying to figure out the best way to learn all of this, I can recommend the book 'Understanding How We Learn' (978-1138561724). It's evidence-based and a fast read. I'm also looking into zettelkasten as a "second-brain" knowledge base to store and link up all the info we learn from the courses but I don't know if it's just a new "productivity youtuber' meme type of thing right now.
>>
Nell Dannerdut - Sat, 11 Dec 2021 08:04:23 EST QD97aOAo No.40080 Reply
OP do you have any resources for making pluggable programs?
I want users to be able to customize almost everything with a generic API but I have no idea how to go about this
>>
Sidney Mammlehall - Sat, 11 Dec 2021 09:58:57 EST W8natdMq No.40081 Reply
>>40076
OP after Jan 29 2022 are you going to left both sites (functionalCS/learnAIfromscratch) untouched so that we can follow them in a reliable way or you will delete them?
>>
Phineas Bluvingstut - Thu, 16 Dec 2021 22:36:07 EST x6K3CZQk No.40083 Reply
>>40081
Sure, after Jan 29 (if I can) I just want to finish AI workshop but crypto/type theory workshop I want to do out of interest for much longer
Algorithms.html is only do very few lectures from MIT/CMU it's mainly programming in kattis, in fact we're pretty much done lectures except for 3 15-295 lectures on dynamic programming and some other topics, and some of 18.337J from MIT where he will teach you what a loop really is: a math dynamic system.

>>40080
What I did anon is make everything so modularized that random people could write an extension, you could probably do this in any language but I found OCaml the easiest because if someone wants obscure China payment system they pay for a module writer, and I just change the options in my app and run the compiler which tells me where to change everywhere else. Literally 5 minutes in emacs and good to go.

>>40078
same site just different curriculum for ai.html and eventually math.html
i combined linear.html and calculus.html into ai.html so those are now redundant
the object is to make everything problem based so a working anon like me can just sit down, do some problems for 1hr, think about them all day in the back of their mind, return home and either finish or look at solution, and repeat. The least amount of work possible but at the same time, the most amount of work just you don't realize it. It's also how you remember

Since interviews take 1-3 months I already queued up 4 of them from le famous shitty bigtech companies just to see what I can do to infiltrate and walking around there not giving a fuck if they fire me.
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Sophie Bleggleham - Fri, 17 Dec 2021 09:25:13 EST 71wdAp2j No.40084 Reply
OP, are you on any other platforms? Is there a LearnAIfromScratch chat?
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Hedda Blatherwell - Sat, 18 Dec 2021 23:39:02 EST u387a6Om No.40085 Reply
>>40083
OP, you have done HtDP, CS19 and SICP. All three.

If someone does only CS19 what do they miss out from the other two?
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Democritus Junior - Sun, 19 Dec 2021 23:39:55 EST c2Y95mQV No.40086 Reply
>>40083
Op, what are you currently reading/studying right now? What textbook or course? After all the calculus books you have read, which is better between Spivak and Apostol?
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Democritus Junior - Tue, 21 Dec 2021 12:14:16 EST c2Y95mQV No.40087 Reply
>>40083
Also, you mentioned in one of your previous posts that you read Apostol calculus, and TAOCP at the same time. What was the process? i ask because i finally have access to a library that has those books. I intend to read them.
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Caroline Drisslefotch - Wed, 22 Dec 2021 11:01:44 EST r4oJ9Lie No.40088 Reply
Any tips for making crypto trading bots?
Will I be able to leverage ML after the AI workshop for this?
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Democritus Junior - Fri, 24 Dec 2021 03:02:17 EST SCkk3ue3 No.40089 Reply
>>40083
What would you say is the pre-req for TAOCP? For volume 1 specifically. It has a notorious reputation for being a book that people just buy, but don't actually read. I have looked multiple places and it seems like you are one of the few people, online, that i have found who have read this work.
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Lillian Blinderchat - Sun, 26 Dec 2021 08:52:59 EST fegwhrR+ No.40090 Reply
Hey OP do you have any resources or tips for attacking web apps?
I want to try bug bounty hunting on Hackerone for a month to see if I can find a few bugs or if I should go back to looking for a soul crushing web dev job
>>
Democritus Junior - Sun, 26 Dec 2021 21:56:54 EST TySaVA38 No.40091 Reply
>>40083
In my next term of college i will be taking a discrete mathematics course that is, from what i have heard other students say, extremely difficult. Do you have any particular discrete mathematics book (or online course) that you would recommend to beginners?
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Jenny Binkinway - Thu, 30 Dec 2021 21:59:09 EST x6K3CZQk No.40092 Reply
>>39739
Redo of math.html to encourage anons to try math via problems. Mainly contains classical research as a way of motivation. I removed Tao because of brainlet complaints on other forums but highly suggest you work through Tao anyway it is one of the best books of our century. Yes, it's very hard but that's the point, you just screw around with the problems and end up figuring them out yourself guaranteed and realize wait this wasn't that hard.

>>40091
it's only 'extremely difficult' because you have to use logic. In every prior math course you just performed some kind of memorized algorithm. Poh-Shen Loh has his CMU discrete math course open on his youtube page which we take in math.html https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0K540qqyJJU he uses this book: Discrete Mathematics, by L. Lovász, J. Pelikán, and K. Vesztergombi you can get on library genesis but try working through the problems in his youtube channel yourself, using that book as research. You can easily finish this anon, CMU's course is 10x as hard as any typical school's 'discrete math' course which is really a grab bag of number theory and combinatorics.

>>40090
Take a shit web app job then attack everything they're working on, make yourself your own 'security team lead' position. Why not. Get that book on greyhat python which teaches you how to make all your own tools. I include advice in theabsolutestateofsoftware.html the cringe hacker workshop of real bug hunters and how they learned their craft, one of them an Egyptian guy simply just played around and gives full advice how to do what he does to get paid to find bugs. Reminder anyone can join NCCgroup and similar security outfits they are always desperate for competent people. CMU's 15-213 teaches you all this, like return oriented programming which is still used in every highly public hack. Sign up to microcorruption with a real identity and spend all your time figuring it out every day. Contact them after and tell them what you did. You will get hired

>>40089
The prereq is curiosity and interest enough to spend time working through the exercises, which Knuth fully works out himself for your benefit. I am likely making a TAOCP workshop because I wanted to use it for algorithms.html but I feel many anons misunderstand. You get caught up in 'i must only learn x! nooo reeeeeee' and don't realize that y is just as good in fact teaching you the exact same thing. So I didn't include it but since nobody else has done it, I'll prove it's not impossible to do and it's exactly what you're already doing. Also see: https://commandlinefanatic.com/cgi-bin/showarticle.cgi?article=art055 this guy has done up to vol 4 (but has an engineering background, so when he says oh hey this is simple it's because he's a real engineer with a MSc)

>>40088
I do but I kind of abandoned crypto for ethical reasons nobody will believe, despite me having a 2010 account on bitcointalk shilling crypto. Despite me being a liberty reserve and even C-Gold vet. I always thought they were flawed and centralized and wished for something else. Bitcoin WAS perfect, but now it (and every other crypto scheme) is just too much of a pyramid scam now. it used to be great. I could 3rd party pay anyone I wanted, I could escape central monitoring. But everyone now just wants to make money like a lottery. Fuck them all. Honestly that's my opinion and I just totally abandoned crypto.

You want to gamble like rouellette (despite what anyone says, cypto speculation is rouellete) then you want to clone gunbot but take a percentage, make it free to use. No money up front just take a percentage. That's what I would do these days and absolute smoke gunbot out of the water, read their github issues where everyone req features. Recall me talking about replicating features that anons want and to do it as fast as possible. You can do this with OCaml right now if you wanted, but I feel dirty doing it myself. I feel guilty telling anons to blow up their money wasting it on crypto scams. That's why I never talk about it despite being there in the very beginning when Satoshi, whoever those/that was, invented modern speculation. I remember when he/they disappeared when Gavin went to the CIA to discuss bitcoin and to be honest I never used it again. Fuck crypto it's so cringe now, reminds me of Tom Vu when I was in elementary school https://youtu.be/kzsSpDyBc_4 and his scheme is actually more likely to make money if we're talking probability

Consider NFTs. They are a money laundering scheme. You buy an entry in a database, you don't even own the NFT. I would recommend anons just abandon that fraud unless you recognize yourself it's a complete fraud and wish to defraud other anons then go for it I'm not a moral judge. That's why I don't mention crypto in any of the meme workshops there's other ways to make money that don't involve gambling and those cringe guys that step to you all the time 'oh hey you're a computer scientist, how can I make money with X shit token' aww fuck me. At the same time, I respect and wholly support the decentralization of everything, but goddamnit these guys in my face in real life everyday trying to scheme money and falling for the big scam, it's like a religion I can't talk them out of it.

For an example of duality, I am completely opposed this guy's politics https://www.stephendiehl.com/ but fully agree with him about crypto scams. Like 100% agree. Make sure you guys never put your own money in crypto schemes if you want stank tokens then make some kind of service that accepts them, THEN gamble. Never pay for crypto. ever
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Jenny Binkinway - Thu, 30 Dec 2021 22:58:15 EST x6K3CZQk No.40093 Reply
>>40087
Apostol I real like Isaac Newton read Descartes. I had to redo it over and over to understand it. There is a ton of proofs in there that make absolutely no sense, so you have to seek secondary sources. I believe this guy has Apostol solutions if interested: https://www.stumblingrobot.com/2015/08/23/compute-the-integral-14/ search around his site, IIRC he did every exercise in both books.

I don't recommend it despite claiming it taught me math because it's honestly very difficult and I don't think other anons will try it. Apostol if he has nothing to say about that chapter will just drill you on trig identities which is kind of hilarious, I did about a thousand trig identities I think in the two books. Anyway that was my process: read until I had no idea what was happening. Redo that entire chapter. If i still didn't get it redo the previous chapter, then the previous. Repeat. However I recommend you definitely look at other analysis texts to understand a few of the proofs he drops which to me were totally alien and out of nowhere, you will get the proofs in the other texts like his own text on analysis. Something that helped was I made my own library of calculus, every chapter I used Lisp (use whatever lang you want) to model the calculus algorithm he was trying to teach and I found it helped but it was a struggle because I knew hardly anything then.

>>40086
Right now in my spare time I do the Nature of Computation book and Ryan Odonell's course because I thought about making an exploratory, interest based workshop out of it. Math shouldn't be a chore or any of these topics, if you're interested you should just go off and play with stuff and see what happens and he kind of teaches this style and esp the book Nature of Computation teaches this. Otherwise I've been trying to go through CMU's advanced algorithm course book for competitive programming, and it's easier than I thought. Of course proving everything is not easy but just screwing around with advanced algorithms is definitely easy.

