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420chan is Getting Overhauled - Changelog/Bug Report/Request Thread (Updated July 26)

Destroying planets

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- Wed, 25 Mar 2015 01:03:03 EST kbd81O3H No.55163
File: 1427259783354.jpg -(39309B / 38.39KB, 1133x900) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Destroying planets
Why would you want to destroy a planet?
In the movie Dark Star, they blew up entire worlds because "instable planets" could threaten the future colonization of other planets.
Is it viable to blow up a planet to mine it as with asteroids? What other use could it have? Elimination of gravitatory perturbances in an Interplanetary Transport Network?
Blowing it up wouldn't send tons of material into chaotic orbits?

Sorry for too many questions. I just read about asteroid mining and thought about why not Jupiter with all that hydrogen?
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Clyde Tombaugh - Wed, 25 Mar 2015 16:00:24 EST YHjXylC8 No.55168 Reply
1427313624225.jpg -(443380B / 432.99KB, 1920x1080) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>55163
>why not Jupiter
Because Jupiter is terrifying. Anything that approaches it gains ~134,000 miles per hour. To get away you have to give ~that much back.
To maintain an orbit just above the atmosphere, any craft would be going 90,000 miles per hour relative to the planet itself.
The difference in jupiter's gravitational interaction with the galilean moons' periapsis and apoapsis keeps their cores molten.
The ionizing radiation Jupiter emits constantly ablates the surfaces of its moons, giving the larger ones an atmosphere that's constantly lost to space and maintains a detectable ring of plasma from ionized particles that can't escape.
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Maximilian Wolf - Wed, 25 Mar 2015 21:08:40 EST HrEw5VUc No.55169 Reply
>Is it viable to blow up a planet to mine it as with asteroids?

no because you could just mine the planet instead of turning a single planet into millions of projectiles

>Elimination of gravitatory perturbances in an Interplanetary Transport Network?
i imagine transport would be more drastically completed by makes tons of asteroids whose paths are unknown

> just read about asteroid mining and thought about why not Jupiter with all that hydrogen?
we don't need that much hydrogen
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Grote Reuber - Fri, 27 Mar 2015 18:04:33 EST CB4800qQ No.55177 Reply
1427493873374.jpg -(19162B / 18.71KB, 428x214) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
Too bad Galileo failed to ignite Jupiter.
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Rudolph Minkowski - Mon, 06 Apr 2015 22:16:50 EST OXINl/7g No.55215 Reply
>Is it viable to blow up a planet to mine it as with asteroids?
That would take a lot of energy, a ton of which would be released as heat. I think the debris would be too hot to be useful or mine-able for a LONG time.

>>55177
I would be awesome if that dishwasher-sized satellite was the last tiny bit of mass needed to collapse Jupiter's core and start the fusion reaction.

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