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Free College In The USA

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- Mon, 20 Aug 2018 19:28:10 EST qum7+esS No.209429
File: 1534807690961.jpg -(9043B / 8.83KB, 259x194) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Free College In The USA
What if you could make college free and then make admission to colleges be based purely on merit, but with a twist: you are compared only to the others at your own school to determine if you qualify for admission to a college rather than comparing you to the whole nation. Say you get the top scores and grades on your tests in your high school, but for national averages, your test scores/grades would still be too low to get into the top schools traditionally, under the new system, you would get admission because compared to your peers you did the best and therefore deserve to be in a top school. If one school has bad teachers or not enough funding, why should the students suffer? They should be judged against those who had an equal playing field, ie those in their own school rather than those who may have gone to some fancy private school with personal tutors and lots of fancy programs and who had advantages they couldn't access.

Now imagine what would happen if you did this. Suddenly all the schools packed with great students would empty out as the parents took their kids to poorly performing schools so they had a better chance at college admission. People act like segregation and school integration is an issue America dealt with in the past, but we didn't really deal with it at all. We did a little, got things moving in the right direction, then basically stopped trying and claimed we fixed the problem while the communities we live in remain highly segregated which keeps racial minorities trapped in poverty as wealthy whites never interact with them and therefore never hire them to do anything for them and spend money at their businesses. Furthermore, people can gain a bunch of value simply by having the value of their house go up because their neighborhood improves. They sit there and do nothing, but other people move into the neighborhood and start fixing pot holes and weeding the sidewalks and mowing the lawns and painting stuff and hiring security and installing floodlights, and suddenly they have more money because the value of their houses goes up.

In my mind this is an elegant solution to many of the social issues plaguing America. It would get around the affirmative action boogeyman and install a system that people can understand as being fair while having the effect of making it easier for people in underfunded and underperforming districts to get into the top schools and incentivize parents to move from over-performing school districts to underperforming districts which could help reverse the negative effects of white flight on inner city minority communities.
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Hugh Girringhall - Mon, 27 Aug 2018 19:55:51 EST tvXthEG2 No.209433 Reply
>>209429
Wealthy people live in areas near their job. They don't want to move because they can't get paid 100k a yr in the podunk working as a walmart greeter.

Also, this is silly because a lot of colleges in the US are very small. If college was based on 'pure merit' but only based on relative merit, then if they only accept 4k students a year and there are 50k schools in the nation, you're back to where we started.

Putting that aside. IMO two things will happen.
  1. people retire early (ya rite...)
  2. People just find loopholes in your plans, described below

They will simply invent a new school to put their kids in. This can be a private school (probably the easiest to do) or a public one (much harder, but possible) to lower the pool and backdoor around your social engineering plans. This would encourage a lot of balkanization of school systems around wealthy parts of the country, increasing costs.
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Thomas Pisslewell - Thu, 27 Sep 2018 19:27:41 EST pdpqZQMH No.209472 Reply
but then you wouldn't be accepting the best qualified students.
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Hannah Goodford - Tue, 09 Oct 2018 01:48:35 EST VhdWon+z No.209487 Reply
1539064115058.jpg -(80717B / 78.83KB, 926x960) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>admission to colleges be based purely on merit, but with a twist: you are compared only to the others at your own school to determine if you qualify for admission to a college rather than comparing you to the whole nation.

Why not just drop the requirement in general and go off the GPA requirements of the school you are applying to. Why should they give a shit about what you "are" in comparison to the rest of your "group."

>your test scores/grades would still be too low to get into the top schools traditionally, under the new system, you would get admission because compared to your peers you did the best and therefore deserve to be in a top school.

The quality of schools is different, not only from state to state but from school to school. The furthest it seems you could push this would be some kind of standardized grading system for the nation. That is to say, you cannot keep adding artificial shit.

> If one school has bad teachers or not enough funding, why should the students suffer? They should be judged against those who had an equal playing field, ie those in their own school rather than those who may have gone to some fancy private school with personal tutors and lots of fancy programs and who had advantages they couldn't access.

The shouldn't suffer the consequences that is true. But that doesn't mean that those that do have the resources should suffer a loss either. Life isn't fair and the best we can do is continue to eliminate those gaps in offerings, textbooks, desks, teachers etc. That's more of a funding thing however.

>Your second paragraph.

It seems to me that you want to create an incentive to get people to relocate in order to get their kids into terrible schools so that they can stand out more and get better chances of getting into school? That's rather strange I think. Would that just make the kids who don't stand out have less chance to succeed? Or learn?

In addition, I don't know why you feel that race is a component of this? There are a great many poor white schools that wouldn't be anymore "integrated" if rich affluent white people took their kids there.

With respect to the perceived economic advantages 1. I don't think your system provides enough incentive to physically relocate. 2. I think that the advantages would be short term assuming that the parents of these students leave once the student has completed their studies to X level.

>In my mind this is an elegant solution to many of the social issues plaguing America. It would get around the affirmative action boogeyman and install a system that people can understand as being fair while having the effect of making it easier for people in underfunded and underperforming districts to get into the top schools and incentivize parents to move from over-performing school districts to underperforming districts which could help reverse the negative effects of white flight on inner city minority communities.

I'm not compelled by your sentiments thus far. Affirmative Action can have it's drawbacks for students, that's true, but otherwise it's a policy matter, not some social battleground, at least as far as I'm concerned.

IF you want to take about an alternative take on education I think we need to completely overhaul how- basically- knowledge is disseminated in society. I don't mean to sound highfalutin but I think that the available options for learning should grow in proportion to the amount of mediums available to spread it.

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