>>40085
HtDP is technically the replacement for SICP and honestly I found it too tedious, I skipped large amounts of it and finished the last few chapters before discovering PAPL/CS19. The things they teach you there are very sound though, like in CS19 the example writing. However it was too easy for me and tedious. I find CS19 the right amount of hand holding plus very difficult but not impossible assignments. Enough to keep you interested but not so tedious that you lose interest. It's still a linear course, and everyone, absolutely everyone, gets bored of a linear course and has no reason to finish it that's why I always am changing everything to be competitive or problem based because even as interesting the CS19 lectures are, and they are all very interesting, some of them groundbreaking teaching, I know ppl won't complete it including myself. I introduce these things to show anons 'this is all you need' but I also recognize they will get too bored and abandon so 2.0 workshop is fixing this because I am you, you are me. I think if learning isn't self directed, you won't do it, so that's kind of why I haven't finished CS19 because I know that there's no reason for anons to finish it.... until they get to graph problems in algorithms.html then they will want to watch those lectures and read the book. There's a method to my inconsistency, it's not because I'm scatterbrained I realize everyone is me and cannot do a whole course except for very specialist cases like I would say Ryan O'Donnells theoretical CS toolkit is the kind of course everyone would finish, it's at the perfect level of being very difficult but not impossible because he's trying to teach you how to do theoretical CS yourself. I feel that course is likely the only one any anon including myself would ever finish in it's entirety since we don't go to school, why bother finishing.

For example there's like 5 CS19 lectures I've never watched, even when I taught CS19 in hong kong I haven't seen them. I'm sure they are the best possible lectures on those subjects but, remember I'm you and you are me, we just can't do it......unless there is a reason. That's what algorithms.html is for there will be a reason to finish them.
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Jenny Binkinway - Thu, 30 Dec 2021 23:44:23 EST x6K3CZQk No.40094 Reply
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>>40084
There's a discord chat I haven't used because no time, in functionalcs. I'll post that chat in learnai too whoever runs it can take over.
Otherwise no I never post elsewhere and if I do I say up front it's me because I enjoy the sea of criticism for other angry anons, it's why I change things.
Remember I'm the guy who cloned other people's programs and then went through their reviews fixing all the problems other developers ignored. I realize these shouldn't be ignored and there needs to be a ying to the yang. Give me all the criticism or I won't learn. btw, the meme curriculum is tried out on a large amount of everyday people like the kid I taught in hong kong working all night in a convenience store doing nothing with his life. That kid is now a better programmer than me by far and making a ridiculous amount of money. My weird fetish for making everything accessible via a phone device, partly comes from my own experience having no time during work and commuting and you can only work on a phone, partly because I travelled enough to realize nobody can afford a laptop/desktop, and because of that kid I met in HK working all night wasting his time watching cricket on a phone. I thought about all the other kids I knew working in convenience stores and that's where the primary fetish for using only a phone comes from in the meme curriculum. Btw, you still can do it all with a phone, including machine learning.

When I'm done this iteration, everything will get rebooted and I will likely solely teach Robert Harper material and the Nature of Computation lectures by Ryan Odonnell because they truly are the perfect mix of wanting to know more, and being very hard to do. Just above any plebs level (including myself) but interesting enough you think you can do it. Real research. That's why I shill Robert Harper so much because he gives you just enough in his lectures to be intrigued. He makes totally radical claims and doesn't give a fuck. You're like, who is this guy and why is he so confident he can model all of mathematics in a type theory. That I feel, is what we should be doing and the applied bullshit of chasing money is secondary. After doing this long enough you will always have money because you got interested in some kind of totally radical compsci curriculum, and taught yourself out of interest.

The only reason I got sidetracked is because all the other curriculum is so awful I felt I had to do something just to get anons money so they can support themselves while doing theoretical CS for fun and eventually more profit. It absolutely pains me to see so many shit recommendations for anons in this field, if you're bored and can't finish eject and go take radical type theory. Go take radical complexity theory. You don't have to follow anybody's curriculum if you become truly interested, and are like me, it becomes a compulsion you have to learn everything there is to know. A side effect is you get paid, at Jane street believe or not. That's another reason for algorithms.html I believe there's some anon taking type theory who dicking around in kattis and can get hired there, in fact I want all anons to get jobs there because why not, get paid to do what you want, make enough to leave and pursue independent interests.That's another goal.

Take out a notebook and think to yourself, what are the hardest problems to solve. Why can't I solve them? There's no reason you can't. Approach it at that level and you'll never be broke.
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Jenny Binkinway - Fri, 31 Dec 2021 00:09:47 EST x6K3CZQk No.40095 Reply
>>40085
>SICP
If you want to know, SICP as much as I shill it, is defective for not teaching you the CS19 or HtDP of writing examples. Of course you can learn to write examples in Poh Shen-Loh's Putnam seminar, or another math class but Prof K makes this a priority in CS19 which is directly taken from his book HtDP. I feel that is a kind of super power many people don't do, having witnessed myself hiring people in HK. Gennady does this in competitive programming if you watch his twitch streams, he starts all problems exactly how Prof K teaches. Reminder Prof K takes the best of the entire US and analyzes their performance, then changes his curriculum to adap so even he doesn't recommend HtDP anymore but he teaches similar to it.

Did anyone read his paper about the logic for CS course that I posted where they tested all Brown students to see the gaps in their education? Everyone who didn't do CS19 essentially failed. There's a reason I shill that course
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Cornelius Giffinglock - Sat, 01 Jan 2022 15:45:06 EST 71wdAp2j No.40096 Reply
Is there a prerequisite to the 'Mathematics via Problems' books?
Maybe I'm too smoothbrained for this but I read problem 1 in the algebra book
and had no idea how to tackle it...
>>
Edwin Piffingmut - Tue, 04 Jan 2022 20:55:37 EST bEwud0Es No.40097 Reply
nerds
User is currently banned from all boards
>>
Edwin Grimville - Thu, 06 Jan 2022 08:56:41 EST momOJXEJ No.40099 Reply
Any resources for Android dev OP?
You mentioned making apps for Chinese app stores in the past. Were those Android apps?
>>
Ernest Sondleham - Sat, 08 Jan 2022 07:55:45 EST fXQjFEc7 No.40101 Reply
>>39739
OP how do I learn webdev, I know you have an entire workshop in functionalcs but I mean, if I were to do it from scratch, any Ivy league courses you recommend?
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Hannah Donningstone - Sun, 09 Jan 2022 01:32:55 EST tcpR9AhQ No.40102 Reply
>>40101
WebDev is essentially little bit of computer networking(i.e. knowing difference between 127.0.0.1 and 0.0.0.0), HTTP protocol and how frameworks model this stuff(i.e. routes, static files, csrf, etc), also shallow knowledge of SQL and databases. Plus difference between server side rendering with templates(PHP/jinja/..) and single page applications where instead you get all the info yourself via some json fetching and decorate it in Angular/React/Svelte.
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Phoebe Crottingcheg - Sun, 09 Jan 2022 09:55:53 EST 51w39PQb No.40103 Reply
>>40101
Speaking as someone who switched from an unrelated career to webdev without extra schooling/boot camp - honestly just do a couple of Udemy courses and build some projects. Try to tick the boxes on one of the many roadmaps out there like https://roadmap.sh/frontend

When it comes to interviews, beyond questions related to the tech, you’ll really either see DS&A questions or some kind of take home project.
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Knuth Apostol - Sun, 09 Jan 2022 16:52:44 EST kj3qRtUy No.40105 Reply
>>40093
>Nature of Computation book

How are you finding that book? I looked around for books on Theoretical Computer science, and i found that one. I heard that Sipser's book is a good introductory text, but my Library doesn't have it. They do have Nature of Computation though.
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Viktor Claval - Fri, 14 Jan 2022 01:53:51 EST Y/0M9exb No.40107 Reply
>>40098
>>40095
OP, you should check out that discord server. Prof k is in there, Ben lerrner too, and he gives advice and answers questions that we have.
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Fucking Dellywell - Fri, 14 Jan 2022 22:49:36 EST x6K3CZQk No.40108 Reply
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>>39739
I'm back
I had to quit my drone job so my 3 week notice was filled with lot's of time not burning bridges, we have drones now anons that can from 500m away, burn a hole with a laser through thick steel in 90 seconds and if they want, and drop a 400lb payload. It was fun but too terrifying, I didn't burn bridges so I can go back and see what's going on later. Anyway the tight control just continues there is no end in sight https://youtu.be/gUybirMnzFc I couldn't keep doing it. I currently live in one of the countries in that video. Shit is real, if you have a heart full of pride https://youtu.be/lGJCGaFugH0 you can only go so far anons until you realize you're kind of programming somebody's murder. Anyway I will go back of course, just to see what they're doing but I don't want to squeeze all my talents making targeting vectors on some guy who hates the modern world and is being chased by a drone owned by Turkey because that's who bought us out too, Turkey is now the premiere drone country. I don't want to help any of them and they needed my help, it's hard to find people that know that CMU course on differential invariants, and they will no longer get my help because it had to stop at sometime and now seems to be the time. Fuck them

Dramatics aside, this means I can do the meme curriculum starting Monday I only have 1 job now, a working class job where you get time to just stop and figure out some difficult problem. I now am totally removed from the tech industry until meme curriculum algorithms.html goes into infiltrating various bigtech corps
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Fucking Dellywell - Fri, 14 Jan 2022 23:57:53 EST x6K3CZQk No.40109 Reply
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>>40107
WUT?? Awesome. Be sure to never mention the meme curriculum reminder I'm still kind of being sued (not by Prof K of course) but yeah, tactical torrent/youtube hosting.

>>40106
Drones have a problem with other drones, but motorcycles no problem can just swarm them and predict movement as a motocycle can't adjust altitude and suddenly go other way, so unfortunately this won't stop a drone(s). I say dones because there is no single drone anymore there is a few hundred now.
>>40105
Anon, Ryan Odonnell's entire TCS Theory Toolkit course uses that book
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLm3J0oaFux3ZYpFLwwrlv_EHH9wtH6pnX

It's the perfect book for inducing creativity in CS, I'd like to do it somewhere in functionalCS though I've been shilling it in algorithms.html, it will teach you shit that is not solved and encourage you to solve it yourself http://bactra.org/reviews/nature-of-computation.html I'll do the whole book sometime just because I think his TCS theory course is so good all anon's should try it, it's like Robert Harper courses you end up leaving thinking what the fuck, why didn't my school teach me this it's revolutionary

>>40101
All I know about modern webdev is you can do a lot with CSS grid now, and just javascript. It's fun for me anyway but there's so many devices and screens still which makes it hard. You want to learn webdev go to next.js website, go to Vercel site and just make something that works. It's a free 'serverless' kind of shill, try it out for fun.

>>40096
Either did I, you learn by just dicking around with the problem and being interested: what is the rule for being divisible by 11? Who the fuck knows.... try dividing stuff by 11 and eventually you're like wait there's a pattern, then you see the proof and it's just the SAME Wildberger lectures you already saw, and you get it. That's why the meme curriculum does those books, they are very difficult high school tier problems, but once you get it you will always get it like now I routinely see numbers and think oh hey that's divisible by 11. Only because I did that book. What if we did the geometry book? What kinds of natural things can be cast into geometry anyway that's how I think about these things.

