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Fermi Paradox... why? by Henrietta Levitt - Thu, 22 May 2014 00:54:34 EST ID:ILYTISHs No.53812 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Another thread made me start thinking about this. The Fermi Paradox states (thanks, Wikipedia):

>The Sun is a young star. There are billions of stars in the galaxy that are billions of years older;
>Some of these stars probably have Earth-like planets which, if the Earth is typical, may develop intelligent life;
>Presumably, some of these civilizations will develop interstellar travel, a technology Earth is investigating even now, such as that used in the proposed 100 Year Starship;
>At any practical pace of interstellar travel, the galaxy can be completely colonized in a few tens of millions of years.

If that's the case, why haven't we been colonized already, or at least seen evidence of intelligent life somewhere in our galaxy?

My take: either A) Life takes a long time to develop, and somehow, improbably, we're the first planet to develop an intelligent civilization in our galaxy, or at least one of the first. We don't see anyone else because there isn't anyone else to see... yet, or we're all still too far apart.

Or b) Given the size and composition constraints of a planet able to foster and sustain life (as far as we know, "habitable zone," big enough to have an atmosphere, small enough to still be rocky, etc.) and continue long enough for said life to begin to explore the galaxy, the home planet simply runs out of resources before meaningful headway can be made. I think this is more of a slow-death kind of thing where maybe we get to do some exploration within the solar system and maybe a bit beyond for a while, but overpopulation, war, disease, famine, and whatever else causes us to realign our priorities from space exploration to merely sustaining life on our own planet. A civilization that had the foresight to know something like that was happening could theoretically, if they had the goal of galactic expansion from the start, avoid this situation, but the problem is that NO civilization has that kind of 10,000 year plan from the get-go, and they all sputter out right before they could have pulled it off. There's not a textbook on "how to succeed as a species" that gets handed out to a life form when it develops self-awareness,…
Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.
274 posts and 66 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Edward Pickering - Wed, 18 Jan 2017 17:16:39 EST ID:OXINl/7g No.56760 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56747
I agree. Occam's Razor ("the simplest solution is the most likely") demonstrates that "they aren't there" is the probable conclusion to the question, "why can't we see them?" A single distant civilization hiding itself from observation is much simpler and more likely than all of them making a concerted effort to blind us. It's possible that there are a couple others out there who don't want to be found, but the more populated systems there are, the harder it gets to avoid detection.

Also, nice Lego pic. I had that one (still do, technically, since it's in the Big Bin with all my Legos).
>>
Kiyotsugu Hirayama - Sat, 21 Jan 2017 17:16:52 EST ID:gmm1Ygns No.56761 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>56760

>I had that one (still do, technically, since it's in the Big Bin with all my Legos).

Same, mate.
>>
Robert Wilson - Sat, 18 Mar 2017 19:28:47 EST ID:sOANcpac No.56867 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56760
> Occam's Razor ("the simplest solution is the most likely") demonstrates that "they aren't there" is the probable conclusion to the question, "why can't we see them?"
Well let me say this. In the world of Finance occam's razor would probably be the least useful system of analysis there would be, because the markets are obviously inefficient (an opposing theory to the efficient market hypothesis). In Finance, the less assumptions one makes, the least probability there is for one to be on the right side of the market. Occam's razor might be probable when something measurable and predictable is concerned, but when it involves people and the behavior of masses then, I argue, that it becomes a bit more useless as a theory for predictability.
So my argument is that when it doesn't really apply to something as complex as the Finance industry, why would it apply to even more complex as intergalactical civilizations, their limitations and possible relationships?
>>
Robert Wilson - Sat, 18 Mar 2017 21:16:28 EST ID:7jcVAyVz No.56868 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56760
Occam's Razor is a heuristic for telling you how you should allocate your cognitive resources, how to find likely answers out of a huge possible set. It doesn't actually prove or disprove anything to be true in and of itself, and you can frame arguments in such a way that Occam will always cut them. I mean really, what's a more probable solution, that there are billions of billions of stars and worlds that we can only indirectly guess at even though we can really only see the stuff around one, or that an omnipotent being created everything? Clearly the latter solution is simpler, and Occam would favor it. In fact, that's exactly what Occam invented his razor FOR; as a way to prove the existence of God. So it's actually been on pretty shaky ground as a cognitive tool for a while now...
>>
Subramanyan Chandrasekhar - Wed, 22 Mar 2017 19:34:40 EST ID:unNII3om No.56872 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56867

