Leave these fields empty (spam trap):
Name
You can leave this blank to post anonymously, or you can create a Tripcode by using the format Name#Password
Comment
[i]Italic Text[/i]
[b]Bold Text[/b]
[spoiler]Spoiler Text[/spoiler]
>Highlight/Quote Text
[pre]Preformatted & Monospace Text[/pre]
[super]Superset Text[/super]
[sub]Subset Text[/sub]
1. Numbered lists become ordered lists
* Bulleted lists become unordered lists
File

Sandwich


420chan is Getting Overhauled - Changelog/Bug Report/Request Thread (Updated July 26)

So New Horizons..

Reply
- Sun, 05 Jul 2015 17:48:57 EST LNoHYvqf No.55473
File: 1436132937924.jpg -(2382B / 2.33KB, 530x297) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. So New Horizons..
Just went safe mode, for seemingly no reason. Either NASA saw something that they don't want us finding out, or some kind of aliens are trying to prevent their discovery. I mean, Pluto seems completely, artificially placed. It orbits on an entirely different plane than the rest of the planets in the solar system. I'm not a /tinfoil/ faggot, and I'm not talking about "greys". I want to have a serious discussion on the possibility of this, because I got super stoked about seeing high-res pictures of Pluto after reading about the last few developments, and this just seems too coincidental.
>pic related, newest pictures of Pluto.
>>
Galileo Galilei - Sun, 05 Jul 2015 22:34:56 EST P+fSJ1RL No.55474 Reply
>>55473
Well pluto is part of the Kuiper belt or some thing similarly spelled. it has so many things pluto sized wizzing at extremely inclined orbits. Think of it like a bubble shield of billions of icy rocks.

As for New Horizons cutting out. I wasn't watching so I don't have any idea the circumstances.
>>
Friedrich Bessel - Mon, 06 Jul 2015 01:44:28 EST XJHlYsmW No.55475 Reply
>Just went safe mode, for seemingly no reason. Either NASA saw something that they don't want us finding out, or some kind of aliens are trying to prevent their discovery.

Or a cosmic ray hit the spacecraft and reset the computer, as can sometimes happen even in the inner solar system. This is the most likely explanation.

It's even possible that there's dust around the Pluto-Charon system and the spacecraft got hit by something.
>>
Irwin Shapiro - Mon, 06 Jul 2015 04:22:07 EST YHjXylC8 No.55476 Reply
1436170927725.png -(435054B / 424.86KB, 624x3640) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
Space is very difficult and spacecraft are very complicated. Don't panic, we're still going to see high res photos.
New Horizons has unexpectedly entered safe mode like this before. We weren't entirely sure exactly why it did last time, so we're in familiar territory.

>NASA’s New Horizons mission is returning to normal science operations after a July 4 anomaly and remains on track for its July 14 flyby of Pluto.
>The investigation into the anomaly that caused New Horizons to enter “safe mode” on July 4 has concluded that no hardware or software fault occurred on the spacecraft. The underlying cause of the incident was a hard-to-detect timing flaw in the spacecraft command sequence that occurred during an operation to prepare for the close flyby. No similar operations are planned for the remainder of the Pluto encounter.
>“I’m pleased that our mission team quickly identified the problem and assured the health of the spacecraft,” said Jim Green, NASA’s Director of Planetary Science. “Now – with Pluto in our sights – we’re on the verge of returning to normal operations and going for the gold.”
>Preparations are ongoing to resume the originally planned science operations on July 7 and to conduct the entire close flyby sequence as planned. The mission science team and principal investigator have concluded that the science observations lost during the anomaly recovery do not affect any primary objectives of the mission, with a minimal effect on lesser objectives. “In terms of science, it won’t change an A-plus even into an A,” said New Horizons Principal Investigator Alan Stern of the Southwest Research Institute, Boulder.
>Adding to the challenge of recovery is the spacecraft’s extreme distance from Earth. New Horizons is almost 3 billion miles away, where radio signals, even traveling at light speed, need 4.5 hours to reach home. Two-way communication between the spacecraft and its operators requires a nine-hour round trip.
>Status updates will be issued as new information is available.
>>
Tycho Brahe - Wed, 08 Jul 2015 07:55:14 EST KlwZpL5U No.55482 Reply
1436356514181.jpg -(202104B / 197.37KB, 500x2000) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>55473
>Either NASA saw something that they don't want us finding out,
>some kind of aliens are trying to prevent their discovery
>Pluto seems completely, artificially placed

>I'm not a /tinfoil/ faggot

Wat
>>
Edwin Hubble - Thu, 09 Jul 2015 16:15:08 EST 35T4RbeJ No.55490 Reply
Pluto is an alien space station. That's why it's so small. IT houses blue visioned aliens and is a research lab on humans. That's what they sent the satellite . But the USA won't tell the truth
>>
Margaret Burbidge - Thu, 09 Jul 2015 17:09:25 EST 415JX8nG No.55491 Reply
Shut up.
Your whole conspiracy only works if their was a live feed and the spacecraft never turned back on.
If there was something to hide, they wouldn't of said anything, they would just Photoshop all the press releases.
But that's retarded too, and not how NASA works, or probably how aliens would choose to operate within our solar system.