It's absolutely amazing what that Russian prof knows, he's like the master of every math field if you read his Russian university page. We venerate people for being successful in a single field and this guy is a master of everything like has dozens of papers and recorded courses (all in russian unfortunately). I'm glad Paul Zeits a guy I shilled for a few years is now translating his works, if you're Russian Skopenkov has a ton of vids on youtube and russian social media for abstract algebra and other topics and just randomly throws in his 300 page fully proven text. Dude is a machine. I shill some of his weird Russian 'math walks' where he goes out into the woods with a group of students, swims in a frozen pond then teaches Euclid's proofs on a tree trunk.

>>40099
Yes, Chinese Android
You can do algorithms.html entirely in Kotlin which is the official android language. Kotlin compiles to JVM
I wrote my APP in OCaml then I compiled using js_of_ocaml but any language that targets jvm is fine to write for Android anon
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Fucking Dellywell - Sat, 15 Jan 2022 02:16:50 EST x6K3CZQk No.40110 Reply
>>39739
Also anons, a large amount of my time is preparing to marry my cherkessian g/f from the caucaus regions of Russia so I do alot of this: https://youtu.be/ua95fPR6HC8 it's really fun, stick your flatscreen on a stand and play a chechen or cherkessian wedding and you will have a good night. The whole lockdown that's all I've been doing, since I can't leave my shit country (yet). Soon.

Anyway Monday we go for peak meme employment, thanks you guys without you I would be screwed
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Nigel Dartgold - Sat, 15 Jan 2022 10:22:56 EST tLyUpCk2 No.40111 Reply
>>40107
Is there a link that still works? The old one expired.
>>
Viktor Claval - Sat, 15 Jan 2022 17:07:52 EST Hf0so4Hq No.40112 Reply
>>40109
Yeah, nobody has mentioned it. We know that it would cause trouble, and be unbeneficial for us since we still learn from it.
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Viktor Claval - Sat, 15 Jan 2022 17:28:18 EST Hf0so4Hq No.40113 Reply
>>40109
>I shill some of his weird balloon animal 'math walks' where he goes out into the woods with a group of students, swims in a frozen pond then teaches Euclid's proofs on a tree trunk.

Can you link this video?
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Viktor Claval - Tue, 18 Jan 2022 17:15:41 EST jHwR5zxX No.40114 Reply
>>40109
Thoughts on "Naive Set Theory" by Halmos if you have read it? Also, do you still recommend "A Course of Pure Mathematics: by G.H. Hardy? I tried to read the first chapter on the irrationality of the square root of 2, and i found the book unclear. I unironically found a better explanation in baby rudin. Although, i won't go further in rudin because it's beyond my level.
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Viktor Claval - Tue, 18 Jan 2022 20:32:04 EST jHwR5zxX No.40116 Reply
>>40110
And have you read Elements of Statistical Learning?
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Nigel Nocklewill - Wed, 19 Jan 2022 22:40:53 EST x6K3CZQk No.40117 Reply
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>>40116
>>40114
>set theory by Halmos
Anon, my guilty pleasure that I screw around with for fun is using Robert Harper's cubical type theory to replace set theory, and it works absolutely effortlessly for Wildberger's crazy rational mathematics. So this is what I normally do in my spare time, write extensions to Jon Sterling's cubical type theory https://youtu.be/u0Ac3e6_FYg proof assistant for Wildberger math and it has worked perfectly. I then use the AI workshop to do this automatically, because we can just cast problems into rational math and screw around with them for fun and profit. So anyway, I recommend you try it just for Isaac Newton levels of fun... which is why I put him into math.html plus it all works geometrically, like I can do 'synthesis' on some thing I'm working on using entirely Wildberger wacky universal geometry and it just works. I put this in Robert Harper's/Jon Sterling's proof assistant and again it just works. Who says we need irrational numbers.... well we do but so far I'm good.

As for the statistical theory book anon, if you read the calculus.html book I recommend which is that calc modelling book, you will easily understand it. Statistics gets very hard as defined by Cozma Shalizi where you need to do data analysis, but for us in machine learning, we already have that analysis and don't need to do it. That's why I picked that Israeli guy's theory lectures they are extremely good at describing what is really going on, at a CMU PhD 10-715 level.

Hardy's book is hard as hell. He derives everything from scratch, all the identities we now take for granted. Rudin's book you should try reading with Tao's Analysis I originally those were the notes he provided to his students to finish Rudin. It's of course, extremely hard because there is some advanced proofs in there where you need to google for about 2 weeks to understand what is going on same with Apostol's calculus, many proofs in there I could never understand until I found them done elsewhere. That's math for you though anon, it's a very, very abstract discipline where you just keep seeing new ways to solve things and you add that to your mind for future problems. That's why I do a problem solving workshop now because I kept running into these 'tricks' so decided to include them all in a single workshop. Example: here's my question on stackexchange trying to figure out a trick done in Asymptotica https://math.stackexchange.com/questions/4319793/proof-of-nk-ll-1-epsilonn-from-spencers-asymptopia-book/4319825#4319825 and the answer admits it's a common trick pulled out of a hat. Anyway that's what you do anon, you go through the material and then ask questions. You learn.

>>40113
I do in algorithms.html link the VK pages and if you search his name on Youtube you get his courses, dude is absolutely a math machine, pumping out insanley advanced papers every month. He has crazy advanced abstract algebra courses at that Moscow uni on YouTube, even though it's all in roooosian (avoiding cat planet) we'll do some of them as we go through math.html the new problem solving workshop. If you are Roooshin then you can take literally all of math.html in your native language all his books are free on his uni page, and you can join his zoom lectures he does every week the Moscow math circle where they do research math for highschool.

>>40112
Anybody with discord access to Prof K... ask him if he still will honor the CS1730 promise that if you complete the course in X days he will give you a written recognition of this saying you completed it, this is like a degree because he's a Brown professor. I have his original written recommendation and I used it to get into grad school along with my lab work I did with the post-docs,

Look here: http://cs.brown.edu/courses/cs173/2012/OnLine/ "The on-line version does not offer credit from Brown; but those who successfully complete it can get recognition of this directly from the instructor. In particular, because we anticipate some people following the course will be busy professionals, we will offer four levels of recognition:..." prof K gives you written recognition, this means you have a 'degree' anons it's worth it's weight in gold and it's FREE (well was, if he still offers it).
>>
Oliver Nuffingset - Thu, 20 Jan 2022 08:45:26 EST mBsGlVHn No.40121 Reply
Arxiv has a programming language section now with new PL theory papers.
Would it help me get hired if I had hobby out of implementing papers from there?
Taking a new paper each weak and implementing in Haskell.
Haskell because it’s already a big research language.
>>
Viktor Claval - Sat, 22 Jan 2022 01:08:19 EST jHwR5zxX No.40123 Reply
>>40117
>I do in algorithms.html link the VK pages and if you search his name on Youtube you get his courses

I can't find the video, and i don't know what "VK Pages" mean. I checked on youtube, and i couldn't find the euclid video.
>>
Eliza Chabberwill - Sun, 23 Jan 2022 03:48:07 EST 9WLwAh+f No.40124 Reply
>>40117
Hey OP (or anyone else). Do you know where I can download the CP4 book from for free? Libgen has Part 1 but it is a >300MB scanned PDF, so not really practical and it is blurry as well. Would appreciate any help.
>>
Clara Crongerteck - Mon, 24 Jan 2022 22:32:29 EST 6yaGGWUJ No.40125 Reply
>>40117
OP what advice do you have for someone who wants to study both the theoretical and practical aspects of databases from scratch?
Also why did you remove everything from algorithms.html ?
>>
Angus Brinnerhot - Tue, 25 Jan 2022 02:44:39 EST x6K3CZQk No.40126 Reply
>>39739
for software.html I played around with fly.io making Elixir/Phoenix apps for free, totally easy, exact same as CS19, dead simple real time apps, They hire people with no resumes if anons are interested: https://fly.io/blog/fly-io-is-hiring-support-engineers/ for $90/k year remote any country, leads to developer role.

I always wanted software.html to go straight into freelancing so that's what I've been doing on the side, making elixir apps for lelz and charging a bunch of money on absolutely trash freelancer sites nobody in their right mind would advertise on but it's working.

>>40125
Everything I do is a big draft I test on real people and you, so it gets rewritten all the time to remove things and not overload a random reader with too much, because there is like a specific few things you need to know and everything else will just come naturally, no need to force it. If you like dbms then Andy Pavlo'v CMU courses anon: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLSE8ODhjZXjZaHA6QcxDfJ0SIWBzQFKEG followed by his deep dive into internals of experimental dbms https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLSE8ODhjZXjasmrEd2_Yi1deeE360zv5O or w/e newer playlist you can find, all his courses are open. Very, very good courses even though if you read his CMU page he basically admits there will be no such thing as any kind of dbms programmer in 10 years since we can just automatically optimize queries with AI eventually. In the meantime everyone will hire you to do this like SAP HANA/Salesforce or anywhere else, but not forever.

>>40124
I'm only using volume 1,it's all you need, and it's very similar to CP3 for many parts, I wouldn't worry about it. All the problems are on methods to solve which is the most recent book resource as CP5 is coming out soon. Try the other resources I linked like Algorithmic Problem Solving https://kth.instructure.com/courses/20699/files/3296468/download?verifier=xTIE4fipNDoRb4BXNI7TiLOAtpuekegxbZZ5XO4M&wrap=1 pdf and just try methods to solve site while you dig through algorithm books. That's the point, learn the algorithm as you implement it yourself.

>>40123
VK is rooosian facebook anon, they literally do math in the woods https://vk.com/photo8967168_117185248 and if you search Skopenkov on Youtube you'll find a lot of his courses, but he has them all linked form his mccme school homepage.

>>40121
Sure, plus write some articles about it somewhere even if it's medium tier cringe. There is a lot of haskell jobs https://boards.greenhouse.io/collegevine/jobs/4168360004 just lie and say you have 3 years or so software exp, and the 'startup' you worked for is now defunct or whatever. Nobody will check im my exp if your github is fleshed out with tons of little projects so it at looks appears you have exp. Do what needs to be done to get paid in my opinion.
>>
Angus Brinnerhot - Tue, 25 Jan 2022 02:52:40 EST x6K3CZQk No.40127 Reply
>>40125
>remove everything
mistake, it's back
emacs sometimes does that, alas I was working on some shit earlier.