It works in this case because we don't concern ourselves with the inner workings of an alien civilization, but with the chance whether aliens exists at all.


Contact by Georges-Henri Lemaitre - Tue, 07 Mar 2017 10:24:21 EST ID:d9ijPul/ No.56851 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Say we could float around and travel in space like a super saiyan god: Could we create scouters which could contact people with the same scouter intergallactically?
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Bernard-Ferdinand Lyot - Wed, 15 Mar 2017 07:31:00 EST ID:d9ijPul/ No.56865 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56863
The Tao is like a well:
Used but never used up.
It is like the eternal void:
Filled with infinite possibilities.

uhh.

I'd rather that everyone on the Earth be able to sit at home and take drugs smoke videogames and basically do what they like for all of time because we have a special automative machines in place which can handle all the labour we used to do, leaving us with only creative labour which is done for the enjoyment of the people creating it. I don't enjoy designing machines and I don't like the idea of being a scientist, or a politician to handle everyone's free housing and what the base welfare for everyone should be, but I would like to send my ideas for this 'utopian' future to everyone through music (who knows what good it'll do however) so that's what I'm going to do. I never said I wasn't going to work (unless you commit that music and the arts are essentially pretty worthless, which is something I agree on, despite wanting music as my career).

I'd say we are pretty entitled, we have no recollection of asking to be here so it's rather forced upon us, and for such a harrowing, pitiless at times, existence, the least you could hope for is that you're allowed to do what you want and not have your freedoms encroached on (freedoms you have because of your superior awareness), which is what the sun does by threatening to kill us all eventually, rendering the game pointless.
>>
William Fowler - Thu, 16 Mar 2017 01:28:51 EST ID:7jcVAyVz No.56866 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56865
Yeah, that quote is about the conceptual nature of the Tao, not a reference to a real energy that you could turn a tap on to somewhere. That would be like if you could have awareness on tap. Doesn't make sense.

>>special automotive machines which let me snoke vigeodames
But we can do all those things in the real world using the power that actually exists (and the sun provides for us) rather than needing some kind of magical infinite aether to do it. We are basically already at the point of not needing humans for productive power anymore, when nano-tech robots and super-sapient AIs run everything, so the future where you sit at home and do drugs and smoke videogames while robots do everything is definitely happening, and the only energy we need for it is sunlight. I recommend /wc/ under Miscellanea for further discussion.

And the sun won't kill us all for several billion years...if we haven't figured out how to leave earth by then, then it will simply be natural selection taking it's course if it wipes us all out and we will deserve it for our laziness. It's our best friend, don't hate it!
>>
Isaac Newton - Sun, 19 Mar 2017 20:59:18 EST ID:tNU6hJcf No.56869 Ignore Report Quick Reply
na but u cud use Instant Transmission to teleport and chat then teleport back
>>
Edwin Salpeter - Mon, 20 Mar 2017 03:31:27 EST ID:RH1VsRBv No.56870 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56865
>The Tao is like a well:
>Used but never used up.

wells run dry all the time
>>
Carl Seyfert - Wed, 22 Mar 2017 06:55:46 EST ID:d9ijPul/ No.56871 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56870
yeah the bad ones without a large influx to source from.


thowing up in your helmet by Johann Encke - Thu, 02 Mar 2017 18:37:45 EST ID:yfFUwunc No.56847 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Anyone here trying to become an astronaut? I've always wondered what working in space would be like and how bright the stars would shine. Anyone else/
>>
Roger Penrose - Fri, 03 Mar 2017 17:27:02 EST ID:unNII3om No.56848 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Are you kidding?