Speculations of speculations, and you have the gull to say it could only mean one of two things.
>>
Clyde Tombaugh - Thu, 09 Jul 2015 19:58:00 EST YHjXylC8 No.55492 Reply
1436486280318.jpg -(239768B / 234.15KB, 1440x645) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>55491
>that's retarded too, and not how ... aliens would choose to operate within our solar system.
Humanity chose to build thousands of nuclear weapons, scatter them all over the earth, then moved on to other things.
We have exactly one datapoint for how rationally a species capable of space flight behaves, and it's "not at all".
>>
Irwin Shapiro - Fri, 10 Jul 2015 21:25:48 EST XJHlYsmW No.55495 Reply
1436577948459.png -(329471B / 321.75KB, 2000x1394) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
Awwwwww yisss getting closer now
>>
Rudolph Minkowski - Sat, 11 Jul 2015 10:00:59 EST 8CAPCiKG No.55498 Reply
>>55497
I don't know if it's just old lava fields. Look at the differentiation. The dark area stretches along the entire equator. I suppose we'll know what we're looking at when the color images come in.
>>
Irwin Shapiro - Sun, 12 Jul 2015 14:07:10 EST okoywjgZ No.55501 Reply
1436724430276.gif -(49275B / 48.12KB, 985x985) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
The computer glitch that happened a few days ago was fixed with a simple reboot. I also reboot my computer occasionally, without the help of any alien lifeforms I might add.
>>
Friedrich von Struve - Tue, 14 Jul 2015 17:19:33 EST afRXzCdX No.55509 Reply
>>55498
Whatever it is, it's frozen. It's really, really, cold out there. Ain't no liquid to be had.
>>
Stephen Hawking - Tue, 14 Jul 2015 19:00:48 EST YHjXylC8 No.55510 Reply
1436914848234.jpg -(398895B / 389.55KB, 1920x1080) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>55509
This. Even nitrogen would freeze on the surface.
>>
Vesto Slipher - Sat, 18 Jul 2015 20:07:01 EST LD9WXxz6 No.55529 Reply
>>55492
Fuck. Are they going to name every sing thing in our solar system?
>>
James van Allen - Tue, 21 Jul 2015 15:51:35 EST OXINl/7g No.55535 Reply
>>55510
And, with Pluto's miniscule atmospheric pressure and very low gravity, most compounds would either exist as solids or gasses. This even happens on Mars with CO2 and water (much bigger, warmer, and more atmosphere than Pluto). They sublimate instead of melting.
>>
George Gamow - Thu, 30 Jul 2015 22:34:17 EST sFc2Gs9d No.55571 Reply
>>55529
If you count any alphanumerical label as a name, then yes. Name all the things!! (for science)
>>
Henrietta Levitt - Fri, 19 Feb 2016 14:30:10 EST 6M9MO6b+ No.56068 Reply
bump for the love of asteroids
>>
Tadashi Nakajima - Thu, 31 Mar 2016 08:16:57 EST Kz5Q207u No.56145 Reply
>>55492
>We have exactly one datapoint for how rationally a species capable of space flight behaves, and it's "not at all".
I know his claim is baseless, but your implication is a logical fallacy. A lack of evidence showing that species capable of space flight behave rationally is not evidence that none (can) behave rationally. Not to mention there's a huge difference between space travel at the distances required to reach us/other planets supporting sentient life, and just being able to make it into space. We don't have even a single data point at all in regards to the level of rational behavior a species capable of space flight at those distances possesses.

Your argument is shit. His might be shit too, but he's not positing that pluto is an alien space station that houses blue-visioned aliens and serves as a research lab where they perform tests on humans. Therefore, your argument is shit and your criticism of his criticism is retarded.
>>
Tadashi Nakajima - Thu, 31 Mar 2016 08:17:46 EST Kz5Q207u No.56146 Reply
>>56145
rationally is not evidence that none (can) behave rationally... or necessarily would*

Report Post
Reason
Note
Please be descriptive with report notes,
this helps staff resolve issues quicker.