I found this interesting and added it: https://ioinformatics.org/journal/INFOL075.pdf it's the Codility 'white paper' how they modelled it exactly from IOI competitions, and how they write questions where there is an easy obvious answer with shit optimization, and a harder one with great optimization in all their questions. This is the shit site you have to bypass for a lot of things like when I hustled for toptal back in the day, they sitll use it
>>
Albert Clocklewag - Tue, 25 Jan 2022 04:02:24 EST I8hgLGOK No.40128 Reply
>>40126
>for software.html I played around with fly.io making Elixir/Phoenix apps for free, totally easy, exact same as CS19, dead simple real time apps, They hire people with no resumes if anons are interested: https://fly.io/blog/fly-io-is-hiring-support-engineers/ for $90/k year remote any country, leads to developer role.
Wtf do they mean by support engineer? From that post it looks like a regular customer support job but why would they be paying 90$k/year for that

Anyway, how are you liking the Elixir/Phoenix combo OP? Part of the reason I stopped web dev is because I started hating React and JS. Are you having trouble finding jobs with Elixir? Where are you freelancing?
>>
Betsy Boddlesen - Tue, 25 Jan 2022 08:26:32 EST w6aVrPZN No.40129 Reply
>>40126
Great dbms resources thanks!
>>40128
Seconding this anon's question. Additionally, is prior knowledge of Elixir or Phoenix required? I wish I knew about this opportunity a year ago. Now enrolled in college so cannot take up this full time role. Thanks a lot though OP.
User is currently banned from all boards
>>
Cornelius Sablingham - Wed, 26 Jan 2022 12:57:30 EST 2y6JXF/a No.40130 Reply
>>40128
>>40129
Their description sounds like like developer tech support, presumably you'd help customers fix their installations, 90k because I'd assume it requires some technical proficiency with provisioning and monitoring containers and owning distributed global infrastructure and maybe diagnosing problems in code or infra just guessing from what Fly.io does maybe just a less hand holdy customer support designed as a developer training position. Could see it making sense if they have a rare tech stack, and need devs on the platform to know it first
>>
Phineas Sennerten - Fri, 28 Jan 2022 08:13:07 EST c/9ztFcw No.40131 Reply
>>40126
Do you know which company you want to infiltrate yet one algorithms.html is finished?
>>
Hugh Dabbleson - Wed, 02 Feb 2022 19:24:46 EST RTMuLrHX No.40133 Reply
>>39739
OP, with the recent AlphaCode development along with OpenAi's codex, we seem to be witnessing a surge in transformer based AI programming. If we assume a linear growth which itself is a conservative estimate, these coding AI systems could dominate the market within the coming 5-10 years. What do you think this will do to the market in terms of the leverage a single programmer can have at the moment?
>>
Hugh Dabbleson - Wed, 02 Feb 2022 19:36:11 EST RTMuLrHX No.40134 Reply
>>39739
>>40133
Samefagging because I forgot to ask, how do I learn entrepreneurship OP? I feel like I need to start creating value independent of working for some company.
>>
Nathaniel Gonnerbidging - Thu, 03 Feb 2022 07:12:13 EST aXPThXcC No.40135 Reply
>>40133 (not op)
You’d get more specialized work done and work on cooler shit. The AI handles the boilerplate for you. In the end it’ll all turn into math. You mathematically model the problem and the AI implements the solution for you. I’m an alphacode maximalist.
>>
Neil Old - Fri, 04 Feb 2022 00:40:27 EST AcNaJXoj No.40136 Reply
>>40127
Op, how did reading "Purely functional data structures" by Chris Osakai help you?
>>
Bittah Assassin - Sat, 05 Feb 2022 07:11:27 EST TVz0LrGl No.40137 Reply
is anyone seeding COMP212? looking to get the labs/hw
>>
Esther Simblespear - Wed, 09 Feb 2022 13:30:15 EST M8jJl2p/ No.40145 Reply
>>40108
I really respect you even more now . thanks on behalf of every freedom seeker and his childs. what a great man you are.
>>
Esther Simblespear - Wed, 09 Feb 2022 13:30:15 EST M8jJl2p/ No.40146 Reply
>>40108
I really respect you even more now . thanks on behalf of every freedom seeker and his childs. what a great man you are.
>>
Priscilla Pabberson - Wed, 09 Feb 2022 19:50:11 EST x6K3CZQk No.40147 Reply
>>39739
Meme curriculum lives on
I took like 2 months off from turbo covid basically was too tired to think straight or move, so I literally just did rehab fitness the entire time so I could function.

>>40137
Yeah one of my torrent boxes just randomly cancelled me but here's the torrent file https://ufile.io/zn1nw6pr with all the labs and hw
I also have all the 15-150 labs and hw somewhere on the github for functionalCS I think I have more and will upload

>>40136
I prefer this version: https://cs.uwaterloo.ca/~plragde/flaneries/FDS/index.html as the Osakai book uses some non-existent features of SML unless of course you implement it all in haskell. A lot of CS19 you are learning this too just he doesn't tell you.

>>40145
Thx yo, what I should do is condense everything to like 12 videos on YouTube where you finish making money

>>40134
>entrepreneur
This guy has good advice https://typicalprogrammer.com/how-to-work-with-freelance-developers for example my brief excursion recently to those awful freelancer sites, that's exactly what I did I requested clients send me 'deliverables' which I could then tick off. It worked well but I had to abandon it. I may even make my own freelancer site as they're all so awful and now we have stuff like mobilecoin (yes, i realize it's a premine) which allows effortless escrow. Peter Thiel's stanford lecture is still the best advice: https://youtu.be/3Fx5Q8xGU8k he gives you everything all at once. Just be good at one specific thing and monopolize that small market

>>40131
Whatever global tech corp (since anons live everywhere) will hire with no experience, because I fully plan on applying with zero exp except a github skeleton with some very minor programs, and of course competitive programming skills to destroy their weak hackerrank and codility challenges. This means Amazon, Planatir, 'Meta', Salesforce, the usual gigantic corps that hire anyone. I actually figured out Zuck's Meta plans, the VR part is just a minor sideshow, think Steam community market for some game item and there's a dozen different offers. Imagine anything for sale, type in the product code and instantly you get local sellers for it or international. He wants to be THE internet, so like tiktok and everything else is encased within 'Meta' so you just log into that and it's some kind of parallel internet which he already fully monopolizes in most of Africa and some parts of Asia where you can only buy 'facebook access' from telecoms like whatsapp etc. 'Meta' is hiring an absolute ridiculous amount of people right now as he takes it all over, you can tell by all the negative articles written about it who don't get what he's really doing. it's his competition dropping that blackPR to corrupt journos like how paul graham used to write how they work.

Once in there I apply to Jane Street in Hong Kong after 6 months and see what happens but JS is the world's hardest interview, and you don't want to do it in OCaml they will catch you on little grenades that exist. The language they least understand the better. I'm also doing the Cytaka app to get into the monthly competition for the haxxx workshop, it's hilarious so far. None of this is hard, just a learned skill you pick up over a long time repeatedly doing it over and over until it's second nature. Anyone can do it I'm convinced.
>>
Hugh Findersock - Fri, 11 Feb 2022 15:03:20 EST qotx5/Tw No.40148 Reply
I hate wageslaving, but i imagine serious freelancing (not just wordpress sites) must be more difficult, as you do everything - front design, software architecture, marketing, system administration and deploying, you need to know everything down to current laws/taxes you dont get fucked.
>>
Nathaniel Sissleset - Sun, 27 Feb 2022 08:09:58 EST qotx5/Tw No.40151 Reply
OP do you know anything about bioinformatics? Is it good and interesting niche for someone that know lot about programming and is interested in AI too, but does not know shit about biology?
>>
Edward Hessleham - Sun, 27 Feb 2022 15:58:13 EST zjJu1du5 No.40152 Reply
>>39739
Anybody with tinnitus going thru this? I have to admit it severely hinders my ability to focus, but fuck it. It's just another stone along this long path
>>
Fanny Dammertutch - Mon, 28 Feb 2022 14:01:34 EST idp+hDNG No.40153 Reply
>>40152
Yes, but could confirm that L-theanine and healthy lifestyle in general could increase your ability to ignore it.

Also is OP kinda dead? He didn't update his site much and also don't post for more then month.
Also hope you can relocate your gf soon because situation in Russia is worse then in 90s right now.
>>
Walter Dronninglock - Tue, 01 Mar 2022 08:39:02 EST 71wdAp2j No.40155 Reply
Wonder if OP has any input about Ukraine, the turkish drones seems to be working atleast.
>>
Nigel Chottinghall - Tue, 01 Mar 2022 11:23:17 EST RTMuLrHX No.40156 Reply
>>40155
Now seems like the perfect time to get OPs input on cybersec. Are the certifications valid? If so what is the cert pathway.

The way I see it, you need to have some networking knowhow to get into cybersec. So, CCNA followed by Net+ and Sec+, then you can go ahead with CEH or pentest+ or whatever.

OP how does one go ahead in cybersec?
>>
David Fabbleson - Mon, 07 Mar 2022 14:14:59 EST LtG7Sdt9 No.40157 Reply
>>40156
Not OP. I don't know how employable those Cisco/CompTIA certs are but any cert backed by a multiple choice test is 100% garbage. Train for the OSCP if you want that kind of job.
>>
Fucking Dridgegold - Tue, 08 Mar 2022 01:13:58 EST x6K3CZQk No.40158 Reply
>>39739
New page, making money https://learnaifromscratch.github.io/money.html
Since there are dudes i know in nowheresville Slavland that are now cancelled globally for things out of their control, I try to make them money or at least enough so you can finish the whole meme curriculum comfortably and not have to worry what you're going to eat that day because that was me too a decade ago. I chose Elixir because then we can do the OCaml book from Cornell, and just read papers about Elixir how their type system works and figure out the language faster than any of the shitty elixir docs.

I put all random calc/linear algebra workshops into the machine learning workshop thinghy to make it self-contained. I expanded the math workshop to do Andreescu's linear algebra and real analysis books. I slacked on everything else because of the usual insane shit we all have to deal with that's going on, but now it's time to just turn it all off and finish.

>>40156
Those certs seem to only matter for management, so my advice would be the same as tptacek's advice: https://krebsonsecurity.com/2012/06/how-to-break-into-security-ptacek-edition/ find some shitty dev job somewhere doing CRUD work, break out the book 'Grey Hat Python' and make your own toolsuite, start breaking inhouse software, make them promote you. At that point you will need all the certs but they will pay for you to get them. Otherwise anon you want to live dangerously try the Cytaka app on google store, you get top 10 each month they fly you to some ultra shady country to compete for fame and glory, and likely a spying contract. https://youtu.be/zCjFz2RvINM I've been playing around with it it's all Python and anyone who's done the meme curriculum can do it, but the live events I have no idea obv you have to be a good hacker. Eventually theabsolutestateofsoftware.html will do that whole app and cornell's security course

>>40155
I'm surprised the autonomous drones haven't been used yet, just like Syria was a testing ground for all kinds of new weapons I'm surprised Ukraine isn't the testing ground for autonomous drones unless Russ/Turkey is already doing this there who knows. I hope not because when I worked on those things it was truly terrifying they are just programmed for mass casualties.