Problem is that you need a PhD at least. Even for maintenance-level work. Things will change as space businesses develop, but I'm afraid the ones to take those jobs will be our kids or grandchildren at worst.

Too early to explore space, just in time to buy drugs off the internet and all that jazz.
>>
Joseph Taylor Jr. - Sun, 05 Mar 2017 17:03:17 EST ID:2H001r1f No.56849 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56848
anything is possible!!!!!
>>
Giovanni Cassini - Mon, 06 Mar 2017 13:47:05 EST ID:+G8ef2Iy No.56850 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56847
Considering how lenses work (referring to your eyes mostly) and how bright the Earth, moon, and sun would be, chances are that they'd be about the same level of brightness as they would be otherwise. Sorry to crush your dreams.
>>
William Hartmann - Wed, 15 Mar 2017 00:10:15 EST ID:OXINl/7g No.56864 Ignore Report Quick Reply
These days, to be an astronaut, you have to be a fucking fighter pilot with a PhD in astrophysics or something. The reqs are insane.


Dark matter matters by Clyde Tombaugh - Wed, 09 Nov 2016 03:09:08 EST ID:zHoQtF+M No.56645 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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There's 10 times more matter in the universe than we thought:
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-brief/2016/10/13/the-universe-is-20-times-more-vast-than-we-thought/#.WCLTmjU2thE

A natural law for rotating galaxies:
http://www.physicscentral.com/buzz/blog/index.cfm?postid=5308541299875990673

And finally, matter causes entropy displacement which accounts for the dark matter effect:
https://arxiv.org/abs/1611.02269

TL;DR, we found our missing mass, we can see that rotation speed varies with the amount of visible matter, and with a better understanding of gravity, the whole concept and purpose of dark matter is bunk.
21 posts and 5 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
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Daniel Kirkwood - Tue, 14 Feb 2017 03:27:41 EST ID:M/g1akbS No.56785 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56783
>Yo, I agree with most of what you've said man but...
Yeah, I was mad in that last part, excuse the flippancy. You raise a valid point about the snapshots-in-time. The only caveat is that we can observe [usually] the same type of effect in several locations in the sky. This can give us a good correlation to the observed effect being distributed evenly in the universe.


It is my sincere wish, however, that we stop poking logic holes in each others' theories [see >>56645 and >>56748 ], and start referencing actual science articles to back up assertions. OP did a good job supplying articles to chew on, followed by good counterpoints by others. Lets get more of that.
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Johann Bode - Fri, 17 Feb 2017 23:29:59 EST ID:yzfSDg8q No.56789 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56785
Well I wouldn't call it a snapshot in time, but rather a snapshot in perception. Our view of the universe is always changing, so the picture we have right now is only a snapshot, regardless of how much time it represents. You can say the current laws of physics are immutable and timeless, but these laws have only been accepted as a general concept of the universe for a couple hundred years. Previous theories of the universe such as Platonic Idealism were also based on observation, and were of course supposed to be immutable. They lasted for thousands of years.
>>
Bruon Rossi - Mon, 27 Feb 2017 13:16:01 EST ID:FoZr+PSB No.56843 Ignore Report Quick Reply
http://cosmos.nautil.us/short/144/the-physicist-who-denies-that-dark-matter-exists
>Dark matter is our generation's ether
>>
George Herbig - Tue, 28 Feb 2017 21:08:22 EST ID:7jcVAyVz No.56845 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56843
If a0 is equal to the speed of light divided by the radius of the universe, since the radius of the universe is equivalent to the time since the big bang and thus always increasing, presumably this also means the acceleration constant decreases overtime, which means the same amount of force creates more acceleration, right? (thus accelerating expansion) is this an intentional aspect of MOND? Why didn't they predict an accelerating universe beforehand if so?
>>
John Bahcall - Wed, 01 Mar 2017 19:11:28 EST ID:e0oA2mYt No.56846 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56843
Wrote a big response but the board swallowed it twice. Milgrom is talking shit, MOND doesn't bridge anything with the largest scales. It fails if you look at anything beyond galaxies. Galaxy clusters, Milgrom admits you need dark matter. Standard cosmology needs dark matter for structure formation but MOND doesn't do structure formation correctly at all, the extra gravity fucks things up. Lastly there is no MOND cosmology, previous attempts to predict the cosmic microwave background were abandoned after they became incompatible with the observations. The only thing MOND does well is galaxies which it was designed to do, it was a model to fit the data, not derived.

