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Astronomy 101

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- Tue, 10 Mar 2015 16:45:18 EST ng5PGFH1 No.55120
File: 1426020318482.jpg -(119531B / 116.73KB, 847x845) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Astronomy 101
I need your help, I'm completely clueless.
If Hydrogen has a spectral line of 656nm and it is measured in a distant galaxy at 705nm, how would you find the recessional velocity of the galaxy?
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Edmond Halley - Wed, 11 Mar 2015 18:13:34 EST rjqBmvyM No.55125 Reply
Wouldn't you need at least one other line? A given spectrum could be translated as well as stretched/compressed, and a single line wouldn't be able to distinguish those, right?
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Edwin Salpeter - Sat, 14 Mar 2015 10:41:12 EST kB08C8qN No.55130 Reply
>>55125
Wavelength dependent effects are rare and in the optical almost always destroy the lines. Just treat it all as a velocity, it's the safest bet.

Size And Age Of Universe Suggests The Existence Of Alien Life

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- Fri, 06 Mar 2015 11:18:40 EST CLP0/vbo No.55104
File: 1425658720324.jpg -(5752B / 5.62KB, 276x182) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Size And Age Of Universe Suggests The Existence Of Alien Life
We are not alone in the universe, just because we have not found life on other planets some people seem to doubt the possibility of alien life. I'm just here to tell you we have not even explored 1% of our galaxy for alien life. It's even probable that there are sentient species as advanced or more advanced than our own i this galaxy based upon the age of it. The main ingredients for life (amino acids) are not that uncommon from what we know. How do we know for sure those are not alien spacecraft we see on occasion in our skies? What's your theory on how advanced alien life is?
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Christiaan Huygens - Sat, 07 Mar 2015 18:34:09 EST uyuUt0io No.55113 Reply
1425771249713.jpg -(49299B / 48.14KB, 512x368) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>55104
there's already a space alien thread on page 0, so i'm not gonna bump, but until we find fossils or microbes or something somewhere that isn't Earth, or until somebody talks to us, it isn't 'probable', it's possible. We've literally got a sample size of 1 to look at right now. Kind of impossible to determine probability based on the one single rock in a galaxy with billions and billions of rocks that sprouted life.
It's fun to think about, and I'm in the camp that believes there's life out there, but we just can't possibly know it based how very, very little we can observe things not on Earth.

Furthermore, 'sentient' life seems like an unbelievably rare occurrence. It's only happened once here. Multicellular life in itself is probably excessively rare if life even exists elsewhere to begin with, animal life even moreso. Rarer still would be a self-aware species. Yet rarer would be self-aware species capable of technological civilization. It's fairly safe to assume quite a few civilizations would end themselves before reaching the stars, and who knows; it might simply be too much time and energy to cross interstellar space for such a species to leave its home planet.

UFOs being filled with little green men is silly, though. Remember all those UFO sightings in the American Southwest during the Cold War? How people thought that they had flying saucers holed up in Area 51, and then a bunch of files were declassified and it turned out the Air Force was testing SR71s and shit out there?
If space aliens have the technology to efficiently get around and build a galactic civilization, then we're like, an ant colony in New York City to them. So advanced compared to us that we could not possibly comprehend them.

I dunno, man. Imagine what people might be like if we manage to maintain a technological civilization for a a thousand, a hundred thousand, one million, five hundred million, even billions of years.

Who knows, though, maybe we're lucky number one. The first civilization to emerge in the galaxy. It's not unfeasible, really. Shit, we might even be the first planet to have life. Or maybe life came to Earth from somewhere else. It's hard to say.

Greased Darkspeed

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- Wed, 04 Feb 2015 18:24:41 EST IhokWyRc No.54990
File: 1423092281534.gif -(620158B / 605.62KB, 402x543) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Greased Darkspeed
Slip the what? Dark the who? MY HEAD ASPLODE
SHUT THE FUCK UP I MADE THE KESSEL RUN IN TWELVE PARSECS SOBSOB SOB
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Bernhard Schmidt - Thu, 05 Feb 2015 19:02:24 EST 3dhJAQX4 No.54996 Reply
I always wonder what people who make these sort of threads are like in real life. It fascinates me.

Non-stellar black hole

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- Sun, 30 Mar 2014 23:19:17 EST ZhOAg7La No.53409
File: 1396235957344.jpg -(1526332B / 1.46MB, 1728x1224) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Non-stellar black hole
OK, odd question but...well marijuana is what...

Here we go - Is a non-stellar black hole theorhetically possible?
Imagine no restrictions of the creation of it. You have an unlimited supply of dense matter to throw into a big old sphere. Say, I dunno...Iron. Unlimited iron. You can just throw that shit by the teraton into one even pile.

I mean, you could create a black hole eventually, right? It would get really fucking hot at first...molten...then maybe some sort of weird plasma? But we keep throwing on the mass. Using special Future Magic to keep shit contained. You get a black hole at some point, right?
25 posts and 2 images omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Wilhelm Beer - Tue, 10 Feb 2015 13:11:50 EST ZM0jvM6N No.55020 Reply
>>55015
It's from one of the other papers published by the author. I'm not sure if that's still what she thinks.
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Robert Dicke - Tue, 10 Feb 2015 23:49:27 EST 415JX8nG No.55022 Reply
It doesn't matter what element it is made of, it is strictly a measure of total mass.
A earth mass of iron would be a planet, a solar mass of iron collapses into a neutron star.

Iron nuclei are much more massive than hydrogen and helium, remember the real implications of the periodic table.
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Margaret Burbidge - Fri, 13 Feb 2015 19:53:11 EST 4HbkLal6 No.55030 Reply
1423875191278.gif -(505454B / 493.61KB, 200x200) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>the universe started when a bunch of shit got thrown together

If instead of astronomy, young Carl had instead become interested in the culinary arts.

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- Sun, 08 Feb 2015 12:18:46 EST ZmBRgB9c No.55007
File: 1423415926683.jpg -(61262B / 59.83KB, 315x476) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. If instead of astronomy, young Carl had instead become interested in the culinary arts.
DICKS EVERYWHERE

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