>>40153
Yes serious problems for obv reasons
I came up with a trick though to fly her to the Czech Republic even though exiting Rus is next to impossible
I would have flown her here by my country is run by peak clowns and it is what it is. I still can't leave either for clown reasons.
One day
She's already working there anyway she can sing classical music in addition to being a teacher, like most Roossians they have these insane talents on the side nobody else would have, and some czech DJ hired her similar to this https://youtu.be/IF3O-VjIZ0k

>>40152
I read an interview from the lead singer of Husker Du https://youtu.be/Lm9uquPK1SQ who said he had to sleep with the TV on full blast in order to block out the tinnitus. I try and reduce lectures because I'd rather have them just to look up something I don't get in the books/material, because they should be able to explain what's going on otherwise I prefer reading because it's much faster. You'd be surprised how many lectures I deleted because they were just shit reciting the book word for word. How did you get tinnitus I was in the woods drunk, at an illegal concert, shooting at tannerite targets a very long time ago and I went to go fix one of them that didn't go off and a guy shot it while I was standing right there blowing out my ears for about a week of tinnitus ringing but I was fine after that how i have no idea. I also work with a lot of deaf or otherwise 'crippled' people so I'm kind of a fan of the most basic UIX possible which is why all my shit in text, you can run it through a translator without problems, you can make the font huge, it's also written so it can talk to you if you're a blind programmer because I read Prof K's paper about the Indian blind developer he teaches who somehow codes at an insane 120WPM. So most of the software I make conforms to disability test suites and in reality if you conform to them then you automatically have better software unlike that react trash that is everywhere which stalls out your phone, only loads a single page at a time, and it has no history or way to translate or increase the font. FUUUu

This is also why I think my site is so popular, because it's plain textso search engines move it to the front. Nothing is plain text anymore. Remember this when we do the software workshop

>>40151
Anon that Prof from MIT 'Manolis Kellis ' has opened all his courses I've posted them a few times https://www.youtube.com/c/ManolisKellis1/playlists he has specific computational biology playlists https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLypiXJdtIca6U5uQOCHjP9Op3gpa177fK but notice it's all the same what we are doing. A lot of these lectures are similar to machine learning http://stellar.mit.edu/S/course/6/fa21/6.047/ or the algorithms.html workshop for dynamic programming just you're working on different data.

>>40148
yes, and we are doing exactly this whole stack of everything here: https://learnaifromscratch.github.io/money.html for sure it's hard, esp when you need designs for every type of screen but you'll see there's tricks we can do and design frameworks that now exist where it's not as tedious, plus we can sell generic software and write it so a real professional designer can be hired to redesign, kind of like a template you sell a generic pattern of computation to somebody who wants an AirBnB website for their properties and somebody who run a nail salon and needs to take bookings, it's the same thing.
>>
Fucking Dridgegold - Tue, 08 Mar 2022 01:25:39 EST x6K3CZQk No.40159 Reply
>>40151
oopps the specific comp bio playlist is here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLypiXJdtIca6GBQwDTo4bIEDV8F4RcAgt

of course it's like any other subject where you apply computation, you dive deep into the prereqs as you go to understand what he's talking about when manipulating DNA data but you don't have to be a doctor or have any kind of bio degree. I screw around in bioinformatics all the time it's ripe for getting a job, getting paid, and disruption because most of the people involved aren't computer scientists they're doctors but reminder this is just data.
>>
Jack Fuckleworth - Tue, 08 Mar 2022 02:14:27 EST fXQjFEc7 No.40160 Reply
>>40158
Glad you are ok OP, thought they got to you. Hope your problems work out and looking forward to the money workshop.
>>
Hugh Grimman - Tue, 08 Mar 2022 03:20:54 EST 26vNmCWt No.40161 Reply
>>40158
>>New page, making money https://learnaifromscratch.github.io/money.html
But there's actually nothing about making money. The biggest problem is not how to build something but how to find what kind of product might make money, how to attract audience, how to choose pricing, etc. Considering that even shittiest, ugliest and slowest electron 'apps' are being used by people - how to build stuff is not that interesting, how to choose/market/sell stuff is.
>>
Hugh Grimman - Tue, 08 Mar 2022 03:24:09 EST 26vNmCWt No.40162 Reply
>>40158
>>New page, making money https://learnaifromscratch.github.io/money.html

But there's actually nothing about making money. The biggest problem is not how to build something but how to find what kind of product might make money, how to attract audience, how to choose pricing, etc. Considering that even shittiest, ugliest and slowest electron 'apps' are being used by people - how to build stuff is not that interesting, how to choose/market/sell stuff is.
>>
Basil Claybury - Tue, 08 Mar 2022 06:41:59 EST y0K8i2cZ No.40163 Reply
>>40161
If you learn how to make a basic CRUD web app with React it's pretty easy to find a job
But since OP choose Elixir/Phoenix I'm not sure how he plans to leverage that into making money
I was looking at Elixir jobs and there's only like 20 of them and most of them require years of experience and/or experience with Ruby/Rails
>>
Walter Sopperstone - Tue, 08 Mar 2022 21:28:06 EST X2w66mlt No.40164 Reply
>>40163
elixir/phoenix pay more than MERN stack and companies using it are much more flexible in hiring with it despite whatever they say on their years of requirement section on the job ad. There's a meme coding bootcamp in my country (https://www.avionschool.com/) that's the only one that teaches ruby on rails while all the others teach MERN stack. It launched in around 2020 and it didn't get much traction from the public back then as all the other students wanted to learn MERN and there's also zero rails jobs in the country. Later after the first few batch of bootcamp graduates started getting jobs and writing reviews on facebook/linkedin, it started becoming popular, became harder to get in, and is suddenly now the elite bootcamp in the country. Apparently their graduates are all landing remote rails and phoenix jobs at top startups like mostly YC (pretty big deal coming from a 3rd world country where there's no FAANG companies here) and their graduates are getting offers that pay 3-6x more than the average pay.
>>
Eugene Pebberstune - Wed, 09 Mar 2022 08:19:42 EST 71wdAp2j No.40165 Reply
Should I do 'II Foundations' part in dcic before watching the cs019 lectures?
The lectures don't seem to follow the structure of the book.
>>
Hugh Shittinggold - Wed, 09 Mar 2022 11:07:33 EST u387a6Om No.40166 Reply
>>40158
OP, will you please first finish the CS19 part of the workshop? many people have pending questions about that.

>>40165
Yes I think so.
>>
Henry Hangerbitch - Wed, 09 Mar 2022 23:34:34 EST x6K3CZQk No.40167 Reply
>>40166
Ask me any question
Tomorrow I'll start the map reduce assignment and finish the whole course eventually, I committed to daily commits on one of the workshops, the tweesearch III problem is meant to be done end of semester after we learn graphs well at least prof k organized that way in prev semesters so I'll move it there but you can figure it out.
CS19 is still the best cs intro course I've found, but getting harder to use because all the materials disappearing
I'm also doing Cornell's Ocaml course in the 'money' workshop because all of it relates to Elixir, the plan is learn how to read statics/dynamics in their notation then just get google scholar papers on Elixir's type system, I'm skipping a ton of documentation and just using papers.

I want to do Favonia's cubical type theory course which is all open on youtube and Robert Harper's book too, plus cornell's hacking course but I will prob mix in some of 'Cytaka' that super shady competition app for fun and profit because I've been doing it in my spare time.
Cryptography too, it's all post-quantum crypto so totally different and imho easier than 'regular' crypto.
Everything else I mixed into the AI workshop and math.html like linear algebra and calculus. Those Ruskie books by Skopenkov are still the greatest possible math books you could ever read, sadly I don't know if his Combinatorics book will come out because of current bullshit but that's why I shoved Poh Shen Loh's course in there anyway.

>>40165
Just follow PAPL I like parts of DCIC but not sure what they're doing with it, it's missing 60% of the content of PAPL, alas it may disappear though I have it archived

>>40164
'money.html' is not about getting a job, it's the exact same thing I used to do to make money online by writing software. 'algorithms.html' is about getting a job. Phoenix framework is this insane real-time abstraction where you can write anything you can imagine and it all runs, for free, on fly.io with 160GB xfer per month outgoing and free postgres instance. We set up absolutely nothing and just write the app and deploy and this is the game, everybody else is selling some shitty app but you need hosting, we are making turn-key apps where it's all done for you. That's the difference. For example I'm going to make an AirBnB style private site for bookings then extract all the generic parts of the booking out, now we can sell cleaning company software, tattoo artist software, salons, anybody who needs a booking. The key anons is making it work with everything, find out what people use (quickbooks, excel, iCal) and make your software target that and they will buy, or at least they did when I used to do this, I'll find out. We are offering paid once, never again software, no monthly contracts, and full ownership of all code and hosting for whoever pays us. Of course some sites won't run on fly.io that you can think of, but this too is possible to deploy on a basic open/freebsd box which requires very little maintenance, I already run them for my China apps that are going strong.

I also only chose Elixir because it's easy to do magic but fly.io supports anything even PHP frameworks apparently, speaking of they are hiring for people to port laravel to fly.io Kirtaner should apply https://fly.io/blog/fly-io-is-hiring-laravel-specialists/

For AirBnB example anybody renting out their place has their property on like 5 different booking sites, and they're all controlled by 'channel managers' which we can easily write an API for, then those channel managers will just add us as a feature. Now you have software officially shilled by other software, there's a scheme I've worked out I'm not just winging it 100% only 70%. Nobody else anywhere provides an API or the features we'll do. We can even go on google playstore and make an app to set it all up automatically, just like I did my Chinese phone market apps.

That is one example too, I plan on redoing all software that I absolutely hate. I want to make generic review software, generic restaurant software, generic ecommerce, and have special cases for each one to showcase, like weed dispensary software in countries where it is legal is pure fucking trash. Absolute stoners making that shit, reminder we are the sharks in their game coming in to scoop up all the fish and eat their lunch. Have you gone to your local corner store and have seen the feeble software they're using for POS? Why is it like this? I walk downstairs and ask the corner store owner what exactly do you need, and make it work by default and undercut competitors in half because it's just me, no team. The software doesn't break either because we know how to write software and prove it works (well, if you took CS3110/15-150/COMP 212) and we will take cs3110. That's the plan anyway, extend this kind of software pitching to Phoenix framework where anything is possible. I won't do this but some anon should, look at dealdash website. Replace everything with weed. Launch it in some legalized area or if you're bulletproof launch it in Europe, make it EU shipping only. Allow people selling to come up with their own payment methods, don't get invovled, you make money when punters buy 'bidding packs' and pay into you with cryptojunk of choice. This is what anons should try the EU market is ripe and if you don't live there, who gives a fuck. They won't extradite you. Make the bids transferrable, make a subsection where people sell bids for any kind of credit card and 3rd party it all out. Why is there no clone site in Canada or clone auction site? it's legalized there. Anybody, anywhere can do this. You don't have to live there. Canada is filled with mushroom delivery sites too all which are total shit. Redo them and directly contact them how your software is superior. Canada is not going to extradite you from say, Indonesia. Just do what you need to do, I guess that is my advice though for foolish moral reasons I'm no longer involved in that but I'm also not starving, some anons are.