Lastly the radius of the universe is a number derived from cosmology, if you change the cosmology to MOND it's not the same. The point about a_0 makes no sense.

>>56845
MOND makes gravity stronger on large scales so that would increase the pull of gravity between galaxies, increasing the deceleration. MOND doesn't have a cosmology so it can't really make these predictions.


EM DRIVVVVVVVVVVE by Joseph-Louis Lagrange - Sun, 20 Nov 2016 17:41:15 EST ID:rszf0FN0 No.56665 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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HOLY SHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII

So apparently after decades of people trying to debunk it and call it pseudoscience, NASA has confirmed the Shawyer EM Drive actually works, producing thrust via microwaves using no propellant, apparently violating the principle of equal and opposite reaction:
http://www.sciencealert.com/it-s-official-nasa-s-peer-reviewed-em-drive-paper-has-finally-been-published

The authors suggest that perhaps the long-dead pilot-wave/Bohmian interpretation of Quantum Mechanics is now a contender again thanks to this new evidence. The microwaves 'push off' of the quantum vacuum, preserving Newton. But if pilot-wave is the true QM, that means not only that alternate realities exist, but that we see them as real effects in our world! (i.e. in the generation of interference patterns in the double-slit experiment. But surely this is but the most minor influence this generates, and probably only the easiest to notice, since in Bohmian mechanics the wave function that governs any given particle system spans the entire universe.)

NASA's totally unoptimized EM drive could get us to Mars in a tithe of the time of even Musk's proposal, with a ship a fraction of the mass ('cause no propellant.) It's bottle popping time /sagan/!
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Walter Baade - Fri, 13 Jan 2017 19:10:19 EST ID:yzfSDg8q No.56756 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56755
>The other two independent groups in China and Germany working on the EM drive have now realized their initially positive results were caused by experimental errors and withdrawn their supportive opinions, by the way.

Would this be the same Chinese group that is claiming that they've been successfully testing it in space and now plan to equip their satellites with this technology?
>>
Edmond Halley - Sat, 14 Jan 2017 04:56:45 EST ID:dz7Zv84F No.56758 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56756
No, that would be the Xi'an team lead by Juan Yang who actually conducted experiments and published their research. And no, Chen Yue's team has not successfully tested the EM drive in space. Right now his only verifiable success is getting a couple of patents approved (which isn't a very radical development, as cold fusion was patented both in the US and Europe). There's also a Chinese state media press release about building a test device that could in the future be tested in space. Let's talk more about how successful or not the tests were if and when the results of the alleged experiment are published.

