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BWP Bump While Philosophizing

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- Tue, 14 May 2019 21:54:25 EST 2LwLwSlz No.209673
File: 1557885265331.jpg -(114270B / 111.59KB, 1100x618) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. BWP Bump While Philosophizing
Thought /pss/, slow as it is, might do well with a more general 'I was thinking/reading about this philosophy thing today' thread. We might get more content if people didn't feel so constrained to staying within a single topic, or had a place for discussions that don't quite warrant a whole topic of their own. Like all BW* threads, only bamp if you're philosophizing, no dumbposting. It would be p cool if we just kept bumping with new, different topics and maybe brief discussion instead of getting snarled into our traditional mires for all saying that will do

Hey, so to start off, I was browsing other boards and seeing shitty posts and thinking about the Santayana 'Those who don't remember history are doomed to repeat it' concept in terms of game theory. I think its reasonable to say that, because history is a collective process, it only requires a certain percentage of the population to not remember history for it to repeat. I looked for like a minute for some scholarly treatment of this concept viz game theory but couldn't find anything, so I wonder if it's really true even in the case of a simulation and what the actual percentage range might be?
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Cyril Bruffingdare - Sun, 02 Jun 2019 05:55:55 EST Bucl4KP/ No.209681 Reply
1559469355065.jpg -(126310B / 123.35KB, 900x900) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>209673
Parents didn't bother teaching new generations about history. I call that collective memory denial or collective memory inhibition. The boomers had a responsibility to teach new generations history but didn't bother. So anything new generations do is the boomers fault. Maybe you avoid it as long as you teach as much history as you possibly can. Tell the kids they can't watch TV and open a history book and read every chapter before they go to bed. Problem solved right?
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Lydia Goodlock - Tue, 04 Jun 2019 19:15:29 EST 2LwLwSlz No.209683 Reply
>>209681
>>Tell the kids they can't watch TV and open a history book
Yeah, but who wrote the history book? I don't think the problem of teaching history to future generations is as much in the media it is conveyed by but what information is available and taken seriously, and what sort of critical thinking capacity the general public has. I mean, there's probably some dude out there who won't let his kids watch TV because it's full of 'liberal lies about race mixing' and gives his kids the Turner Diaries to read before bed.
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Thomas Dubblelock - Fri, 07 Jun 2019 03:00:52 EST dj+OKlwT No.209685 Reply
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>>209673
Considering whether many people listen to specialists who have access to this knowledge or preserve it through practice, people may be destined to repeat past mistakes or reinvent the wheel.

Maybe there is a certain collective unconscious threshold. What of latent or inherited knowledge? I don't know.

Between just a couple generations presently it seems like alot of useful wisdom and knowledge was lost. If certain specialists who keep certain fires going are valued by society then alot will continue to be known and utilized despite a majority of people who aren't knowledgeable about what-have-you. An institution with a public relations focus that translates technical jargon into layman's terms helps.

That essay comparing a most pit to the kinetics of gaseous particles and a study of human collective behavior defined two types of participants, one being active and subject to replicating the behavior of others nearby, the second being passive and "not subject to the flicking motions or random forces." Anyways, I wonder if knowledge could be modeled similarly to trace certain informations spread from person to person. It's interesting how (or if) a crowd reaches critical mass. https://youtu.be/hO8MwBZl-Vc most people are certainly the core and spirit of the show and have a significant effect on the crowd as whole despite their participation or not in the moshpit.

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