>>40160
They killed both my torrent sites, which is kind of amazing I specifically chose two certain seedboxes that were heavily shilled as resisting takedowns but alas. I'll put them back up eventually. The latest killed one had heavy Ruskie traffic, that could be it too. It's crazy right now.
>>
Cedric Bennerlock - Thu, 10 Mar 2022 05:21:01 EST Ms3Q7XCQ No.40168 Reply
>>40167
That sounds cool but I think most people just want to find a comfy remote job, not to run their own business
>>
William Gillytick - Thu, 10 Mar 2022 08:29:12 EST u387a6Om No.40169 Reply
>>40167
For starters can you make a table with columns of lecture, readings, lab, assignments, etc with the CS19 course. Because you write in a linear fashion things get lost with scrolling.
Moreover someone else may want to finish the entire course first (and has the motivation to do it) before doing the other workshops. Since they are beginners and the material is covered all over and Prof K doesn't maintain any such table it would be of great help. Just like other public course websites are arranged.
The discord server: people are confused which chapter to read first; what lab goes with which lecture, etc. That kind of thing.
>>
Jarvis Shakewell - Thu, 10 Mar 2022 09:34:00 EST 71wdAp2j No.40170 Reply
>>40169
I concur with the 'what lab goes with which lecture' thing.
I'll probably just read the whole book then watch the videos and do the labs...
>>
Hugh Drazzlechick - Thu, 10 Mar 2022 16:38:29 EST fXQjFEc7 No.40171 Reply
>>40168
Most people want money, and to be able to work on cool stuff. You can take the less traveled road and use OPs method for that.
>>
Polly Bleblingham - Thu, 10 Mar 2022 22:17:42 EST VYvG6Atw No.40172 Reply
>>40167
OP, Do you have any suggestions or advice for learning AWS/Cloud Computing? I heard it's pretty in-demand atm and would be useful to know.
>>
Phyllis Nurringville - Thu, 10 Mar 2022 23:47:44 EST u387a6Om No.40173 Reply
>>40169
The thing is people don't ask much about other course contents because they are well organised on their websites. CS19 material is scattered all over. That is why people are confused.
>>
Ian Midgestock - Fri, 11 Mar 2022 17:26:08 EST x25HXj+H No.40174 Reply
I feel like I'm too brainlet for skopenkov's books and/or I don't cover the requirements for it.

t. turd worlder with poor HS background.
>>
Caroline Turveyfield - Sat, 12 Mar 2022 16:06:33 EST OAsPQwEz No.40175 Reply
>>40164
Is it because of that thing Yaron Minsky said where if you use obscure technologies you will get applicants who went out of their way to specifically learn those technologies instead of flavor of the month JS library #34
>>
Basil Tillingson - Tue, 15 Mar 2022 01:41:53 EST x6K3CZQk No.40176 Reply
>>40169
I myself am confused which chapter to read, because I don't have access to piazza where prof k hands this out, I assume the topics anons can figure out themselves like we're doing Tour Guide, which is Dijkstra's algorithm, you can find that in PAPL or just go off lectures. Tip the lectures cover everything in the book and subjects not in there like search algorithms. My plan is to go through the book at end of all the lectures anyway skimming every chapter and prove we know the material. I will do the same for ai.org too

>>40174
Anon almost nobody on earth has the background for those books
I don't get 90% of the Skopenkov problems either, esp the geometry book I get 0%, that's the point, they are meant to be very hard. Load them up in your head in the morning and just go about your business during the day with it in the back of your mind. When you have time think about the problem like over lunch, think about it wandering around buying food for dinner, waiting in line for something, this is what I do. It would be very nice if we had an 'easy' math curriculum where we just do some popular book and all the special cases and call it a day but that won't help you at all if you want to do Nature of Computation research or Type Theory or cryptography. If you don't care then just get a reg calculus book and practice that, they will give you easy pre formatted cherry picked problems to do that have nothing to do with reality because IRL optimization requires solving some nasty inequality, but I made my meme list to go beyond that: what do you as a regular person need to understand say, this graduate algorithms course? Well you need Skopenkov math and Prof Loh math, and it's actually a short cut, we avoid many, many boring courses just doing those resources instead of the trad university curriculum which is now cut off from us anyway. I will also mix in all the Wildberger lectures I've seen, like when we do Diophantine equations.

>>40172
I don't, because customizing their Ubuntu instances is trivial but the pricing structure of aws is totally insane and I've never tried to understand it, that's why i now shill fly.io because it's 0 cost. AWS has tons of paid credentials of course if you want or udacity courses, I'm not interested at all because it's just yet another technical thing to learn in a weekend. Just tpe it into youtube somebody will have a tutorial.

>>40170
The lectures cover 100% of the book and most most of the labs, do them whenever you feel like you can understand them. We only have access to the 2016 and 2017 labs anyway which haven't changed but the support code is all gone now. Prof K in the lectures actually tells you when the labs are due if you watch them, and the assignments for example we just did a lecture where he talks about queues lab, though we can't ourselves do it it's all in the book because the lab itself says 'this is based on PAPL chapter x'. We have to take what we can get, we're never going to get a full course esp now post pandemic all that shit is locked up tight. I chose CS019 because you can do it on a phone if you have to, prof K descripes these structures like nobody else, and you get just enough to be able to do anything else you want like much harder algorithms courses will all make sense now.

>>40168
Which is why I do both. I have a fire lit under me I did the entire graphs curriculum in 2 days for CS19 and now I will finish everything else the same, reminder if I can do it, and I'm a pleb, anybody can.
I'm fucking stuck here, because of bullshit, I can't leave, I have nothing else to do after I work so I'm going to try and marathon finish everything at once because what else am I going to do. I will smash every workshop I no longer care and have no respite from this federally mandated hell. Let's do this
>>
Augustus Hanningstudging - Tue, 15 Mar 2022 11:13:56 EST 9P8F3X9V No.40177 Reply
>>40176
Regarding your advice about Skopenkov, that's what I'm attempting to do, sometimes I just resort to "explaining" the exercise in plain english, well, spanish and maaybe look up what could be a proper mathy way to do it.

btw are you still stuck in HK or went back to the states? I hope you can leave, wherever you are.
>>
Walter Furringtack - Tue, 15 Mar 2022 12:47:22 EST XsPV0mM2 No.40178 Reply
>>40159
>>40158
thoughts on ROSALIND? Some are pretty easy but some excercises filter me hard, for example
https://rosalind.info/problems/mrna/
How to find all RNA string that could have create given protein? My idea how to solve it is probably expensive, also i dont really understand how this modulo description has anything to do with excercise
>>
Jack Bosslestedge - Wed, 16 Mar 2022 01:44:17 EST u387a6Om No.40179 Reply
>>40176
OP, if you didn't have CS19, what is the next best course you would have chosen for the workshop?
>>
Emma Nuffingfoot - Wed, 16 Mar 2022 17:03:18 EST 71wdAp2j No.40180 Reply
>>40179
not OP but HtDP is probably a close second.
SICP if you have some mathematical maturity.
>>
Ian Garrysun - Thu, 17 Mar 2022 00:41:20 EST u387a6Om No.40181 Reply
>>40180
I see HtDP getting trashed all over HackerNews for various reasons. I don't understand why there is so much hate against it. Why do you think HtDP is good?
>>
Hannah Fennernock - Thu, 17 Mar 2022 12:08:54 EST 71wdAp2j No.40182 Reply
I think most of the hate comes from it using a small student language based on Racket
which devs hate because it's not a language used in the industry.
What I like about HtDP is that just like PAPL or DCIC it teaches you to actually design programs.

A lot of java/c++ based courses are literally just syntax + some common algorithms.
Ask someone who just completed a java or c++ course to design something nontrivial
and they would probably freak out.

HtDP with its design recipes kinda sidesteps that issue.
>>
Clara Chullyban - Fri, 18 Mar 2022 13:56:36 EST +tlRDPiz No.40183 Reply
>>40158
>How did you get tinnitus
Randomly woke up with it one day, still have perfect hearing. Very odd.

For now I'm going thru The Odin Project to get a job and be independant asap, once that is figure out I'll pour everything on what I actually want to learn - Computer Science properly. That seems like the plan.

Good luck with everything OP.
>>
Thomas Goodstone - Sat, 19 Mar 2022 19:52:59 EST x6K3CZQk No.40184 Reply
>>40177
That's all you have to do anon, explain it to yourself like you're teaching a class. We're doing the hardest math possible no matter what anybody says, and this is the math they assume you have when you later do difficult things like Robert Harper's book that's why I included it. Or calculus, or any university math, they kind of expect this background and I think any anon, anywhere can learn it too just stick with it. Esp if you can program you can understand this.

I left HK FOOLISHLY which meant my g/f, who is from the Caucuses of Russia and me had to separate and I went to my shit country and she went back to hers. Of course, she is free to move around anywhere but I can't, which is hilarious though I live in a 'free western country' (not the US, though I have claim to US citizenship.. a longer story). So when the bullshit happened in Ukraine I helped her move to the Czech republic which she is teaching kids right now, I don't want to say entirely what province she is originally from but this should give some idea: https://youtu.be/yiI026r2snk that will be me soon

anyway who cares about me, the meme curriculum is about you

>>40178
Sure check stackexchange all the answers are on there for any rosalind questions https://github.com/mtarbit/Rosalind-Problems
All of this will come up in the Skopenkov book too

>>40179
I like CS19 because Prof K is very good at explaining difficult topics
otherwise since it's being removed from all history right now and hard to do cs19, cs3110 is probably the next best thing, or even Dan Licata's course if it still remains open

>>40181
they hate HtDP because they all learned from anecdotes, for example a lot of people learned from K&R how to program, so they think hey this is all you need. Then some random anon comes along and tries it and fails. Meanwhile, Prof K has done empirical studies how students learn, and claims this is how it's done for the greatest amount of people. It doesn't mean you're stupid if you can't just magically figure out from K&R how everything works or SICP, it just means the the teaching is not tested across a thousand students like Prof K has done. So that's why I shill Prof K because he has actually done the work to see what students do and don't learn. Every other compsci curriculum is just a bunch of anecdotes
That said CS19 is not easy at all, it's hard as fuck, but the point is that it will still be hard as fuck if you had not done CS19 and just jumped into some algorithms text

>>40182
That too.
I also picked CS19 because it is the only course you can do on a phone. You can just load up code.pyret.org and start coding on your cheap android phone and literally nobody in the 3rd world has access to laptops to install whatever language and editors and shit, I think many people forget this. The meme curriculum is designed... for a phone. Because I went everywhere on earth and saw that NOBODY HAS A LAPTOP... they have a phone though. Can you learn what I know from a simple phone and is there a course that teaches this? YES

Also I used to do these courses on my own phone during lunch breaks working other jobs, and imagined other anons doing the same. Tell me any course you can do this on a phone like programming a priority queue for Dijkstra's algorithm, absolutely nowhere.