Feel free to read the press release yourself. There's been a lot of dodgy science journalism and wild claims in the blogosphere about this lately.
https://translate.google.com/translate?js=n&sl=cn&tl=en&u=http://digitalpaper.stdaily.com/http_www.kjrb.com/kjrb/html/2016-12/11/content_357004.htm

And of course every nation would put it on their satellites if it works - this shit would revolutionize space propulsion, provide free energy to Mankind, and allow us to conquer the stars. But all extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. Right now the "best" evidence for the EM drive is shit like this >>56712
Just look at that graph and laugh.
>>
Heinrich Olbers - Wed, 01 Feb 2017 12:14:50 EST ID:7Ip/yKza No.56775 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>56719
>Don't you think if that worked someone would have made one by now? Are you a fucking troll?
Oh but they did. Also there isn't a giant sail in front of the fan, which kind of helps.
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Kip Thorne - Thu, 02 Feb 2017 03:47:10 EST ID:10QI3ruX No.56777 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56758
Damn, all I wanted was unlimited energy and mankind to conquer the universe. This whole thing sounded so star trek at first, but now all my hopes are getting fucking dashed. I just wanted to travel the universe, is that so bad?
>>
Henry Russell - Tue, 28 Feb 2017 15:32:15 EST ID:3rYafGRG No.56844 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Sounds pretty abstract.


Other worlds by William Herschel - Tue, 08 Nov 2016 04:19:55 EST ID:FFHdMrF/ No.56642 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Do you think we will be capable to leave our solar system one day? Or that getting even to the closest star is impossible.
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James Elliott - Tue, 29 Nov 2016 18:44:49 EST ID:2iiuuOyi No.56694 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I think we will, we just don't understand space well enough or have the proper measurement devices to do it yet.

My train of thought goes like this: It wasn't until Newton we were able to invent the sextant, which in turned allowed us to traverse the globe. It wasn't until Einstein that we were able to move around in outer space.

I think next level physics and measurements will allow us to move through space more efficiently. Maybe a holographic universe, gravitational astronomy, or mastery of quantum mechanics will lead to avenues that allow mundane interstellar travel
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Edwin Hubble - Fri, 02 Dec 2016 17:07:44 EST ID:OXINl/7g No.56701 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56642
Impossible, no. Time-consuming, definitely. Right now, the fastest speed we think is possible is the Speed of Light, and it would still take ~3 years to get "next door" at that rate. We're not really capable of propelling any considerable mass to the Speed of Light, and we're definitely not capable of stopping if we did. But with technology we currently have, we could get to Proxima Centauri in a few hundred years (maybe not live humans), and that time will only get shorter and shorter. It's just a mater of when we think the travel time is short enough to pay off.
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Arno Penzias - Fri, 16 Dec 2016 15:14:16 EST ID:nRjWggLk No.56725 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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I wanna go to space, get me some space pussy.
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Johann Bode - Wed, 21 Dec 2016 19:38:59 EST ID:SD/dK0pb No.56732 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56694

europeans were sailing to asia in the late 1400's.
>>
Pierre-Simon Laplace - Fri, 24 Feb 2017 23:19:23 EST ID:r2zIu0Bs No.56842 Ignore Report Quick Reply
YA


SpaceX by Gerard Kuiper - Mon, 21 Dec 2015 21:08:08 EST ID:UJHLFL7d No.55894 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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WE FUCKING DID IT
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Vaccer !u96GHOSTmY - Thu, 29 Sep 2016 12:57:57 EST ID:x76pLNZo No.56498 Report Quick Reply
>>56493
>>56495
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QSyY5ACnXVg
>>
Kiyotsugu Hirayama - Fri, 30 Sep 2016 18:39:46 EST ID:3t/weoS/ No.56501 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56497

Yeah, one easily forget that you'd experience about the same (more) radiation from the sun in orbit as at the equator of the Earth.

Space isn't cold, at least the part of you that faces the Sun.
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Alan Guth - Thu, 20 Oct 2016 16:20:30 EST ID:pqsy+weD No.56544 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>55997
>pudding like consistency
why isnt this a party thread? A Wizard got banned.
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Nicolaus Copernicus - Fri, 13 Jan 2017 21:04:45 EST ID:s8eqU4E9 No.56757 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Heads up to ya'll

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tTmbSur4fcs
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Edmond Halley - Sat, 18 Feb 2017 00:59:16 EST ID:Zekh8fi+ No.56790 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>55894
Elon Musk is turning to a real life Robert Edwin House.

Lava tunnel societies on Mars is about the dopest shit I've ever heard of though.


Europa Mission by Ejnar Hertzprung - Thu, 18 Aug 2016 23:04:09 EST ID:Y3T9nNnZ No.56318 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Anyone else hyped for the Europa mission?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GqTaDCt_F1Y

The US gov't has given NASA $30 millon to go poke around up there. They're gonna try to scoop up ejecta and see what's in it. I haven't been this interested in a mission since the Titan lander.
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James Christy - Wed, 26 Oct 2016 20:20:15 EST ID:10QI3ruX No.56559 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56558
You've gotta think about the big picture here. Life in space, sustainable places for people to live, things that could be mined (cause yes humans will eventually sap away from everywhere they vist and live) its like the cycle of industrialization starting up again. But only this time, its going to be on other planets. Mars colonization is the first step to this, discoveries in space will prod on intrest, and in the end, we'll end up with a very much diffrent existance as human beings. Mankind can spread out to the stars, and make colony after colony, thats how I envision it.
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William Lassell - Thu, 03 Nov 2016 16:15:00 EST ID:OXINl/7g No.56616 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56558
There's probably no direct incentive outside of advertising (Company X went to Europa, so buy our shit because we're awesome like that). But these are all kinds of scientific benefits that might also be good for a private company down the road: pharmaceuticals, materials science, genetic engineering, etc. Plus just having the infrastructure in place in capitalize on new sources of ET-related income if/when they figure one out would allow you to get in on the ground floor, so-to-speak.
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Astrobiology Student - Wed, 23 Nov 2016 16:14:22 EST ID:UuJsarOA No.56671 Ignore Report Quick Reply
I am! In fact, my Astrobio class had to do mission proposals for a few bodies to search for potential life. My group got Europa, so we came up with the porbe part of CLIPPER that congress asked for. Yes NASA is doing their own that hits the counsel next moth, but its a school project. Let me know if anyone is interested in the presentaton!
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Fred Whipple - Fri, 10 Feb 2017 04:24:21 EST ID:tNU6hJcf No.56781 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56671

please, share some of the key details
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George Gamow - Thu, 16 Feb 2017 22:54:10 EST ID:U3oyeBRN No.56788 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56318

I'm waiting for Triton Sample Return.


Teaching an astronomy class by Frigate - Tue, 24 Jan 2017 17:29:35 EST ID:CtuYLr3e No.56766 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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So next week, I have been given the opportunity to teach astronomy (sadly only stars and galaxies) and I need to add some stuff to it. I could go as hard as I want on these freshmen, so what should I include?
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Tycho Brahe - Sat, 04 Feb 2017 19:11:45 EST ID:Gsa9fLd4 No.56779 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56778
Hardly every bit as likely. There is no alternative model that can currently explain redshift and the uniformity of the CMB not to mention dozens of other observations.
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Irwin Shapiro - Tue, 07 Feb 2017 19:21:17 EST ID:nHQDeeId No.56780 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Show them how to find andromeda
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Joseph Taylor Jr. - Fri, 10 Feb 2017 20:16:33 EST ID:4yc+FRR6 No.56782 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>56767
That just sent me on a fun little side quest, thank you.
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Joseph-Louis Lagrange - Thu, 16 Feb 2017 12:33:23 EST ID:M/g1akbS No.56786 Ignore Report Quick Reply
Well, OP, How did it go??
>>
George Gamow - Thu, 16 Feb 2017 22:51:43 EST ID:U3oyeBRN No.56787 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>>56766

Random Space Fact youtube videos from Dr. Bruce Betts


Extreme blazar thread by William Hartmann - Mon, 30 Jan 2017 14:35:44 EST ID:dz7Zv84F No.56774 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2017/nasas-fermi-discovers-the-most-extreme-blazars-yet