>>40183
I've done Odin project myself
Try the money.html curriculum instead
technically we're still doing Ruby, only with Elixir
and it's about selling software which I don't think anyone else does anywhere

we'll see how it works but you will learn the same as Odin project just not for a specific framework, we learn for all frameworks but w/e, if you like it continue
It became an emergency for me to do money.html because I know of a few thousand people doing the meme curriculum from a certain country who are now all out of work permanently for something they have no control over
>>
Reuben Crettingken - Sat, 19 Mar 2022 20:23:56 EST x6K3CZQk No.40185 Reply
>>40184
also I shouldn't talk about this but
my g/f is cherkess but her father is from grozny
so that's where our wedding is
I have already paid my entire HK salary because I lived off 'other money' (remember, phone reprogramming) and never touched my HK money so i have paid for over 300 guests, the equivalent of a year's salary there to attend because I don't care about the money
This has attracted a famous person from that region I cannot mention here who doubled the money, because apparently nobody else has done this, it was a flippant thing I did I was like well I have this money I can't touch from HK for tax reasons so I'll just give it away because I always do this.
I'm in way over my head, it's going to be an insane event with gunfire galore, the leader of the city there and my family prob will have a heart attack but it's all good. It would be nice if I could actually leave my country but I can't anyway that's the source of my constant shitposting I'm trapped here STILL because of silly covid rules.
In the meantime forget about me let's learn some CS and make money no bump pretend this post doesn't exist I shouldn't write this in current political climate but it happened way before all the shit happened
>>
Charles Breckleson - Sun, 20 Mar 2022 01:22:00 EST fXQjFEc7 No.40186 Reply
>>40185
GL OP hope you have a nice wedding and even better life after
>>
Doris Pallystock - Sun, 20 Mar 2022 11:18:57 EST 89pFA5FQ No.40187 Reply
>>40184
Thanks OP, I'll make it. And I'll be sure to giveback.
>>
Fucking Bunstone - Sun, 20 Mar 2022 11:25:19 EST gEJdgYod No.40188 Reply
1647789919109.jpg -(563763B / 550.55KB, 1920x1080) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
OP, you have done a wonderful job working through the CS curriculum and giving out high-quality resources on it. But, in my opinion, Wildberger is a giant meme and you should properly learn mathematics by visiting here: https://theportal.wiki/wiki/Read
and going through their discord server.
>>
Nell Hobblewater - Sun, 20 Mar 2022 13:36:33 EST 9P8F3X9V No.40189 Reply
>>40185
Good luck and thanks for everything, OP. Even if the world is going to shit doesn't mean you don't deserve a bit of happiness, enjoy it. btw I remember a friend from CA that flew to CDMX with no issues whatsoever. Maybe that's doable? But anyways I don't want to force you to talk about your life. As I said, all the best.

>>40188
I think I've seen this in some /sci/ server, is that correct? Interesting
>>
Angus Nisslechetch - Sun, 20 Mar 2022 16:13:05 EST CdGug88s No.40190 Reply
>>40188
Not that you're wrong about Wildberger but I can't take someone who posts these book charts serious
>>
Cedric Bardgold - Mon, 21 Mar 2022 12:12:38 EST pc3XYMG2 No.40191 Reply
>>40188
That website is almost as gross as that infographic. Whoever made that monstrosity should be put to death.
>>
Beatrice Billingham - Mon, 21 Mar 2022 13:11:43 EST n1dH0S4p No.40192 Reply
>>40191
Secular Humanists and the Morally Minded must out an end to maleducation in mathematics. By any means necessary.
This is a scientific crrtainty. No curriculum but the meme curriculum.
@OP can we use drones against people with bad math recommendations?
>>
Phyllis Blollynack - Mon, 21 Mar 2022 15:24:03 EST 9P8F3X9V No.40193 Reply
>>40191
It's a guy from that >math is /sci/ server, the name was ker, he seems to be really invested in this Eric Weinstein podcast and research. Regarding the list, I think lang, apostol, and shilov books are alright, can't say much about the others

sage
>>
Charles Debbergold - Wed, 23 Mar 2022 00:40:43 EST x6K3CZQk No.40194 Reply
>>40188
I like Wildberger because he takes math and models all of it in the rational system. There's no reason you can't do this, the models are easy to work with too and in the end do the same thing. I use his trig models all the time as softare libraries. Wildberger I consider one of those research options for a curriculum, he always drops something crazy on the audience like what if the continuum was the rational number line, could you still work with it? Try it.
>>40186
>>40187
Thank u guis, also the meme money curriculum is actually done, I just watched the last data abstract design lecture and honestly that's all you need. Pick your own technical implementation, I will go with Elixir/OCaml and work through those but anything else will work too like node or whatever just I won't cover that because dependencies are a nightmare, I like stuff a single developer can do and not have to rely on a team of assistants.
>>40193
Eh Shilov is fine but I think I found the real curriculum to teach the absolute insane 'abstraction' that is linear algebra. It's really, really abstract like when you get to abstract algebra you're like wait, there's just this notion of algebra and it works for several dimensions? Addition and subtraction rules just work abstractly, because these objects don't SEEM to divide/substract or add/mutliply but they do. It's very, very weird that's why I picked an unusually hard (at first!) curriculum which is only hard because you haven't seen it before, once you've seen it you get it.

And I will get into JS Hong Kong
I'm going to change algorithms.html to do some OCaml algorithms because I got some sweet intel that nobody there knows OCaml who applies which reminds me of when I hired people in HK and just taught them what I knew, but anyway I'm going to try that and see what happens.... because everything changed they now hire anybody, this war and pandemic has fucked up everything. You can get into there no problem now.

See you in hong kong anons we're going cruise control none of this is hard, just a learned skill you work at, we're going to SEVVA bar balcony that overlooks the whole city. Good luck
>>
Hannah Sagglesut - Wed, 23 Mar 2022 14:14:05 EST XsPV0mM2 No.40195 Reply
why not use Wordpress if you just need to make money quickly?
>>
Henry Fizzledale - Wed, 23 Mar 2022 14:44:53 EST LqACjpLn No.40196 Reply
>>40194
if the money curriculm in done, what are your next plans? Do you plan to detail the entrepeneurial process? Focus on employment? Another iteration of the curriculmn consisting only of plaintext and problem sets?
>>
Eliza Buvingsit - Wed, 23 Mar 2022 19:37:58 EST gO7cRqNe No.40197 Reply
>>40194
Intel collecting is a nice skill. You turn into the all seeing eye of God knowing everything.
>>40196
He could make his own lectures. If I was him I would hire voice actors for privacy reasons. Voice recognition ai is getting scary nowadays.
>>
Charles Cronningmatch - Mon, 04 Apr 2022 21:30:48 EST OLnL89qm No.40198 Reply
OP I remember you shilling Guix or Nix some time ago. Do you still shill it now that you have more web dev experience?
>>
Eliza Honeyhood - Thu, 07 Apr 2022 09:11:47 EST Gj9i1oEH No.40199 Reply
op, what important lessons did you learn while working for those Phds at the lab?

I always wonder how such guys can chomp through textbooks in record time.

PS: Congratulations on getting married!!
>>
Clara Hucklehatch - Sun, 10 Apr 2022 14:31:53 EST ElZlewjk No.40201 Reply
Hey OP I know you're using Elixir in your workshop for selling software but do you recommend learning Elixir for a regular job to avoid the JS cancer?
I'm looking online and there really aren't many Elixir jobs and most of them want someone with prior Elixir or Rails experience.
I already know React even though I hate it so it would probably only take me a few months to get decent at Elixir/Phoenix.
Basically my question to you is how hard do you think it is to get an Elixir/Phoenix job?
>>
Emma Billingman - Sun, 10 Apr 2022 19:10:19 EST uVmDxa1u No.40202 Reply
>>40201 my cousin uses Elixir for his job as a climate scientist modelling thunder storms and the associated risks for an insurance company.
He maintains a web dashboard with thunderstorm casualty estimates for the actuaries to monitors. Took him around 4 months to learn elixir. You can learn it fast too
>>
Priscilla Mammlelock - Mon, 11 Apr 2022 10:07:34 EST qbXQbvmM No.40203 Reply
OP do you think the competitive programming book 1 (chapters 1-4) is enough to be able to pass those annoying tech interviews? I got both books some time ago and looking at the second one it seems like it's way too in depth for some tech interview problem.
What do you think? Also how long do you think it would take to go through book 1? I'm aiming for around 3 months and want to know if that's realistic
>>
Graham Grandson - Wed, 13 Apr 2022 14:16:11 EST XsPV0mM2 No.40204 Reply
>>39739
Do you know how to make Google right now? I mean do you know how to make search engine from 0% to 100% just reading those books and watching those lectures?
>>
Molly Geblingtad - Fri, 15 Apr 2022 02:10:41 EST HkS+bQxe No.40207 Reply
>>40194
I don't particularly like programming and CS, but I had a knack for basic logic and mobile OS programming when I took college courses on it. I hate being poor more than I dislike everything about CS, so should I just bite the bullet and grind my way to Hong Kong?

I'd rather pound rusty nails into my dick, but miserable with money can't be worse than miserable and not able to make rent or pay for a hospital visit.
>>
Matilda Billingshaw - Fri, 15 Apr 2022 14:09:10 EST 4/LuAbqc No.40208 Reply
OP, are you still planning to do TAOCP workshop? I'm starting vol1 today.
>>
Where's Waldo? - Fri, 15 Apr 2022 23:45:56 EST eAo0R8Td No.40209 Reply
>>40194
OP, are you still alive? it's been about 3 weeks...
>>
Eugene Biblingwater - Sat, 16 Apr 2022 12:49:07 EST QR66jxPb No.40210 Reply
OP what was that security company that had a job posting saying if you could do some challenge (it might have been microcorruption or overthewire, can't remember) you should apply for the job? It's not NCC group. It was a startup I think. You linked it once previously but I couldn't find it in the other threads. Do you remember by any chance?
>>
Fanny Sullymack - Mon, 18 Apr 2022 15:06:22 EST VDG10sZv No.40211 Reply
>>40210
not OP, I think he's busy getting married and stuff, hope everything goes well for him.

If memory serves well, it was microcorruption, but that was written at least before the pandemic so maybe things are different now.
>>
Esther Dezzlechutch - Wed, 20 Apr 2022 18:42:20 EST +h7VX/ri No.40213 Reply
What web dev project should I do to put on my resume for getting a job?
>>
Jimmy Jones - Thu, 21 Apr 2022 08:46:42 EST qb4YteeD No.40214 Reply
>>40213
  1. https://github.com/gothinkster/realworld
  2. Something actually useful to yourself. It doesn't have to be huge. Just think of some app you use daily or some app you wish existed and make it. It will let you talk about that in interviews when they ask bullshit like "What's something you built that you're proud of?" and you tell them about your app that you actually use daily and that makes your life easier
>>
Wesley Drabberlock - Sat, 23 Apr 2022 04:44:26 EST eCQ6whKS No.40215 Reply
We need Pyret android app with exercises from cs19 included
>>
Nathaniel Pungerstare - Wed, 27 Apr 2022 13:33:24 EST tBVU18Xb No.40217 Reply
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Graph problems are a gold mine for points on kattis.
Once you get past your first problem in a category and add it to your library of algorithms you can do like 10+ similar problems with some copy paste and minor modifications.
Like if you know kruskal, ez 10+ MST problems 3.5-5.5 points each.
I did 4 strongly connected components problems today for a total of 22.6 pts using kosaraju's alg mostly copy paste, although i did take part of the hints on methodstosolve.
>>
Beatrice Goodstone - Fri, 29 Apr 2022 18:52:36 EST qYMjBQCn No.40218 Reply
>>40217
If this is OP
What are your next plans? Getting into Jane Street?
>>
Frederick Greenbury - Sat, 30 Apr 2022 15:41:39 EST tBVU18Xb No.40221 Reply
1651347699325.png -(303108B / 296.00KB, 500x375) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>40218
Not him. Worry about yourself instead.
>>
Basil Gurrychag - Sat, 30 Apr 2022 16:10:01 EST DJAeM1O8 No.40222 Reply
>>40221
Its him, or it might as well be lol. We are all OP, OP does not matter anymore
>>
Eugene Nunnergold - Sun, 01 May 2022 00:17:07 EST 9WLwAh+f No.40225 Reply
>>40194
Hey OP. I have tech interviews coming up in about 2 months. What would be a good backend framework to learn and build some projects out of in this short period of time? I know you recommend Elixir+Phoenix in money.html, but it seems sorta difficult to get started with. Is it possible to do these in 2 months, or should I pick up something like Node?
The only backend framework that I've worked with is Flask which is quite barebones. So I need something else. Thanks in advance.
>>
Sophie Siblingshaw - Sun, 01 May 2022 10:33:29 EST F3QfXHVE No.40227 Reply
OP is still alive. He updated his GitHub 5 days ago.
I have a question for OP, this is coming from a lowly third-worlder (the Philippines). As a fresh graduate, is it possible to get remote work from international companies? Something something Elixir/Phoenix Framework jobs and the drone job that you mentioned one time.
>>
Phyllis Clullercocke - Mon, 02 May 2022 01:14:22 EST 9WLwAh+f No.40228 Reply
>>40226
I was thinking of doing the MERN course from fullstackopen
>>40227
Would like to know about this too. Afaik Shopify hires remotely regardless of your location or citizenship.
>>
Polly Shittingbanks - Sun, 08 May 2022 21:52:25 EST brEuwMe5 No.40231 Reply
>>39739 What was that hedge fund job in Hong Kong like? Do you have any cool stories?
>>
Phoebe Wovingchitch - Mon, 09 May 2022 16:42:32 EST RTMuLrHX No.40233 Reply
>>40231
I don't think OP will be posting here anymore, I could be wrong. Joing the discord he posts there now
>>
Phoebe Wovingchitch - Mon, 09 May 2022 16:42:32 EST RTMuLrHX No.40234 Reply
>>40231
I don't think OP will be posting here anymore, I could be wrong. Joing the discord he posts there now
>>
Simon Fisslehat - Sun, 15 May 2022 05:05:45 EST x6K3CZQk No.40235 Reply
>>40216
I would like to do Wildberger's radical geometric linear algebra course, it can all done in a programming lang as you do it (of your choice).
In fact I've done almost all of his vids and they're excellent, I've 'patched' the real numbers and proved it all in cubical type theory. I honestly dislike the real numbers though I understand why they exist (a convenient abstraction) and I dislike the fundamental theory of algebra iand many other wildberger topics but I don't inflict this on anons however I was able to use his meme trig to write entire librarires, There is an entertaining videohttps://youtu.be/Nu-YPJSNFpE here where he just makes the rational number line the continuum and nobody else is doing work like this, anywhere. You can disagree or agree but say 'modeling' the continuum is dead simple, his linalg is dead simple, his calculus his dead simple and these things I can make into a proper programming library and oddly nobody knows about it, so I can take derivatives all day long in rational elementary school mathematics or integrals using his polynumber abstraction, and it 'just works'. Of course if I inject this into the meme curriculum everyone will flee so I don't talk about it, but try it sometime, the polynumbers abstraction is just addition complexity anybody can write this and do derivatives. The trig has applications to stats, we can edo 'rational stats'. But alas that is my personal interest I won't inflict it on anons
My goal is to get anons to follow me into very famous outfits like JS and that's what I'm doing, because I don't think it matters your background and ppl with our background are chasing other things right now. They want the hat and hanging out with the campus in SF they don't want to manpulate markets.
See you there anons
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Cedric Nattingshit - Mon, 16 May 2022 00:15:23 EST 9WLwAh+f No.40236 Reply
>>40235
Thank God OP you are back. Do you have any advice for me here >40225 ?
One other thing, don't elite firms like Jane Street filter out candidates if they are not from a prestigious school?
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Fanny Greenstock - Fri, 20 May 2022 06:04:05 EST x6K3CZQk No.40239 Reply
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>>40236
>>40236
After interviewing in over 20+ firms I think anybody can get into JS
Of course the hard part is getting them to notice you but you'd be surprised how bad it is right now to find 'qualified programmers' they even have troubles recruiting on campus because bigtech screwed them if you read their recruiter blogs like I do

I never used to do this but interviewing is the easiest thing I've ever done, it's just CS19 or the beginner algorithms.html like a famous place asked me last week how to write fibonacci with recursion, I literally have done this for months in the meme curriculum I banged it out in seconds it's also a SICP exercise (and TAOCP exercise) and also Robert Harper old 15-150 course taught this. I was hired immediately I now have 4 F/T jobs. I get up at 4am and I write programs for an AI platform, at 8:30 I do working class union work, at 3pm I'm done and then have 2 hours to make food and do some cringe workouts I updated getinshape.html with, then I start job #3 and they have me doing nothing right now so I'm just bug fixing shit on my own accord in github, 6pm rolls around and I have to start my 4th job I just got and so far it's all meetings too I do nothing, 8pm rolls around I talk to my g/f and then I do meme exercises as outlined in getinshape.html and then I shower and update the meme curriculum as long as I an until tired then sleep.

Anybody can do it, I never thought I could but now I'm realzing how easy it is. I will update algorithms.html with this and even ai.html because now in my 4th job I'm the 'ai expert' because I took that waterloo course! wtf. I need to update that workshop

Anyway anons, it's easier than you think esp if you did CS19, if you did that course you're already better than 70% of other applicants just you don't know. Maybe even more, like who knows property-based testing? Nobody, I smoked my 4th interview with that just imitating Prof K walking through examples and talking about the problem which was typical CS19 trees and nothing more difficult.

I know JS is much more difficult and certain other M(F)AANG companies that's why I meme competitive programming because when they see you dunk stuff like tkhat on cruise control it's shocking to them, you may think it's a joke but nobody else has these skills, anywhere. Nobody. True the people that are there will make you feel like an imposter but you should expect that from an 'elite' firm whereas everyone I've met so far at work in my now 3 tech jobs including m(f)aang knows half what YOU know if you've done CS19. I'm not exaggerating at all I was shocked when I got in I was thinking surely, I'm an imposter. Nope. Guy with Msc as my mgr asking me to explain my code because nobody understands my basic recursion algorithms I learned from Robert Harper and Prof Ragde. I will have his job and hire you anons some day, directly, that's actually my plan.

Anyway this is EASIER than I thought, of course the real world problems that need to be solved are not easy but getting paid to do this, not hard.
and now HK is desperate to hire people right for finance, it's all so crazy what's happening like a full circle. Anyway good luck anons remember, we're already doing the most '''elite''' courses that nobody else does like Brown university or Waterloo or Robert Harper material or Cornell. Think about that. *You* are the elite! I tricked you all by giving you the hardest courses. You did them and now are SOME of the best programmers on earth. That was the plan all along, a confidence surprise you will not understand until you get hired to one of these places and realize that YOU are the 'senior developer' now!

It was all a trick anons and now you're the best of the best.
Anyway I have to finish all the workshops on learnai and functionalcs so trying 1hr a day per workshop, esp the AI one so we can finally finish it doing the original author of Waterloo's famous ML book. Reminder you can get paid doing the homework of ppl who aren't taking the course we're doing, I will include it.

Good luck see you at the party https://youtu.be/hjMqMPKa9Mk
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Ian Bankindock - Wed, 25 May 2022 23:01:58 EST SvzM68ui No.40247 Reply
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>>40239
OP how do you keep giving a shit? When I'm out of uni, I'm so motivated, I build stuff, study and have fun. When I'm uni, my eyes turn to glass, my brain fogs up and I can't stand doing anything. I think it's because of all the superfluous structure that's being imposed on me, or just how much I hate the bureaucratic faggotry of uni in general.

I used to think I wanted to go for JS, or some quant job, but now I don't know. I either want to work for myself or do interesting work, but I don't know how to do either right now (at least not in tech). I graduate in just a few months. Probably gonna take a year off, do some hiking, build some cool stuff, learn a bunch etc. Then apply like mad, or go to grad school for stats.
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Cedric Blenderforth - Sat, 28 May 2022 07:08:52 EST 9V6WCnnC No.40250 Reply
OP, what is the end goal of all this learning and grinding? (for you, why do you keep going? I assume money is not an issue for you)
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Cedric Blenderforth - Sat, 28 May 2022 07:12:11 EST 9V6WCnnC No.40251 Reply
OP, what is the end goal of all this learning and grinding? (for you, why do you keep going? I assume money is not an issue already)
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Wesley Cullerdet - Fri, 10 Jun 2022 11:45:02 EST xBSLTkn7 No.40255 Reply
>>39739
Hi, OP. Do you know of any course/book to teach someone maths, who don't know anything beyond basic arithmetic and pre-calculus algebra?
pre-calculus would be a stretch, he knows Arithmetic and basic algebra.
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William Tootshaw - Mon, 13 Jun 2022 11:35:57 EST XjL8QqYl No.40259 Reply
>>40258
just noticed the link i generated was identical to the one you said was invalid, I don't know what the problem is then.
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Charlotte Bushcocke - Mon, 13 Jun 2022 14:29:51 EST jSNk3cJg No.40260 Reply
How do we know OP is behing honest with his job claims
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Hamilton Bligglecocke - Wed, 22 Jun 2022 20:23:22 EST Sph1DDcx No.40263 Reply
>>40260
idk levels.fyi but tbh most people dont go the functional route, so its more a grind cracking the coding interview and leetcode
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Lydia Brookshaw - Sat, 25 Jun 2022 09:02:21 EST DqdTbfPL No.40264 Reply
>>39739
I have 2 years to become a proficient programmer. I am shit at maths, only know arithmetic, pre-algebra and basic trigonometry. So I cannot start straight away with 'Mathematics via problem' series. On top of that I will be joining a meme college with shit curriculum for a CS degree, it'll also have some course load. Help me out man. Pardon my subhuman tier English.
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Nathaniel Fockletick - Tue, 28 Jun 2022 16:15:37 EST YYULFOri No.40265 Reply
>>40264
Solve coding problems with automated judges, in your language of choice. Take MIT's Missing Semester if you need it. >>40264

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