Fuck yeah those black holes are massive


Aliens by Mars - Sun, 16 Mar 2014 20:44:47 EST ID:Jzd78Ub0 No.53216 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Yo guys. I just had an opifany or what you call it(english is not my first language), if you consider that ufos really exists and the are flying in the sky all the time but why wont they communicate? Then it hit me, we would have done the same, using Rovers! Basically the ufos we see are probably machines flying about and taking pictures and samples of earth. They dont care that we see them, they obviously treat us as beings not worthy to be spoken to. I think its kind of creepy
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Henrietta Levitt - Mon, 23 Jan 2017 02:11:25 EST ID:tQX5ylFX No.56765 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>54376
because /tinfoil/ is a shit hole. At least this isn't some flat earth copy pasta adn this is some what on topic. It's bound to get eccentric so why don't you use your vast logic and come up with some thing feasible for the thread. I'm sure we are all big enough to admit that believing it's not possible is a stupid assumption now.
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Karl Swarzchild - Sat, 28 Jan 2017 04:20:34 EST ID:SD/dK0pb No.56770 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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>quintuple post followed by triple post followed by triple post
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Roger Penrose - Sat, 28 Jan 2017 16:52:21 EST ID:gmm1Ygns No.56771 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Let this thread die, ffs.
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Kip Thorne - Thu, 02 Feb 2017 03:39:11 EST ID:10QI3ruX No.56776 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56771
Gonna have to agree, nb. No bueno. Was a nice read and all but I'm not gonna turn around and just start speculating wildly. Not that it isn't fun.But still. There is no way to put together an alien mind other than wild speculation. So there's not much to it as is.
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Friedrich Bessel - Fri, 10 Mar 2017 12:22:11 EST ID:bbe1VMqZ No.56856 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Well while we no-bump it back to oblivion maybe we should post some pictures.


Gas Station by MOON FUEL - Sat, 17 Dec 2016 00:07:43 EST ID:3JvngLEe No.56726 Ignore Report Reply Quick Reply
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Right now, I'm working on opening a gas station in low orbit around the moon, mostly refueling for interplanetary & deep space exploration. It'll have mechanics on site, parking on the dark side, though a bag of doritos will be $70 and a diet coke will be $14, you'll thank me when you come through. The air force 109 airlift is testing our tech in their fuel depot on the south pole. So I'm still going to come back to earth quarterly to visit the black bear sanctuary that I work at, but they've been getting so used to human food that they're getting pretty aggressive when I see them. Accually I've been pretty good about being able to chase bears out of the front yard, just by waving a broom and yelling, but my parents were out there the other day and ran when they saw our bear, and the little guy chased them. That really gave my parents a shock!
So, tldr; space won't kill me, the planet won't burn, we'll just leave it to the bears and other fluffy animals.
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Robert Dicke - Sun, 18 Dec 2016 07:11:00 EST ID:gmm1Ygns No.56728 Ignore Report Quick Reply
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Will you accept charons as payment, or just he-3?
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Irwin Shapiro - Sun, 18 Dec 2016 16:23:22 EST ID:rszf0FN0 No.56729 Ignore Report Quick Reply
What about me I can only pay in hiffwe?
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bob - Mon, 19 Dec 2016 02:09:33 EST ID:YR8vKebs No.56730 Ignore Report Quick Reply
derp
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Stephen Hawking - Sat, 14 Jan 2017 23:54:55 EST ID:veR+j0aW No.56759 Ignore Report Quick Reply
hey man I'll take a pack of zigzag blues, and a lighter too.
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Margaret Burbidge - Sat, 21 Jan 2017 22:04:37 EST ID:1xERvVrq No.56762 Ignore Report Quick Reply
>>56729
>pay in hiffwe?
is that like dogecoin?


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